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Fall 2022 Mosaic Now Available

The Fall 2022 issue of Mosaic is now available in the Digital Library. For those with visual accessibility needs, an optimized, accessible PDF is also available on the same page.

In this issue, we talk with Victor “Vic” J. Maggitti Jr. ’56 VSB whose $20 million gift was the largest in Falvey Library’s history, profile our 2022 Falvey Scholars, create a poster-worthy send-off for Coach Jay Wright, and explore the pitfalls of staging Julius Caesar for modern audiences.

 


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Expanded Access to PRWeek

By Nicole Daly 

PRWeek

If you have used any of our marketing and public relations databases or serials in the past, you’ll be happy to hear that Falvey Library has expanded access to PR Week online. In the past we have maintained access to PR Week articles, but there was a publication gap, limiting access to the newest and most up to date information in the field. Now with our expanded access students, faculty, and staff will have the opportunity to create a free account for the PR Week website. Giving access to the most relevant and up to date information! 

PRWeek has been around since 1998 and offers a website for public relations and marketing professionals to easily access news and opinion pieces relevant to the field. Our subscription now includes access to Breakfast Briefings each weekday morning, US Breaking News Alerts, and a Weekly Edition,which will provide students, staff, and faculty with the latest news coverage affecting the marketing communications industry. For more information on this resource go to https://www.prweek.com/us/about_us.

To benefit from unrestricted access to PRWeek.com you must be registered with your Villanova email address and not a personal email.

How to gain access:

Already registered? As long as you are registered with your Villanova email address, all you need to do is ‘Sign out’ and ‘Sign in’ at https://www.prweek.com/login

Not registered? Activate your subscription by completing a short registration Form.

  • Step 1: To create your online account using your Villanova email address, visit https://www.prweek.com/register/ . Please provide your firstname, lastname, email and password, select your region and then click “CONTINUE”
  • Step 2: Subscribers will automatically receive the Breakfast Briefing, Breaking News, Weekend and Weekly Online editions; Be sure to click “REGISTER” to complete your registration and activate your account. Once logged in, you may go to My Account, sign up for other newsletters and/or update your newsletter preferences.

Online support:

Forgotten your password? Simply enter your email address at users.prweek.com/password/ and a new password will be sent to you.

For further assistance please visit the FAQ page at prweek.com/us/faq . Alternatively, you can contact the support team at subscriptions@prweek.com . 

 

This resource is available from the Falvey Library homepage, Databases A-Z list.


Headshot of Nicole Daly, Social Science Librarian. Nicole Daly is Communication Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.


 


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TBT: Introducing Falvey Memorial Library

Image courtesy of the Villanova University Digital Library.


On November 16, 1968, Villanova celebrated the dedication of Falvey Memorial Library. Yesterday marks 54 years since this historic ceremony. Here is a picture of the program from the event, including information about the Rev. Daniel P. Falvey, OSA, and pictures from the original library at Villanova. Click here to celebrate this great event.


Anna JankowskiAnna Jankowski ’23 CLAS is a senior Communication Major from just outside Baltimore who ​​works as a Communication & Marketing Assistant in Falvey.

 

 


 

 


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Happy Anniversary, Falvey!

Program, Villanova University Falvey Memorial Library Dedication, Saturday November 16th, 1968.

 

On November 16, 1968, Villanova celebrated the dedication of Falvey Memorial Library’s new building. As part of the celebration, Dr. Francis M. Hammond of the U.S. Office of Education received an honorary Villanova degree in recognition of his contributions to interracial justice and higher education.

Dr. Hammond was serving as Higher Education Facilities Program Officer at the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare at the time of his honorary degree. Originally from Nova Scotia, Canada, he had previously taught at Seton Hall University and was the institution’s first African-American faculty member (1946). Photos of the event from University Archives are now online in the Digital Library.

Dr. Francis M. Hammond, 1911-1978.

Photograph, Falvey Memorial Library Dedication (Convocation), 1968.

Dr. Francis M. Hammond with wife and family, receiving an honorary degree from Rev. Robert J. Welsh O.S.A. (28th president of Villanova) at the dedication of Falvey Memorial Library.

 

After the presentation of the degree, Dr. Hammond delivered the address at the ceremony. You can read the text of the words he spoke to dedicate the new library building – now in the Digital Library here: https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:757210.

 

You can also read more about Dr. Hammond and the Falvey Memorial Library dedication ceremony on p.2 of the Villanovan (November 13, 1968) here: https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:187269. 

 


Rebecca Oviedo is Distinctive Collections Librarian/Archivist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Scholarship@Villanova Event: Alan Drew, MFA, on “The Recruit: A Novel”


Please join us on Friday, Nov. 4 from 2-3 p.m. in Falvey Memorial Library’s Room 205 for a Scholarship@Villanova event featuring Alan Drew, MFA, associate professor of English, and director of Villanova University’s Creative Writing Program. Drew will be talking about his recently published book, The Recruit: A Novel (Random House, 2022) in conversation with Jean Lutes, PhD, Professor of English, Luckow Family Endowed Chair in English Literature.

The Recruit follows Detective Benjamin Wade and forensic expert Natasha Betencourt as they try to connect a series of strange and unsettling crimes in Rancho Santa Elena, Southern California, in 1987. Ben soon discovers that a gang of youths may be responsible for the crimes and focuses in on their latest recruit, hoping that he will lead to uncovering the leader and mastermind of the operation. Ultimately, what they uncover is an extensive and powerful network of white supremacists and so much more.

The Recruit is Drew’s third book. His other works include Shadow Man (Random House, 2017) and Gardens of Water (Random House, 2008). Drew received his MFA at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop at the University of Iowa. In addition to teaching English classes and directing Villanova University’s Creative Writing Program, he is the director of the Villanova Literary Festival.

This ACS-approved event is co-sponsored by the Department of English, the Creative Writing Program, and Falvey Memorial Library. Light refreshments will be served.


 


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Weekend Recs: Iranian Protests

Happy Friday, Wildcats! Falvey Memorial Library is delivering you another semester of Weekend Recs, a blog dedicated to filling you in on what to read, listen to, and watch over the weekend. Annie, a graduate assistant from the Communication department, scours the internet, peruses the news, and digs through book stacks to find new, relevant, and thought-provoking content that will challenge you and prepare you for the upcoming week. 

Over the past month, protests in Iran have been raging after the death of an Iran-born Kurdish young woman, Jîna Amini, also known by her Iranian legal name Mahsa Amini. This sparked global conversations about women’s rights. Although protests were provoked by Amini’s murder and focused on Iran’s treatment of women, many protestors are broadly calling for an overthrow of the current regime. This weekend’s recs will give you an overview of some key information and context about what is currently happening in Iran.

If you have 5 minutes…and need a basic overview of the Iran situation, read this BBC article. It will answer any questions about the situation for those who may not be caught up.

If you have another 5 minutes…and can’t imagine your life without the Internet, read this article about how the Iranian government is shutting down Iranian citizens’ access to the Internet, heavily suppressing their message.

If you have 7 minutes…and don’t know the turbulent history between Iran and the U.S., read this article from The Hill. The U.S. inadvertently played a major role in the current regimes rise to power, and as much of our conflicts in the Middle East, it was triggered by oil interests.

If you have another 7 minutes…and are wondering why I am referring to Mahsa Amini as Jîna, read this opinion piece. “Mahsa”  was the legal Iranian name given to her, while “Jîna” was her Kurdish name, a key facet often overlooked in media coverage. It is very possible that her Kurdish ethnicity played a role in her murder.

If you have 10 minutes…and want to learn more about Amini’s death that sparked global protests, read this New York Times article. Her death was the result of Iran’s strict “morality” laws, which strip women of the right to choose whether to practice hijab or not.

If you have another 10 minutes…and want to learn more about the response of the Iranian people, read this New York Times article. The article specifically focuses on how young people have been the driving force behind recent protests.

If you have 12 minutes…and are wondering how the Iranian military regime has responded to protests, read this article from the New York Times. The Iranian regime’s security forces remain supportive of the current regime and have stifled protests.

Photo by Neil Webb on Unsplash

If you have 15 minutes…and want to hear the stories of two girls who were killed as a result of protesting the death of Mahsa “Jîna” Amini, read this New York Times article. Nika Shakarami and Sarina Esmailzadeh are just two girls of many who have been brutalized in the military response to the protests.

If you have another 15 minutes…and want to learn some basic history on the Kurds in Iran, read this article. Despite the Iranian government’s harsh and violent treatment of all women, Amini’s Kurdish identity is something that should not be erased, and Iran has a long history with the Kurds.

If you have 1 hour and 32 minutes…and want to check out a documentary about women’s rights activism in Iran, watch NASRIN, available online through Falvey. This 2020 documentary highlights the story of Nasrin Sotoudeh, an Iranian political prisoner and women’s rights activist.

If you have 1 hour and 41 minutes…and want to learn about international women’s rights and girl’s global access to education, watch Girl Rising, also available online through Falvey. Girl Rising is a documentary that features the stories of 9 girls around the world as they share their stories.


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library.


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Cat in the Stax: The Season of Pizza?

By Ethan Shea

"Pizza"

You know October is the month of ghosts and ghouls, but did you know it’s also National Pizza Month? Neither did I, but it’s fitting, as I’ve been fortunate enough to enjoy some quality pies as of late.

Back home in Connecticut, there’s heated debate over who makes the best pizza. In fact, pizza restaurants from New Haven, Conn., are almost always included in lists concerning the best pizza in the country. Some of the most popular pizza producers in New Haven are Sally’s, Modern, and Frank Pepe’s.

"Modern Apizza"

Pizza from Ethan’s visit to Modern Apizza

All these restaurants serve “New Haven-style” pizza (or apizza), which is a thin-crust, coal-fired Neapolitan pie. A signature dish in New Haven is white clam pizza, a pie that is topped with fresh clams, garlic, oregano, olive oil, and grated cheese. You can order this pizza with mozzarella cheese if you’d like, but it’s discouraged because adding too much cheese makes this dish heavy.

Frank Pepe’s is the origin of this sort of pizza, and they are so adamant about using fresh clams that if there are none available, they simply do not serve white clam pizza. Canned clams just won’t do.

I recently visited Modern Apizza and thoroughly enjoyed my experience. I tried the white clam, pepperoni, and Margherita pizzas, all of which were delicious. However, I have to say the white clam pizza is undoubtedly my favorite.

"Altoona Style Pizza"

Altoona Style Pizza (Image by Matt Alvarez of WTAJ)

It seems like there’s an endless variety of pizzas. New Haven-style, New York-style, Detroit-style, Chicago-style deep-dish, Sicilian, and Hawaiian pizzas are just a few types of pizza available. There’s even Altoona-style pizza, which originated in the Altoona Hotel of Altoona, Pa. This pizza is known for using Sicilian style bread and being topped with salami, peppers, and (shockingly) American cheese.

Let us know what your favorite pizza place is in the comments below! Are you a fan of classic New York-style pizzas, or would you rather support Villanova’s home state by digging into a slice of Altoona pizza?

If you’d like to learn more about pizza, from cooking it for yourself to the history of the dish, check out some of these resources at the Library:


Headshot of Ethan SheaEthan Shea is a graduate student in the English Department at Villanova University and Graduate Assistant at Falvey Memorial Library.


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2022 Nobel Prize in Literature Announced

By Ethan Shea

"2022 Nobel Prize in Literature Books"

Earlier this month, Annie Ernaux was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. Ernaux is French writer who has always been open about the intimate details of her life. Her ability to communicate these personal highs and lows in such lucid fashion is what won her the most coveted of all literary awards.

Even at the age of 82, Ernaux says this award motivates her to continue writing. As someone whose activism for women’s rights is often at odds with French President Emmanuel Macron and American political counterparts, Ernaux’s work is still very much steeped in and relevant to contemporary politics.

"2022 Nobel Prize in Literature Books (2)"Only 17 out of 119 writers who received the Nobel Prize in Literature have been women, so it is significant that Ernaux has been the second woman to receive the prize in the last three years.

If you would like to learn more about last year’s recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature, Abdulrazak Gurnah, check out this blog on Falvey’s website.

Additionally, Falvey has a few of Ernaux’s books, such as La Place, La Honte, and her first novel Les armoires vides, available for pick-up in the stacks. If you consider yourself a Francophile or someone who enjoys French literature, you should certainly give them a read.

To learn more, use your access to the New York Times granted through Villanova University to read this NYT article!


Headshot of Ethan SheaEthan Shea is a graduate student in the English Department and Graduate Assistant at Falvey Memorial Library.


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Peek at the Week: October 17

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

In Silver Linings Playbook, Pat Solitano Jr. said, “You have to do everything you can. You have to work your hardest, and if you do, if you stay positive…you have a shot at a silver lining.”

Welcome back, Wildcats! As you return from Fall Break, hopefully refreshed and recharged, try to channel your newfound energy into something that you think is meaningful. Whether it’s academics, your job, athletics, or a hobby, give it your all (or at least all that you can reasonably give without overworking yourself). Great things can come out of any situation when you work hard and, although often unbelievably difficult, stay positive.

THIS WEEK AT FALVEY

Monday, October 17

Mindfulness Monday | 1-1:30 p.m. | Virtual | Free & Open to Villanova Students, Faculty, and Staff

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Tuesday, October 18

Cultural Studies Food Matters Week: Food as a Universal Human Right Talk & Tasting | 4:30-6:30 p.m.| Room 205 | Free & Open to the Public

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Wednesday, October 19

Fall 2022 Falvey Forum Workshop: Introduction to Data Visualization | 12-1 p.m. | Virtual | Free & Open to the Villanova Community | Register Here

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Thursday, October 20

Cultural Studies Food Matters Week: Food as a Universal Human Right Talk & Tasting | 4:30-6:30 p.m.| Room 205 | Free & Open to the Public

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Friday, October 21

Villanova Gaming Society Meeting | 2:30-4:30 p.m. | Speakers’ Corner | Free & Open to the Public

Sunday, October 23

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 3-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

HOLIDAYS THIS WEEK

For all the Italian food-lovers and carb connoisseurs, today is National Pasta Day. Celebrate by eating your favorite pasta dish. Pasta seems to be on the menu at St. Mary’s Hall and Dougherty Hall, so swing by either dining hall for an easy on-campus option.

Information Overload Day falls on Tuesday, Oct. 18. With the unfathomable amount of information at our disposal everyday, it is unsurprising that we get stuck in the doomscrolling loop and experience information overload. Information Overload Day is a day to unplug and give yourself a break. Although many of us did just that over Fall Break, routinely making time for yourself is still important to continue throughout the semester’s entirety. Celebrate the day by taking some time, whether it’s a minute or an hour, to relax (preferably without technology, but if the only way you can relax involves technology of some sort, c’est la vie).

Saturday, Oct. 22, is National Color Day. Colors are all around us, and they can often make our surroundings come to life. Whether its neons, pastels, or neutrals, celebrate by appreciating the colors around you. We take them for granted, but colors truly have a larger impact of our lives than we often realize.

National Crocs Day is this Sunday, Oct. 23. Do you remember when crocs were deemed as one of the ugliest shoes on the market? I do. But as a former swimmer (and lime green girl), crocs have always held a special place in my heart, and now, many of our closets. Celebrate the day by wear your favorite pair of these semi-aquatic shoes. I will definitely be wearing my worn-down black crocs (with Spider-Man and Captain America charms) in celebration.


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library.


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Photo Friday: Falling for Autumn

Image of a beautiful tree with autumn leaves on campus.

Photo courtesy of Kallie Stahl.


Hope you had a great fall break, Wildcats! Some beautiful autumn colors await your return to campus.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Last Modified: October 14, 2022