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Friday Outlook: Growing and Thriving

West Goshen, PA—Spring has sprung in the garlic bed and the garden soil was delivered today! Homemade compost bins are thriving, too! Compare this view with the meetings that seem to sprout out of my computer with great regularity. We will be ready to tackle our team goals for the coming year when we return to campus! —Luisa Cywinski, Director of Access Services

What’s your personal #FridayOutlook? We want to see the view from where you are! Send it along to shawn.proctor@villanova.edu or message it (@villanovalibrary on Instagram and @FalveyLibrary on Twitter.)


Luisa Cywinski is Director of Access Service at Falvey Memorial Library. 

 

 


 


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Remote Discoveries: The National Theatre Collection

  • Posted by: Nathaniel Haeberle-gosweiler
  • Posted Date: April 2, 2020
  • Filed Under: Library News

Most of us are probably finding that balance of productivity, mental, and physical well-being, and, of course, Netflix. Yet many of us are probably afflicted by a common ailment known as, can’t-decide-what-to-watch-itis. Sifting through the cornucopia of series, specials, documentaries and movies can sometimes give one the impression of seeing the same things over and over.

However, the newly added National Theatre Collection may provide a much needed variation of content.

“Drawing on 10 years of NT Live broadcasts, alongside high quality recordings never previously seen outside of the NT’s Archive, the National Theatre Collection makes this rich body of work available to students in schools, universities and libraries around the world.”

To access this resource you can click the link here. Alternatively, you can search Drama Online in the Falvey Library resource database and go to the National Theatre Collection.

 


Nate GosweilerNate Gosweiler is a graduate assistant for Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication department.

 


 


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New Database Added: Lives of Literature on JSTOR

Photo courtesy of Prateek Katyal from Pexels.

By Regina Duffy

With spring semester classes at Villanova University now remote, Falvey Memorial Library is offering a more expansive and accessible variety of resources in support of our faculty and student scholars across all disciplines. One new, temporary resource, opened by the vendor due to the current pandemic, that is of interest to those who specialize in the study of English Literature is Lives of Literature on JSTOR. This database features a hefty collection of over 70 academic journals that focus on an author or text.

According to JSTOR, Lives of Literature “supports advanced literary studies and interdisciplinary research on writers and texts critical to curricula in literature. With its focus on journals that use an author or text as a starting place, Lives of Literature also fulfills a scholarly resource need for in-depth study and courses on a single author or text. It will contain 100 journals that are all new to JSTOR when completed.”

You can access JSTOR’s Lives of Literature until June 30, 2020.

lives of literature database picture

 

Featured journal topics in Lives of Literature include Medieval authors and texts, Modernist authors, Victorian, Edwardian and Gothic authors as well as notable literary theorists. Some notable journal titles include Angelicum, Celestinesca, Faulkner Journal, Langston Hughes Review, Le Cygne as well as the Woolf Studies Annual, among others. Undoubtedly, this database will prove to be an invaluable asset to anyone looking to explore different perspectives or ideas related to prominent literary works or authors.

This database is just one sampling of the many new or expanded resources that Falvey Library has added to its offerings in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. For the complete list, please see the Temporarily Available Online Resources.

If you are looking for help navigating this or any other new database, or, if you would generally like to learn more about Falvey’s online services and offerings at this time, please visit our Falvey Memorial Library COVID-19 Updates and Resources webpage.

Remember, the Falvey Virtual Library is open and adding resources to help you succeed!

 


headshot picture of regina duffy
Regina Duffy is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library. After reviewing Lives of Literature, she’s reminiscing about her undergrad capstone English class with Dr. Paul Orlov.

 


 


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Bloomsbury Cultural Histories on Trial

By Jutta Seibert

Bloomsbury Academic has given the Villanova community generous trial access to the Bloomsbury Cultural Histories book series until May 31. While the community has temporarily lost access to the print titles in the Library’s collection, it has gained electronic access to all titles published in the series.

If you are not familiar with Bloomsbury Cultural Histories, here is what you need to know in a nutshell. Each six-volume set explores a theme from antiquity to the present. Bloomsbury has published 16 sets so far. Topics include, among others, childhood and family, dress and fashion, the human body, the senses, western empires, work, and women. New this academic year are the six-volume Cultural History of Money and the Cultural History of Emotions. Announced for later this year are the Cultural History of Disability, the Cultural History of Marriage, and the Cultural History of Tragedy. Forthcoming themes include color, education, home, medicine, and sports.

Each six-volume set presents an authoritative survey of scholarship on a single topic through time. For example, each volume of the Cultural History of Western Empire has a chapter about race to allow readers to follow the topic through time. The first volume covers race in antiquity, followed by the medieval age, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and the age of empire. The last volume covers race in the modern age.

The collection also includes a selection of cultural and social history books from Bloomsbury Academic, Berg, and Continuum. My personal favorites are Alison David’s Fashion Victims: The Dangers of Dress Past and Present, Rudy Koshar’s German Travel Cultures. Leisure, Consumption and Culture, and David Sutton’s Remembrance of Repasts: An Anthropology of Food and Memory.

Visual resources from the Wellcome Collection, the Rijksmuseum, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art round out the collection, which also includes an interactive timeline and lesson plans for the undergraduate classroom. Remote access is provided from the Library’s Databases A-Z list.

Let us know if you want to recommend this collection for permanent access.


Jutta Seibert is Director of Research Services & Scholarly Engagement at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 



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Stand Up and Be Counted! Learn about the Census with Falvey’s Brown Bag Panel

Happy Census Day, the date by which every American should have received an invitation to participate in the census!

To mark this once-in-a-decade occasion, we rewind to our fall Brown Bag series, which included this census panel with faculty experts Camille Burge, PhD, Political Science; Judith Giesberg, PhD, History; Rory Kramer, PhD, Sociology and Criminology; and Stephen Strader, PhD, Geography and the Environment.

Their discussion dove into the history of the Census, its use in research and policy-making, and issues particular to the 2020 Census.

In case you missed it, watch the video on Youtube below.

 


Shawn Proctor

Shawn Proctor, MFA, is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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‘Cat in the Stack: Brenda Shaughnessy

By Daniella Snyder

Cat in the Stacks logo or header

I’m Daniella Snyder, a graduate student at Villanova University, and your ‘Cat in Falvey Library’s Stacks. I’ll be posting about academics–from research to study habits and everything in between–and how the Falvey Memorial Library can play a large role in your success here on campus!

Brenda Shaughnessy Headshot

Source: PoetryFoundation.org

This week, Falvey would have hosted poet Brenda Shaughnessy for a public reading in Speakers’ Corner as part of the English Department’s annual Literary Festival. While we cannot be there in person to hear Shaughnessy read, we can still appreciate her work and learn more about her. This week, my stack is filled with her poetry.

Brenda Shaughnessy is the author of five poetry collections, including The Octopus Museum (2019, Knopf); So Much Synth (2016, Copper Canyon Press); Our Andromeda (2012), which was a finalist for the Kingsley Tufts Award, The International Griffin Prize, and the PEN Open Book Award. 

Her work has appeared in Best American Poetry, Harpers, The New York Times, The New Yorker, O Magazine, Paris Review, Poetry Magazine, and elsewhere.

Recent collaborative projects include writing a libretto for a Mass commissioned by Trinity Church Wall Street for composer Paola Prestini and a poem-essay for the exhibition catalog for Toba Khedoori’s solo retrospective show at LACMA. 

A 2013 Guggenheim Foundation Fellow, Shaughnessy is an Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing at Rutgers University-Newark. She lives in Verona, New Jersey, with her family, according to her website.

Shaughnessy’s work is known for its ability to twin opposites: her poems are both playful and erotic, lyrical and funny, formal and strange. Reviewing Human Dark with Sugar, poet Cate Peebles noted that “Shaughnessy draws attention to the contradiction of being made up of so many parts while appearing to be one single body.”

In the New Yorker, Hilton Als said of her book, Our Andromeda: “it further establishes Shaughnessy’s particular genius, which is utterly poetic, but essayistic in scope, encompassing ideas about astronomy, illness, bodies, the family, ‘normalcy,’ home.”

Hilton Als’ description of Our Andromeda, and the mention of illness, bodies, the family, normalcy, and home, sounds like Shaughnessy’s poetry may help us work through our current moment.

Want to read Our Andromeda, but cannot access the collection online? Watch this 2013 video from the Chicago Humanities Festival, in which Shaughnessy reads a fair amount of her poetry from the collection.

If you want to stay connected with Brenda Shaughnessy, I recommend following her on Twitter (@brendashaughnes). Like many other authors, artists, and musicians, she shared that she will be posting about the books getting her through these uncertain times:

A Tweet by Brenda Shaughnessy, described in paragraph above. "I'm going to post about the books getting me through. #1: How is Jenny Offill such a genius? First page of Weather and I can barely turn to the second because it is so perfect and luminous and luscious I don't want it to be over, ever."

Here’s the page she’s referencing:

The first page of Weather by Jenny Offill.

While it is certainly disappointing that we will not be able to see Shaughnessy in person, I hope this brief overview offers a chance to get to know one of our Lit Fest authors a little better.

 


Daniella Snyder Headshot

Daniella Snyder is a graduate assistant in the Communication & Marketing department at Falvey Memorial Library, and a graduate student in the English department. This week, she’s reading Call Me By Your Name, a book that was recommended to her by the VU Book Club (@vubookclub).

 


 


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The Global(Half)SmackDown: Bolsonaro’s response to Covid-19 in Brazil

Dr. Tim Horner’s Global(Half)SmackDown for Monday, March 30, is available via Zoom (Click Here).

In keeping with the current focus on Covid-19, this week’s G(H)SD tackles Jair Bolsonaro’s response to the Corona virus in Brazil. Dr. Horner’s presentation touches on the “magical thinking” underlying Bolsonaro’s response (or lack there of) to the pandemic.


Nate GosweilerNate Gosweiler is a graduate assistant for Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication department. He is currently watching new Netflix series to avoid the stress of finishing half-watched series.


 


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Friday Outlook: Working From Home

Downtown Phoenixville—this is the view just a short distance from where I am working from home.

This quiet scene is Bridge Street, a place normally filled with couples arm in arm and families pushing strollers. I am eager to see those same faces return to the theaters, restaurants, and stores that make “The ‘Ville” one of America’s most vibrant small towns.

Until then, along with Falvey’s librarians and staff, I am home working to support students and faculty taking classes from their homes around the world.

What’s your personal #FridayOutlook? We want to see the view from where you are! Send it along to shawn.proctor@villanova.edu or message it (@villanovalibrary on Instagram and @FalveyLibrary on Twitter.)


Shawn Proctor

Shawn Proctor, MFA, is communications and marketing program manager at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 

 


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If you have books on loan and are worried about returning them, don’t stress.

""

We recognize the University closure and travel restrictions will prevent many students and faculty from returning loaned books by their due dates.

Here is what you need to know:

  • The Library has stopped assessing overdue fines on Falvey materials.
  • Books checked out from the Falvey collection, Interlibrary Loan, or E-ZBorrow should be held by library patrons until such time as the University returns to normal operations.
  • Overdue books will not affect seniors’ ability to graduate.

Other questions?

Contact the Falvey Service Desk at circ@villanova.edu


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Remote Discoveries: Catching up on Lit Fest

Hey, Wildcats,

In recent weeks most of us have revisited the uncomfortable FOMO (the fear of missing out), of seeing the taken-for-granted suddenly become absent, realizing the preciousness of “the normal.”

In no way does this downplay the much greater worries and pains that surround this crisis – and these are very real things that will affect millions of human beings in ways we would hope not to imagine. Yet, the small losses, notably those connections between people in lively, real, and present conversations leave a palpable absence in our lives.


Catching up on a Canceled Lit Fest Event

When I looked through library events that had to be canceled this semester, I am reminded that there were numerous small things that we missed out on. On March 24, Bryan Washington’s Literary Festival book reading and discussion on his new novel, Memorial, would have taken place in Speakers’ Corner. Although I was unfamiliar with Washington’s work prior to writing this blog post, a deeper dive through his essays available online as well as his previous book talks, showed me what we are all missing out on.

For this week’s Remote Discoveries blog, I will provide some links to Bryan Washington’s work and talks. To preface these links, Washington’s work does contain explicit content and he does not shy away from the expletive-prone speech of everyday conversation, nor does he shy away from topics that make some uncomfortable.

That being said, I believe that many people would thoroughly enjoy Washington’s work, regardless of whether it was encountered on-campus or discovered remotely.


Some of Bryan Washington’s Work

One of Washington’s first essays, View From the Football Field; or, What Happens When the Game is Over, presents a poignant description of playing football, and all the (un)importance it has on communities, friendships, family, and race. Writing on his personal experience playing football in a Texas suburb, Washington shows how the game harbored various meanings, and what it stood to mean for people in different times of their lives.

In our own library stacks, we have Washington’s first book, Lot, a New York Times Critics’ Top Book of 2019. The book is a coming of age story for a boy in Houston, and his experiences of his neighborhood, family, friends, and own sexuality. I will certainly be getting a copy of this book once some of the strain is taken off Amazon.

Finally, here is a YouTube link to his book talk about “Lot” in 2019 at the coffee shop, Politics and Prose in Washington D.C.. Hearing Washington speak about the influences of his life and work is interesting, and it is wonderful to hear the work read in his own voice with enthralling delivery.


Nate GosweilerNate Gosweiler is a graduate assistant for Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication department. This week he will be catching up on some leisure reading in order to avoid necessary reading. That certainly won’t be regretted later…

 


 


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Last Modified: March 26, 2020