Skip Navigation
Falvey Memorial Library
Advanced
You are exploring: Home > Blogs

Photo Friday: Dog Days of Summer

Image of a Jack Russell Terrier sitting next to a message painted in chalk stating "We miss you Wildcats!"

Photo courtesy of Regina Duffy, Communication and Marketing Program Manager.


The dog days of summer are almost over! Regina Duffy’s dog Lucky, and all of us at Falvey Library are excited for your return to campus. See you on Aug. 24, Wildcats!


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


Like
1 People Like This Post

Confronting Cujo, the Fearsome & Famous Canine

""

Since we are nearing the end of summer and preparing to enter the spooky season, what better way to start the transition than with a good horror book? To help continue the celebration of famous dogs from literature, I want to focus on a fearsome canine from a darker type of book: Stephen King’s Cujo. This once-friendly St. Bernard turned vicious animal is famous for terrifying children and adults alike. The name “Cujo” itself elicits fear and endures as an everlasting part of pop culture.

To give you a little teaser if you haven’t yet read the book…

Cujo was released in September of 1981. The book is centered on the story of two families in the small fictional town of Castle Rock, Maine, which is a location often featured as a setting in many of King’s works.

Cujo is a member of the Camber family—longtime residents who live on the outskirts of the town. Charity, a homemaker, and Joe, a mechanic, are married and have one young son named Brett. At the beginning of the novel, Cujo is their large, congenial, and obedient St. Bernard.

We learn that Joe is an angry alcoholic who is abusive to his wife and son. Charity would like to leave Joe, but she isn’t financially able to do so. She is, however, the recent winner of a $5000 lottery (minus taxes) and in exchange for buying her husband some equipment with her winnings, she’s able to bargain herself a trip to see her sister Holly in a different state, accompanied by Brett. Joe is left alone with Cujo as he works on cars in his garage.

On the other side of Castle Rock, lives the Trenton family, new residents from another state. We meet Vic, an ad executive, his wife Donna, and their small son Tad. Vic is having some troubles at work and is on the verge of losing a big account and Donna is lonely and she reveals that she’s been unfaithful to her husband. Tad struggles with nightmares, and imagines a ferocious dog-like monster in his closet every night.

While everyone is dealing with the traumas in their own lives, the Camber’s dog Cujo goes off on an adventure and follows a rabbit down a hole and in the process gets bit on the muzzle by a rabid bat. Over the course of the next few days, Cujo’s personality completely transforms as the disease progresses. Slowly, he becomes unhinged and vicious to everyone he comes across, including his owner, Joe Camber. In a fit of rage, he mauls Joe to death and roams the empty property.

Around this time, Vic goes on a business trip, leaving Donna and Tad at home. Donna was experiencing car trouble and decides to visit the Camber residence for help. She barely makes it to the Camber’s when she receives a surprise greeting from Cujo, who at this point is deadly and grotesque, fully taken over by rabies. With Joe Camber dead, Charity and Brett on a trip, Vic out of town, and no one for miles, she is utterly trapped in her car with her son.  Donna is forced to take up the fight of her life to figure out how she and Tad can escape the wrath of Cujo.

You’re going to have to check out the book for the ending!

At the beginning of the novel, Cujo starts off with a warm, pleasant, and playfully-curious demeanor. This is typical of most St. Bernard dogs. They are well-loved, often portrayed in books and films as family dogs, like in the popular 90’s movie, Beethoven as well as the Disney animated film, Peter Pan.

Fast facts about St. Bernard Dogs, Courtesy of the American Kennel Club

  • Typical Height is 26-28 inches (females) and 28-30 inches (males)
  • Average Weight is 140-180lbs (males) and 120-140lbs (females)
  • Life Expectancy is 8-10 years
  • Got their name by helping a monk named Bernard of Menthon (later canonized), who created a hospice that would aid pilgrims journeying to through the Swiss Alps to Rome. Their keen sense of smell would enable them to help travelers trapped beneath snow drifts.

Dig Deeper:

“Remarkable Rescues by St. Bernard Dogs” (Scientific American)

“St. Bernard History: The Original Rescue Dogs of the Italian-Swiss Border” (AKC Staff)

“The Dogs of St. Bernard” The Christian Recorder

“Barry the First St. Bernard” (Hello It’s DOG! Podcast)


headshot picture of regina duffyRegina Duffy is a Communication and Marketing Program Manager. Her favorite dog is the loveable and ever-faithful Golden Retriever.

 

 


 


Like

TBT: A Dog Gone Good Magazine

The People’s Home Journal, v. XXXIX, no. 3, March, 1924. Photo courtesy of the Villanova University Digital Library.


Of course, we had to feature a dog in this week’s Throwback Thursday (TBT). This cover of The People’s Home Journal (v. XXXIX, no. 3) was published in March of 1924. Read the full magazine here. Looking for more content? The Villanova University Digital Library has a vast collection of dime novels and popular literature.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


Like

Happy Birthday, Snoopy: The World’s Most Famous Beagle!

""

 

By Shawn Proctor

Peanuts’ most famous character, Snoopy, is turning 72 years old…or there abouts.

For the record, Snoopy was first drawn in comics by Charles M. Schulz in October 1950, according to the Charles M. Schulz Museum, but Snoopy’s inspiration came from the cartoonist’s dog Spike, first adopted in 1927. The dog’s many antics sparked Schulz’s imagination, leading to Snoopy’s many adventures as beleaguered novelist, World War II flying ace, and grocer, among many others.

""

Courtesy of Peanuts.

In dog years, Snoopy is 350 years old. But you wouldn’t know it from the longevity of Peanuts and the many holiday cartoon specials still in heavy rotation.

So why August 10 as the day to celebrate Snoopy’s birthday? According to the Schulz’s Museum: “…even Snoopy can’t remember when he was born. And, of course, if you were to ask Snoopy, every day would be his birthday!”

Schulz was wise to make Snoopy a beagle, according to 50 Quick Breeds. The hound sports a tri-colored coat and is sleek, hardy, and short. “This is a curious dog which loves everyone. With a wagging tail they are gentle, sweet, calm and loving.” And generations of children and adults love Snoopy right back!

(The one knock on the breed: based on my experience, they have a distinctive and very loud yawp-bark that could be heard for miles.)

Snoopy and the many characters that populated the strip are considered apolitical by the general public. However, in a book discussing Schulz, Charlie Brown’s America: The Popular Politics of Peanuts, it was noted how the cartoon strip reflected the times and politics.

“Peanuts regularly commented on the politics and social turmoil of Cold War America,” the author Blake Scott Ball says. “From nuclear testing to the Civil Rights Movement, from the Vietnam War to the feminist revolution, Peanuts was an unlikely medium for Americans of all stripes to debate the hopes and fears of the era.”

In 2000, Schulz retired as the world’s wealthiest cartoonist and passed away soon after.

Resources:

Andrews, Paul. 50 Quick Dog Breeds: The Quick Guide to Some Popular Dog Breeds. Andrews UK Ltd., 2011.

Ball, Blake Scott. Charlie Brown’s America: The Popular Politics of Peanuts. Oxford University Press, 2021.

“Charles M. Schulz.” Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th Edition, 2021, p. 1.

“Charles M Schulz Retires.” The Christian Century, vol. 117, no. 2, 2000, p. 53.

“The Life of Charles M. Schulz.” Charles M. Schulz Museum: https://schulzmuseum.org/timeline/

 


""

Shawn Proctor is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Library.


Like

Because of Winn-Dixie: A Lovable (Not) Berger Picard

 

Because of Winn-Dixie

Note: this cover is not a Berger Picard. (Courtesy of Good Reads.)

By Shawn Proctor

Like a slippery dog after a bath, this book completely slipped by me for two decades.

When Because of WinnDixie, Kate DeCamillo’s Newberry Award winning debut novel, was published in 2000, I wasn’t reading books often (or at all.) And my then-childless self wouldn’t have wandered into the middle-grade fiction section of the library anyway. But like the dog for whom the book is named, Because of WinnDixie came at the right time–when I was finally ready for him.

A Berger Picard

A Berger Picard (for real!) from Public Domain (By Leanam (talk) (Uploads) – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=85490418)

Ten-year-old Opal moves into a Florida town with her emotionally cloistered father, who she calls “The Preacher.” Her mom left seven years before, and Opal is very much alone. Then she meets a “big, ugly, suffering dog with a sterling sense of humor” in the back of a Winn-Dixie grocery store. Opal opens her heart to this dirty, friendly dog, and, in turn, Winn-Dixie opens the world to Opal, and she meets new friends, mends her relationship with The Preacher, and helps people along the way. It’s brief, funny, sad, and (like Winn-Dixie) very easy to love.

Now, Winn-Dixie is not a specific breed of dog in the story. Likely, he’s just a mixture of different stray dogs and grew up on the street, as evidenced by his strong fear of thunder.

In the movie, however, Winn-Dixie was cast as a group of Berger Picards (pronounced bare-ZHAY pee-CARR, according to the Bloomberg Businessweek article “Puppy Love.” There is zero chance one of these dogs ended up in a Florida store, as they are a rare breed of French herding dog that nearly became extinct after the two World Wars. Few print Library resources mention the Picardy Shepard (as they are also known), but online access to The Dog Encyclopedia indicates simply: “This breed can be stubborn.”

“Puppy Love” traces the growth in popularity of dog breeds from rarity to fad, using the Berger Picard as one example, as it was recognized by the American Kennel Club only in 2014. This arrival on the dog show scene is often met by interest in sourcing puppies and, sometimes, unscrupulous behavior from profiteering breeders. The owners in the article explained they sought out the Berger Picard especially because it is energetic and affectionate.

Energetic. Affectionate. Stubborn. That sure sounds like Winn-Dixie to me.

Resources:

  • Battan, Carrie. “PUPPY LOVE.” Bloomberg Businessweek, 4451, 2015, p. 62.
  • Merriam Garcia. The Dog Encyclopedia. Abdo Reference, 2021.

""

Shawn Proctor is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Library.

 


Like

Big Dog, Big Heart: Everyone’s Favorite Vizsla

Concept art for a new version of Clifford the Big Red Dog. Credit: Scholastic.

Well known for being a book lover and writer, we had to celebrate Snoopy‘s birthday on Aug. 10! This week on the blog, we’re celebrating some of our favorite literary dogs. Are you a fan of Joe Cool? Or, is there another canine companion that has your heart?

Vizsla dog breed. Credit: Dog’s Best Life.

Kallie Stahl, Communication and Marketing Specialist, chose everyone’s favorite red dog: “While Scooby-Doo is one of my all-time favorites, I have to choose Clifford because he was one of the characters that inspired my love of reading when I was young.”

Written and illustrated by Norman Bridwell, Clifford the Big Red Dog was first published in 1963. The books follow the adventures of two-year-old Clifford and his owner eight-year-old Emily Elizabeth. Originally the runt of his litter, Clifford grew to be an impossibly large, red dog after being cared for by Emily Elizabeth. Clifford’s size was ambiguous in the books. Jordan Kerner, Director of Clifford the Big Red Dog (2021 film) stated, “The dog ranged from eight feet tall to 35 feet, depending upon the book you were reading.” Clifford’s breed was never attributed, though many people state he has the characteristics of a giant Vizsla. Originating in Hungary, the Vizsla is a hunting dog. “Because they were bred to be both a pointer and a retriever, they were also bred to attach and stick very close to their master, making them excellent family dogs. Just like Clifford would do anything for Emily Elizabeth, Vizslas are very loyal,” according to Dr. Jennifer Shepherd.

Since 1963, Scholastic reports “Clifford has appeared in more than 80 books (with more than 133 million copies in print in 16 languages), an Emmy Award–winning television series, and a feature film.” Describing the lasting legacy of Clifford, Scholastic chairman, CEO, and president Dick Robinson reflected on Bridwell’s loveable creation: “The magic of the character and stories Norman created with Clifford is that children can see themselves in this big dog who tries very hard to be good, but is somewhat clumsy and always bumping into things and making mistakes. What comforts the reader is that Clifford is always forgiven by Emily Elizabeth, who loves him unconditionally.”

“Young kids could relate to the stories because they focused on real-life situations,” said Stahl. “Clifford routinely made mistakes, but he learned from them and always treated everyone with kindness.”


References:

Ask Dr. Jenn: What Kind of Breed is Clifford the Big Red Dog? (n.d.). Retrieved August 4, 2022, from https://www.petassure.com/maxscorner/ask-dr-jenn-clifford-the-big-red-dog-breed/

Judy Newman at Scholastic. (n.d.). Judy Newman at Scholastic. Retrieved August 4, 2022, from http://www.judynewmanatscholastic.com/content/judyblog/en/blog/2020/01/legacy-story-clifford.html

Nast, C. (2021, June 29). Clifford the Big Red Dog Is Simply Too Big for New York City. Vanity Fair. https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2021/06/clifford-is-simply-too-big-for-new-york-city

 


Like

Photo Friday: Welcome to Villanova!

Photo of a "Welcome to Villanova" sign in front of the Oreo.


See you on campus soon, Wildcats!


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 



Like

TBT: Micro-Machine for Magazines

Two Library patrons use a micro-machine to view archived magazines and periodicals.


In the ’60s, Falvey Memorial Library patrons used a “Micro-machine” to view archived magazines and periodicals. This Throwback Thursday (TBT) was featured in the 1960 Belle Air yearbook (page 43). To browse the entire yearbook, visit the Digital Library.

The Villanova University community can browse a selection of newspaper and magazine archives available digitally on the Library website.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


Like

New Exhibit on Illustrated and Military Maps

Low, David, Caricature of Post-War Europe. [London]: Picture Post, 1952, SMITH VII-49.

Maps do far more than showing us the locations of places. They can persuade viewers and shape their perceptions of the world. They can also offer critical insight that leads to world-changing decisions, especially in times of war.

Art of War: Illustrated and Military Maps of the Twentieth Century, an upcoming exhibition co-curated by Rebecca Oviedo, Distinctive Collections Archivist, and Christoforos Sassaris, Distinctive Collections Coordinator, explores the creation and various uses of illustrated and military maps in the twentieth century. The maps are drawn mainly from the most recent addition of items generously donated to the John F. Smith, III and Susan B. Smith Antique Maps Collection. Several maps from this extensive collection have been digitized and can be viewed on Falvey’s Digital Library. You may also access an audio tour in which Mr. Smith comments on the maps’ significance.

Situation Map to Accompany Subj 5303/3. Münster. Central Europe 1:100,000. G.S.G.S. 4416 Published by War Office 1944. Revised, drawn and photolithographed at O.S. Army Map Service, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C., 1944. Reproduced at the U.S. Army Command and Staff College, 1947. SMITH VII-50.

The maps on view will range from strategic situation maps used by the US military to pictorial maps that implement satire and caricature to influence public perception of ongoing conflicts. Together, these maps shed light on how the spread of information—both textual and visual—took part in shaping major conflicts of the twentieth century.

Art of War: Illustrated and Military Maps of the Twentieth Century is co-hosted by Falvey Memorial Library and the Office of Veterans and Military Service Members, and will be viewable on both the first floor of Falvey Memorial Library and in the Prince Family Veterans Resource Center starting on September 8th through the remainder of the fall semester.

We hope to see you there!


Like

Nicole Daly Joins Research Services and Scholarly Engagement

Headshot of Nicole Daly, Social Science Librarian.

Nicole Daly, Social Science Librarian.


Nicole Daly joins Research Services and Scholarly Engagement as the Social Science Librarian. Research Services and Scholarly Engagement works to “support research, teaching, and learning at Villanova University; enabling the discovery of, access to, and stewardship of a vast array of scholarly resources.” You may have seen Daly at Falvey’s front desk; she joined the Library staff in 2021, working as the Service Desk Coordinator in Access Services.

Daly earned a BA in Psychology from Arcadia University, a MS in Psychology from Villanova University, and will complete her MLIS degree from San José State University this fall. She also earned an advanced certificate in Digital Assets with a focus in Data Analytics and Data Driven Decision Making from San José State University.

Daly’s first day as Social Science Librarian was Monday, July 11. She is liaison to the communication department, sociology and criminology department, and the College of Professional Studies. “Right now I’m working on collection development for those specific areas; anticipating their needs, making sure they are getting the resources they need from the Library,” said Daly. “When we get into the semester, I’ll be teaching information literacy courses, helping students to develop research skills. I’ll be creating subject guides so patrons can easily find resources, and I will be providing research assistance to those that may need help tracking down resources.”

Collaborating with the Villanova community is an essential part of Daly’s role. “All of it is very interconnected: As I build these relationships with students and faculty, I feel like those relationships will inform what is needed from the Library as far as collections.” Listening to various groups on campus will also assist Daly in ensuring Falvey’s collection reflects all voices. “Learning from the Villanova community, I will work to broaden Falvey’s collection; creating awareness and providing students with the information they need to expand their own knowledge and continue advocating for social change. Building an understanding of the current collection is essential moving forward; understanding if I need to provide context for specific content or edit material to reflect current language or provide content warnings. Thinking ahead but also addressing current material will be an important part of my role as liaison librarian.”

Transitioning from Service Desk Coordinator to Social Science Librarian, Daly feels her experience working in Access Services will help inform her new role. “In Access Services, we are the first to welcome Library patrons. Working with people and physically seeing and speaking with them, those experiences will inform how I approach my new role.” Working together with Falvey’s librarians, Daly was able to see what questions were frequently asked by community members when working at the front desk. She also worked in course reserves, assisting faculty and helping to send requests to Falvey’s librarians to see what items were needed for a particular course. “I’ve learned so much working in Access Services, specifically all of the different pieces (Interlibrary loan, course reserves, etc.) that people sometimes miss because they tend to be more behind the scenes. Having a vast knowledge of the innerworkings of an academic library is a valuable resource.”

A graduate of Villanova University, Daly wants students to know that Falvey librarians are here to help! “As someone who has gone to Villanova and lived that experience I remember thinking “Oh gosh, how do I conduct this research project?” She fondly remembers Falvey librarians coming to her undergraduate classes to provide helpful outreach. “We had wonderful librarians that came to our classes and gave very targeted help for specific projects. It was very enlightening, just showing us that they are available.” Acknowledging that the first year of college can be a challenge, Daly encourages students to reach out to her. “I can do so much more than just find a book. I can help students narrow down resources, determine which resources are valid, and find resources that may be unavailable at Falvey Memorial Library. I can help in so many different ways.”

If you happen to miss Daly at the many orientation fairs this fall, stop by the Library and say hello. She is also meeting students on Zoom. Daly’s office is located in the Learning Commons on the second floor of Falvey Memorial Library in room 225.

Telephone: 610-519-5207. 

Email: .

For more on Daly, check out her “Welcome to Falvey” blog here. Visit her webpage here.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


Like

Next Page »

 


Last Modified: August 3, 2022