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Photo Friday: Thank You 1842 Day Donors

Photo of Villanova students visiting an 1842 day table in front of Falvey Memorial Library.

Villanova students visit Falvey Memorial Library’s 1842 day table for fun gifts and helpful information. Photo courtesy of Shawn Proctor, Communication and Marketing Program Manager.


Thank you to all of our 1842 Day donors! Falvey Memorial Library raised $11,860.94 from the gifts of 76 generous donors and the Affordable Materials Project (AMP) raised $2,271.84 from 25 supporters.

AMP is a university-wide collaboration between the bookstore, Falvey Library, CASA, and the Office of the Provost, all working together to faculty with resources and options for selecting high quality, affordable course materials and creating student awareness of affordable options for obtaining course materials. 2021 contributions to AMP support library-purchased assigned e-books made available at no cost to students, faculty grants that support the adoption and authoring of free, openly licensed textbooks, known as Open Educational Resources (OER), and purchase of loaner laptops and graphing calculators for students who may not be able to afford to purchase, replace, or repair their devices.

2021 gifts to Falvey Memorial Library support the Library’s collection, benefiting Villanovans for years to come. Past donations were used to purchase new diversity, equity, and inclusion materials, new public health materials, and preservation supplies to preserve rare materials for future scholarship.

Every gift makes an impact for our students. Thank you for your support!

Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Weekend Recs: Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

Happy Friday, Wildcats! After a year off, Falvey Memorial Library is bringing back Weekend Recs, a blog dedicated to filling you in on what to read, listen to, and watch over the weekend. Jenna, a graduate assistant from the Communication department, scours the internet, peruses the news, and digs through book stacks to find new, relevant, and thought-provoking content that will challenge you and prepare you for the upcoming week. 

Wednesday, Sept. 15 kicked-off Hispanic Heritage Month. The observation started in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to cover a 30-day period starting on Sept. 15 and ending on Oct. 15. It was enacted into law on August 17, 1988, on the approval of Public Law 100-402.  

Why does Hispanic Heritage Month start in the middle of the month? It is the anniversary of independence for Latin American countries Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico, and Chile celebrate their independence days on Sept. 16 and Sept. 18, respectively. Take some time this weekend to learn more about Hispanic Heritage Month and how you can celebrate.

If you have 3 minutes… check out this article I wrote last year to find a new book by a Hispanic or Latino American author to read this month. 

If you have 7 minutes… read this article from the Skimm about co-founders of streetwear and empowerment brand Daughter of an Immigrant, Leslie Garcia and Karen Garcia. 

If you have 12 minutes… watch this YouTube video from Great Big Story celebrating Hispanic American stories. 

If you have 20 minutes… listen to VISIT PHILADELPHIA’s podcast, Love + Grit, and hear the stories of Francisco Garcia, founder of Philadelphia’s first Latino-owned whiskey distiller, and social justice professional Alba Martínez, who composed a song inspired by SEPTA’s Route 47 bus, which runs through the heart of the city’s Latino community. 

If you have an evening… visit one of these Latinx-owned restaurants right here in Philly. 


""Jenna Renaud is a graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication Department.


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Rivalry Renewed: Villanova Looks to Extend Three-Game Winning Streak Against Penn State

Tomorrow, Saturday, Sept. 25, the rivalry between Penn State and Villanova will resume. Their first matchup in 70 years, Villanova looks to extend a three-game winning streak against Penn State. Prior to Saturday, the Wildcats have faced the Nittany Lions eight times. Although Penn State leads the series by a 3-4-1 count, Villanova has won the last three: 1936 (13-0), 1949 (27-6), and 1951 (20-14). Saturday’s showdown, the first of a two-game series, begins at noon. The teams will meet again on Sept. 13, 2025. Both games will be played at Beaver Stadium in State College, PA.

Before kickoff, be sure to check out some photos from the rivalry’s previous meetings. Images courtesy of the Villanova University Digital Library.

1936

Image featured in the 1936 Belle Air yearbook (p. 157).

Villanova defeats Penn State (13-0). Image featured in the 1936 Belle Air yearbook (p. 157).

1949

Image featured in the 1949 Belle Air yearbook (p. 196).

Villanova defeats Penn State (27-6). Image featured in the 1949 Belle Air yearbook (p. 196).

 

Image featured in the 1949 Belle Air yearbook (p. 199).

“Ralph Pasquariello and the rest of the team had a great day in turning the tables on a very good Penn State club that has been highly rated.” Image featured in the 1949 Belle Air yearbook (p. 199).

 

Image featured in the 1949 Belle Air yearbook (p. 200).

Villanova defeats Penn State (27-6). “The Lions’ lone touchdown was harmless, scored in the last period as a result of a blocked punt.” Image featured in the 1949 Belle Air yearbook (p. 200).

 

Image featured in the 1949 Belle Air yearbook (p. 204).

“Big John Sandusky leads the way for little John Gippi as he steps off yardage against Penn State in the Cats’ 27-6 win.” Image featured in the 1949 Belle Air yearbook (p. 204).

 

Image featured in the 1949 Belle Air yearbook (p. 205).

“Pasquariello picking his way through Penn State players as he carries forward for the ‘Cats. This game marked the first time in many years that the Staters were defeated in their opening game.” Image featured in the 1949 Belle Air yearbook (p. 205).

1951

Image featured in the 1949 Belle Air yearbook (p. 180).

“The scrappy Wildcats clawed the Nittany Lions (20-14), in what many considered a surprise victory.” Image featured in the 1949 Belle Air yearbook (p. 180).

 

Image featured in the 1949 Belle Air yearbook (p. 183).

“Yes, you may take one giant step—but that’s all! Bill Brannau’s pass finds Jake Patrick on the Penn State 3-yard line in the second quarter at Allentown.” Image featured in the 1949 Belle Air yearbook (p. 183).

 

Image featured in the 1949 Belle Air yearbook (p. 184).

“Shopa of Penn State is tripped by Ralph Cecere.” Image featured in the 1949 Belle Air yearbook (p. 184).

Go ‘Cats! Beat State!


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


References:

Villanova University. (2018, August 30). Villanova and Penn State Announce Two Game Football Series. https://villanova.com/news/2018/8/30/villanova-and-penn-state-announce-two-game-football-series.aspx?path=football


 

 


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Bloomsbury History: Theory & Method on Trial

By Jutta Seibert

Bloomsbury History: Theory & Method is a brand new digital resource dedicated to historiography and the examination of historical theory and methods using a global approach. It features cutting-edge scholarship in the form of exclusive articles contributed by historians from 25 different countries. At the core of the collection are the recently published four-volume survey Historiography: Critical Readings edited by Q. Edward Wang and 100 essays that explore key concepts, thinkers, debates, and methods as well as a small selection of classical texts that shaped the discipline. Example of topics include medievalism, social movements, agency, causality, microhistory, environmental history, and public history to name just a few. The collection also features digital access to more than 60 previously published monographs and essay collections that focus on historiography, theory and methods. Included are the following titles:

New content will be added continuously in the coming years. Trial access will be available until October 22, 2021. A link to the collection is available on the Library’s Databases A-Z list under B. Get in touch if you would like to recommend this resources for the Library’s permanent collection.


Jutta Seibert is Director of Research Services & Scholarly Engagement at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 



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TBT: New Beginnings for Theatre

By Ethan Shea

"Excerpt from Belle Air 1969"

“Excerpt from Belle Air 1969”

As Villanova Theatre’s 2021 – 2022 Season begins this week with performances of James Ijames’ White, this excerpt from the 1969 edition of Belle Air reminds us of another time Villanova’s theatre program changed venues. The snippet describes the theatre’s “new location in Vasey Hall” with an enthusiasm similar to current attitudes toward the upcoming inaugural performance in the John and Joan Mullen Center for the Performing Arts.

This new beginning gives us an opportunity to reflect on the changes Villanova has underwent since 1969. Upcoming performances of White will challenge audiences to reckon with “racism, misogyny and cultural appropriation”, contrasting the lack of diversity in the image above and reminding us of the importance of continuously striving to embody an accessible culture of inclusion.


Headshot of Ethan SheaEthan Shea is a first-year English Graduate Student at Villanova University and Graduate Assistant at Falvey Memorial Library.

 


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Welcome To Falvey: Meg Leister Joins Access Services

Meg Leister. Photo courtesy of Kallie Stahl, Communication & Marketing Specialist.

Meg Leister, Student Employment Coordinator. Photo courtesy of Kallie Stahl, Communication & Marketing Specialist.


“On the weekends, I would walk through campus and think ‘This would be my dream to work at Villanova,’ and now it’s here.”

Meg Leister recently joined Access Services as the Student Employment Coordinator. Supporting the University’s teaching, learning, and research goals, Access Services provides a number of services to patrons including access to and maintenance of Falvey’s collections, library information and assistance, support for library equipment and technologies, placement of selected print or scanned materials on Course Reserves and Blackboard, and delivery of materials that are requested through Interlibrary Loan or E-ZBorrow. In order to assist the University community, Access Services must be fully staffed, and Leister ensures each area is operating successfully.

“What’s wonderful about Access Services is that everyone supports each other. There are various duties that we all do, such as supervising the service desk; however, my role as student coordinator is to assess which areas will need student employment for the upcoming semester. After going through applications and interviewing students, I coordinate with Access Services staff to see which areas would be a good fit for applicants. Working in the book stacks with Gerald Dierkes, Access & Collections Coordinator, aiding Roberta Pierce, Access & Collections Coordinator, with resource sharing, or working alongside Mike Sgier, Access & Collections Coordinator, at the service desk.”

Before joining the Falvey Memorial Library staff, Leister worked as the Access Services Supervisor at the Paul J. Gutman Library, Philadelphia University/Jefferson University. “It was a similar position [to my role at Falvey], and I was so fortunate to work there. I really enjoyed working with the students. It was very hands on and involved a lot of scheduling. Like Falvey, everything at the library was constantly evolving and moving.” Having a vast knowledge of resource sharing, Leister also aided in Gutman Library’s migration from SirsiDynix to Alma. “It was daunting in the beginning, but the people I worked with were amazing and I learned a lot behind the scenes implementing an integrated library system.”

Growing up in the area, Leister attended Temple University and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Administration of Justice with a minor in Sociology. “It’s the people aspect,” noted Leister, when speaking of what drew her to Falvey. “I’ve always known the value of Villanova to the community, and I also know several people that work here. It’s such a positive place to be.”

In her free time Leister enjoys spending time outdoors—hiking, walking, biking, and gardening. She also enjoys reading, particularly historical fiction. She recommends The Four Winds by Kristin Hannah and American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins for late summer reading. Leister’s desk is located in Access Services on Falvey’s first floor (Email: Margaret.schwoerer-leister@villanova.edu.) Stop by and say hello if you see Leister at the service desk!


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Bloomsbury Cultural Histories

By Jutta Seibert

Bloomsbury’s Cultural Histories are multi-volume sets that survey the social and cultural construction of specific subjects through the ages. All volumes in a set explore the same themes. For example, the Cultural History of Western Empires consists of six volumes covering antiquity, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Age of Enlightenment, the Age of Empire, and the modern age.

Each volume in the set includes a chapter on race written by an expert in the field. Compare the chapter on race by Cord Whitaker from the volume covering the Middle Ages to the chapter on race by Vanita Seth from the volume covering the Age of Enlightenment to gain a better understanding of what the series has to offer.

The digital platform currently comprises 24 subjects ranging from animals to work. Recently added subjects include comedy, education, home, memory, and peace. Color, democracy, fairy tales, genocide, medicine, and sport are among the subjects currently in production for the digital archive.

The collection also includes a small selection of cultural and social history books from Bloomsbury Academic, Berg, and Continuum that complement. Among them are David Sutton’s exploration of the relationship between food and memory in Remembrance of Repasts: An Anthropology of Food and Memory (Berg, 2001) and Mark M. Smith’s Sensory History (Berg, 2017), to name just two examples.

Visual resources from the Wellcome Collection, the Rijksmuseum, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art round out the collection, which also includes an interactive timeline and lesson plans for the undergraduate classroom. Remote access is provided through the Library’s Databases A-Z list under B.


Jutta Seibert is Director of Research Services & Scholarly Engagement at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 



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Modernism Explained

By Jutta Seibert

Scholars interested in modernism will be delighted to learn that they now have electronic access to The Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism (REM) through Falvey Memorial Library. Modernism is an umbrella term for a hodgepodge of movements in literature and the arts, among them expressionism, dadaism, cubism, social realism, surrealism, futurism, and Bauhaus. Modernist thinking and ideas influenced architecture, dance, theater, film, literature, music, philosophy, and the visual arts from the late 19th century until the middle of the 20th century.

All the articles in the Encyclopedia are written by subject specialists and include recommended reading lists as well as cross-references to related content. For example, the article about Russian Modernism includes links to articles about representative Russian artists together with links to overview articles about Social Realism and Symbolism. A scholar looking up Entartete Kunst will find two overview articles on Modernism in Europe and Expressionism, five topical articles including one on Entartete Kunst, and three biographical articles on artists associated with the movement.

REM’s global interdisciplinary coverage is particularly noteworthy. Contents are indisputably skewed towards Europe, but there is a fair amount of global coverage. Articles about literature and the visual arts clearly dominate content about the other arts. REM’s landing page links out to popular and new content. Modernism in the Middle East and Arab World is currently featured as the most read article. If you would like to learn more about REM, take the online tour.

Related resources:

Jutta Seibert is Director of Research Services & Scholarly Engagement at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 



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Cat in the Stax: Answering All Your Study Questions

By Ethan Shea

""

It might seem like the semester just began, but believe it or not, in just a couple weeks it will be time for midterm exams. Luckily, that also means Fall Break will be at our doorstep in no time.

I hope everyone’s had the chance to get into the rhythm of their new daily routines. If so, we can all take advantage of this relatively calm time of the semester and prepare for the trials to come. One habit that’s crucial to surviving midterms is a productive study routine. At least for me, when it comes to lining up my idiosyncratic study tendencies neatly in a row, I’m always left with questions and concerns.

In general, I can never decide how I want to study. Where should I be studying? Should I be listening to music? What time is best to study?

For this week’s “Cat in the Stax” I decided to answer these questions once and for all. I hope you’re able to use the answers I found to improve your academic experience here at Villanova. Enjoy!

Does listening to music help or hurt study sessions?

A study carried out by the University of Wollongong in Australia concluded that the answer to this question depends on the music you’re listening to. Because music tends to reduce stress, students will be more likely to buckle down and focus with greater intensity when aurally occupied. This revelation disproved the complex theory that classical music stimulates specific parts of the human brain that make studying more efficient. Contrarily, just about any instrumental music can help you study if it improves your mood. Songs with lyrics tend to make reading comprehension a bit more difficult, so if possible, stay away from vocal performances.

Where is the best place to study?

At the risk of sounding a bit biased, I’ll posit that all the best places to study are located right here in Falvey Library, but I’m not just saying that because this is a Falvey blog. In fact, I’ve got science to back me up. The ability to retain information and concentration levels are increased when studying in new locations. Being in the same place over and over again does not stimulate the brain to the greatest possible extent in the same way that focusing on one subject for too long can lead to burnout. Studying in an area with very few distractions and relative quietude is also important to learning efficiently. Stimulation overload prevents you from focusing intently on anything because your focus spreads too thin.

Thankfully, Falvey Library has plenty of quiet spaces, such as Third and Fourth Floor Stacks in addition to the Reading Room. There are also many different places to study in Falvey, so you can try a new one everyday without rendering your mind weary!

When is the best time to study?

Odd as it may seem, research has shown that studying when you’re tired is actually helpful. For example, if you study right before bed, your brain will essentially be reviewing the material in your sleep, causing the information to soak in a bit deeper. On the other hand, studying after a workout session has its benefits as well. Because of the increased flow of oxygen and blood that exercise causes, our brains get neurological boosts immediately after exercise. With that being said, feel free to take a jog over to Falvey Memorial Library when it’s time to hit the books!


Headshot of Ethan SheaEthan Shea is a first-year English Graduate Student at Villanova University and Graduate Assistant at Falvey Memorial Library.


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Support the Affordable Materials Project (AMP) on 1842 Day

 


Today is 1842 Day, Villanova’s annual day of giving! This 24-hour event celebrates the people and programs that are making a difference at Villanova and beyond. Support the Affordable Materials Project (AMP) by making a gift to its 1842 Day campaign.

Your gift of any amount goes further on 1842 Day. Your contribution will help support AMP’s programs, including Library-purchased assigned e-books made available at no cost to students, faculty grants that support the adoption and authoring of free, openly licensed textbooks known as Open Educational Resources, and purchase of loaner laptops and graphing calculators for students who may not be able to afford to purchase, replace, or repair their devices.

Thank you for supporting AMP and Falvey Memorial Library.


 


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Last Modified: September 21, 2021