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Welcome to Falvey: Roberta Pierce Joins Access Services

By Kallie Stahl

Roberta Pierce joined Access Services as the Access and Collections Coordinator in the fall. Focusing on resource sharing, Pierce assists patrons with Interlibrary loan (ILL) requests, specifically through E-ZBorrow and ILLiad services.

“It’s like solving a puzzle,” Pierce says of her position at Falvey. “My favorite part is researching and locating a specific book chapter or particular journal article to assist a patron in their scholarship.”

Access Services processed 4,500 E-ZBorrow requests and 8,650 ILLiad requests in 2019. As Interlibrary loan services are free of charge to all Villanova students, faculty, and staff, Pierce encourages the campus community to utilize the available services. “The possibilities are endless through Interlibrary loan.”

Pierce previously worked in resource sharing at Jefferson University on the East Falls campus and is a student in Villanova’s College of Professional Studies pursuing a bachelor’s in Information Systems. She earned a bachelor’s in Psychology with a minor in Women’s Studies from California State University, San Bernardino.

When she not spending time with her family, Pierce enjoys listening to podcasts and audiobooks. She’s currently reading Room 1219, a novel detailing the rise and fall of comedic actor Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle.

Pierce’s office is located behind the Access Services Desk on Falvey’s first floor.

Telephone: (610) 519-3848.

Email: roberta.pierce@villanova.edu.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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TBT: Technology Op-Eds

  • Posted by: Daniella Snyder
  • Posted Date: February 20, 2020
  • Filed Under: Library News

By Kelly McMahon

This week, I was struck by the timelessness of this 1993 op-ed from The Villanovan. Peter Shauger writes a scathingly hilarious article about phones acting as a “vehicle for stupidity,” and argues that telephones, which originally began as a “luxury” soon became “vice.” According to Shauger, human beings are more annoying than ever because of cellphones. He also writes about the newest piece of technology at the time, Villanova’s voicemail system, and how he believes it brings a true “ugliness” to society. Read the whole article on our online database here.

While technology has advanced greatly since Shauger’s 1993 op-ed, people’s opinions about technology haven’t changed too much. For example, check out this excerpt from a Villanovan op-ed from last year. In this article, Maggie Cavanaugh ponders the effect of Instagram making “like” counts private:

Although Cavanaugh notes that while Instagram’s decision “treats the symptom” of our desire for constant acceptance and validation, we, as humans, “will always compare ourselves to what we see and know,” and that making “likes” private will not really solve any problems. Read the full article here.


Kelly McMahon CLAS ’22 is a Communication and Spanish double major and a student assistant in Falvey’s Communication and Marketing department.


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TBR: Followers

By Daniella Snyder

I’m Daniella Snyder, a graduate student at Villanova University, and your ‘Cat in Falvey Library’s Stacks. I’ll be posting about academics– from research to study habits and everything in between–and how the Falvey Library can play a large role in your success here on campus!

Followers cover image

Hey Wildcats! With spring break around the corner, I’m slowly piling up some books I want to read during my days off. At the top of the list is Followers by Megan Angelo MA ’06, a Villanova English alumna’s debut novel.

Angelo will be meeting with English majors and other interested students on Thursday, April 2, 2:15-3:15 p.m., in SAC 300 to discuss Followers as well as her path to becoming a successful novelist. Angelo’s meeting with students will be followed by a public reading from the novel.

Angelo’s debut is a techno-thriller that explores the present and future stakes of American’s obsession with social media. Orla Cadden dreams of literary success, but she’s stuck writing about movie-star hookups and influencer yoga moves. Orla has no idea how to change her life until her new roommate, Flossa striving, wannabe A-listercomes up with a plan for launching them both into the high-profile lives they so desperately crave. But it’s only when Orla and Floss abandon all pretense of ethics that social media responds with the most terrifying feedback of all: overwhelming success.

Thirty-five years later, in a closed California village where government-appointed celebrities live every moment of the day on camera, a woman named Marlow discovers a shattering secret about her past. Despite her massive popularitytwelve million loyal followersMarlow dreams of fleeing the corporate sponsors who would do anything, even horrible things, to keep her on-screen. When she learns that her whole family history is a lie, Marlow finally summons the courage to run in search of the truth, no matter the risks.

Followers traces the paths of Orla, Floss, and Marlow as they wind through time toward each other, and toward a cataclysmic event that sends America into lasting upheaval. At turns wry and tender, bleak and hopeful, this darkly funny story reminds us that even if we obsess over famous people we’ll never meet, what we really crave is genuine human connection (Google Books).

I’d recommend this book to fans of  George Orwell’s 1984 and Dave Eggers’ The Circle. Next week, crack open Followers. Then, tell us what you think! DM us @villanovalibrary on Instagram or @falveylibrary on Twitter!

 


Daniella Snyder HeadshotDaniella Snyder is a graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the English department. For spring break, she plans on reading Followers on the train to New York City to visit a long-distance friend.

 

 

 


 


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Timelapse Video of “Be Not Afraid of Greatness: Celebrating the History of Villanova Theatre”

 

This recording is of curators Beaudry Rae Allen, Preservation and Digital Archivist, and Emma Poley, Theatre MA ’21, prepping materials for the new Spring Exhibit, “Be Not Afraid of Greatness: Celebrating the History of Villanova Theatre.” Before exhibit material is put on display Beaudry and Emma organize and arrange material beforehand to determine how the narrative should be displayed, where the exhibit text should be placed, and what items look best for each case. To make sure sizing is right, they use a cut-out template to outline the space available.


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#FunFriday: Literary Lovebirds Word Search

Happy Valentine’s Day, Wildcats! Looking for love? Then find your favorite literary lovebirds in the word search below! Download and print from here, or pick one up at the library’s front desk.


Joanne Quinn ’15 MA, ’84 CLAS is Director of Communication and Marketing at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Foto Friday: Literary Festival Lineup

By Kallie Stahl 

The 22nd Annual Villanova Literary Festival begins Thursday, Feb. 20! A reception and book signing with the author will follow each reading. All events begin at 7 p.m. The festival, co-sponsored by the English Department, the Creative Writing Program, the Honors Program, Africana Studies, Global Interdisciplinary Studies, The Writing Center, Gender and Women’s Studies, and Falvey Memorial Library, is free and open to the public.

Dinaw Mengestu — Thursday, February 20, Dougherty Hall, West Lounge 

Mengestu is the author of three novels, all of which were named New York Times Notable Books: All Our Names (2014), How To Read the Air (2010), and The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears (2007). He is a 2012 MacArthur Fellow and recipient of a Lannan Literary Fellowship for Fiction, Guardian First Book Award, and Los Angeles Times Book Prize, among other honors.

Bryan Washington — Tuesday, March 24, Falvey’s Speakers’ Corner 

Washington’s debut collection of short stories, Lot, was published by  in 2019. His fiction and essays have appeared in The New York TimesThe New York Times MagazineThe New Yorker, BBC, The Paris Review, Tin House, and numerous other publications. He’s also a National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 winner, and the recipient of an O. Henry Award.

Brenda Shaughnessy — Thursday, April 2, Falvey’s Speakers’ Corner 

Shaughnessy is the author of five poetry collections, including The Octopus Museum (2019), So Much Synth (2016) and Our Andromeda (2012), which was a finalist for the Kingsley Tufts Award, The International Griffin Prize, and the PEN Open Book Award. A 2013 Guggenheim Foundation Fellow, Shaughnessy is Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing at Rutgers University-Newark.

Robin Coste Lewis — Tuesday, April 21, Falvey’s Speakers’ Corner 

Coste Lewis is the poet laureate of Los Angeles. In 2015, her debut poetry collection, Voyage of the Sable Venus, won the National Book Award in poetry–the first time a poetry debut by an African-American had ever won the prize in the National Book Foundation’s history. Lewis’ writing has appeared in various journals and anthologies such as Time MagazineThe New YorkerThe New York TimesThe Paris ReviewTransition, and Best American Poetry.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Flick or Flip: The Handmaid’s Tale

By Allie Reczek

Flick or Flip logo

Welcome to Falvey’s Flick or Flip? My name is Allie Reczek, and I am a sophomore undergrad and student worker in the Library. For this blog, I will pick a book that has been turned into a movie, and argue which I thought was better.

This week on Falvey Flick or Flip, I will be discussing The Handmaid’s Tale, written in 1985 by Margaret Atwood. The novel is set in a future dystopian society in which societal roles consist of patriarchal men and subservient women. Offred, the main character, sets out to escape the confines of this life and be reunited with her family. The Republic of Gilead, which is the name of the totalitarian state that takes over after the fall of the United States government, limits the role of many women to “handmaids” who are forced to bear children for barren women and their husbands. Offred is defiant of the new role she has been forced into and works with other handmaids to secretly destroy this toxic government. Throughout the novel, Atwood pushes the boundaries of the human mind, highlighting gender stereotypes and the dangers of technology, leaving readers wondering if we are not that far away from reaching this hypothetical future. 

Rather than a movie adaptation, The Handmaid’s Tale was converted into a TV series on Hulu in 2017. In the first two seasons, the show follows the same storyline, with some changes that take a modern-day approach to this 1980s novel, like the inclusion of an interracial couple and highlighting the fear of expressing same-sex relationships in Gilead. 

While very well-directed and produced, I feel that after the first season I was not as invested in the series as I was reading the book. For anyone who can keep up with a TV series, I highly suggest this show. However, unlike a movie that tells a whole story in less than two hours, I grew bored of the plot line as more episodes were released.

Ultimately, regardless of the format in which you unfold this tale, The Handmaid’s Tale is a story that should not be overlooked. 

So, Flick or Flip?

FLIP


Picture of Allie Reczek

Hi! My name is Allie Reczek, and I am a sophomore Psychology Major. I work as a Marketing and Communication Assistant in Falvey. Hope you enjoy this blog! Which flips or flicks should I debate in the future? Message @villanovalibrary on Instagram or tweet us @FalveyLibrary!


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Throwback Thursday: Black History Month

By Kelly McMahon

In the first week of Black History Month, I went back to a 1993 edition of The Villanovan to learn how the campus community honored Black History Month in the past.

One of the largest events of the ’93 Black History Month celebrations included a presentation by black feminist author, documentary maker, professor, and social activist Toni Cade Bambara. According to The Villanovan, “the presentation will concentrate on black women in the creation of literary and cinematic texts.” If you’re interested in learning more about Bambara, click here to find some of her works in the Library’s collection.

Additionally, the article reports that “for the first time in history,” Black History Month included student presentations. The reporter focused on a student series on the historical functions of rap music in American society, including a discussion of female rappers and “hardcore rap.”

In this article, the reporter observes that there has “been a transition” on campus, from celebrating MLK Day to “the emergence of an entire month dedicated to black history.”

Want to know more about this year’s Black History Month? Check out the calendar of events.

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Kelly McMahon CLAS ’22 is a student assistant in the Communication and Marketing department at Falvey.

 


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Love is in the stacks!

By Daniella Snyder

I’m Daniella Snyder, a graduate student at Villanova University, and your ‘Cat in Falvey Library’s Stacks. I’ll be posting about academics– from research to study habits and everything in between– and how the Falvey Library can play a large role in your success here on campus!

Happy Valentine’s Day, Wildcats! Whether you’re celebrating with your sweetheart, your gal pals, or your dog…the day is meant to be filled with love, happiness, and appreciation for those you love the most.

This week, I pulled some books out of the stack that attempt to demystify the mysterious and elusive feeling of love: why we feel it, how it affects us, and why it matters at all. There’s a book for every person’s unique interests, including computer science, economics, mathematics, chemistry, history, sociology, and psychology. This week, curl up with a good book to learn what love is all about.

cover image for "love, a history"

Source: Amazon.com

Love: A History by Simon May

May covers over 2,500 years of human history in his book, offering an in-depth and critical historical look at love. May turns to cultural studies, philosophy, literature and more, dissecting love and all its forms.

cover image of "the art of loving"

Source: Amazon.com

The Art of Loving by Erich Fromm

Social psychologist Erich Fromm gives a sociological overview of the cultural forces influencing the way we think about “true love.” Then, he shares how we can best carry out the “pragmatic art” of loving others, which involves discipline, patience, courage, and other daily practices.

cover image of "consuming the romantic utopia"

Source: Amazon.com

 

Consuming the Romantic Utopia: Love & the Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism by Eva Illouz

Illouz, a sociologist, believes that feelings of love are subconsciously influenced by social trends, and in particular, capitalism and consumer culture. In Consuming the Romantic Utopia, Illouz explores the ways in which modern capitalist societies have endorsed “grand ideals of love” upon us, in books, magazines, television, movies, and music.

cover image for "the mathematics of love"

Source: Amazon.com

The Mathematics of Love: Patterns, Proofs, and the Search for the Ultimate Equation by Hannah Fry

Fry writes a “compulsively readable examination” behind the statistics of love, from dating to divorce, and everything in between. Fry uses mathematical patterns to predict the unpredictable: love.

Cover image for "the chemistry been us"

Source: Amazon.com

Chemistry Between Us by Larry Young, Ph.D and Brian Alexander

Young and Alexander explore the theory of love that we often ignore: the chemicals in our brains that drive attraction, sexual orientation, and desire.

cover image for "data, a love story"

Source: Amazon.com

Data, A Love Story: How I Cracked the Online Dating Code to Meet My Match by Amy Webb

Webb writes about her own experiences with the modern online dating work, and how she found true and lasting love. This book is a perfect read for anyone trying to find love in our current technological world.


Daniella Snyder HeadshotDaniella Snyder’s favorite book about love? all about love by bell hooks.


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2020 Falvey Scholar Award Nominations Are Now Being Accepted

By Kallie Stahl

The 2019 Falvey Scholars Award recipients (from left to right): Matthew Fagerstrom, Erin Donnelly, Elizabeth O’Brien, Jubilee Marshall, Ritesh Karsalia, and Erica Ferrara.

The 2019 Falvey Scholar Award recipients (from left to right): Matthew Fagerstrom, Erin Donnelly, Elizabeth O’Brien, Jubilee Marshall, Ritesh Karsalia, and Erica Ferrara. Photo courtesy of Shawn Proctor, Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library.

Attention faculty and Villanova seniors: Falvey Scholar Award nominations are now being accepted. The Falvey Scholar Awards are given each spring semester to individual or group projects of seniors who have completed exemplary (and publicly presentable) scholarship or research during their undergraduate careers at Villanova. The awards traditionally have an emphasis on work that has required substantial use of scholarly literature of the sort provided and supported by the library.

Villanova faculty:

  • Faculty can nominate students until March 27 by using the link provided on following page: http://library.villanova.edu/about/projects/falveyscholars/
  • Once nominated, students will be asked to apply in order to be considered for the award by using a link on the same page. Faculty mentors who plan to nominate should encourage students to apply.
  • Please consider nominating a student who exemplifies the awards criteria.

Villanova seniors:

  • Villanova seniors, if you’d like to be considered for the Falvey Scholar award urge your faculty mentor to nominate you by forwarding them the nomination link provided on following page: http://library.villanova.edu/about/projects/falveyscholars/
  • Students MUST be nominated by a faculty mentor before applying in order to be considered for the award.
  • The deadline for faculty nominations is March 27. The deadline for student applications is April 3.

The Falvey Scholar award is an annual program established by Falvey Memorial Library and the Center for Research and Fellowships to recognize outstanding undergraduate research. 2020 winners will be recognized at an awards ceremony in Falvey Memorial Library’s room 205, on Friday, April 24, at 9 a.m. that will include presentations by the award recipients on the content and findings of the research involved in the writing of the thesis or creation of the project report.

Digital copies of the winning papers are maintained in Falvey’s Digital Library. If you have questions, please contact: libraryevents@villanova.edu


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Last Modified: February 12, 2020