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TBT: Preserving Memories

photo from digital exhibit "Scraps for Keeps" and the "A Family History in Watercolors and Prints: Life in Victorian Era Hull, England" collectionWe’re just about to kick off the spring semester, which also means a time to make more memories and reminisce on the old. One great way of looking back on and preserving memories is to make a scrapbook! Falvey has a digitally archived collection called “Scraps for Keeps” that looks at the classic way of storing information – through albums and scrapbooks.

The picture above shows a page of a scrapbook depicting the life of Edith Good of Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire. Being from a family of artists, the scrapbook contains many watercolor photos of her, her family, as well as some landscape pictures. Falvey’s “Scraps for Keeps” collection shows more pages from Edith Good’s scrapbook, as well as many others.

The last time I made a scrapbook was my senior year of high school for a Psychology project, what about you?


Jenna Newman is a graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication Department. Current mood: Not ready to virtually travel to work today.


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From the Archives: Digitized Primary Sources on the 1918 Flu Pandemic

By Rebecca Oviedo

Preserved in Villanova University Archives and now available in the Digital Library are dozens of first-hand accounts and records from women religious of Philadelphia who volunteered to nurse the sick during the 1918-1919 “Spanish Influenza.” The accounts were solicited and collected by Rev. Francis E. Tourscher, O.S.A., who quickly took up the timely task to “assemble facts while they are still a living memory” and compiled that research as Work of the Sisters during the epidemic of influenza, October, 1918 / Philadelphia : American Catholic Historical Society, 1919.

Now we are making the original experiences and recollections written by the Sisters available online. Rev. Tourscher served as University Librarian from 1923-1939, and his papers are part of the Falvey Memorial Library records. His aim in gathering these facts was “to record the experiences and impressions of the Sisters, and incidentally to record their personal observations of the symptoms of the disease and conditions existing during the epidemic in private homes and hospitals.”

Senior Elizabeth Lyons works in the library as a Collections & Stewardship Technician in the scan lab and was eager to digitize the papers. “These papers were a crucial part of my research into volunteering efforts during the 1918 Spanish Flu epidemic in Philadelphia. They offered a unique insight into what it was like at the hospitals in Philadelphia. There weren’t a lot of personal accounts of what it was like to live through this period of time, so these offered a really unique perspective. I love working in the library and getting to interact with all sorts of historical documents. It’s really exciting to see what sorts of things have been preserved and what life was like back then! A lot of my fellow history majors were jealous that I get to keep working with primary sources like this, since most archives are closed right now.”

Further access to the manuscripts is provided through careful transcription of each handwritten document. Briana Felice is pursuing a Master’s degree in Library and Information Science from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and is completing an internship at Falvey Memorial Library. She has been transcribing the Sisters’ recollections into machine-readable format (Microsoft Word document and PDF) where they are available alongside the digitized item in the Digital Library. This added process ensures that the papers are more easily accessible and findable for users when performing keyword searches. She observes, “With everything going on with the looming pandemic, these letters are very timely. It shows that history really does repeat itself. Hopefully, we can learn a little something from the past.”

Just as scholars today are examining these records of the past, we anticipate that future scholars, staff and students may wish to know and understand what it was like for the Villanova community living through the current COVID-19 pandemic. We invite you to submit your own story and be a part of history: https://library.villanova.edu/about-falvey/coronavirus/submit-your-story

 

 

 


Rebecca Oviedo is Distinctive Collections Librarian/Archivist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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#TBT: Automobiles Then and Now

advertisement from The Willy-Overland Company2020 Ford commercial shot

This week we’re looking at automobiles advertisements “then and now.” The photo on the left side displays an advertisement for Willys-Overland Company, a car company operating from 1908 through 1963, headquartered in Toledo, Ohio. This advertisement uses color and imagery to draw in the audience and then uses their companies production statistics to try to close a deal. Although The Willys-Overland Company hasn’t been making cars for a long time, one of their main competitors, Ford, is still active in 2020. 

In contrast to the text-heavy ad from 1913, the image on the right shows a 2020 Ford advertisement. Ford has established such a brand presence by 2020, that their tagline “Built Ford Proud” and an image of their newest cars outside in nature, is enough to tell the viewer of the quality that the company provides. To learn more about 20th century advertisements, check out Falvey’s digital exhibit “You can learn a lot from ADVERTISING”.


Jenna Newman is a graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication Department.


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Quarantine Cooking with Kallie: Halloween “Prize” Filling

Happy Halloween, Wildcats! The holidays—especially Halloween—are always fun at Falvey; Library staff continually planning new ways to celebrate. Last year, Distinctive Collections staff hosted a Halloween Open House with eerie treasures on display in the Rare Book Room including a seventeenth century exorcism manual. Their featured treat was a Prohibition-era mocktail called the St. Augustine (follow link for recipe.) Costumes weren’t mandatory, however, Falvey staff still commemorated the spooktacular day!

Library staff (left to right): Chris Hallberg, Sarah Wingo, Kallie Stahl, Laura Bang, Rebecca Oviedo, Beaudry Rae Allen, Shawn Proctor.

Reminiscing on Halloweens past and brainstorming ideas for this blog, I decided to alter a recipe I stumbled upon a few weeks ago. The original recipe was a white layer cake featured in the Prize Cook Book, part of the John Regan Five Cent Pamphlets (no. 4) Dime Novel Collection. Listing multiple fillings for the layer cake including caramel, maple sugar, apple, and chocolate, I chose to simplify the recipe and add the maple sugar filling to cinnamon rolls. Mixing a few drops of orange food coloring to the packaged frosting, I crafted a simple and tasty autumnal treat!

Below are a few images of the Prize Cook Book if you’d like to explore the cake fillings. The entire cook book is available for reading in the Villanova University Digital Library.

The recipe I used for this blog is featured in the second image above. Here are the original instructions for the maple sugar filling:

  • Two cups maple sugar (cooked until it strings)
  • Add beaten whites of two eggs and beat until cold

I altered the recipe using cinnamon rolls instead of layer cake:

  • One (or two) cans of packaged cinnamon rolls
  • Orange food coloring
  • One cup brown sugar
  • 2 tbsp. water

Cooking instructions (maple sugar filling):

  • Mix one cup of brown sugar and two tbsp. water in saucepan on stove
  • Stirring constantly on low heat, bring sugar and water to a boil
  • Wisk one egg white and gradually add the heated sugar to the egg white (stirring constantly)
  • Let mixture cool

Cooking instructions (cinnamon rolls):

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees
  • Grease round cakepan and place rolls in pan
  • Drizzle a spoonful of maple sugar filling on each roll
  • Bake 15-19 minutes until golden brown
  • Spread icing (add food coloring if desired)
  • Option to add additional maple sugar filling in lieu of icing (or use both!)

Check out the finished product below. View the full cooking tutorial here.

Cinnamon rolls with maple syrup filling and orange icing.

Cinnamon rolls with maple syrup filling and orange icing.

Image of Villanova caramel candies.

Attempted to make Villanova caramel candies with leftover maple sugar filling.

Interested in Dime Novels? Explore Dime Novels and Popular Literature in the Digital Library. Save the date for Papers for the People: Dime Novel Symposium on on Wednesday, Nov, 4, and Thursday, Nov. 5, from 7:30-9:30 p.m. EST. The virtual event, hosted by Northern Illinois University and Villanova University, will feature panel discussions with notable and upcoming dime novel scholars. These conversations will focus on how dime novels can be used in the classroom and will offer regional educators, academics, and students at the graduate and undergraduate level the opportunity to learn about and discuss dime novels directly with experts in the field. Participation is free. Register here.

While this Halloween will be different at Falvey Memorial Library and Villanova University, there will still be plenty of socially distanced activities for this “Halloweekend” on campus! Hopefully the featured recipes will inspire some quarantine cooking for Halloween and the cooler months ahead. Thank you all for your dedication to the Caritas Commitment. Be well, ‘Cats!


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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#TBT: Coca-Cola Then & Now

photo of a 1916 Coca Cola advertisement featuring Grover Cleveland Alexander

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many brands have held a place in the media for decades, one of those being Coca-Cola. Take a minute to look at the evolution of Coca-Cola ads over the years. The Grover Cleveland Alexander ad is from May 20th, 1916, while the video is one of Coca-Cola’s most recent ad campaigns from August 2020. The company’s advertisement campaigns have evolved from the traditional “drink Coke because so-and-so is.” The modern-day campaign focuses on drinking Coke because of the values of the company and their desire to ignite change.

To see more classic advertisements, visit Falvey’s digital exhibit, “You Can Learn a Lot from Advertising!”

You can watch the full Coca-Cola advertisement here.


Jenna Newman is a graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication Department. Current mood: Getting ready to run out and buy a nice, cold Coke on my lunch break.

 

 

 

 


 


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Quarantine Cooking With Kallie: Grape-Nuts Fruit Pudding (1923)

Welcome back, Wildcats! ICYMI: For the past few weeks, I’ve been cooking recipes featured in the Villanova University Digital Library while teleworking from home during the pandemic. With the fall semester back in session, I wanted to feature a simple recipe that could be easily made in residence halls and apartments; which bring me to the exciting reveal of this week’s recipe…Grape-Nuts Fruit Pudding!

Yes, Grape-Nuts.

And don’t be fooled by the title, the recipe is made with Jell-O, not pudding.

I was familiar with the wheat and barley cereal prior to the discovery of this recipe. My grandmother would put Grape-Nuts in her yogurt, and I sometimes ate Grape-Nuts with milk and multiple spoonfuls of sugar (which defeated the purpose of Grape-Nuts as a healthy alternative to sugary cereal). For those of you unfamiliar with the whole-grain cereal, it was “developed by C.W. Post in 1897 and has remained a fixture in American culture.”

Advertisements for Grape-Nuts were frequently featured during “The Andy Griffith Show” in the 1960s. During the 1970s the company paired with “wild-food-expert-turned-spokesperson, Euell Gibbons as part of the return to nature movement sweeping parts of the country.” Gibbons’ most famous quote, “Ever eat a pine tree? Many parts are edible,” was featured in a 1974 Grape-Nuts commercial.

Below is an advertisement for Grape-Nuts on the back cover of The People’s Home Journal, v. XXXVIII, no. 7, July, 1923. The entire magazine is available for reading in the Villanova University Digital Library.

ad for Grape-Nuts on the back cover of The People's Home Journal, v. XXXVIII, no. 7, July, 1923

Image courtesy of the Villanova University Digital Library.

The recipe I used for this blog is featured in the image above. Here are the original instructions:

  • One package of lemon Jell-O dissolved in one pint of boiling water.
  • One cup (half-pint) Grape-Nuts. One half-pound of raisins or dates.
  • As many walnuts as desired.
  • Mix thoroughly and pour into a dish or mould to cool and harden.
  • Serve with whipped cream.

I altered the recipe slightly:

  • Bring 1 cup of water to a boil.
  • Add boiling water and Jell-O mix in a dish (stirring until mixture is dissolved.) Then add 1 cup cold water.
  • Mix in 1 cup of Grape-Nuts and 1 cup of raisins or dates.
  • Refrigerate for four hours.
  • Garnish with chopped walnuts and whipped cream.

Check out the finished product below.

Photo of Grape-Nuts pudding.

While this semester will be unlike any other, the staff at Falvey Memorial Library is diligently working to provide access to resources to help you succeed. For more recipes visit the Digital Library. Questions about the Digital Library, University Archives or Special Collections? Contact the Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement staff.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Transcribing History in the Digital Library

By Rebecca Oviedo

 

Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement is pleased to share a new guide on finding, using, and doing transcriptions in our collections. This resource, Transcribing History in Villanova University’s Digital Library, includes examples of some transcriptions of note, an explanation of how to search and access transcriptions in the Digital Library, and an invitation to join us in transcribing history yourself!

The guide also includes several links and examples for teaching and learning online with primary sources. Especially now, when physical access to archival collections has been limited, the Digital Library provides access to thousands of digitized materials from Villanova University’s Special Collections and University Archives as well as dozens of digital donor and partner institutions. One of the goals of the Digital Library is to transcribe these handwritten documents so that they are more easily searchable and accessible to the public.

 

 


Rebecca Oviedo is Distinctive Collections Librarian/Archivist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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100 Seasons of Villanova Basketball Now Available in the Digital Library

By Rebecca Oviedo

This past year, in celebration of Villanova’s 100 seasons of men’s basketball, and in partnership with the Department of Athletics’ External Operations Unit, Falvey Memorial Library’s Distinctive Collections & Digital Engagement has added a significant contribution of basketball-related images and content to the Villanova Digital Library. The items from University Archives include nearly 400 photographs and negatives, and more than 60 additional items, such as media guides, schedules, tickets, and scorebooks.

Since 1920, Villanova Basketball has produced three NCAA national championships and a rich history of outstanding players and coaches. Search and view images of such iconic Wildcats and future NBA stars as Paul Arizin, Larry Hennessy, Bob Schafer, and George Raveling under coach Alex Severance; Wali Jones, Hubie White, Jim Washington, Bill Melchionni, Howard Porter, Chris Ford and Tom Ingelsby from the Jack Kraft era; and, of course, selected images from Rollie Massimino’s 1985 NCAA championship team. One of the most photographed: legendary longtime athletic trainer John “Jake” Nevin.

Negative, Basketball (Jake Nevin/ Trainer and Howard Porter), 1970.

The process to convert these analog materials to a digital environment involved many hands and multiple steps.

The work began last summer, with the help of Erik Sherwood, Laura Davis, and Jessica Leventry, three Penn State students participating in the Villanova Athletic Department summer internship program with Assistant Athletic Director/Marketing Jacob Whitten’s team. The students spent two weeks in University Archives transcribing data from University Negatives Collection envelopes housing the negatives and entering the information into a spreadsheet to be incorporated into University Archives and Digital Library databases. They recorded such metadata as box and folder numbers, names, dates, subject headings, and descriptions for each negative.

Laura Davis carefully examines a negative.

Villanova College Basketball Facts, 30th Season, 1949-1950.

In September of the fall semester, several undergraduate Collections & Stewardship Technicians began scanning the items using the library’s Indus Color Book Scanner and a recently added Epson 12000XL Photo Scanner. These students, trained in appropriate collections care and proper handling techniques for rare materials, included Bernadette Goratowski, Martin Han, Courtney Schultz, and Erin Warren. After scanning materials, the students performed several post-processing steps, including rotating, cropping, and tonal adjustment of the digital images. They logged and tracked their work in the same spreadsheet started by the summer interns. Images were then uploaded to a library server to await further description and metadata by Distinctive Collections staff.

Items were scanned through March 2020, when campus was closed due to the growing threat of the COVID-19 pandemic, and sadly the remainder of Villanova’s 100th season of basketball was cancelled. As much of the world’s workforce transitioned online, I continued my work of describing and entering metadata, now from home, a task that surely could not have been completed had it not been for the careful work of our student employees and interns this past year.

Some images still require additional identification and description. I tried to identify players and add subject headings as best I could, and the media guides proved invaluable for this. If you can identify or date any images lacking this information, please email archives@villanova.edu. We have scanned selected images from the University Negatives Collection through 1974, and there are still several hundred images that have not yet been digitized. The collection spans the 1930s to 1985. If you have a favorite past player, let us know by email or in the comments below.


Rebecca Oviedo is Distinctive Collections Librarian Archivist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 

 


 


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Digital Library Discoveries: The 1918 Flu Pandemic

With the world currently battling a new global pandemic of the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, many news sources are looking back at the 1918-1919 worldwide influenza pandemic commonly known as the Spanish flu. An estimated 500 million people, or one-third of the world’s population, became infected with the virus and the number of deaths is estimated to be at least 50 million worldwide with about 675,000 deaths occurring in the United States.

While researching one of our newest Digital Library collections from partner organization The Museum of Nursing History, I came across a featured article in Columbia University’s School of Nursing Alumnae newsletter highlighting Ada Mutch and her experience in 1918.

Philadelphia in particular had “the highest, most rapidly accumulating death toll” in the country. With many doctors, nurses, and medical staff serving overseas in World War I, it was left to nursing students and lay people to step in and help tend to the sick. In Bryn Mawr, the local hospital was overwhelmed with patients and an emergency hospital was opened in the old, vacant Lancaster Inn. At thirteen years old, future World War II army nurse Ada Mutch and her sister volunteered as kitchen help preparing food and serving meals to the doctors, nurses, and staff. They helped to prepare visitors by dressing them in protective gowns and masks and escorting them to see their ill family members. Amazingly, none of the Mutch family became ill.

Ardmore Chronicle – Volume XXIX, No. 55 [57 sic], Saturday, November 2, 1918.

Towards the end of October 1918 the Board of Health for the state of Pennsylvania began to gradually lift quarantines and reopen public places. In our Digital Library, an article in the November 2nd issue of the Ardmore Chronicle reports, “after four weeks the influenza ban which has kept the lid upon virtually every form of activity in the community outside of those connected with the most stringent needs of the people and Government, will be lifted tomorrow in Lower Merion, when the churches will be permitted to resume services. Monday the schools will again hold daily sessions, and Tuesday saloons, theatres, poolrooms, dance halls and other public places will be allowed to open.” Still, the Acting Commissioner of Health, Dr. Benjamin Franklin Royer warned, “great care should be practiced at the time of removing restrictions.”

While we are currently practicing “social distancing” here in Pennsylvania in 2020, Falvey’s Digital Library is always open and awaiting your discovery!


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New Digital Library Resource: WWII Army Nurse Records

Last week we shared some highlights from a recently digitized collection (See: New Digital Partnership: Museum of Nursing History), and we’ve just added some additional items – the scrapbook and papers of World War II Army Nurse Jessie Margaret Ada Mutch (1905-2012).

 

Women in Uniform (The New York Times Magazine, January 24, 1943); from Scrapbook (Part 2).

Ada Mutch was born February 2, 1905 in Scotland and emigrated to the U.S. in 1912 with her parents and siblings. Reverend Andrew Mutch, her father, was Pastor of the Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church. Ms. Mutch was educated at The Baldwin School and then earned her Nursing Degree at the Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital School in New York. In World War II she enlisted in the U.S. Army Nurse Corps earning the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. She served from 1942-1946 and distinguished herself in the European Theater of Operations. She then returned to Columbia-Presbyterian to pursue her career in nursing, along with a master’s degree in 1948. She held a dual position as Assistant Director of Nursing and Assistant Professor of Nursing at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center. In 1955 she became the Director of Nursing at Lankenau Hospital in Wynnewood, Pennsylvania until her retirement in 1970. She was active for many years as a volunteer for ElderNet, and died on January 27, 2012, one week before her 107th birthday.

Items in this collection include a large scrapbook compiled during her time serving in the U.S. Army Nurse Corp, as well as various materials relating to her career in the army and as a nurse. The disbound scrapbook is on brittle paper and very fragile in nature. Digitization serves as a preservation strategy by creating a surrogate version of the item that allows for immediate access. We are proud to partner with the Museum of Nursing History to digitize the history of this important profession.

 

Most of the scrapbook appears to be from her time in France and contains many French theater programs and souvenirs, photographs, maps, correspondence, newspaper and newsletter clippings and full articles, and several United States government publications from the War Department. Ada Mutch served overseas for three years and two months during World War II. Initially she was a 1st Lieutenant and Assistant Chief Nurse in England; and subsequently became director of the Nursing Section, Northern Ireland Base Section. She later acted in this capacity in France, in the Brittany Base Section, and then in the Burgundy Bay Section, concluding her service in Europe as Director of the Nursing Service in the 807th Hospital Center.

Photograph and map, the “Palace” Hotel, Vittel, France, where the 807th Hospital Center was stationed, April 20 – July 17, 1945.

We were able to scan only a portion of this collection before the temporary closure of campus due to the COVID-19 pandemic. We are eager to return to campus and share the remainder of this exceptional scrapbook and additional items from Ms. Mutch’s collection – as soon as it is safe!


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Last Modified: April 16, 2020