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’Cat in the Stacks: THE CHILLY WEATHER HAS RETURNED

CAT-STAX4I’m William Repetto, a second-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is the “‘Cat in the Stacks” column. I’m your ‘cat. I’ll be posting about college life, about learning and growing here at Villanova, and, of course, about the Falvey Memorial Library’s role.


The chilly weather has returned, ’Nova Nation, and you know what that means; no, not stuffy noses, dry coughs, and miserable, dark, dreary mornings. It means the return of flannel, finding a cozy corner to hunker down in the library; chilly weather means Halloween, apple cider, leaves changing colors, and most of all: some pretty rad events to celebrate here at the Falvey.

The first of these events will occur tonight (Thursday, Oct. 19) and will actually be in service of those who have fallen victim to a vastly different kind of weather. “The Crisis in Puerto Rico: A Faculty Panel” will be part of the ongoing marking of Hispanic Heritage Month, which has blossomed into a full semester here at ’Nova and will also feature brief presentations by the Hispanic Club and Catholic Relief Services. 

Here’s an eVite to the Puerto Rico event!

Next up, we have our celebration of Open Access Week. In case you didn’t know, corralling the large amounts of information that libraries like the Falvey provide access to requires amazing amounts of woman- and manpower each year. Managing these subscriptions and understanding what each includes is a huge part of what librarians must be able to do these days. 

This system works for the Falvey because we have some of the best and most knowledgeable librarians in the world combined with the resources of such a great university. The biggest issue, however, is that this system concentrates all the best scholarship and data for research into the hands of similarly endowed institutions. Open Access Week is about celebrating those organization that seek to make said information free and easily accessible. Our biggest event for this celebration, titled “Open Your Mind to Open Access” will occur on Wednesday, Oct. 25, from 12:30-1:30pm in Room 205.  

This celebration happens to correspond with another keynote event here at the Falvey – so you can take shelter from the chilly weather all day on Oct. 25! This year’s Mannella lecture, “Issues on U.S.-Italy Relations,” will be given by Dr. Spencer M. Di Scalia of UMass Boston’s Department of History at 1pm on that day. We hope to see you there for spirited discussion and, of course, light refreshments. 

Di Scalia, of UMass Boston, poses for a photo.

If library events aren’t your favorite chilly weather pastime, well… then you’re surely lost! But we’d love to know what you’re up to, Wildcats. Whether hot chocolate is your favorite cooler weather activity or just snuggling up under a quilt, we’d love to know: comment below or reach out to us on Facebook or Twitter. 


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.


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’Cat in the Stacks: Gotta Collect ’em All!

CAT-STAX4I’m William Repetto, a second-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is the “‘Cat in the Stacks” column. I’m your ‘cat. I’ll be posting about college life, about learning and growing here at Villanova, and, of course, about the Falvey Memorial Library’s role.


Here’s a situation: as the temperature starts to drop into those fall digits, and midterms loom on the horizon, you find yourself walking along out front of the Falvey. Like the smart, suave Villanova student that you are, you decide to go into the library to get some studying done.

Only wait, you start to day dream off, thinking of curling up back at the dorm (apartment, etc.) with a nice, warm cup of Ramen; how could the library possibly top that? Well, guess what! We can. A “hot” topic among patrons and staff alike here at the Falvey has been the quality of the soup at Holy Grounds.

The strong opinions surrounding the topic have led us to declare this week: “Soups Mania.”

Graphic design by Joanne Quinn!

Okay, you caught us. This week is no different from any other: “It’s always Soups Mania” here at the Falvey. Just like you have to wait to see who performs at Hoops Mania each year, we patiently wait here to see which soups will grace our taste buds each afternoon here in the Falvey.

The “Soups Mania” pins are a way of showing our appreciation to Dining Services for supplying the Falvey with such a unique option for guests. That said, we’d love to see how you enjoy your soup here at Falvey. Do you chow down in the first floor lounge? Do you bring your king’s ransom to the armchairs in the Dugan Polk Family Reading Room? Or is soup your appetizer for an event at the Idea Accelerator? Let us know via Twitter (@FalveyLibrary) or, better yet, tag us in an Instagram post (@VillanovaLibrary) wearing your fancy, new button!

Look how excited Hunter gets when she buys her soup!

Also, #DidYouNova, we’re giving away buttons all semester long here at the Falvey, here’s a photo of our favorites so far:

I think the “Rollie” and “Eboo” are my favorites! What about yours?

Have you collected ’em all?


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University. (Graphics courtesy of Bitmoji, and Hunter and I spending hours perfecting our representations!)


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The Highlighter: Banned Books Available for Borrowing

Welcome to “The Highlighter,” where we’ll be exploring the various new and old services and resources available through the Falvey!


In the past, we’ve brought you staff-picks of banned books, displays on banned books, topics in banned books, and even film-adapted banned books. With the topic of censorship taking over our Twitter feeds, however, I’d like to take the present “Highlighter” to remind you of the cultural import of banned books and tell you where they might be found in the library!

Here’s the thing with banned books: we often get a kick out of “why” a book was banned: “Harry Potter” for promoting witchcraft, for example, or “The Lord of the Rings,” for its Satanic elements. The list goes on and on, really. “Brideshead Revisited” was banned for elements of homosexuality – poor Anthony B-B-Blanche! – and “Fahrenheit 451,” itself an indictment on censorship, was censored for foul language.

If you are at all like Hunter here, you’re thinking “William! Why are you giving me more reading?” But stick with me; I promise it’s worth it!

In the curiousness (and even downright hilarity) of these accusations, we often forget to take the moment to think about how others might see things. Maybe it’s easy for us to see that “Harry Potter” is about friendship and coming of age, or simple for us to see the greater, yet fictional, powers at work in “The Lord of the Rings.” But maybe for others that distinction is not so black-and-white.

No book ought ever be banned. This week, as we mark ALA’s Banned Books Week to celebrate, “the freedom to read,” let us remember the great freedoms afforded to us through our Villanovan education. Let’s not forget to read these books critically, and, instead of laughing off those who have banned them before, let’s learn a thing or two about “how” others think. Perhaps a bit of old-fashioned well-rounded thought will go a long way as far as ensuring that our cherished tales of the future remain on the bookshelves for all to enjoy.

Me settling in with one of our banned books.

Here’s some of my favorites and where you’ll find them in the Falvey!

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” by J.K. Rowling – Why not start from the beginning and give the whole series another read?

Brideshead Revisited” by Evelyn Waugh – Melodramatic yet deeply profound, “Brideshead…” keeps you asking for more.

Watchmen” by Alan Moore – A comic? Yes. Comical? No.

Carrie” by Stephen King – Decades before my college roommates hung the creepy “Carrie” film poster in my dorm room, King wrote the original as a bone-chilling yet touchingly sad novel.

Lord of the Flies” by William Golding – My middle school teachers put this book in the hands of an all-boys class perhaps too soon; we admired the boys for their state-building acumen – not the case, now that I’m a bit older (and at least slightly more mature).


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.


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Tuesday Highlighter: Happy (Belated) National Read an eBook Day!

Welcome to “The Highlighter,” where we’ll be exploring the various new and old services and resources available through the Falvey!


 

Yesterday, Sept. 18, marked National Read an eBook Day. Last year, we celebrated the day by bringing you some recommendations on which eBooks to read. This year, recognizing the quantity and quality of eBooks available through the Falvey, I dug a little deeper. Description Management Librarian David Burke provided me with the just the information I needed:

WR: Just how many eBooks are available to those with access to the Falvey’s catalog and databases?

DB: We have access to nearly 300,000 unique eBooks available through several platforms and publishers.

Are these mostly contemporary novels and academic journals?

They come in many different types.  Some collections consist of digital facsimiles of old published works—for example, Early English Books Online is a collections of books, pamphlets, and other primary source material published in the late 1400’s (about when printing came to England) to 1700.

David Burke, Description Management Librarian and knower of all things eBook -related at the Falvey.

Are most eBooks, then, just digital versions of physical books whose copyrights have elapsed?

Well, others are published collections of specific publishers, including Wiley, the University of Oxford Press, and Springer (from this last we have over 37,000 titles).  And there are platforms featuring titles from various publishers including JSTOR, Ebook Central (a subsidiary of ProQuest), and Project Muse.

Are most historical in nature?

Subjects covered by these ebooks are all across the board, and vary from 2 page pamphlets to multi-volume encyclopedia to novels.

New hobbies!

Many historical books have been converted to the eBook medium for ease of access!

Can I access some of the materials in our own Special Collections as eBooks?

Of course! We also have our locally-digitized collections of eBooks within the Digital Library, especially our dime novel collection.


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.

 


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’Cat in the Stacks: “Throw”back Thursday, 1896 Edition

CAT-STAX4I’m William Repetto, a second-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is the “‘Cat in the Stacks” column. I’m your ‘cat. I’ll be posting about college life, about learning and growing here at Villanova, and, of course, about the Falvey Memorial Library’s role.


What a devastating loss last Saturday, huh, ’Nova Nation? If you’re among the uninformed: the Wildcats lost a game of football to the Temple Owls this past weekend. Now you’re thinking: “the ‘’Cat in the Stacks is not a sports blog, William. Why are you reporting this here?” 

Well! Sports are in fact an important part of the Falvey currently, as we are exhibiting our “Wildcats: Past & Present” display on the first floor. Now before you say, “What a lame marketing ploy, William,” and you click to a new page, let me highlight one of our pieces for you, and then show what it has to do with your Villanova career: 

 

This is a picture of the 1896 football team from the “Past & Present” display itself! In addition to being just a very cool artifact in general, the photo tells us a lot about what it means to be Villanovan both as a student and beyond. 

You see, the gentlemen of this photo would be approximately 140 years old if they were alive today (assuming the photo was taken when they were roughly 20). Now take a quick look at the names. Do you recognize any of them? 

I don’t either! To my knowledge, none of these men are particularly famous or historically significant. Even the very gentlemanly looking Captain McDonald, who the photo seems to revolve around, doesn’t strike me as someone I’ve seen before in a history textbook or read about in an acclaimed biography. But now I want you to take a look at another photo: 

 

This is a picture from last Saturday at Lincoln Financial Field. If you zoom in on the scoreboard, you’ll notice that this is the moment the Wildcats’ defeat became official. If you zoom back out and compare the photo to the artifact from above, you’ll notice a striking difference. 

The Wildcats of 1896 didn’t have fancy gear, a giant stadium as their playing field, or indeed more than 16 team members! They still played though, knowing that they enjoyed the game themselves and that their dedication to the program would payoff for students somewhere ages and ages hence. 

 

I’ve been practicing up on my gridiron skills myself…

There’s a lesson to be learned here that goes beyond sports. No matter what you decide to do with your time at Villanova, whether it’s improving something small about campus or helping a large group on campus get even larger, you can never predict the long term benefits of your project – but that project is definitely worth the added effort. Just look at what became of 16 young guys excited about a sport after 100 years. 

The same lesson goes for life as well. Even if you’re just a small part of a company for a few years, or, even better, if you just spend a couple hours volunteering each week, you could never guess what can become of a small effort when it’s given time to flourish. One day your effort may be immortalized in a display on the past and present.  

Even Hunter’s getting into the football spirit!

For many other lessons that can be drawn from sports make sure to stop by “Wildcats: Past & Present,” curated by Special Collections and the University Archives. Or take a look at the digital library! We’d love to hear about your favorite items; what lessons can we learn from them? Let us know on Twitter, Facebook, or use the comments below!


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University. (Graphics courtesy of Bitmoji, and Hunter and I spending hours perfecting our representations!)


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Tuesday Highlighter: Novel Adaptations

Welcome to “The Highlighter,” where we’ll be exploring the various new and old services and resources available through the Falvey!


“The Highlighter” typically focuses on updates either interior to the library or updates accessible through the library, but this week I’ll be writing about something a little different: adaptations. As it turns out, some of our favorite books here at the Falvey will hit the screen at the end of this year and beginning of next. Here’s our top five, the book versions of which happen to be available through the catalog:

1. “It” by Stephen King:

Cover to Stephen King’s “It.”

Already grossing nearly $200 million worldwide, “It” has taken horror films to new heights, and industry insiders are already talking about how its September release may indeed sway how studios approach marketing their films in the future. The story of Pennywise the clown, of course, comes from a Stephen King novel of the same name released in 1986.

You can find it through the catalog here. We recommend taking advantage of Falvey’s 24/7 hours pilot and reading it in the dark of night.

2. “The Glass Castle” by Jeannette Walls:

“The Glass Castle” by Jeannette Walls cover.

This 2009 OneBook Villanova selection has also already been released. In theatres now, “The Glass Castle” tells the harrowing story of Jeannette Walls’ own childhood and adolescence of extreme poverty. Originally a memoir, the filmic adaptation stars Brie Larson and Woody Harrelson. Make sure to bring your tissues for this one, and get your inner-social-justice-warrior persona geared up and ready to go.

3. “The Vietnam War: An Intimate History” by Geoffrey C. Ward:

A page within the companion volume to “The Vietnam War: An Intimate History.” (Courtesy of Google Books’ preview of the same.)

Starting this Sunday on PBS, “The Vietnam War: An Intimate History” will be a 10-part series by esteemed director Ken Burns. The idea of the project is to tell stories of the Vietnam War that differ from the standard narrative. This one is less of a strict “adaptation,” and more of a companion reader, but you won’t want to miss out! Geoffrey C. Ward wrote the screenplay and companion book, which you won’t find on the stacks in the Falvey, but it is available through Inter-library Loan.

4. “Looking for Alaska” by John Green:

“Looking for Alaska” 10th Anniversary Cover. (courtesy of johngreenbooks.com)

Break out another box of tissues for this John Green young adult novel. If the central drama of this tearjerker does not evoke strong emotions for you, then I simply don’t know what will. It doesn’t look like we’ll get to see this film before the new year, but that gives you plenty of time to check out the novel and give it a read before testing it against the adaptation.

5. “Murder on the Orient Express” by Agatha Christie:

“Murder on the Orient Express” cover, courtesy of Wikipedia.

A star-studded cast, including Penelope Cruz, Johnny Depp, and Daisy Ridley, will bring this Agatha Christie novel to life on-screen in November. Before then, you can check out our copy of the novel (which includes another four novels!). You should also be aware, however, that this is not the first adaptation of this installment of the Hercule Poirot series. It came to life three times before on screen and once as a BBC Radio series.

These are the adaptations we’re looking forward to the most at the Falvey! Which adaptations did we miss, ’Nova Nation? Are you Wildcats looking forward to seeing any of your favorite books on the big screen this year? Let us know in the comments below or via Twitter and Facebook.


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.


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’Cat in the Stacks: Five Things to Look Forward to this Semester

CAT-STAX4I’m William Repetto, a second-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is the “’Cat in the Stacks” column. I’m your ’cat. I’ll be posting about college life, about learning and growing here at Villanova, and, of course, about the Falvey Memorial Library’s role.


Third week of the semester already?! I don’t know how it’s possible, Wildcats, but the pages of the calendar seem to turn faster and faster ever onward. We already talked about kitten back to work and about adapting to a little bit of change, but this week – as we settle back into our routines – let’s look forward a little, so we know what this month has in store before it becomes another turned page on another year’s planner.

1. Fall Weather: There’s no denying it, ’Nova Nation, sweater-weather is the best weather of them all. As Labor Day has marked the unofficial end of summer, it will soon be time to put away those athletic shorts and cargos. You’ll have to break out those stylish Villanova sweaters, a few hip hoodies, and hopefully look as good as Hunter does while she’s studying:

Hunter’s not only styling this semester, but she’s looking forward to getting that master’s thesis started!

2. OneBook Celebration: If you haven’t read this year’s OneBook Villanova selection, “Acts of Faith” by Eboo Patel, I encourage you to drop whatever it is you’re doing right this instant, head over to the Falvey, check out a copy, grab an armchair in the Dugan Polk Family Reading Room, and read until your heart’s content (hint: it won’t be until the book is over, and then you’ll still want to learn more). On Tuesday, Sept. 19, Patel will join us on campus for the OneBook Dinner and a keynote lecture among other events.

3. Pumpkin Spice: Well, according to some, you needn’t wait until fall to have a pumpkin spice treat, but let’s face it; there’s no better time for a PS Latte than late September, and PS muffins seem to bring out the cheer in the early October weather. For those of you who aren’t into trendy flavors (or, indeed, seasonal cheer) there’s always the tried and true flavor of National Chocolate Day on Sept. 13.

4. Godspell: The Villanova Theatre Program impressed us all in spring semester with their excellent rendition of “Little Women.” And who could forget their production at the Abbey Theatre (excellent playwrights on that play, if I understand correctly)? Anyhow! They’re back for a new season, and they’ll be kicking off with a classic – “Godspell” – with a contemporary twist: a gender-blind casting. Opening night will be Sept. 19 at 8pm. If you stay updated with us here on the Falvey blog, you might even catch a review written by yours truly.

In honor of Hunter’s birthday, I’ve been out slaying dragons. Happy birthday, Hunter!

5. Football: The beginning of fall in the United States can hardly be discussed without talking about football. It’s a basic truth that we work hard each week in order to reach the weekend. The addition of Eagles (or insert hometown team) football each Sunday only adds spice to an already exciting part of the week. And, if you don’t really understand the rules of the game all that well (like some bloggers for particular library websites), then there’s always the social aspect! And more time with friends is always awesome.

These are five things that we’re all looking forward to! But I’m sure we all have our own various dates circled on the calendar: days of big presentations, tickets to that awesome concert, birthdays, anniversaries, etc. We’d love to know what sorts of things you’re looking forward to this semester! Drop us a line on Twitter or Facebook (or in the comment box below), and we’ll let you know how Falvey can factor into your big day.


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University. (Graphics courtesy of Bitmoji, and Hunter and I spending hours perfecting our representations!)


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Tuesday Highlighter: Chicago Manual of Style, Edition 17

Welcome to “The Highlighter,” where we’ll be exploring the various new and old services and resources available through the Falvey!


“Did you know that US lexicography even had a seamy underbelly?” Asked esteemed author David Foster Wallace in the intro of his famous essay Authority and American Usage. This essay, released in review/commentary of Bryan A. Garner’s A Dictionary of Modern American Usage, introduced the lay public to the nuanced debate of prescriptive versus descriptive grammar, conservative versus liberal usage, and the term SNOOT.

With the release of the new “Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition,” I thought it might be important to revisit one of the key questions DFW raised in his essay, not least of all because Garner himself is credited with writing full chapters of the style manual. In his (in)famous piece, DFW asks, “It’s the millennium, post-Everything: Whence the authority to make any sort of credible Appeal for SWE at all?”

The cover of the new “Chicago Manual of Style.” (Courtesy of the CMOS website, linked below.)

The answer to DFW’s question, it so turns out, is the 17th edition of the “Chicago Manual of Style.” The new edition contains updated rules on “etc,” bureaucratese, and capitalization of internet. It also contains a series of established SWE (Standard Written English) rules, such as clarifications on gerunds and infinitives (though Garner doesn’t cover split infinitives here!).

The most prominent change of all might be the elimination of “ibid.” or “ibidem” for citations of the same source.

Best of all, the interactive, online edition available through the Falvey contains each of these rules in discrete segments that make searching through the new rules navigable and manageable. Take a look at the full list of updates, available here.

(For any assistance with understanding these changes, reach out to Director of Academic Integration and History, Sociology & Criminology Liaison Librarian Jutta Seibert.)


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.


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’Cat in the Stacks: “Got a little change in my pocket…”

CAT-STAX4I’m William Repetto, a second-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is the “‘Cat in the Stacks” column. I’m your ‘cat. I’ll be posting about college life, about learning and growing here at Villanova, and, of course, about the Falvey Memorial Library’s role.


Here we are on a new day, ’Nova Nation. Your favorite Wednesday blog has become your new favorite Thursday blog. How exciting! In celebration, let’s discuss change this week. The topic seems appropriate after all; this time of the year always comes with big changes.

You’re probably settling in this week to new courses, new lodgings, and maybe even a new routine. A little change can be tough; a little change can bring big difficulties, but, most of all, change can be refreshing and open new opportunities.

Hunter’s taken up yoga as her big new school year’s change.

Take for example the changes being made here at the Falvey. The relocation of CASA to the Learning Commons, while it made us shuffle some rooms around, has definitely given the second floor a new and brighter look! It’s also opened up opportunities for us to continue providing resources apropos to our diverse patrons here at the Falvey. (I’ve even heard whispers of a topic guide catered to that end.)

On a personal level, I’m adjusting to a new role here at Villanova as a teaching intern with the English Department. The return to having classes scheduled in the middle of the day, as opposed to exclusively in the evening, has actually been an interesting jump! I’m also adjusting to being a second-year grad student: do I have good advice for my first-year colleagues? What’s next for me – the real world?

I guess change always calls to mind questions like these. New schedules and routines always make me question when I’ll have time for friends and for unwinding. New courses usually make me think: “how in the world am I supposed to get all this done?!” Keeping these questions in the back of my mind, though, usually helps me adjust to the changes in small ways.

My perception of self while I’m writing this blog. (“Because it’s for the birds?” asks Hunter… to which I make the same face as above.)

Of course some of you are thinking that life changes constantly, and adjusting to changes is the same as learning to live. I think that’s partly correct! To me, life functions on different planes, and we’re talking about the long-term plane today. We have to adjust to a new semester and a new day for the blog!

The point is this, Wildcats: while change is wonderful, it can sometimes bog you down. The Falvey staff is here to help you no matter which changes you’re adapting to. This blog particularly will be here each week to help you think about the changes as they come.


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University. (Graphics courtesy of Bitmoji, and Hunter and I spending hours perfecting our representations!)


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’Cat in the Stacks: Right Back ’Cat It

CAT-STAX4I’m William Repetto, a second-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is the “‘Cat in the Stacks” column. I’m your ‘cat. I’ll be posting about college life, about learning and growing here at Villanova, and, of course, about the Falvey Memorial Library’s role.


A year ago, I served up a Cup of Cat-’feine to celebrate the start of the school year and to start my own journey as a Wildcat. Waaay back then, the Dugan Polk Family Reading Room was in its infancy, The Sixth Extinction was on everyone’s mind, and the Falvey would close at a reasonable hour.

Outside of the Library, the campaign between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump was reaching a boiling point, the Chicago Cubs hadn’t won a World Series in over 100 years, and there were only four “Pirates of the Caribbean” movies.

Welcome to a new school year! As the description says above, I’m your “Cat in the Stacks.” I’ll be discussing quite a bit in this column this year.

But look at us now! The Dugan Polk Family Reading Room has become one of the most popular quiet-study locations on campus, Acts of Faith has become the literary talk of the town, and the Falvey will be piloting a 24/7 hours access for the fall, for those who study at decidedly unreasonable hours. (Read carefully: “piloting,” so make sure you’re on your best behavior during those late nights!)

Donald Trump has become the 45th President (though the political scene seems to remain red hot), the Chicago Cubs won a World Series just a few months ago, and now we’ve been graced with a fifth “Pirates” film – oh boy. If you had told me any of these things would come to pass about a year ago, I maybe could have guessed two out of three… I’ll let you guess which one I couldn’t predict.

Isn’t it crazy how much can change in just a single year? It makes you wonder: in one year from now, what kinds of things will we look back on that we never would have predicted? As you will get accustomed to reading this blog, I’ll tell you that this type of thinking does not apply to only the Library and the great wide world outside of Villanova; it’s a good way of thinking about the changes you yourself will undergo this school year.

This is Hunter, the other Graduate Assistant in the Falvey Communication and Marketing Department. As you can see, she’s been training very intently for this semester.

Maybe a year ago you were starting your senior year as the star quarterback of your high school, and, a year from now, you’ll be on your way to shaping the field of nursing or physics or biology. Maybe a year ago you were starting a rough first year of college and now a new major will bring energies renewed. Perhaps you just started blogging a year ago and now your new school year’s resolution is to bring even more quality posts to your readers. (Okay, that last one was maybe overly personal.)

Whether this year marks a new direction for you or a continuity down the path of life, the Falvey has some important tools to keep you going. There’s always the coffee from “Holy Grounds,” seemingly a staple of my diet. But make sure to get in touch with your subject librarian! Socialize on the first floor and buckle down in the Dugan Polk Family Reading Room.

Some things this year will be unpredictable, but the Falvey can definitely help you prepare.


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University. (Graphics courtesy of Bitmoji, and Hunter and I spending hours perfecting our representations!)


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Last Modified: August 23, 2017