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Weekend Recs: Thanksgiving Specials

Happy Friday, Wildcats! Falvey Memorial Library is delivering you another semester of Weekend Recs, a blog dedicated to filling you in on what to read, listen to, and watch over the weekend. Annie, a graduate assistant from the Communication department, scours the internet, peruses the news, and digs through book stacks to find new, relevant, and thought-provoking content that will challenge you and prepare you for the upcoming week. 

Yesterday, families across the country celebrated Thanksgiving. For many, the holiday involved traditions like a roast turkey, cranberry sauce, baked mac and cheese, pie, and football. I’ll admit, Thanksgiving is by no means my favorite holiday, but one Thanksgiving tradition has my full support: Thanksgiving specials on television and in film. For this weekend’s recs, I’ve compiled a list of some of the best, or perhaps my favorite, Thanksgiving-themed specials (that aren’t the obligatory A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving) to wrap-up the November holiday season.

If you have 18 minutes and 36 seconds…and want to take part in a Thanksgiving musical tradition, listen to Arlo Guthrie’s song “Alice’s Restaurant Massacree.” Although the song’s length makes it somewhat of a feat, it’s worth one listen around the Thanksgiving season. (Although if my mom had it her way, it would be on a continuous loop on Thanksgiving Thursday).

If you have 21 minutes…and are a Constance Wu admirer, watch Fresh Off the Boat’s first Thanksgiving episode, “Huangsgivng.” It accurately portrays some of the pre-Thanksgiving stress, and Randall Park and Constance Wu are, as always, great.

If you have 22 minutes…and love Friends, watch “The One with the Football.” As a sitcom, Friends has a host of Thanksgiving episodes, but this one shakes it up a bit by focusing on Thanksgiving’s football tradition.

If you have another 22 minutes…and are a fellow Bob’s Burgers fan, watch “Dawn of the Peck.” The Thanksgiving specials of Bob’s Burgers are always worth the watch, but “Dawn of the Peck” features some less standard Thanksgiving conventions, including a Thanksgiving race, vengeful (living) turkeys, and Donna Summer.

If you have 1 hour and 24 minutes…and want a sprinkle of romance in your Thanksgiving queue, watch Spike Lee’s first feature film, She’s Gotta Have It. It’s an offbeat comedy, quirky in that signature Spike Lee way. (Lee also made a Netflix series version of the film).

If you have 1 hour and 34 minutes…and want to watch a relatively anti-colonialist take on Thanksgiving (at least for the 90s), watch Addams Family Values. The privileged youth summer camp’s Thanksgiving play gets quite the Wednesday Addams reckoning. (Plus, Joan Cusack is an absolute treasure in this movie).

If you have 2 hours and 9 minutes…and want to watch something only tangentially related to Thanksgiving, watch The Blind Side (also available in Falvey’s DVD Collection, if you’re currently on campus). It only has one brief Thanksgiving dinner scene, but it’s brimming with family and football.


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library.


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Weekend Recs: COP27 and the Climate Crisis

Happy Friday, Wildcats! Falvey Memorial Library is delivering you another semester of Weekend Recs, a blog dedicated to filling you in on what to read, listen to, and watch over the weekend. Annie, a graduate assistant from the Communication department, scours the internet, peruses the news, and digs through book stacks to find new, relevant, and thought-provoking content that will challenge you and prepare you for the upcoming week. 

Today is the last (official) day of COP27, an annual international climate conference spearheaded by the United Nations. The conference allows world leaders, national representatives, and key climate activists to engage with the international problem of global warming and its various (and vast) environmental effects. This weekend’s rec will catch you up to speed on some of the key COP27 takeaways and climate change news.

If you have 7 minutes…and don’t know much about the conference, read this New York Times guide to COP27. Its Q&A format is perfect for those who may be unfamiliar. (This BBC guide is also very helpful).

If you have 10 minutes…and need some (rare) positive climate and environment news, read this article about how conservation efforts in Mexico has led to the return of jaguars to the Yucatan region.

If you have another 10 minutes…and are a visual learner, check out this article highlighting climate crisis photography. It truly showcases the good, the bad, and the ugly truths of global warming while managing to capture the beauty of the world around us.

Bonus: check out this video of President Biden talking at COP27.

If you have 15 minutes…and want to know a major takeaway from the conference, read this article from the New York Times. Developing nations, which are often the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change, are calling for the biggest emissions producers to pay for the damage.

Bonus: check out this article for an overview of how some of the world’s biggest emitters, including the United States, are actually fairing in comparison to their proposed goals.

If you have 2 hours and 25 minutes…and want to commiserate in some of your  climate denial frustration, watch Netflix’s Don’t Look Up (2021). By now, I imagine many of you have already watched this, but it’s worth a re-watch, especially after recent events.

If you have 16 hours…and want to read a collection of essays on the climate crisis from experts and some hopeful solutions, read Greta Thunberg’s new book, The Climate Book.


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library.


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Weekend Recs: Dark Academia

Happy Friday, Wildcats! Falvey Memorial Library is delivering you another semester of Weekend Recs, a blog dedicated to filling you in on what to read, listen to, and watch over the weekend. Annie, a graduate assistant from the Communication department, scours the internet, peruses the news, and digs through book stacks to find new, relevant, and thought-provoking content that will challenge you and prepare you for the upcoming week. 

Photo by Henry Be on Unsplash

Freshly shined oxfords, leather-bound books, knee-high socks, secret societies, argyle sweater vests, Greek mythology, and plaid, lots of plaid. The dark academia genre of literature and media blends a romanticization of academia, especially the Classics, with a plot rife with mystery, murder, romance, and intrigue. Since it’s growth in the 1980s and 1990s, it has also become a thriving Internet subculture and, more recently, a mod aesthetic on social media. For the interested or unaware, this weekend’s recs will help you explore the dark academia subculture.

If you have 5 minutes…and know nothing about dark academia, check out L’Officiel‘s dark academia guide. The article discusses dark academia both as a social media trend, rooted in a dark prep aesthetic, and a thriving subculture.

If you have 7 minutes…and want a grounded glimpse into dark academia, read this article from the New York Times. Pamela Paul is able to balance the elegant and, perhaps misguidedly, nostalgic allure of dark academia with the current, less glamorous realities of modern academia.

If you have 10 minutes…and aren’t aware of some of the common critiques of dark academia, read this article. The main critique of dark academia is its overwhelming whiteness, which often can discourage and marginalize People of Color within the subculture (This article also helps shed light on these criticisms).

If you have 15 minutes…and want to hear how a Black queer woman negotiates a love for dark academia with its Eurocentric tendencies, read Mel Monier’s “Too Dark for Dark Academia?” essay. Monier’s essay is both a firsthand critique and a hopeful love letter to dark academia (and truly worth the read).

If you have 20 minutes…and are interested in exploring or adopting the dark academia lifestyle for yourself, check out this style and subculture guide. It provides some big-sister-style advice for getting into the dark academia subculture, including outfit ideas, shopping and styling tips, and movie and book recommendations.

If you have 1 hour and 45 minutes…and are in the mood for a based-on-a-true-story dark academia film, watch Kill Your Darlings, available online through Falvey. The film follows the poets Allen Ginsburg (played by Daniel Radcliffe) and Lucien Carr (played by Dane DeHaan) as they attend Columbia University and get wrapped up in a plot of murder, romance, and poetry.

If you have 12 hours…and are looking for a queer dark academic novel, read Victoria Lee’s A Lesson in Vengeance, available through Interlibrary Loan. This modern take on dark academia centers (obviously) academia, queer romance, secrecy, and the occult.

Bonus: If you want to get some POC-centered dark academia book recommendations, check out this list.

If you have a free weekend…and want to read a dark academic cult classic, read Donna Tartt’s The Secret History, available through Interlibrary Loan. Set in (my favorite state) Vermont, the novel features Classical academia and a murder mystery.

Bonus: Check out this list of dark academia literature essentials for more book recommendations.


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library.


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Weekend Recs: Native American Heritage Month

Happy Friday, Wildcats! Falvey Memorial Library is delivering you another semester of Weekend Recs, a blog dedicated to filling you in on what to read, listen to, and watch over the weekend. Annie, a graduate assistant from the Communication department, scours the internet, peruses the news, and digs through book stacks to find new, relevant, and thought-provoking content that will challenge you and prepare you for the upcoming week. 

The beginning of November marks the start of Native American Heritage Month. Before European colonization and genocide, the Americas had a thriving expanse of Indigenous cultures and communities, including the Philadelphia region. Centuries later, Pennsylvania remains one of the few states that does not include a reservation or officially recognize an Indigenous tribe within its borders, despite its Indigenous history. In celebration of Native American Heritage Month, this weekend’s recs seek to elevate Indigenous and Native American content and voices.

If you have 23 seconds…and want to check out an Indigenous activist and content creator, watch this TikTok from IndigenousIcon.

If you have 50 seconds…and are curious about the braids that some Native American cultures wear, watch this TikTok. In some Indigenous cultures, hair is extremely important, and the three strands of a braid represent mind, body, and spirit.

If you have 5 minutes…and don’t know about the horrific history of Indigenous residential schools in the US, read this article in TIME. This article gives key background and perspective on these brutal “schools.”

If you have another 5 minutes…and haven’t heard about the upcoming challenge to the Indian Child Welfare Act, read this article. It provides some explanation about the law and why it is so important for it to be upheld.

If you have 7 minutes…and are interested in climate activism, read this article about Indigenous climate action from the New York Times. This opinion piece, which discussed the Global Alliance of Territorial Communities, emphasizes the importance of centering Indigenous voices in climate change activism.

If you have another 7 minutes…and want to learn more about the history of the Indigenous people native to Philadelphia, read this article about the Lenape. The greater Philadelphia area, including Villanova, has a rich indigenous history and rests on Lenape land.

If you have 10 minutes…and want to learn about the ongoing Lenape struggle to be welcomed and recognized in Pennsylvania, read this article. (This article also helps shed further light on the situation).

Bonus: if you want to read about local efforts, read about this initiative Ursinus College, my alma mater, started to help Lenape people reconnect with their roots.

If you have 42 minutes…and want to hear some Native American perspectives on the history of Thanksgiving, listen to “The Thanksgiving Episode” of the Toasted Sister Podcast. This podcast, created and hosted by Andi Murphy, centers on Native American food and chefs, blending discussions of Indigenous history, culture, and experience with culinary expertise.

If you have 1 hour and 30 minutes…and want to watch a Native American cult classic, watch Smoke Signals, available through Falvey’s DVD Collection. Although the film is not perfect by any means, it’s an enjoyable coming-of-age film that allowed Indigenous people to see themselves in theaters and on screen in the late 1990s.

Bonus: if you want to watch some other Indigenous-made films, check out this list.

If you have a free weekend…and want to binge-watch a highly praised Indigenous-made television show, watch Reservation Dogs. This crime dramedy, created by Sterlin Harjo and Taika Waititi, features of host of talented Indigenous actors and production team and follows a California-bound group of Native American teenagers.


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library.


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Weekend Recs: Final Girl Trope

Happy Friday, Wildcats! Falvey Memorial Library is delivering you another semester of Weekend Recs, a blog dedicated to filling you in on what to read, listen to, and watch over the weekend. Annie, a graduate assistant from the Communication department, scours the internet, peruses the news, and digs through book stacks to find new, relevant, and thought-provoking content that will challenge you and prepare you for the upcoming week. 

With Halloween right around the corner, horror movies are in season. Over the weekend, horror movies will likely fill up cable television runtime, streaming service recommendations, and, as we’ve already seen over the past month, movie theaters. As it may become clear to anyone watching horror, new or old, the Final Girl trope stands out as a lasting genre cliche, albeit with some updated takes. This weekend’s recs will explore the Final Girl trope and help you conclude this spooky season with a bang.

If you have 10 minutes…and are unfamiliar with the Final Girl trope, read this No Film School article. This article is a great introduction to the trope for any newcomers and an interesting (and short) read for fans.

If you have you have 34 minutes…and want to learn how the trope has evolved over the years, watch this Youtube video essay by Naomi Cannibal. She delves into the history of the Scream Queens and Final Girl tropes with some of the the most iconic historic and modern examples to date.

If you have 1 hour and 20 minutes…and want to check out a great horror movie podcast, check out Dead Meat Podcast’s “Final Girl” episode. Dead Meat is one of the best content creators for all things horror, and this episode is an enjoyable listen.

If you have 1 hour and 32 minutes…and want to check out a film that blends the best elements of campy old slashers with a comedic, self-aware twist, watch The Final Girls. It follows in the footsteps of films like Scream and Cabin in the Woods while poking fun at the Final Girl trope.

If you have 1 hour and 40 minutes…and want to check out my personal favorite Final Girl, watch Wes Craven’s Scream. This movie put the life (or death) back into the dwindling slasher sub-genre, and Sidney Prescott exemplifies a truly formidable Final Girl.

If you have 1 hour and 50 minutes…and want to see an early Final Girl prototype, watch the Alfred Hitchcock’s classic horror-thriller Psycho, available in Falvey’s DVD Collection. This movie blends the Scream Queen and Final Girl trope together and even if you are aware of the iconic shower scene and the villain’s psychology, still manages to be eerie and intriguing.

If you have 5 hours…and want to interact with some (slightly) less scary Final Girl content, read Neil Gaiman’s Coraline. This book, and the movie adaptation, gives a family-friendly twist to the horror genre, and Coraline certainly fits in the Final Girl category.

If you have 6 hours…and want to read the book that first coined the term “Final Girl,” read Carol Clover’s Men, Women, and Chain Saws: Gender in the Modern Horror Film, available online through Falvey.


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library.


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Weekend Recs: Iranian Protests

Happy Friday, Wildcats! Falvey Memorial Library is delivering you another semester of Weekend Recs, a blog dedicated to filling you in on what to read, listen to, and watch over the weekend. Annie, a graduate assistant from the Communication department, scours the internet, peruses the news, and digs through book stacks to find new, relevant, and thought-provoking content that will challenge you and prepare you for the upcoming week. 

Over the past month, protests in Iran have been raging after the death of an Iran-born Kurdish young woman, Jîna Amini, also known by her Iranian legal name Mahsa Amini. This sparked global conversations about women’s rights. Although protests were provoked by Amini’s murder and focused on Iran’s treatment of women, many protestors are broadly calling for an overthrow of the current regime. This weekend’s recs will give you an overview of some key information and context about what is currently happening in Iran.

If you have 5 minutes…and need a basic overview of the Iran situation, read this BBC article. It will answer any questions about the situation for those who may not be caught up.

If you have another 5 minutes…and can’t imagine your life without the Internet, read this article about how the Iranian government is shutting down Iranian citizens’ access to the Internet, heavily suppressing their message.

If you have 7 minutes…and don’t know the turbulent history between Iran and the U.S., read this article from The Hill. The U.S. inadvertently played a major role in the current regimes rise to power, and as much of our conflicts in the Middle East, it was triggered by oil interests.

If you have another 7 minutes…and are wondering why I am referring to Mahsa Amini as Jîna, read this opinion piece. “Mahsa”  was the legal Iranian name given to her, while “Jîna” was her Kurdish name, a key facet often overlooked in media coverage. It is very possible that her Kurdish ethnicity played a role in her murder.

If you have 10 minutes…and want to learn more about Amini’s death that sparked global protests, read this New York Times article. Her death was the result of Iran’s strict “morality” laws, which strip women of the right to choose whether to practice hijab or not.

If you have another 10 minutes…and want to learn more about the response of the Iranian people, read this New York Times article. The article specifically focuses on how young people have been the driving force behind recent protests.

If you have 12 minutes…and are wondering how the Iranian military regime has responded to protests, read this article from the New York Times. The Iranian regime’s security forces remain supportive of the current regime and have stifled protests.

Photo by Neil Webb on Unsplash

If you have 15 minutes…and want to hear the stories of two girls who were killed as a result of protesting the death of Mahsa “Jîna” Amini, read this New York Times article. Nika Shakarami and Sarina Esmailzadeh are just two girls of many who have been brutalized in the military response to the protests.

If you have another 15 minutes…and want to learn some basic history on the Kurds in Iran, read this article. Despite the Iranian government’s harsh and violent treatment of all women, Amini’s Kurdish identity is something that should not be erased, and Iran has a long history with the Kurds.

If you have 1 hour and 32 minutes…and want to check out a documentary about women’s rights activism in Iran, watch NASRIN, available online through Falvey. This 2020 documentary highlights the story of Nasrin Sotoudeh, an Iranian political prisoner and women’s rights activist.

If you have 1 hour and 41 minutes…and want to learn about international women’s rights and girl’s global access to education, watch Girl Rising, also available online through Falvey. Girl Rising is a documentary that features the stories of 9 girls around the world as they share their stories.


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library.


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Weekend Recs: Self-Care

 

Happy Friday, Wildcats! Falvey Memorial Library is delivering you another semester of Weekend Recs, a blog dedicated to filling you in on what to read, listen to, and watch over the weekend. Annie, a graduate assistant from the Communication department, scours the internet, peruses the news, and digs through book stacks to find new, relevant, and thought-provoking content that will challenge you and prepare you for the upcoming week.

As Fall Break comes to a close, it may be easy to mourn the loss of your free time and feel stressed for what is to come. While (sadly), we can’t exactly change our upcoming workloads and schedules, we can take a moment to breathe and take care of ourselves before it gets overwhelming. This weekend’s recs are some of my self-care favorites to keep you rejuvenated as you enter the semester once more (but even if none of these are your cup of tea, I still hope you are able to take some time to prioritize your own self-care).

If you have 49 seconds…and are dealing with negative thoughts, watch this soothing and uplifting TikTok. It might not cure you of all the negativity swirling around in your (I’m sure beautiful and capable) brain, but it might be a helpful reminder when you’re struggling.

If you have 4 minutes…and want to relax with an oddly calming classic Internet video, watch “MARCEL THE SHELL WITH SHOES ON.” Perhaps an early version of ASMR, Marcel the Shell is an oddly endearing sentient clay-mation seashell with a small voice (provided by the very talented Jenny Slate) and positive vibes.

If you have 5 minutes…and need to do something tactile, play with some putty (slime’s less messy cousin). I use Crazy Aaron’s Thinking Putty, which comes in a wide variety of colors, textures, and scents. (Also, if you can get your hands on one, Falvey’s stress balls are great).

If you have 15 minutes…and want to learn more about self-care and what it looks like for others, read this New York Times article. It might give you some ideas for new self-care practices you could work into your own routine.

If you have 20 minutes…and need to find a new calming soundtrack, listen to Alice Kristiansen’s recent album Memos from Maine. “Lucid Dreaming” and “Oregon” are my particular favorites for taking a few minutes for myself. (And of course, Hozier’s self titled album is also great for calming any nerves).

If you have 1 hour…and need to get your endorphins pumping, go on a walk or a hike. If you don’t want to leave campus, check out Villanova’s self-guided tree tour. It’ll take you on a walk around campus and show you some interesting greenery.

If you have 2 hours…and need to throw something on in the background, watch one of your comfort movies or TV shows (perhaps from Falvey’s DVD Collection). Addams Family Values is my favorite comfort film, especially during October. Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing is a more recent comfort movie of mine (even though it’s not entirely comforting).

If you have 8 hours…and have been bogged down with reading for classes, read a book for fun. Although we might be a bit biased at Falvey, reading something you actually enjoy might help rekindle your love for reading (or at least make it seem less like a chore), while keeping your brain active. Sarah Dessen’s Just Listen has been a comfort book of mine since middle school.

Bonus: If you want to set-up a good habit for the rest of the semester, join Falvey’s Mindfulness Monday virtual session this Monday, Oct. 17. Campus Ministries will lead us through a guided meditation/mindfulness exercise that will leave you feeling less stressed.


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library.


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Weekend Recs: Spooky Season

 

Happy Friday, Wildcats! Falvey Memorial Library is delivering you another semester of Weekend Recs, a blog dedicated to filling you in on what to read, listen to, and watch over the weekend. Annie, a graduate assistant from the Communication department, scours the internet, peruses the news, and digs through book stacks to find new, relevant, and thought-provoking content that will challenge you and prepare you for the upcoming week. 

It might not be Halloween yet, but as far as I’m concerned (and according to Freeform‘s “31 Nights of Halloween” programming), the first day of October marks the beginning of spooky season. Even if you hate spooky things, the season still brings sweater weather, pumpkin-flavored treats, and Fall Break with it. Plus, I am a firm believer that there is at least one Tim Burton movie out there for everyone. For a whole week without classes, as Fall Break begins tomorrow, here are some recs to help you get in the spirit of the season.

If you have 15 seconds…and want to reminisce on spooky season in the 2000s, watch this TikTok. Halloweentown marathons and spooky Kid Cuisines definitely make me nostalgic.

If you have 28 minutes…and think the characters in horror movies always make the worst decisions, watch this Youtube video about how to survive the recent vampire flick The Invitation, (beware: there are spoilers), and check out the rest of the channel for other videos on how to survive all of your favorite scary movies.

If you have 45 minutes…and are in the mood for a scary podcast that might send shivers down your spine, listen to a Let’s Read episode. This episode is Halloween-themed, but scroll through the channel to find stories with a number of different spooky twists, including ghosts, stalkers, murderers, and cryptids.

If you have 1 hour…and want to try out some Halloween-inspired recipes, try a recipe from this cookbook. They may be a bit silly, but they look delicious and might get you into the Halloween spirit.

Bonus: if you’re looking for a simple dessert you can try out in your dorm kitchen, check out this Halloween cookie-cake recipe from TikTok.

If you have 1 hour and 45 minutes…and want to give yourself a dose of nostalgia, watch Hocus Pocus 2 on Disney+. Hocus Pocus is one of the most iconic Halloween movies of all-time, and I have high hopes for the sequel.

If you have 4 hours…and want to experience an interactive cult classic (or live out your The Perks of Being a Wallflower fantasy), find a screening of The Rocky Horror Picture Show near you. Philly is a great Rocky Horror hub in October, and if you’ve never been to a live screening, it’s quite the experience. I know I will be at the Oct. 15 screening at the Colonial Theater in Phoenixville.

If you have another 4 hours…and want to get your steps for the day in…visit a local corn maze with some friends. If you’re heading out West toward Lancaster, Cherry Crest Adventure Farm has been one of the highest rated mazes in recent years. I have personally gone to Wilcox Farms, located in Boyertown, (and gotten lost in their previous corn mazes).

Bonus: if you want to get some steps in and get scared while doing so, visit a local scary Halloween attraction. Field of Screams is a major attraction that typically garners a crowd, and The Valley of Fear is usually pretty fun, especially if you have some squeamish friends.

If you have 6 hours…and want to learn about some Halloween history, read Nicholas Roger’s Halloween: From Pagan Ritual to Party Night. This one is for all my history buffs.

If you have 8 hours…and want to brush-up on the classic thrillers, read Stephen King’s The Shining or virtually any other Stephen King novel. (Misery is also a good, less supernatural option). Hearing his name in the month of October may seem cliche to some, but there is a good reason that he is a horror household name.

Bonus: put DCDE’s Halloween Haunts event on your calendar for Oct. 31. The event will feature some of the most festive items from Distinctive Collections and some delicious (free) Halloween treats.


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library.


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Weekend Recs: Artificial Intelligence

Happy Friday, Wildcats! Falvey Memorial Library is delivering you another semester of Weekend Recs, a blog dedicated to filling you in on what to read, listen to, and watch over the weekend. Annie, a graduate assistant from the Communication department, scours the internet, peruses the news, and digs through book stacks to find new, relevant, and thought-provoking content that will challenge you and prepare you for the upcoming week. 

AI, or artificial intelligence, is becoming a more and more prevalent topic in the U.S. What once was a sci-fi work of fiction is now a very real possibility, albeit (likely and hopefully) less dystopian. Although the AI we see today is far from the likes of films such as Smart House, The Matrix, or Tau, it still raises some interesting questions and concerns. This weekends’ recs will help you enter the AI conversation.

If you have 1 minute…and want to see AI at work for yourself, watch this TikTok. It features a filter that uses AI to generate a background based on what words you type (which you can test yourself).

If you have 10 minutes…and don’t know a lot about AI, read Guru99′s guide to AI. It gives important background and basic information about AI.

If you have another 10 minutes…and are interested in a recent AI-related controversy, read this New York Times article about an AI-generated digital painting winning an award at an art competition. This certainly is a fitting example of the popular concern that AI might eventually replace human labor.

If you have 15 minutes…and are a mental health proponent, read this New York Times article about an AI therapy bot (that surprisingly performed decently well, all things considered).

If you have 20 minutes…and have some questions on AI sentience, read this New York Times article. It might debunk some common misconceptions about just how “human” AI actually can be.

If you have 30 minutes…and want to read a thought-provoking piece on the ways in which social biases are often inadvertently coded in AI technology, read “Engineered Inequity: Are Robots Racist” from Ruha Benjamin’s book Race after Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code. This chapter genuinely changed the way in which I think about AI for the better. Just because something is becoming “more human” does not make it better.

If you have 2 hours and 20 minutes…and want to cross a cinematic classic off your list, watch 2001: A Space Odyssey. If you’re a sci-fi fan, Stanley Kubrick enthusiast, or just an enjoyer of good movies, this is definitely worth a watch.

If you have 12 or more hours…and are into story-based video games, play (or watch a playthrough of) Detroit: Become Human. This game, set in 2026 Detroit, features the rise of AI androids in the American workforce. It’s basically a sci-fi movie that you can play, and it touches on some of the (realistic or not) concerns many have with the rise of AI technology.


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 

 

 


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Weekend Recs: Deaf Culture

Happy Friday, Wildcats! Falvey Memorial Library is delivering you another semester of Weekend Recs, a blog dedicated to filling you in on what to read, listen to, and watch over the weekend. Annie, a graduate assistant from the Communication department, scours the internet, peruses the news, and digs through book stacks to find new, relevant, and thought-provoking content that will challenge you and prepare you for the upcoming week.

Did you know that Deaf people have their own culture? Although often labeled as a disability by hearing society at large, Deaf people are fighting back against this notion. Instead, they contend that their supposed “disability” is actually the foundation of a rich culture here in the U.S. and elsewhere. In celebration of International Week of Deaf People, this weekend’s recs will highlight some key aspects of Deaf culture.

If you have 1 minute…and are unsure about the correct terminology, watch this TikTok. It explains why “Deaf” is the preferred label, and why “hearing impaired” can be viewed as offensive or outdated.

If you have 3 minutes…and want to check out some music made by a Deaf artist, listen to “Hanaa!,” or any song by Signmark. He is a Deaf rapper from Finland who often signs while he raps.

If you have 5 minutes…and are wondering how Deaf culture differs from hearing culture, read this article that explains some of the differences.

If you have 7 minutes…and were wondering why the “D” in Deaf is often capitalized, read this article about how people identify themselves as a part of the Deaf community. Spoiler: deaf and Deaf do not mean the same thing, and not all deaf people identify as Deaf.

If you have 10 minutes…and have some questions about deafness and Deaf culture, browse this Deaf culture FAQ page. It might save you from a potentially awkward or embarrassing interaction or from bothering a deaf person with frequently asked questions.

If you have 15 minutes…and want to learn more about the fight for a Deaf president at the only Deaf-centric university in the world, watch this TED Talk with Irisa MacAulay. Warning: although Irisa, the presenter, gives an absolutely amazing talk, the camera often switches angles, making it difficult to understand her ASL without using subtitles or listening to the interpreter.

If you have 1 hour and 35 minutes…and like (corny) old horror movies, watch Deafula. The film features ASL as the primary language with an English dub for hearing people and is available through inter-library loan.

If you have 1 hour and 51 minutes…and want to watch a more recent movie that showcases Deaf culture, watch CODA. This award-winning film specifically focuses on the story of a CODA (Child of a Deaf Adult) who discovers her passion for music.

If you have 12 or more hours…and want a deep-dive into Deaf history, read Gannon’s Deaf Heritage: A Narrative History of Deaf America. The book moves through Deaf history in America by decade and even features an entire chapter dedicated to Deaf humor.


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library.


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Last Modified: September 23, 2022