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Distinctive Collections – Preserving our most valued past

By Nathaniel Haeberle-Gosweiler

Villanova University has a lot of history. However, some students and patrons are not aware just how much history is kept by the office of Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement (DCDE) at Falvey Memorial Library. Located on the second floor of the library, DCDE archives and displays books, articles, and artifacts that preserve and maintain history and cultural heritage.

Many people would be surprised what is available to view upon appointment, leading to experiences that Michael Foight, Director of Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement, says are critical for Villanova’s globally-minded students.

“The experience of touching an item that is hundreds if not thousands of years old can change a person’s life. It creates an appreciation of the ephemeral nature of our digital lives. Often it leads to students thinking about how to preserve their communication, whether that be emails or even tweets, for their children and generations to come,” he explains.

Maintaining this collection, containing thousands of historically valuable and culturally important materials, is just one more way Falvey Memorial Library provides a valuable context to academic research.

“For faculty, being able to talk about the history of printing calls to mind the period in which those people were teaching. For example, being able to peruse the first edition of St. Augustine’s The Confessions can lend students increased historical sensitivity when they are reading the book. Teachers making assignments with those artifacts, including transcribing or translating documents, gives back to the greater historical culture,” Michael Foight adds.


Here are some of the notable inclusions of the collections from DCDE, many of which might just surprise you!


What’s the oldest item in the Distinctive Collections?

cunniform tabletA Sumerian clay cuneiform tablet, est. 2000 B.C.E., detailing the taxes paid on a cow!

 

What are the most requested items in Distinctive Collections?

Sherman's legendary frock

Special Collections:

  • William T. Sherman’s frock coat from 1864 (pictured above)
  • Gregor Mendel’s Experiments on Plant Hybridization paper
  • Codex Atlanticus / Leonardo da Vinci (facsimile)
  • John Maynard Keynes’sThe economic consequences of the peace

    Reap Collection:
     
  • Commemorative Box with Sake cup—Celebrating the Invasion of Nanking, China–Seabag

    University Archives Collections:
  • Belle Air yearbooks
  • Commencement Programs
  • Villanovan issues

Nate GosweilerNathaniel Haeberle-Gosweiler is a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Department at Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in Communication at Villanova University.


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Holiday destinations: the long and short of it

Sometimes we need background information for a speech or project. Maybe we need to become familiar with a subject before seeking in-depth, scholarly information. Sometimes, we just need a very short introduction. That’s where Oxford University Press’ “Very Short Introductions,” published since 1995, can help. very short introductions cover

Over 400 of these concise, printed, pithy “pocket-portable introductory lectures” (Guardian Review) covering such topics as archaeology, arts & architecture, biography, business & management, economics & finance history, language & linguistics, law, literature, mathematics & sciences, medicine & health, music, sociology, philosophy, politics, psychology & neuroscience, religion & bibles, and the social sciences can be found at Falvey.

Take one home, before you leave for Thanksgiving break!

Author specifics prove that although the introductions are short, the scholarship and authority behind them is not. Noted authors in many fields have contributed to these short successful volumes about the world.

As a prominent reviewer described one of the series titles “The brevity of this volume is both its strength and its weakness,” judge for yourself.

Find out more about “Very Short Introductions” (VSI) at You Tube. Or learn more from one of the VSI study guides at Oxford University Press.

Newest Additions

The latest editions in our collection are below Click the authors’ names to find their other, more detailed, publications:

Coffee-Long Stories

Falvey has other shorts as well. Try a short story.

Need some help?  There’s always the Short Story Index (EBSCO).

Short stories can provide a hint of other places. Henry James said, “It should be a little gem of bright, quick, vivid form.”  The Library has online and print short stories under many subjects, languages and translations – for example, Short stories, Irish., Short stories, Latin American.,  Short stories, American., Short stories, Ukrainian > Translations into English., Short stories, African > Translations into English.,  Short stories, Arabic > Translations into English. Better yet, suggest a quality story you have read and want Falvey to consider acquiring.

No Time? No Problem!

Need something even  shorter?  Try the many forms of poetry in the Falvey catalog.  Remember, poetry is “The Rhymical Creation of Beauty” – Edgar Allan Poe.


Merrill Stein is Social Sciences Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.


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New Resources: Taylor and Francis Collections

The Villanova community now also has access to many journals that were previously unavailable. Falvey Library recently acquired three large collections from Taylor and Francis.taylor and francis website

Previously, the library subscribed to fewer than 200 Taylor and Francis journals. But now, Villanovans have access to the complete Social Science and Humanities Library (~1,400 titles), the Science and Technology Library (~500 titles), and the Medical Library (~190 titles).  These collections contain articles published since 1997.


Alfred Fry is Science & Engineering Librarian at Falvey Library.


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New Resources: Forbes Magazine, Fortune Magazine

people working at notebooks on computers

Photo by Helloquence on Unsplash.

The library recently added two foundational business magazine archives to our collection: Forbes and Fortune.

Our coverage of Fortune, founded by Henry Luce, begins with the first issue published during the Great Depression in 1930. Fortune was recognized for departing from dry and statistic heavy business reporting by using images and words to communicate “the dignity and beauty, and smartness and excitement of modern industry” (Miller, 2003).

Steve Forbes, the current editor in chief and great grandson of founder Bertie Charles Forbes, remarked that since 1917 Forbes has “always focus[ed] on the people” and the other constant is Forbes unwavering commitment to “provid[ing] the tools for people who want to get ahead, who want to do business, who want to invest”(Talking Biz, 2017).Forbes Cover

These collections can be used as primary sources for American studies, journalism and business history in general including company histories, wealth studies, as well as for chronicling economic and management trends.  Forbes lists (Billions, Highest Paid, Best Employers and Fortune rankings (Most Admired, Greatest Leaders & 500) are often used as jumping off points by scholars, but the content of Fortune and Forbes magazines are also the subject of numerous scholarly studies in different disciplines including the following:

The full text of both magazines is searchable. Fortune offers some additional nice search features, such as limiting to advertisements, illustrations, and cover stories. Forbes supports searching by some features, such as quotations or poems or images.

Access to these databases is from the Journal Finder or a Books and more search.  Dedicated links are also posted on the Business Subject page.


Linda Hauck is the Business Librarian at Falvey Library.

Works Cited


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New Resources for LGBTQ Research: LGBT Magazine Archive and LGBTQ Thought and Culture

LGBTQ Resources ScreenshotThe library has recently purchased access to two essential LGBTQ+ research resources: Alexander Street’s LGBT Thought and Culture and Proquest’s LGBT Magazine archive. These new additions will greatly bolster the University’s LGBTQ+ research resources and help fill important gaps in our LGBTQ+ and Gender and Women’s Studies collections.

LGBT Thought and Culture provides coverage of the essential works and archival documents of the global LGBTQ+ movement. It includes the Pat Rocco and Jeanne Cordova collections, which contain speeches, correspondences, and ephemeral from these important LGBTQ+ activists. The collection also includes the Magnus Hirshfeld collection, which includes professional correspondence, confidential reports, and court documents from the renowned early 20th century sex researcher.

The collection includes a huge array of limiters including subject heading, archival collections, and media-type, allowing researchers to hone in on very specific aspects of LGBTQ+ culture. Whenever possible the resource includes a high definition direct scan of the source material with a sidebar table of contents for the scanned resource.

The LGBT Magazine Archive feature full coverage of 26 of the most influential LGBTQ+ magazine and newspapers. This archive also includes, for the first time, the entire run of the Advocate from its inception in 1967 to the present. The ProQuest interface allows researchers to search all the tiles simultaneously or restrict their searching to a specific title or titles. A place of publication limiter also allows researchers to search by region.

Both resources will provide researchers with long overdue access to a huge store of LGBTQ+ primary resources.

For any research-related questions regarding LGBTQ+ or gender studies, contact Susan Turkel,  the Sociology & Criminology, Global Interdisciplinary Studies, and Gender & Women’s Studies librarian.


Rob LeBlanc is First year Experience Librarian at Falvey Library.


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Falvey Brown Bag Lunch Series: Fall 2019

Please join us for the Falvey Brown Bag Lunch Series. Sessions will begin at 12:00 p.m. in Falvey’s room 205.

Text Analysis 101 (Tuesday, Sept. 24)

Analyzing textual data with computational tools can aid in both reading and interpretation, allowing us to discover patterns and trends across large volumes of text. Come learn more about text analysis and introductory software for text and data mining like AntConc and Voyant Tools. Session will be led by Librarian Erica Hayes.

Measures of Impact (Wednesday, Sept. 25)

Learn about impact factors, fake impact factors, other citation measures, and altmetrics. (Also offered Oct. 29). Session will be led by Librarians Deborah Bishov and Alfred Fry.

Affordable Materials Project @ Villanova University (Wednesday, Oct. 2)

Join us for a discussion about library supported (licensed books and articles, copyright “fair use”, course reserves and OER) and bookstore offered (early adoption, Follett Discover, course packs) mechanisms for keeping a check on the cost of course materials. Session will be led by Librarian Linda Hauck and Bernadette Mania, Villanova Bookstore Course Materials Manager. Preregistration required: https://bit.ly/2jZS1ae

You may also join this session remotely via Zoom: https://villanova.zoom.us/j/496692906

Capturing the Web: Introduction to Web Archiving (Thursday, Oct. 3)

Get a foundational view of web archiving and learn ways to leverage the Wayback Machine and other web preservation tools in your scholarship and teaching. Session will be led by Archivist Beaudry Allen.

Data Visualization with Tableau (Wednesday, Oct. 16, Griffin Room, 10:00 a.m.)

What makes a good data visualization? In this session, we will discuss how to tell a compelling story using effective visual elements. We will also provide a gentle introduction to using Tableau Desktop Public, a free software that allows individuals to publish interactive data visualizations on the web. Session will be led by Librarian Erica Hayes.

Open Educational Resources (Wednesday, Oct. 23) 

Open Educational Resources (OER) can reduce textbook costs for students and push publishers to reconsider their textbook publishing models. If you are not entirely satisfied with the textbook you are using and are interested in learning about options, this workshop is for you! Session will be led by Librarians Linda Hauck and Sarah Hughes. Preregistration required: https://bit.ly/2kyNg7O

You may also join this session remotely via Zoom: https://villanova.zoom.us/j/887238686

The 2020 Census (Wednesday, Oct. 23, Speakers’ Corner, 4:00 p.m.)

Expert panel with Camille Burge, Political Science; Judith Giesberg, History; Rory Kramer, Sociology and Criminology; and Stephen Strader, Geography and the Environment. Ahead of Census 2020, coming up this spring, faculty experts will provide context and insight into the history of the Census, its use in research and policy-making, and issues particular to this upcoming Census. Session will be led by Librarians Deborah Bishov and Merrill Stein.

Measures of Impact (Tuesday, Oct. 29)

Learn about impact factors, fake impact factors, other citation measures, and altmetrics. Session will be led by Librarians Deborah Bishov and Alfred Fry.

Storytelling and GIS (Wednesday, Oct. 30)

While maps have been around for centuries, the digital age has given them new meaning. GIS software offers users the potential to visualize, analyze, and tell spatial stories. Learn more about GIS and the many online mapping platforms out there, including Esri Story Maps, Social Explorer, and StoryMapJS. Session will be led by Librarians Deborah Bishov and Erica Hayes.

Chicago-Style Resource Formatting and Management: Best Practices and Recent Updates (Wednesday, Nov. 6)

Learn about changes proposed in the 17th edition, best practices and tools to manage sources, and how to navigate the content-rich CMOS online platform. Session will be led by Librarian Jutta Seibert.

Staying Alert: Tracking New Books and Publications in Your Field (Thursday, Nov. 7) 

Let your inbox be your watchdog and get notified of new publications on your interests or new citations of your work. Session will be led by Librarians Sarah Hughes and Susan Turkel.

Citation Wrangling (Tuesday, Nov. 12)

Serious research projects call for no-nonsense tools for taming citations. Learn how to use Zotero and Mendeley to save, organize and share references. Session will be led by Librarians Nik Fogle and Alfred Fry.

Introduction to Data Management (Wednesday, Nov. 13)

Learn about data management plans and best practices. Session will be led by Librarian Alfred Fry.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.


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Welcome To Falvey: Erica Hayes Joins Research Services and Scholarly Engagement

Erica Hayes recently joined Research Services and Scholarly Engagement (RSSE) as Digital Scholarship Librarian. RSSE works to support research, teaching, and learning at Villanova University; enabling the discovery of, access to, and stewardship of a vast array of scholarly resources.

Hayes earned a Bachelor of Arts in English Literature from Chapman University in Orange, CA; a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing, specializing in poetics from California State University, Long Beach; and a Master of Library Science and Master of Information Science from Indiana University, Bloomington.

She is passionate about scholarship and was an Adjunct Professor teaching English Literature and Composition courses when a colleague’s spouse, who was a Digital Humanities Librarian, introduced her to the world of digital scholarship. Encompassing a variety of subjects, digital scholarship lies at the intersection between technology and research. She is excited to collaborate with Villanova faculty and students to help bring their research to life.

“Integrating digital tools into research methods can extend traditional methods of scholarship, sharing knowledge and pedagogy beyond the page,” she says.

While at IU Bloomington, Hayes worked on several projects including the Petrarchive Project, an open access “rich-text” digital edition of Francesco Petrarca’s songbook Rerum Vulgarium Fragmenta. “The project proposes a new digital way of visualizing, studying, and investigating Petrarch’s work by offering a more ‘authentic’ text as well as multiple indices and tools to access the diverse strata of the work’s composition and cultural contextualization.”

Exhibit: Bird by Bird
She also worked at the Lilly Library, IU Bloomington’s Rare Books and Special Collections Library, as the Web Development Assistant, managing digital collections, Omeka online exhibits, and their website. Collaborating with faculty, Hayes assisted in developing touchscreen exhibits for the library’s special collection exhibits: One of which accompanied the permanent exhibition of John James Audubon’s double elephant folio, Birds of America. “The touchscreen exhibit featured 50 plates of North American bird species from the collection and was created to make the volumes more accessible to library visitors. The touchscreen helped make the collection more interactive while offering an opportunity for patrons to learn more about Audubon and his life,” she explains.

Before starting at Falvey Memorial Library, Hayes completed a two-year fellowship at the NC State University Libraries working in the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center and the User Experience Department. She led a variety of Digital Scholarship workshops including storytelling with GIS, georeferencing historical maps, and text and data mining.

As the Project Manager on the Immersive Scholar Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant at the NC State University Libraries, Hayes also worked with a group of scholars to create large-scale visualizations and extensible models for the James B. Hunt Jr. Library’s visualization walls. She says, “managing the grant’s workflows, I worked closely with creative residents we hosted at the NC State University Libraries on developing open source visualization projects to be shared across institutions.”

Mapping African Coinage
In her free time, Hayes enjoys traveling, experiencing new cultures, and is looking forward to exploring Philadelphia. Currently, she is also collaborating with her friend, Dr. Kacie Wills, on a digital humanities project, entitled “Exploring the Collections of Sarah Sophia Banks,” which was recently awarded a research grant from the Keats-Shelley Association of America. Sarah Sophia Banks was the sister to Joseph Banks, President of the Royal Society and famed botanist on the Cook Voyages. “While her life has often been overshadowed by her brother, Sarah Sophia was an avid collector of coins, medals, and tokens from around the world. It was most unusual for a woman to study numismatics during the eighteenth century and some of her coins are incredibly rare.  For our project, we are mapping the African coins detailed in her coin catalogues that are housed at the British Museum and the Royal Mint,” she says. “Our GIS map features coins from her catalogues, which connects the coin’s location of authority to their places of issue in order to display these unique coins, tokens, and medals while showing how money was being distributed during the growing British Empire.”

As she works to build a digital scholarship program at Villanova, Hayes invites the campus community to reach out and set up an appointment with her: “I can help students incorporate digital tools into their scholarship and assist faculty with developing digital pedagogy assignments in the classroom.”

Hayes’ office is in the Learning Commons of Falvey Memorial Library, room 229. Email: erica.hayes@villanova.edu.


Kallie Stahl, MA ’17 CLAS, is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library. 


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What’s Missing From This Picture? Suggest a Title for the Library’s Collection

bookcart with books

This is not just any cart filled with books. These are the newest print titles that the Library has added to its collection of over a million print and electronic books.

Each was selected due to its ability to support the teaching, learning, and research needs of the entire Villanova University community, including undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and staff. It is part of the Library’s effort to advance knowledge on campus, promote information discovery and access, encourage intellectual curiosity, and empower users by providing timely and critical information resources.

The Library understands the impact of evolving information technologies, changing scholarly communication practices, new forms of information seeking behaviors, and learning styles in a networked world.

The library also acknowledges the interdisciplinary nature of academic resources and firmly believe in free and open access to knowledge, freedom of expression, diversity, interculturality, and inclusion in all its collections. As such, it promotes open access educational resources, zero-cost classroom texts, and DRM free e-resources whenever possible when making collection building decisions.

Learn more about the Library’s process of developing its collection here: https://library.villanova.edu/collections/development/collection-development-statements

But we also rely on faculty and students to help guide the selection process.

If you discover a resource that should be added to the collection, the Library staff welcomes you to visit the website and suggest the purchase of a title. It may be just the thing students will need for their next groundbreaking research project!

 


 

headshot of Shawn ProctorShawn Proctor, MFA, is Communications and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library. He most recently read Dar Williams’ book What I Found in a Thousand Towns.


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Welcome to Falvey: Sarah Hughes Joins Research Services and Scholarly Engagement


Sarah Hughes recently joined Research Services and Scholarly Engagement as the Nursing and Life Sciences Librarian. Research Services and Scholarly Engagement works to support research, teaching, and learning at Villanova University; enabling the discovery of, access to, and stewardship of a vast array of scholarly resources.

A native of New Jersey, Hughes has a passion for research, earning a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology from Rutgers University and a Master of Science in Library and Information Science from the Pratt Institute. She is currently pursuing a Master of Arts in Professional Communication from William Paterson University.

“I enjoyed spending time in the library as an undergrad and eventually discovered that I wanted to pursue a career that was both research oriented, but also personal, where I helped people,” she says.

Her interest in the field began when she enrolled in a medical librarianship course taught onsite at Weil Cornell Medicine in Manhattan. “I was in the same building that was being used by the doctors, residents, and nurses. It was exciting. I liked the idea that the research I was assisting the community in could be used for making advances in medicine,” Hughes says.

Furthering her knowledge of the profession, Hughes worked several internships in various hospitals and institutions, including the New York Academy of Medicine, the Manhattan VA Medical Center, and the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro. The experience she gained helped make for a smooth transition from medical librarian to academic librarian.

Hughes is familiar with academic libraries due to her work with nursing students at Dominican College and teaching library instruction courses to undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral students at William Paterson University before transitioning to Falvey Memorial Library. Hughes knew Falvey Library was right for her when she saw that the scholarly librarian position focused exclusively on nursing and life sciences. “I have a deep respect for nurses. Working in the emergency department at Princeton, I was amazed by all of the tasks the nurses dealt with during their shifts.”

Hughes says she is excited to meet the students and faculty in the fall and encourages the Villanova community to reach out and set up an appointment. “I can assist nursing students with finding and using databases, utilizing citation management tools, and pointing them towards great evidence-based practice resources.” Faculty in the Fitzpatrick College of Nursing can also contact Hughes about research consultations. “Research is a big undertaking and takes a great amount of time—months, sometimes years. We’re exploring what tools the library can offer to help scholars in the sciences and other disciplines. Given that Villanova is R2: doctoral university, the stakes and the expectations are higher, and we need to support them.”

In her free time, Hughes enjoys going to see live music, watching foreign and documentary films, exploring new restaurants, traveling, and spending time outdoors kayaking. An avid tennis fan, she likes watching her favorite players Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal.

“My door is always open to students and faculty. The Fitzpatrick College of Nursing is very prestigious, so I’m thrilled to have a great group of students with which to work. There’s so many different avenues they can take once they finish their degree. I’m excited to help prepare students for their time at Villanova and beyond.”

Hughes’ office is located in the Learning Commons on the second floor of Falvey Memorial Library. Room 220. 610-519-8129. Email: sarah.hughes@villanova.edu. She will also be at Driscoll Hall from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thursdays this fall.


Kallie Stahl MA ’17  is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library. 


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The Curious ‘Cat: “What kind of shark?”

Curious 'Cat - image

Celebrating Shark Week, the Curious ‘Cat asked Falvey Library staff,

“If you could be any species of shark, what would you be?”

1Mike Sgier, Access and Collections Coordinator: “Jaguar shark” [The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou.]


3Chris Hallberg, Library Technology Developer: “The Greenland shark because they are the longest living vertebrate on the planet.”


4Sarah Wingo, Librarian for English Literature, Theatre, and Romance Languages and Literature: “I don’t know why, but the hammerhead shark is my favorite; they just look so cool.”


Darren Poley, Theology, Classics, and Humanities Librarian: “I would be a friendly brownbanded bamboo shark.”


Geoffrey Scholl, Library Technology Developer; Dave Uspal, Library Technology Developer: “A whale shark because they look more dangerous than they really are. They’re actually super chill.”

 



Kallie Stahl MA ’17  is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library. (This blog is was originally published July 26, 2017, in a slightly altered form.)


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Last Modified: July 31, 2019