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Announcing the 2024 Falvey Scholar Award Winners

Announcing the 2024 Falvey Scholar Award Winners:

Kathleen Jordan

Project Title: “The State and the Mine: How the ASGM sector conditions state power and non-state capacity in the Sahel”

Faculty Mentor(s): Lance Kenney, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; Maira Reimao, PhD, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; and Laura Meinzen-Dick, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Sydney Walsh

Project Title: “Vulnerability to Inland Flooding from Landfalling Hurricanes in the United States from 2016-2023”

Faculty Mentor(s): Stephen Strader, PhD, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Jennifer Santoro, PhD, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Anne Eby

Project Title:Brain-Behavior Relationships: Assessing the Impact of Repeated Amphetamine Exposure on Stress Susceptibility and Gene Expression in the Hippocampus and Central Nucleus of the Amygdala”

Faculty Mentor: Benjamin Sachs, PhD, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Catherine Messier

Project Title: “The Women Behind the Words: Collaborative Authorship in 20th Century Literature”

Faculty Mentor: Megan Quigley, PhD, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Matthew McMullen

Project Title: “Data Center Environmental Burden Reduction Through On-Site Renewable Power Generation”

Faculty Mentor: Aaron Wemhoff, PhD, College of Engineering

PJ Scarperi

Project Title: “Caring beyond Cure: Perspectives of Pediatric Oncology Nurses on Palliative and End-of-Life Care”

Faculty Mentor: Meredith MacKenzie Greenle, PhD, M. Louise Fitzpatrick College of Nursing


The Villanova community is cordially invited to join us on Friday, April 26, at 10 a.m. in Falvey Library’s Speakers’ Corner for the 2024 Falvey Scholars Research Presentation and Awards Ceremony.

This program will provide the opportunity to recognize outstanding undergraduate research by the senior students who were selected as the 2024 Falvey Scholars from across Villanova’s campus. The event also serves as a recognition of the dedication of faculty in supporting undergraduate student-faculty collaborative research and scholarship. During the event, award recipients will provide a brief 10-minute presentation to highlight their overall research process and showcase a summary of their winning project.

Program Schedule

10:00-10:10 a.m. Continental Breakfast

10:10 a.m. Program Opening/Welcome: Millicent Gaskell, University Librarian

10:15 a.m. Presentation #1: Anne Eby

10:30 a.m. Presentation #2: Sydney Walsh

10:45 a.m. Presentation #3: PJ Scarperi

11:00 a.m. Presentation #4: Kathleen Jordan

11:15 a.m. Presentation #5: Matthew McMullen

11:30 a.m. Presentation #6: Catherine Messier

11:45 p.m. Closing Remarks: Millicent Gaskell

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Library and the Center for Research and Fellowships, is free and open to the public. Join us to recognize some of Villanova’s finest senior scholars!

Livestream link: https://vums-web.villanova.edu/Mediasite/Play/46f867442c5945109c3bff77be30d2191d


 


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Curious Cat: Favorite Song

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Happy Thursday, Wildcats! This week, the Curious Cat team wanted to know what songs students are listening to. We asked library patrons, “What is your favorite song right now?”

“Highway Queen”
-Emma Lane ’26 CLAS

 

“Too Sweet–Hozier”
-Grace Hinshaw ’26 CLAS

 

“Where The Wild Things Are”
-Peyton Gibbs ’27 CLAS

 


Rebecca AmrickRebecca Amrick is a first-year graduate student in the English Department and a Graduate Assistant at Falvey Library.

 

 

 

Julia Wagner ’26 CLAS is a second-year Economics major and student worker at Falvey Library.

 

 

 


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TBT: Earth Week Brings the Sustainability Fair’s Return

By Shawn Proctor

Earth Day

Happy Earth Week!

We flashback to 2021, when the sustainability fair returned to campus, offering a variety of fun and functional wares. This year’s Earth Week is under way, so make sure to check out all of the great events!

 


Shawn Proctor Head shot

Shawn Proctor, MFA, is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Library.

 


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My Backstage Perspective Working on Villanova Theatre’s The Spanish Tragedy

Left to Right: Balthazar (Justin Badoyen), Bel-imperia (Emma Drennan), Lorenzo (Monroe Byer), and Hieronimo (James Keegan)                       Photo by Paola Nogueras

 

 

This semester, I had the chance to assist Villanova’s Theatre Department in its production of The Spanish Tragedy by Thomas Kyd. Written between 1582 and 1592, this Elizabethan tragedy marked the beginning of a new genre in English theatre: the revenge play. After failing to attain legal justice for his murdered son, courtier Hieronimo takes matters into his own hands. Teaming up with the canny and resolute Bel-Imperia, the two set out to seek blood for blood. With its intricate plotting and bold theatricality, Thomas Kyd’s tragedy still speaks to us today with its unflinching look at judicial inequity, legacies of violence, and the seductive nature of vengeance.

We finished our first week of performances, but the show will still be running until April 21. Buy your tickets here while seats are still available!

Photo courtesy of Villanova Theatre

I also invite you to attend The Spanish Tragedy Symposium which will take place April 19-20. The Symposium will include a facilitated discussion about the play and larger pedagogical project, an introduction to the grant-funded web archive, a performance of student-authored Spanish Tragedy spinoffs, and a splendid reception. This event is FREE for all Villanova students, faculty, and staff. Register at this link.

If you want to know what people thought of the play, check out GA Annie’s review here.

Although this play is frequently studied by academic scholars, it is rarely staged because of its considerable theatrical demands, including onstage hangings, multiple plays within plays, and dialogue in several non-English languages. Therefore, a great deal of discussion and effort had to be put into accomplishing this huge undertaking. The production of The Spanish Tragedy was an intense project that required a lot of work and time, but, to me, seeing the play come together was well worth it.

So how did I get involved in this bloody play? My story actually begins at the beginning of the school year, during the Fall 2023 semester. The directors of Villanova’s The Spanish Tragedy offered an interdisciplinary Theatre/English course called “Legacies of Revenge” focused on developing an understanding of the dynamics of vengeance in western culture. In this class, we studied The Spanish Tragedy in its entirety along with other plays and narratives, philosophical texts, and media from films and TV shows exploring the theme of revenge. The professors also gave us the opportunity to participate in some pre-production work: we created production designs for sets and costumes and edited the play’s manuscript for performance. This was an incredibly insightful and fascinating class, and I gained an in-depth understanding of The Spanish Tragedy long before it graced the stage.

Drs. Chelsea Phillips and Alice Dailey, the professors of “Legacies of Revenge” and the directors of The Spanish Tragedy, encouraged everyone in the class to participate in the spring production for course credit. Having greatly enjoyed the class and interested in the chance to help move the play into a physical theater, I enrolled in “Staging the Spanish Tragedy” for the Spring 2024 semester. Out of the small group of students registered for this “course,” I was the only one who did not audition to be a cast member, so Phillips and Dailey invited me to join the Stage Management Team as an Assistant Stage Manager (ASM).

Being an ASM was a huge time commitment. Not only did I have to attend nearly every rehearsal, but I had to arrive half an hour early to set up the room (and later the stage) and stay late to clean up and help fill out paperwork. This drastic change to my normal daily routine was difficult to adjust to, and I had to re-evaluate how I managed my time in order to remain on top of my schoolwork and other responsibilities.

Revenge (Annabella Nordlund)
Photo by Paola Nogueras

However, despite the challenges this role posed, I loved it all the same because it allowed me to witness the development of this play. The directors had a clear vision for The Spanish Tragedy, and the cast and production members worked hard to bring about that vision. Despite how big of a project this production was, everyone involved was super passionate and enthusiastic. They all wanted to be there and see this thing to its completion, and that motivation and dedication rubbed off on me.

My experience with The Spanish Tragedy was an amazing opportunity. Being a part of stage crew in a theatre production was new to me, but I learned so much. I had no idea so much work went on behind the scenes, and I definitely gained a better appreciation for the individuals who help make these shows a reality.

I’ve had so much fun backstage working with the other ASMs, and I am excited for this upcoming week of shows. It’s sad to know that the end of the production is near, especially since this play has been a part of my life all year. I’m grateful for this opportunity all that same and so happy that I was able to participate in the production of such an awesome play.

 

 


Rebecca AmrickRebecca Amrick is a first-year graduate student in the English Department and a Graduate Assistant at Falvey Library.


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Cat in the Stax: Earth Week

As Falvey’s Cat in the Stax, Rebecca writes articles covering a broad range of topics, from academics to hobbies to random events. All the while highlighting how Falvey Library can enhance your Villanova experience!

We are officially two weeks away from the last day of classes! I don’t know about you, but I feel like this month has been flying by. Assignments are piling up, finals are looming, and you’re probably anxious for summer break. Make an effort to take some time to yourself this week. Find some way to decompress so that you can finish the semester strong!

Image by Markus Spiske from Unsplash.com

Take care of yourself this weekend, and if you have time next week, try to take care of the Earth. Next Monday, April 22 is Earth Day, the second day of Earth Week, which runs from April 21-April 27 this year. The global nonprofit Earthday.org selected the 2024 theme “Planet vs. Plastics,” informing about the dangers of single-use plastics and undertaking a commitment to ending the use of plastics entirely. Proponents for this cause are demanding a 60% reduction in plastic production by 2040. Kathleen Rogers, President of Earthday.org, explains that “The Planet vs. Plastics campaign is a call to arms, a demand that we act now to end the scourge of plastics and safeguard the health of every living being upon our planet.”

Achieving sustainability is huge focus in efforts to combat climate change. Simply put, sustainability means meeting the needs of the current generation without compromising future generations’ ability to do the same. On an individual level, this can be as simple as changing your habits to reduce your carbon footprint. The biggest things you can do, of course, are recycle and use reusable water bottles and food containers instead of plastic ones. If you want to learn more about sustainable living and the various ways you can make a difference, check out Villanova’s Pathways to Sustainable Living. You can calculate your ecological, carbon, and water footprints and learn ways to reduce your impact.

Looking to get involved in making a difference? Villanova has organized a myriad of events over the next two weeks to celebrate Earth Week. Click here to look at what’s being offered and to sign up!

If you would like to learn more about the importance of protecting the environment and how you can make a difference, check out some of these books and film documentaries available at Falvey:


Rebecca AmrickRebecca Amrick is a first-year graduate student in the English Department and a Graduate Assistant at Falvey Library.


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Caturday: Spot Yourself at the Eclipse Event?

Did you (safely) check out the recent eclipse (along with practically everyone else on campus?) Then see whether we spotted your friendly face at our event or outside of the Library!

Photo at the event courtesy of Emilie Agras ’25 CLAS.


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Foto Friday: Ed Scion Discusses Research on White Dwarf Stars

By Shawn Proctor

Ed Scion, PhD, with Margot Accettura, STEM Librarian, Falvey Library

Ed Scion, PhD, with Margot Accettura, STEM Librarian, Falvey Library

A full house attended the recent Scholarship@Villanova lecture series talk by Ed Sion, PhD, Professor of Astronomy & Astrophysics, honoring his book Accreting White Dwarfs: from Exoplanetary Probes to Classical Novae and Type Ia Supernovae. This series recognizes scholarly publications, ongoing research, and other intellectual contributions of faculty members from all five colleges of Villanova University.

 


Shawn Proctor Head shot

Shawn Proctor, MFA, is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Library.


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Women’s Prize for Fiction Longlist Available Via Falvey

By Shawn Proctor

Ruth Ozeki, author of The Book of Form and Emptiness is announced as the winner of The 2022 Women’s Prize For Fiction, taking place at Bedford Square Gardens, London. Picture date: Wednesday June 15, 2022. PA Photo. As the winner of the prize, which is now in its 27th year, Ruth Ozeki will receive £30,000. Photo credit should read: Ian West/PA Wire (Used for editorial purposes, courtesy of the Women’s Prize)

 

The Women’s Prize for Fiction longlist was recently announced, and Falvey Library has acquired the full longlist of books (along with many other DEI-focused award-winning or nominated books). A special landing page will help patrons learn what titles have been added and how to search for them within the Library’s collection. See the full list at the bottom of this blog!

“The Women’s Prize for Fiction is a celebration of women’s creativity and literary achievements. We’re excited to offer the Women’s Prize longlist from this year forward as part of an initiative to diversify our shelves. One of our vendor partners, Gobi, is offering an approval plan based on DEI-focused literary prizes, so a curated list of award-winning titles will be highlighted in the main collection,” says Danielle Dempsey, MLIS, Metrics and Assessment Librarian.

In fall 2023, Falvey Library introduced a new collection of print books that have been nominated for or awarded the diversity-focused prizes listed on this page. This highlighted collection aligns with Falvey Library’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Collection Development Statement, which informs collection development in all subject areas across the Library.

Please note: the Women’s Prize also launched an inaugural non-fiction prize, which is also exciting and worth a look!


 


Shawn Proctor Head shot

Shawn Proctor, MFA, is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Library.


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Curious Cat: Favorite Emoji or Gif

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Happy Thursday, Wildcats! This week, the Curious Cat team asked library patrons, “What is your favorite emoji or gif to use with your friends?”

“The ‘You Got It Dude’ Michelle Tanner Gif”
-Lily Matranga ’25 CLAS

 

“🫡”
-Sadie Callahan ’25 COE

 

“😵‍💫”
-Nikky Sherriff ’26 CON

 


Rebecca AmrickRebecca Amrick is a first-year graduate student in the English Department and a Graduate Assistant at Falvey Library.

 

 

 

Julia Wagner ’26 CLAS is a second-year Economics major and student worker at Falvey Library.

 

 

 


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Cat in the Stax: Author Spotlight: Carolyn Forché

As Falvey’s Cat in the Stax, Rebecca writes articles covering a broad range of topics, from academics to hobbies to random events. All the while highlighting how Falvey Library can enhance your Villanova experience!

Happy Wednesday, Wildcats! We’re back with another Author Spotlight. I know life may be getting hectic as we near the end of the semester, but remember to take some time to take a break and relax. This month’s featured writer is a poet, so you can simply take a few minutes to read one poem at a time.

April is National Poetry Month, a time to recognize poets and poetry’s contribution to literature and culture. Established by the Academy of American Poets in 1996, National Poetry Month is now one of the largest literary celebrations in the world. Millions of readers, students, teachers, librarians, and publishers participate every year by recognizing poets and reading poetry. Therefore, it seems fitting that this month’s Author Spotlight should feature poet Carolyn Forché, who the University had the honor of hosting as a speaker last week for the 2024 Villanova Literary Festival.

Photo courtesy of Blue Flower Arts

Carolyn Forché is recognized as a “poet of witness,” a term she herself coined. She has published five books of poetry, and much of the poems in these works address political and social issues. However, her first volume, Gathering the Tribes, is a deeply personal work. It was published when she was 24 years-old and recounts experiences from her young adult life. It won the 1975 Yale Series of Younger Poets Award. Her next release was The Country Between Us which won the Lamont Prize of the Academy of American Poets in 1981. Forché is also the author of The Angel of History, winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Award, and The Blue Hour, which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her most recent collection of poetry is called In the Lateness of the World and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. The poems in this collection meditate on migrations across oceans and borders but also between the past and present and life and death.

Forché has also written a memoir titled What You Have Heard is True, an account of her experiences in El Salvador during a time of political upheaval. Her visit to El Salvador sparked her work as a human rights activist, which can be seen in many of her early poems. Her anthology, Against Forgetting: Twentieth-Century Poetry of Witness, was praised by Nelson Mandela as “itself a blow against tyranny, against prejudice, against injustice.” For her humans rights work and efforts to preserve memory and culture, she was presented the Edita and Ira Morris Hiroshima Foundation for Peace and Culture Award in 1998 in Stockholm. 

Carolyn Forché is not only a poet but a translator as well. She has translated the works of Claribel Alegría, Robert Desnos, Lasse Söderberg, Fernando Valverde and Mahmoud Darwish. Her translations of these poets have received great critical acclaim.

For all you poetry lovers out there, Carolyn Forché’s work will make you think and feel as she ties the political and poetic together to create memorable, though-provoking, and heart-wrenching poems.


Rebecca AmrickRebecca Amrick is a first-year graduate student in the English Department and a Graduate Assistant at Falvey Library.


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Last Modified: April 10, 2024

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