Skip Navigation
Falvey Library
Advanced
You are exploring: Home > Blogs

TBT: Villanova and the History of Running Shoes

By Ethan Shea

"World Record Two Mile Relay Team"

Villanova’s World Record Two Mile Relay Team
Left to Right: Chris Mason, Marty Liquori, Andy O’Reilly, Frank Murphy

It goes without saying that athletic footwear has developed in leaps and bounds over the past several decades, but did you know Villanova is connected to one of the most innovative running shoes ever built?

"Brooks Villanova"

1974 Villanova by Brooks

In fact, the name of this groundbreaking shoe is the Villanova, and it was made in 1974 by the running shoe company Brooks. The Villanova was the first shoe to use EVA (ethylene vinyl acetate) in its midsole as an alternative to heavier and less responsive rubber. Since the Villanova was released, EVA has become commonplace in the production of running shoes.

This game-changing shoe earned its name through a connection to Olympic middle-distance runner and Villanova alumnus Marty Liquori. The Villanova’s design was guided by the input of Liquori, who has a long list of athletic accolades, including American record holder in both the two mile and five kilometer distances.

At the age of 19, Liquori was also the youngest person to compete in the 1500 meter Olympic finals. Liquori’s Olympic debut took place during the summer of 1968 in Mexico City.

In 1979, Liquori published his autobiography, On the Run: In Search of the Perfect Race, which is held in Falvey’s Special Collections. The above photo of Liquori can be found in the 1969 edition of Belle Air, which can be accessed through Distinctive Collection’s Digital Library. The recently updated Digital Library can also be used to read previous issues of The Villanovan, faculty and student publications or even University commencement material dating back to 1850.


Headshot of Ethan SheaEthan Shea is a second-year graduate student in the English Department and Graduate Assistant Falvey Library.

 


Like

Falvey Library Acquires Senatorial Papers of Former Pennsylvania Senator Patrick J. Toomey

Villanova University’s Falvey Library has acquired the senatorial papers of Patrick J. Toomey, who served as US Senator from Pennsylvania from 2011 to 2023. The collection includes extensive electronic records and media, as well as papers from Toomey’s service as a member of the House of Representatives for the 15th District of Pennsylvania from 1995 to 2005, campaign materials and social media archives. It will be housed as part of Falvey Library’s Distinctive Collections, making this important research collection publicly accessible. Information about when the collection will be viewable by the public is forthcoming.

“We are honored that Senator Toomey has selected Villanova University to house this notable collection,” said University Provost Patrick G. Maggitti. “Falvey Library is an academic hub for learning and discovery, including an exceptional collection of distinctive materials and artifacts. The addition of Senator Toomey’s papers will allow the global community of scholars critical access to these important historical documents.”

“It was an honor to serve as a US Senator representing the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania,” noted Senator Toomey. “The materials from my time serving the Keystone State belong to Pennsylvanians. Villanova University diligently worked with me during my final years in office to create this archive for educational and historical purposes. It’s an honor that such a revered and respected academic institution is doing this work. Thank you to Villanova University and its staff for their tremendous efforts.”

Falvey Library possesses significant collections of rare, distinctive materials, organized into three categories: Special Collections, University Archives and Digital Library—a public access portal to digital content. The Library actively works to identify and acquire materials to complement its existing ones and promotes open access to these collections for global scholarly and research inquiries. The papers of Senator Toomey provide Falvey Library with yet another important collection.

“This significant donation of materials from Senator Toomey provides the Villanova University community and indeed the broader community with an important research collection that offers a rich source of information for the study of national and regional issues, political science, public policy and local and state history,” said Michael Foight, director of Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement at Falvey Library. “Having served on the Banking, Budget and Finance committees, Senator Toomey played a significant role in the oversight, regulation and legislation related to the national economy and the financial sector. His donation provides primary sources for the study of legislative functions related to these critical areas.”

The new collection of materials from Senator Toomey is complementary to other collections held by Villanova’s Falvey Library, including the papers of US Representative Richard T. Schulze, who served in Congress from 1975 to 1993 from Pennsylvania’s District 5. Additionally, Distinctive Collections maintains the personal paper collection of Lawrence M. O’Rourke, a reporter with the Philadelphia Bulletin who served as the newspaper’s Washington bureau chief until it closed in 1980. O’Rourke served in President Jimmy Carter’s newly created Department of Education and was later White House correspondent and columnist for the St. Louis Dispatch and other newspapers. As a journalist, he covered the Watergate scandal and other significant national and international stories.

About Villanova University: Since 1842, Villanova University’s Augustinian Catholic intellectual tradition has been the cornerstone of an academic community in which students learn to think critically, act compassionately and succeed while serving others. There are more than 10,000 undergraduate, graduate and law students in the University’s six colleges—the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Villanova School of Business, the College of Engineering, the College of Nursing, the College of Professional Studies and the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law. Ranked among the nation’s top universities, Villanova supports its students’ intellectual growth and prepares them to become ethical leaders who create positive change everywhere life takes them. For more, visit www.villanova.edu.


Like

Cat in the Stax: The Trillion-Dollar Coin

By Ethan Shea

"Spilled Pennies"

Once again, the infamous American debt ceiling is all over the news.

Last Thursday, the United States hit the $31.4 trillion debt limit. What does that mean? In brief, the debt ceiling (or limit) is the amount of money the United States government can borrow to spend on programs such as social security, paying government workers and anything else the government deems necessary. Because the United States must borrow money to afford such payments, failing to raise the debt ceiling means the government could default on its debt.

Even when the United States technically reaches the debt ceiling, there is still time to avert economic ruin. By taking “extraordinary measures,” the government can continue to pay debts for a few months even after the limit is reached.

There are plenty of ideas floating around that all claim to be solutions to this economic issue, but there is one particular plan I find both fascinating and hilarious.

"Trillion-dollar coin design by DonkeyHotey"

Trillion-dollar coin design by DonkeyHotey

This idea is known as the trillion-dollar coin. The concept involves minting a coin worth one-trillion dollars and placing it in the Federal Reserve. This would give the United States more spending power and the ability to pay its debts.

Miraculously, because of a 1996 law, such coinage would be legal if it were minted with non-traditional metal such as platinum, as there are no value restrictions officially imposed on platinum coinage.

This concept was first introduced in 2011 during a debt ceiling crisis that lasted until the end of July, just days before the U.S. would officially default. Ever since, the trillion dollar coin has faded into obscurity and subsequently reemerged when another debt crisis looms.

Despite the appealing simplicity of the idea, there are quite a few reasons why minting a one-trillion dollar coin could be harmful. The biggest risk is rapid inflation, which is already a major issue in the United States.

But above all, minting such a coin would be an action never taken before, so despite speculation, no one truly knows what would happen. Markets generally dislike such unpredictability, so to keep investors calm, government will most likely avoid such a move.

If you’re interested in learning more about the trillion-dollar coin or economics in general, check out Falvey Library’s subject guide on economics. There, you can access economic article databases, peruse relevant statistics or even chat with Linda Hauck, Falvey’s Business Librarian.

With complimentary access to the New York Times provided by Villanova University, you can also read this in-depth article on the current debt ceiling debacle.


Headshot of Ethan SheaEthan Shea is a second-year graduate student in the English Department and Graduate Assistant at Falvey Library.


Like

Cat in the Stax: Winter Break Reading Recap

By Ethan Shea

"Man reading in the snow"

Welcome back Wildcats! I hope everyone had a restful break. 

In addition to my annual tradition of buying more books than I need with Christmas cash, I was able to read some exciting books during my time off.

To begin the semester, I thought I would give a couple reading recommendations and share these recent reads.

Circe – Madeline Miller 

The first book I read during break was Circe by Madeline Miller. The majority of this book was read during a Caribbean cruise I went on with my family, making the islands described in the story seem even more surreal. I really felt like I was on Aeaea with Circe.

Circe tells the story of, well … Circe, the daughter of Helios, God of the sun. Importantly, this story is told from Circe’s perspective, a response to the generally male-centric focus of classic Greco-Roman literature. Miller’s tale manages to make the grandiose life of Gods relatable through her intimate depictions of girlhood and motherhood. Overcoming childhood trauma and being outcast because of differences are problems not just mortals but even children of Gods must overcome. 

During last winter break, as you can see on this blog, I read Madeline Miller’s first novel, The Song of Achilles. It made sense to read Miller’s second novel during my second winter here at Villanova. 

"If We Were Villains"If We Were Villains – M.L. Rio 

Another book I read has a much different toneM.L. Rio’s novel If We Were Villains is a classic dark academia tale, an aesthetic you can learn more about on this blog. I usually would not have been drawn to a book with such an aesthetic, but I’m glad I listened to my roommate’s recommendation.

In Rio’s story, an elite group of students working to become Shakespearean actors are forced to reconcile with the mysterious death of a classmate. With no shortage of Shakespeare quotes, Rio slowly unveils the truth of the matter while weaving a messy story of romantic love and friendship.

If you haven’t already, I hope you find the time to check out one or both of these great novels before the semester gets too busy. 

Stay tuned for more Cat in the Stax content every Wednesday throughout the semester! 


Headshot of Ethan SheaEthan Shea is a second-year graduate student in the English Department and Graduate Assistant at Falvey Library.


Like
1 People Like This Post

Elementary, My Dear Sherlock: A Look at New Works Entering the Public Domain

By Shawn Proctor

While many were celebrating the beginning of a new year on January 1, the day also held another special meaning: Public Domain Day. Note: Falvey has added a host of new materials that have just entered the public domain! Learn more about them here: https://blog.library.villanova.edu/2023/01/06/meg-piorkos-weekly-picks-5/.

Works from 1927, and before, now are available for writers, musicians, and cinephiles to share freely without permission or fees. They can be shown in theaters, added to online databases, and new works based on them created by modern artists.*

This day is not as popular with the rights holders, however, who would like to continue to profit from and control these artworks, well, forever it would seem. For example, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s estate has furiously fought to earn money from Sherlock Holmes, despite the fact that the legendary consulting detective has been in the public domain for years.

The final works just entered this year, in fact. But that didn’t stop the estate from trying to legally seek money from even very divergent stories, including the Enola Holmes Netflix series, adapted from the series by Nancy Springer.

And even Disney’s big, white gloves are beginning to slip away from its characters. Last year Winnie-the-Pooh became public domain…and, since, the main character of a horror film and a theme of a cell phone commercial. This year, the last of A.A. Milne’s stories vaulted into the public domain as well, an opening salvo for a showdown years in the making.

Yes…Mickey Mouse, that central figure of Disney’s company, will be US public domain in 2024. Will he finally escape Walt’s vault? And does that mean Mickey will be remixed, revised, and revitalized by new imagineers? Only time will tell.

Selected works that entered the public domain this year, according to the Center for the Study of the Public Domain:

Books: the last of the Sherlock Holmes stories, Death Comes for the Archbishop by Willa Cather, To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf, and the first Hardy Boys book The Tower Treasure by Franklin W. Dixon.

Films: Metropolis, the first “talkie” The Jazz Singer, and the first Oscar winner for outstanding picture Wings.

Music: “(I Scream You Scream, We All Scream for) Ice Cream,” “Funny Face” from the musical Funny Face, and “Puttin’ on the Ritz.”

Who knows what new creations these older works might inspire? We’ll have to wait and see!

*Note: I’m not a lawyer and this only applies to US copyright.


Shawn ProctorShawn Proctor is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Library.


Like

Coming soon! Love Data Week February 13-17, 2023

By Nicole Daly 

Love Data Week 2023 is only four weeks away! 

February 13-17, 2023, marks the annual international celebration of Love Data Week! This year’s theme is “Data: Agent of Change,” focusing on inspiring significant change through data, whether large or small, ranging from policy change, structural change, and social change! If you have not participated previously, now is the time! Learn more at https://myumi.ch/ICPSRlovedata23. #LoveData23

Let’s help new and seasoned data users find data training and resources to move the needle on issues they care about. It is easy! 

Here are 10 simple ways to get involved.

  1. Follow @lovedataweek on Twitter and Instagram.
  2. Attend one (or more!) of the Love Data Week activities virtually from wherever you are. Check out the calendar of events. New events are still being added so check back soon!
  3. Host your own event. Want it added to the calendar? Submit your events and we’ll add it! Event ideas include:

                     Data management and sharing workshop

                     Finding data demo with your favorite data archive(s)

                     Participate in ICPSR’s yearly Adopt a Dataset Program 

                     Highlight impacts of recent local data-driven research

                     Share an activity or project for teaching with data

                     Host a data-thon where teams combine, analyze or visualize datasets on a key topic

                     Pick a crowdsourced project at a site like Zooniverse and host a data contribution party 

  4. Recognize colleagues for their participation in Love Data Week activities and events with a Love Data Week-specific Certificate of Participation.
  5. Post your own Love Data Week activities on social media with the hashtag #lovedataweek23.
  6. Use a cool Love Data Week background graphic as your Zoom background or screensaver.
  7. Download, print, and share Love Data Week stickers with friends, students, and colleagues. |
  8. Have a data trivia contest with your team, office, staff, classroom, students, or family – and tell us what happened. (If you’re following us on social media, you’ll be able to see our daily trivia questions during Love Data Week.)
  9. Spread the word about Love Data Week 2023 to maximize participation and creative events.
  10. Sign up to receive Love Data Week update emails to get the latest news on activities and posts!  

This event is hosted by ICPSR, a data repository that is available from the Falvey Library homepage, Databases A-Z list.


Headshot of Nicole Daly, Social Science Librarian. Nicole Daly is Communication Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.


 


Like

Dig Deeper: the Rev. Jim Wallis, 2023 MLK Keynote Speaker

The Rev. Jim Wallis. Image courtesy of Georgetown University.


The Rev. Jim Wallis will deliver the 2023 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Keynote Lecture at Villanova University on Wednesday, Jan. 25, at 7 p.m. in the Villanova Room, Connelly Center.

Born in Detroit, Wallis was raised by an Evangelical family in Redford Township, a small suburb of Detroit. During this time Wallis “questioned the racial segregation in his church and community and later became involved in the civil rights and antiwar movements at Michigan State University.” He attended Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Illinois. In 1971, Wallis, along with his fellow seminarians, founded the People’s Christian Coalition in Chicago. He also founded a Christian magazine named Post American that same year. The People’s Christian Coalition moved to Washington D.C. in 1975 and adopted the name Sojourners (Post American became Sojourners magazine.) Sojourners’ ministries “are a committed group of Christians who work together to live a gospel life that integrates spiritual renewal and social justice.”

A bestselling author, Wallis served on President Obama’s White House Advisory Council on Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships in 2009. He is currently serving as the first Chair in Faith and Justice, and leader of the Center on Faith and Justice in the Georgetown University McCourt School of Public Policy. Prior to his current role, Wallis was a research fellow at the Georgetown University Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs. He taught courses at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and Georgetown University, and was awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters from Georgetown University in 2007. Produced by Georgetown University’s Center on Faith and Justice, Wallis hosts The Soul of the Nation, a bi-weekly podcast with more than 15,000 listeners. In 2022, Wallis was named one of Washington DC’s 500 Most Influential People by the Washingtonian staff.

Dig deeper and explore the links below to learn more about Wallis before his visit to campus:

Wallis’ Books Available at Falvey Library:


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Library.

 

 

 

References:

About Jim Wallis. (n.d.). Center on Faith +Justice. Retrieved December 21, 2022, from https://faithandjustice.georgetown.edu/about-jim-wallis/

Jim Wallis. (2012, November 1). Sojourners. https://sojo.net/biography/jim-wallis

Jim Wallis | Biography & Facts | Britannica. (n.d.). Retrieved December 21, 2022, from https://www.britannica.com/biography/Jim-Wallis

Obama Announces White House Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships. (n.d.). The White House. Retrieved December 21, 2022, from https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/realitycheck/node/2159


 


Like

Photo Friday: Calm and Bright


Campus is calm (and bright) this evening. Looking forward to your return, Wildcats! Enjoy the last few days of winter break.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Library. 

 

 


 


Like

Photo Friday: Sing Joy

Photo courtesy of Shawn Proctor, Communication and Marketing Program Manager.


Falvey staff members Brian Warren, Library Technology Developer (second row, second from right), and John Banionis, Metrics and Assessment Librarian (bottom row, first from left), along with Nicole Subik, Director, Learning Support Services (second row, first from right), sing joyful carols to all those in attendance at the University’s staff Christmas party on Thursday, Dec. 15. Interested in joining Villanova’s Faculty-Staff Choir? The volunteer choir accepts singers of all ability levels and interests. For questions or more information please email Betsy Springuel (elizabeth.springuel@villanova.edu). Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

Looking for more holiday tunes? Check out this playlist by Olivia Dunn ’23.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Library. Her favorite holiday albumsThe Carpenters: A Christmas Portrait and A Swingin’ Little Christmas by Jane Lynch, Kate Flannery, Tim Davis and The Tony Guerrero Quintet.

 


 


Like

Curious Cat: That Post-Finals Feeling

By Olivia Dunn & Ethan Shea

"Curious Cat Banner"

Happy Thursday, Wildcats! Welcome to the final (pun intended) 2022 installment of the Curious Cat. Because it’s finals season, we decided to ask a question everyone has an answer for: How will you celebrate completing your finals?

It’s the home stretch, so buckle down, finish those essays, and ace your exams! We know you will!

Hopefully these responses inspire you and reinvigorate your will to wrap this semester up:

"Curious Cat Dec. 15 (1)"

“Reading for pleasure.”

— Deidra Cali ’23 MA

"Curious Cat Dec. 15 (2)"

(in unison) “We’re going to the Poconos!”

— Tierney Schiff ’23

— Josh Javier ’23

— Ishan Varma ’23

— Bridget Caste ’23

— Michael Correia ’23


Olivia Dunn HeadshotOlivia Dunn is a senior at Villanova University. She works in Falvey Library as a Communications and Marketing Assistant and majors in Communication with specializations in both Journalism and Public Relations.

 

 

 

 

 

Headshot of Ethan SheaEthan Shea is a graduate student in the English Department at Villanova University and Graduate Assistant at Falvey Library.


Like

Next Page »

 


Last Modified: December 15, 2022