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Celebrating, Supporting Nurses During National Nursing Week and Beyond

Sarah Hughes

By Shawn Proctor

National Nursing Week, May 6–12, celebrates and honors the sacrifices and many contributions of nurses to improving and saving lives. At Falvey Library, Sarah Hughes, Librarian for Nursing, Biology, and Health Sciences, supports the academic and research efforts of the students in the M. Louise Fitzpatrick College of Nursing as they join the proud tradition of Villanova nurses.

We sat down with Hughes to learn more about her work with nurses, before and after joining Villanova University in 2019.

Question: Your experience working in the emergency department at University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro gave you insight into the role of nurses in that clinical setting. Can you tell me more about the work and challenges of those nurses?

Sarah Hughes: At Princeton Medical Center, I worked with nurses as both a medical librarian, but also in a separate role when I worked evenings at the emergency department (ED) assisting the front desk, basically as a glorified greeter. In both roles, I saw different sides to the nursing profession.

As a librarian, I helped with information-seeking behavior, mostly many of the nurses came to the library to get access to BLS, PALS, and ACLS books for recertification. I also did searches for nurses and doctors, provided patients with consumer health information, interlibrary loan services and maintained the nursing intranet page.

Working in the ED in a non-clinical role, but observing clinical practice really helped me to fully appreciate and understand what nurses do. I observed the triage process for the ED and also helped patients and family while they waited to be seen. Inside the ED, I watched first hand as nurses worked doing a variety of life saving measures including resuscitating patients, treating children that came in with significant burns, bedside assistance, and all sorts of things that the average person will never see with their own eyes.

When the COVID-19 pandemic started, my immediate first thought was with the nurses and other ED workers because their jobs were tough to start with, but the added layer of working through a highly contagious, deadly, airborne virus day in and out was simply unthinkable. The horrors that health care providers have seen over the past years is simply incalculable. Many nurses have chosen to leave the profession due to burnout and unsafe working conditions. Others have chosen to take early retirement because they were exhausted from seeing so much sadness and death.

This is why I personally choose to continue to masking indoors at all times in public, because I don’t want nurses to continue working through this pandemic forever. To me, masking is the most responsible thing a person can do in this moment. I mask to not only protect myself, but for all the nurses and healthcare workers out there.

Q: How would you describe Villanova’s nursing students and your work with them?

SH: I’ve found all students in Villanova nursing to be incredibly dedicated and hardworking. From the undergraduates to the DNP and PhD students, the vast majority of students are serious about their studies and ask me wonderful questions every day.

I tend to be involved early on in the NUR1102 course pointing students towards Falvey Library resources like CINAHL and PubMed for finding credible, peer-reviewed information. I come back again to the undergraduates in the Research Methods class and cover more advance searching and review things like PRISMA charting and use of citation management tools like Zotero. And I’m more deeply involved with long one-on-one research consultations with students in several of the higher level courses.

Asking the right research question and framing it in such a way is highly important to retrieve appropriate search results. I spend time also getting students familiar with citation management tools like Zotero, particularly if students are doing extensive searching and need to organize their search results for publication or group projects.

Q: Why is celebrating nurses and their work during Nurses Week important?

SH: National Nurses Week is an essential celebration and acknowledgement of those in the profession. It’s important to honor the varying roles of nurses and all the ways they make a difference in the different communities they serve. Since many nurses are struggling right now with what they have endured during the pandemic, it is more important than ever that they are commended and provided with safer working conditions in hospitals and health care settings.

These nurses must be recognized for their efforts, and it is imperative that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration implement a permanent safety standard for hospital and healthcare settings to protect our vitally important nurses and healthcare workers. Nurses are highly trained and skilled workers that tend to be in short supply, so it is vital they have a safe environment.

Q: You joined Falvey Library about 6 months before the pandemic. How has your way of engaging students during this time changed? Are there takeaways or practices that you would continue in the years beyond?

SH: I got to have one fully pre-pandemic semester so I had a glimpse of what “normal” was like. The majority of my research consults were conducted virtually on Zoom, even before the pandemic so not all that much has changed. It’s often easier to demonstrate searching techniques on a Zoom meeting than in person, so the student can observe what I do when I share my screen. Or conversely, I can watch what a student is doing and then take control of the screen if they have questions or cannot locate something right away. I also find virtual instruction sessions to be more conducive to online as well, since again students can watch and mirror my actions. We are fortunate to have such technology that allows for virtual instruction and meeting online when it is not safe to be together.

Students who wish to schedule a nursing, biology, or health sciences consultation, visit Sarah Hughes’ staff page or email sarah.hughes@villanova.edu.


Shawn Proctor

Shawn Proctor is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Library.


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Falvey Memorial Library Service Hours: Summer 2022

Picture of the blue Falvey Memorial Library entrance sign with multiple red tulips surrounding the sign and library entrance.


Falvey Memorial Library Service Hours: Summer 2022

Villanova students, faculty, and staff may enter the Library building 24/7 with a valid Wildcard. Library services are available to the University community during posted service hours. Electronic collections (articles, e-books, and more!) are accessible through the Library’s website 24/7. For a full listing of service hours, visit our website. Have a relaxing and safe summer, Wildcats!

Saturday, May 7—Sunday, May 8

  • Service desk and book stacks closed.

May Intersession (effective Monday, May 9—Tuesday, May 31)

  • Monday—Thursday
    • Service desk: 9 a.m.—5 p.m. (book stacks: 9 a.m.— 4:30 p.m.)
  • Friday—Sunday
    • Service desk and book stacks closed.

Memorial Day—Monday, May 30

  • Service desk and book stacks closed.

Summer Sessions (effective Wednesday, June 1—Sunday, July 31)

  • Monday—Thursday
    • Service desk: 9 a.m.—7 p.m. (book stacks: 9 a.m.—6:30 p.m.)
  • Friday—Sunday
    • Service desk and book stacks closed.

Summer Exception Dates

  • Monday, June 20 (Juneteenth)
    • Service desk and book stacks closed.
  • Monday, July 4 (Independence Day)
    • Service desk and book stacks closed.

August Intersession (effective Monday, August 1—Sunday, August 14)

  • Monday—Thursday
    • Service desk: 9 a.m.—5 p.m. (book stacks: 9 a.m.—4:30 p.m.)
  • Friday—Sunday
    • Service desk and book stacks closed.

Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library. Her summer break reading recommendation is “Hello Molly” by Molly Shannon.


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Photo Friday: The “Wright” Attitude

Coach Wright talks with former Villanova basketball player Randy Foye.

Image courtesy of the Villanova University Archives.


Thank you, Coach Wright.

Thank you for the wonderful memories these past 21 years. Thank you for your dedication to Villanova basketball and the Villanova community.

Over the past few days, many have commented on Coach Wright’s legacy; just ask Jessica Bianchi ’20, who quantified Wright’s greatness in her honors thesis for the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. ‘Nova Nation is thankful for Coach Wright’s leadership and attitude—both on and off the basketball court. His values and principles have had a lasting impact on all Villanovans, inspiring us to be leaders in our own lives.

As the Rev. Peter M. Donohue, OSA, PhD, Villanova President, says, “Jay taught us all the true meaning of attitude.” That mindset will stay with us all, whether we’re playing for a team, learning in the classroom, or upholding Villanova’s Augustinian tradition.

Once a Wildcat, always a Wildcat.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Virtual Event: Russia’s War on Ukraine: Historical Turning Points

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Russia’s War on Ukraine: Historical Turning Points

Monday, April 25, 6-7 p.m.

What were the turning points that led to Russia’s current war on Ukraine and its people? Join us for a discussion of the Ukrainian-Russian relationship, including: the Holodomor, WWII and its aftermath, the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Budapest Memorandum, the Russian war on Georgia, and the illegal annexation of Crimea.

Speakers:

  • Dr. Adele Lindenmeyr, Historian of Russia and the USSR, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Villanova University
  • Dr. Mike Westrate, Historian of Ukraine and the USSR, Assistant Vice Provost, Graduate Education and Research, Villanova University

Co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, Villanova University

***EVENT CHANGED TO VIRTUAL-ONLY*** 

Click here to register


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Falvey Memorial Library Extends Service Hours For Final Exams

Stock image of the entrance of Falvey Memorial Library.


Falvey Memorial Library is extending service hours for final exams. Library services are available to the University community during posted service hours, (bolded below are the extended service hours.) Villanova students, faculty, and staff may enter the Library building 24/7 with a valid Wildcard. Electronic collections (articles, e-books, and more!) are accessible through the Library’s website 24/7. For a full listing of service hours, visit the Library website.

Friday, April 22: 8 a.m.—10 p.m. (front doors lock at 5 p.m., book stacks close at 9:30 p.m.)

Saturday, April 23: 9 a.m.—10 p.m. (front doors lock at 5 p.m., book stacks close at 9:30 p.m.)

Sunday, April 24: 12 p.m. to 12 a.m. (book stacks close at 11:30 p.m.)

Monday, April 25 —Thursday, April 28: 8 a.m.—12 a.m. (book stacks close at 11:30 p.m.)

Friday, April 29: 8 a.m.—10 p.m. (front doors lock at 5 p.m., book stacks close at 9:30 p.m.)

Saturday, April 30: 9 a.m.—10 p.m. (front doors lock at 5 p.m., book stacks close at 9:30 p.m.)

Sunday, May 1: 12 p.m. to 12 a.m. (book stacks close at 11:30 p.m.)


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.


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Join Us for the Remaining Lineup of Spring Events

Happy April, Wildcats! The end of the semester is quickly approaching. Be sure to check out one (or a few) of the remaining events at Falvey Memorial Library. All events are ACS-approved and open to the Villanova University community. The lineup of events are listed below.


2022 Villanova University Literary Festival: Tiphanie Yanique

  • Thursday, April 21, at 7 p.m. in Falvey Library’s Speakers’ Corner.
  • Livestream link.
  • Tiphanie Yanique is a novelist, poet, essayist, and short story writer. She is the author of the poetry collection, Wife, which won the 2016 Bocas Prize in Caribbean poetry and the United Kingdom’s 2016 Forward/Felix Dennis Prize for a First Collection. Tiphanie is also the author of the novel, Land of Love and Drowning, which won the 2014   Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Award from the Center for Fiction, the Phillis Wheatley Award for Pan-African Literature, and the American Academy of Arts   and Letters Rosenthal Family Foundation Award, and was listed by NPR as one of the Best Books of 2014. Land of Love and Drowning was also a finalist for the Orion Award in Environmental Literature and the Hurston-Wright Legacy Award. She is a tenured associate professor at Emory University.
  • For more information on Yanique, please visit her website.
  • This event is co-sponsored by the English Department, the Creative Writing Program, Global Interdisciplinary Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies, the Center for Irish Studies, and Falvey Library.

Polar Voyaging and the Humanities

  • Tuesday, April 19, at 4 p.m.
  • Virtual lecture on Zoom. Register here.
  • Lecture by Hester Blum, PhD, Professor of English at Penn State.
  • In the summer of 2019 Blum was the lone humanities scholar on a scientific expedition tracking climate change in the Northwest Passage. Drawn from her experience on the Arctic icebreaker (and on an Antarctic expedition), as well as her research on nineteenth-century polar expeditions, Blum’s talk offers a meditation on ice as a measure for visualizing, writing about, mourning, and mediating the state of the climate in an age of ecological and institutional crisis.
  • This event is offered in support of Falvey Memorial Library’s current exhibit “That Fairyland of Ice”: Polar Exploration in Mind and Memoryand is included alongside Earth Week events.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Office of Sustainability, the Department of Geography and the Environment, the Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest, and the Department of English.

2022 Falvey Forum Workshop Series: Capturing the Web: Introduction to Web Archiving

  • Wednesday, April 20, at 12 p.m.
  • Virtual workshop on Zoom. Register here.
  • Workshop led by Beaudry Rae Allen, Preservation and Digital Archivist.
  • Web archiving is the process of gathering up data that has been recorded on the World Wide Web, storing it, ensuring the data is preserved in an archive, and making the collected data available for future research. Get a foundational overview of web archiving in this workshop and learn ways to leverage the Wayback Machine and other web preservation tools in your scholarship and teaching.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Library and the Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest.

 


“The Politics of the Irish Harp Symbol from Henry VIII to Brexit” Lecture and Harp Performance with Mary Louise O’Donnell

  • Wednesday, April 20, at 4 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner.
  • Mary Louise O’Donnell, PhD, will discuss the origin of the Irish harp symbol and its history and significance in Irish political iconography through the centuries.
  • Dr. O’Donnell is a harpist, musicologist, and Fulbright scholar 2019/2020. She holds a doctorate from the University of Limerick and is a former Irish Research Council postgraduate scholar and postdoctoral fellow. Her first book Ireland’s Harp: the Shaping of Irish Identity c.1770 to 1880 was published by UCD Press in 2014. She has also published widely on topics relating to Irish cultural history, semiotics, and performance studies. Some of her most recent research can be found in Musicians and their Audiences: New Approaches to a Timeless Division (Ashgate, 2016) and Thomas Moore and Romantic Inspiration (Routledge, 2017). Dr. O’Donnell has performed extensively throughout Ireland, Europe, Africa, and Asia as a soloist and with various ensembles; she has also appeared on BBC, RTÉ, CNN, and NHK (Japan). Working alongside her sister, Dr. O’Donnell recently recorded an album which includes compositions for pedal harp, portable Irish harp, and voice to harp accompaniment by the nineteenth-century Irish composer Charles Egan.
  • This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Irish Studies and Falvey Library.

2022 Falvey Forum Workshop Series: Bringing Historical Maps into GIS

  • Wednesday, April 27, at 12 p.m.
  • Virtual workshop on Zoom. Register here.
  • Workshop led by Erica Hayes, Digital Scholarship Librarian.
  • Georeferencing is the process of connecting images (e.g., scanned historical maps, aerial and satellite photographs) to their geographic locations, so that they can be used as spatial layers in GIS software. Using tools like Map Warper and ArcGIS Online, this workshop will provide participants with the steps to align geographic coordinates to a scanned historical map and display them online to examine how locations have changed over time.
  • Falvey Scholars will give short presentations on the content and findings of the research involved in the writing of the thesis or in the creation of the project report.

 


Russia’s War on Ukraine: Historical Turning Points

  • Monday, April 25, from 6-7 p.m.
  • Virtual lecture on Zoom. Register here.
  • A conversation about the ongoing war in Ukraine.
  • Dr. Adele Lindenmeyr, Historian of Russia and the USSR, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Villanova University, and Dr. Mike Westrate, Historian of Ukraine and the USSR, Assistant Vice Provost, Graduate Education and Research, Villanova University, will discuss the turning points that led to Russia’s invasion.
  • What were the historical turning points that led to Russia’s current war on Ukraine and its people? Join us for a discussion of the Ukrainian-Russian relationship, including: the Holodomor, WWII and its aftermath, the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Budapest Memorandum, the Russian war on Georgia, and the illegal annexation of Crimea.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Library and the Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest.

2021-2022 Alfred F. Mannella and Rose T. Lauria-Mannella Endowed Distinguished Speaker Series Lecture featuring Poet Maria Famà

  • Thursday, April 28, at 2:30 p.m.
  • Virtual lecture on Zoom. Register here.
  • Lecture by Poet Maria Famà.
  • Famà’s talk is titled, “Mining an Italian Heritage for Poems.” As a poet of Sicilian descent, she mines the richness of the oral culture that has been passed down by her family of storytellers. Famà writes her poems to preserve family tales, personalities, sufferings, joys, and wisdom for future generations.  In her presentation, she will give examples of her poems from her various books and explain how they came into being.
  • For more information on Famà, please visit her website.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Library, the Italian Studies Program, the Department of English, and the Creative Writing Program.

Falvey Library’s Semi-Annual Stress Busting Open House: Make Finals a Grand Slamphoto of the Philadelphia Phillies stadium

  • Friday, April 29 (Reading Day) from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. or until supplies last on the Old Falvey patio.
  • Stop by for some major (league) fun and treats to make these finals a grand slam!
  • Pals for Life therapy animals will be there to help you during the 7th inning stretch of the semester.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Library, the Office of Health Promotion, and POWER.

 

 


2022 Falvey Scholars Awards Presentation and Reception Ceremony

  • Friday, April 22, at 10 a.m.
  • Virtual lecture on Zoom. Register here.
  • The 2022 Falvey Scholar award winners: Nadjulia Constant, Daryl Jucar, Christopher DiLullo, Addison Drone, Nicole Garcia, Alec Henderson, Mai Khuc, and Erica Mallon.
  • Falvey Scholars is an annual program that recognizes outstanding undergraduate research by senior students at Villanova University.
  • Falvey Scholars will give short presentations on the content and findings of the research involved in the writing of the thesis or in the creation of the project report.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Library and the Center for Research and Fellowships.

CONCEPT Virtual Recognition CeremonyConcept poster

  • Friday, April 22, at 1 p.m.
  • Virtual lecture on Zoom. Register here.
  • Join us as we celebrate the official launch of the 2022 issue of CONCEPT, the interdisciplinary journal of graduate students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
  • The ceremony will recognize this year’s Graduate Research Prize for top paper, along with all of the student authors and editors, faculty editors, and peer reviewers.
  • CONCEPT accepts submissions from Villanova graduate students in all fields of the arts and sciences and is an opportunity for them to share their scholarship and research.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Library and the Office of Graduate Studies in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
  • Visit the CONCEPT website to learn more about the journal and to browse past volumes.

Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.


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Photo Friday: A Brewtiful Day

Image of Falvey Library staff members Jutta Seibert and Kallie Stahl sharing their freshly roasted coffee beans.

Falvey Library staff members Jutta Seibert and Kallie Stahl share their freshly roasted coffee beans.


A special thank you to the Idea Lab in Falvey Library for hosting a coffee brewing workshop for the Villanova community on Thursday, April 7.

Falvey staff members—and coffee lovers—Jutta Seibert, Director of Research Services and Scholarly Engagement, and History, Art History, Global Interdisciplinary Studies Librarian, and Kallie Stahl, Communication and Marketing Specialist, learned how the coffee roasting process works and roasted their own beans in a popcorn maker. Stahl roasted a Columbian blend, while Seibert selected an Ethiopian brew.

Check out more programming at the Idea Lab here. Have a brewtiful weekend, Wildcats!


 


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View a Replica of The Lincoln Bible This Presidents’ Day

Image of the Lincoln Bible replica.

Replica of The Lincoln Bible.

This Presidents’ Day, stop by Falvey Memorial Library’s first floor to view a replica of “The Lincoln Bible.” Used during his inauguration in 1861, the Lincoln Bible didn’t actually belong to the President. The clerk of the Supreme Court, William Thomas Carroll, was the owner of the Bible Lincoln placed his hand upon. The Bible remained in Carroll’s possession until it was acquired by the Lincoln family sometime after the president’s assassination in 1865. Now known as “The Lincoln Bible,” the original copy is currently housed in the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. The Lincoln Bible was used by President Barack Obama at his inaugurations in 2009 and 2013. President Donald Trump also used the Bible at his inauguration in 2017.

The replica mirrors The Lincoln Bible as it appeared in 1861, as it was not possible to duplicate the wear and fading of the original copy. More features of the replica are listed below:

  • 280-page, 1853 Oxford University Edition.
  • Inscription of William Thomas Carroll, complete with the seal of the Supreme Court.
  • Velvet-covered; framed with brass borders and has a brass clasp, authentic gilded edges, and two ribbon markers.

The Lincoln Bible will be on display in the Library’s first floor Wednesday, Feb. 16, through Monday, Feb. 28.

Mary Lincoln gave the Bible to the Rev. Noyes W. Miner, a friend of the President, seven years after her husband’s death. Having been passed down through the generations, Miner’s descendants recently disclosed its existence and donated it to the public.

For more on President Lincoln, whose 213th birthday is Feb. 12, check out the links below:

Looking for a specific resource on President Lincoln? Contact, Jutta Seibert, History Librarian. A special thank you to Andrew McKeough, ’19 CLAS for the exhibit concept.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


References:


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3MT: Villanova Students Share Their Research in Timed Competition

Poster of the 3MT event.


Join us for the Three Minute Thesis (3MT) Competition on Friday, Feb. 18, in the John and Joan Mullen Center for the Performing Arts. The main event will take place from 3-5 p.m. and the reception will take place from 5-6 p.m.

What is a 3MT competition? Three Minute Thesis (3MT) is a competition for master’s and doctoral students to develop and showcase their research communication skills. Developed by The University of Queensland, 3MT cultivates students’ academic, professional, presentation and research communication skills. To be successful, competitors must effectively explain their research in three minutes, in a language appropriate to a non-specialist audience.

A panel of judges will select a first-place winner ($1,000 award), a second-place winner ($500 award), and audience members in attendance will select an audience choice winner ($250 award). In addition, the first-place winner of Villanova’s 3MT competition will be entered into the regional 3MT competition for the Northeastern Association of Graduate Schools.

This event, sponsored by the Graduate Programs in CLAS, COE, FCON, VSB, and Falvey Memorial Library, is free and open to the public. For more information about 3MT, please visit the 3MT website.

Grab your tickets to the competition here (there is no cost to attend the event).


 


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Dig Deeper: Jericho Brown

Jericho Brown. Photograph by Darnell Wilburn.

Jericho Brown. Photograph by Darnell Wilburn.


Jericho Brown, one of the 2022 Villanova University Literary Festival featured speakers, will read works from his Pulitzer Prize winning poetry collection, The Tradition, on Thursday, Jan. 27 at 7 p.m. in Falvey’s Speakers’ Corner (and virtually). Brown grew up in Shreveport, LA, and earned a PhD from the University of Houston, an MFA from the University of New Orleans, and a BA from Dillard University.

Brown is author of the The Tradition (Copper Canyon 2019), for which he won the Pulitzer Prize. He is the recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard, and the National Endowment for the Arts, and he is the winner of the Whiting Award. Brown’s first book, Please (New Issues 2008), won the American Book Award. His second book, The New Testament (Copper Canyon 2014), won the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award. His third collection, The Tradition, won the Paterson Poetry Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. He is the director of the Creative Writing Program and a professor at Emory University.

Dig deeper and explore the links below for more on Brown’s work:


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 

 


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Last Modified: January 26, 2022