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From the Archives: Year in Review

New Material

2019 has been a busy year for the University Archives! The University Archives acquired over 100 linear feet of new collection material from campus departments like Nursing, Engineering, Alumni Office, Theater, and many others. The new material has not only helped the collections grow in size but has added a wealth of new information and artifacts. And for the first time, the archives has made a concerted effort to expand the scope of collecting to include born-digital materials.

 

 

2019 was also the year more material was digitized and published on the Villanova Digital Library. Programs, posters, photographs, and negatives from commencement, basketball, and the Theatre department were added to the digital library.

Negative, Basketball (Alexander G. Severance (Coach) & Team), 1946.

Negative, Basketball (Alexander G. Severance (Coach) & Team), 1946.

 


2019 Exhibits

Nova Stories: Campus Life from the 1960s

In the Spring, the archives launched a digital exhibit showcasing a selection of University Archives material highlighting the traditions and changes on campus in the 1960s.

 

Case display

Case display of Special Olympic artifacts

In celebration of Villanova’s Special Olympics Fall Festival, held November 1-3, 2019, a small exhibit about Special Olympics at Villanova University was put on display. Special Olympics events on campus has a long history starting in 1979 to now being known as the largest annual student-run Special Olympics event today. Photographs,


Building New Ideas

Our collections cover many areas of Villanova: administration, planning, events, and university periodical publications. But we want to work more closely with campus and student communities to develop more inclusive collections. One of the first steps this year was start outreach efforts to engage with student organizations because not only do these organizations produce material that document the activities, interests, and social climate of our campus, but it is an opportunity to engage with students about the importance of the archives. One of the projects to come out of it was the creation of a zine that would outline what is an university archives, how to do research, and how to contact us. Library Ambassadors from Office of Intercultural Affairs, Sidney Holmes and Colette Termaat, helped out by passing out the zines to student organizations during the Fall Semester.

The cover of "Villanova University Archives" Zine Volume 1, Issue 1Zine page requesting student life records with text bubbles.The inaugural issue was illustrated by:

Beaudry Rae Allen, Digital & Preservation Archivist

Shawn Proctor, Communications & Marketing Program Manager

Mike Sgier, Access & Collections Coordinator

Scott Barnebey

The zine has been such a great outreach tool that a few student organizations have donated material to the archives. Look out for the second issue in 2020!

 

 


None of this could have been done without the student support the archives has had this year. Many students lent their voices to recording Villanovan articles for the digital exhibit. Most importantly, student assistants were on hand for collection pick-ups, rehousing projects, and exhibit work that has helped shape the archives to becoming a more active and accessible area for our community.

Student moving a cart of archival material

Emma Poley, MA ’21. Assisting in a pick-up

Student working at desk

Erin Warren, ’21. Rehousing 4×5 negatives

 

The University Archives looks forward to 2020 with new exhibits, new collections, and many more new projects!

 

 


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From the Archives: Special Olympics Celebration!

Skill, Courage, Sharing, Joy – Tenants of the Spirit of Special Olympics

In celebration of Villanova’s Special Olympics Fall Festival, held November 1-3, 2019, University Archives has a small exhibit about Special Olympics at Villanova University on display. Special Olympics events on campus has a long history starting in 1979 to now being known as the largest annual student-run Special Olympics event today.

Case display

The exhibit contains facsimiles of photographs and programs from the early days of the event. All materials are from collections located in the University Archives. The case was curated by Beaudry Allen, Preservation and Digital Archivist.

photographs being prepped for the exhibit.            A print being cut with paper cutter.

Images of putting the exhibit together.

You can check out the case on the 3rd floor of Falvey Library for the rest of the semester.

Photograph of exhibit case

For more information about the Special Olympics and how to get involved, check out the Special Olympic website!


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#TBT: Props to Vasey Hall

The Playboy of the Western World play bill, 1960 , at Villanova

THROWBACK THURSDAY

This week, our throwback pic features a playbill from the 1960 production of “The Playboy of the Western World” by John Millington Synge. The playbill is housed in the University Archives along with many other treasures from Villanova’s past.

Did you know that the Villanova’s Theatre Program has been around since 1958? Over that time the program has produced hundreds of plays and musicals in its beloved campus home, Vasey Hall. While Vasey is centrally located on campus, it is a bit tight as other academic offices are also located in the building.

In early 2020, the University hopes to officially open a new, larger space for the Theatre Program—the Performing Arts Center as part of Villanova’s Campus Transformation Project.

We are looking forward to visiting the new space and adding more play bills to our collection. Thanks for the memories, Vasey!


Regina Duffy is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library.


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A Small Treasure Found in the Stacks

Merriam Webster dictionary defines ephemera as an item of “no lasting significance” and usually pertains to paper items expected to be used temporarily like tickets, greeting cards, menus, pamphlets, bookmarks, and brochures. Though sometimes ephemera is far from transit; ephemeral items are often found in scrapbooks, keepsake boxes, the drawers we never clean out, or, in our case, books. This 1968 football ticket was discovered as a bookmark in a book from the stacks. Its new home is now in the University Archives where it’ll join a collection of Villanova ephemera related to the history of the campus. Preserving such items are significant because they give insight to past events and social attitudes of time.

…By the way, Villanova won the game 21-10!

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#TBT: Caps off to Vintage Villanova!

THROWBACK THURSDAY

Enjoy this throwback pic from 1939, when a couple of students experienced Freshman initiation for Villanova’s Centennial Class of 1943.

Did you know that vintage head caps like the ones in this photo can be found within the University Archives’ collection? The University Archives, housed on Falvey Library’s ground floor, contains many historic items from Villanova’s past, including photos, publications, and memorabilia.

cap, 1939, villanova college,

If you are looking for more cool throwback pictures and information about Villanova’s history, you could also check also out the book Ever Ancient, Ever New: Villanova University 1842-1992. You will likely recognize many familiar faces, names, and landmarks on campus from years past.


Gina's headshot

Regina Duffy is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library. 


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#TBT: Yearbook Staff

Photo courtesy of University Archives.


THROWBACK THURSDAY

The 1962 Villanova University yearbook staff poses for a group photo. View more images from the 1960s in Distinctive Collections’ new digital exhibit, Nova Stories: Campus Life from the 1960s. Curated by Beaudry Allen, the exhibit draws on University Archives to reveal the photographs, newspaper-clippings, audio-recordings, and programs that illustrate what student life was like in the 1960s and highlights some of the traditions and changes happening on campus.


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University Archives Acquisition: Ann Marie Cammarota Research Records

Pages from the archives

The University Archives recently acquired the research materials compiled by alumnus Ann Marie Cammarota for her 1985 Master Thesis, Consideration of the American Press Coverage of the Cuban Political Situation from 1952 to 1958 and its Influence of the United States Foreign Policy. Cammarota’s thesis investigated if American press coverage of Batista’s government influenced the State Department’s policies at the time. The papers include declassified memoranda from the State Department regarding Cuban activities between 1957 and 1958. The documents reveal the State Department’s growing apprehension surrounding escalating violence and the United States’ international reputation.

After completing her Masters in 1985, Cammarota continued her studies at Temple University for a PhD in History. She has been an instructor Neuman College, St. Joseph’s University, and Rosemont College. In addition to teaching, she has published a book, Pavements in the Garden: The Suburbanization of Southern New Jersey, Adjacent to the City of Philadelphia, 1769 to Present, which is also available in our general stacks.

The University Archives is excited for the new addition to the collections because the documents serve as significant primary sources for US-Cuban relations as well as highlight the work of our former students. The documents have been added to VUA 32 Alumni Records and available for research.


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Nova Stories: Campus life from the 1960s

What was Villanova like fifty years ago?

Distinctive Collections is proud to announce our new digital exhibit, Nova Stories: Campus Life from the 1960s. Curated by Beaudry Allen, the exhibit draws on University Archives to reveal the photographs, newspaper-clippings, and programs that illustrate what student life was like in the 1960s and highlights some of the traditions and changes happening on campus.

A special element to the exhibit is audio recordings of current Villanova students reading 1960s articles from The Villanovan. So a special thanks goes out to Shannon Murray, Tariere Tebepah, Lilly Sullivan, Nasir Dowling, Matthew Fagerstrom, Samantha Palazzolo, and Norman Williams.

Many of the images from the exhibit can be found in Villanova Digital Library.

The exhibit will remain ongoing to add newly digitized or acquired materials.


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University Archives Acquisition: The Circus Comes to Town!

🎪Come see feats of wonder, from trick riders to acrobats trapeze through the air, at the Field House🎪

The University Archives has recently acquired a poster announcing a circus event on campus. Not much is known about the event on campus itself or its sponsors but the Hanneford Circus, also known as Royal Hanneford Circus, is considered one of the oldest circuses dating back to possibly 1690 England.  According to legend,  Edwin Hanneford, a foot juggler who performed on London street corners and fairs, was summoned to perform before King George III in a contest to determine who was the best juggler in England.  In the nineteenth century, the family was performing internationally as traveling troupe and attracting acclaim for bareback riding, acrobatics, and juggling. The family was so well-known that while performing in Spain in 1915, the Hannefords were seen by John Ringling who wished to sign the Hannefords to the famed Ringling Brothers-owned Barnum and Bailey Circus. The troupe grew to a full-fledged circus, which continues to tour across the United States.

Hanneford Circus came to Villanova either sponsored by or in support for Women’s Committee for Philadelphia’s Wills Eye Hospital. The hospital was established in 1832 and is the oldest continually operating optometry facility in the United States. After doing more research on other Hanneford Circus posters it can be determined the event happened in the 1960s and was a familiar event across campuses as the Circus would perform at many colleges and universities during that period.

The poster is a fascinating glimpse into campus activities long ago. The archives hopes to continue to acquire these types of treasures that tell the story of our past.


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College Costs at Villanova: 1918

Celebrating 175 Years of Augustinian Catholic Education 1842-2017

Catalogue of Villanova College, 1918-19.

Catalogue of Villanova College, 1918-19.

Villanova Digital Library includes a selection of Villanova College’s academic catalogues published from 1871-1918. The earliest volumes published rarely changed in format and information provided which included a “Catalogue of Students,” listing students’ names their hometowns and states, and the annual Commencement ceremony and list of graduates. An interesting tidbit: the 70 students, listed in the 1870-71 catalogue, were mostly from Pennsylvania followed by Massachusetts and included Ireland, Cuba and Spain.

From the Seventy-fifth catalogue of Villanova College: Villanova, Delaware County, Pa.: conducted by the Augustinian fathers for the academic year 1918-1919, p. 16-17.

Transcribed text from the digitized copy found in the University Catalogues of the Villanova Digital Collection.

EXPENSES

*****

The expenses at Villanova vary in amount according to the course which the student pursues and the accommodations which he enjoys. The scholastic year is divided into two terms of approximately four and a half months each. The rates given below are per term.

Ordinary Expenses

Board, bed and bedding.              $112.50
Tuition, Engineering Courses.         75.00
Tuition, all other courses.                50.00
Laboratory fee
(Chemistry and Biology).               5.00
*Private room.                               30.00
Private room, with bath.                   75.00
Laundry.                                        5.00
Physician’s fee.                             2.50
Gymnasium fee.                           2.50

Extra Expenses

Music, Piano, per term.             $ 30.00
Music, Violin, per term.                30.00
Use of typewriter, per course.        7.00
Certified Credits for admission
to another college                         2.00
———

*A few rooms are sufficiently large for two students. The charge will be not be reduced on that account.

In addition to the above, a deposit of fifteen dollars ($15.00) is required of every student at the beginning of each scholastic year to cover injury to property, breakage, etc. Any balance remaining at the end of the year will be refunded on application or credited to the student’s account for the next year. Every student is held personally responsible for property entrusted to his care or assigned for his use.


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Last Modified: September 7, 2017