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Connelly Center 41 Years Young

40 41 Years of Connelly Center

Last year marked the 40th anniversary of the Connelly Center. Leading up to the anniversary Distinctive Collections was hard at work digitizing photographs of Connelly over the years. While COVID may have dashed in-person celebrations, the University Archives invites you to check out Connelly over the years and celebrate September 21st as the anniversary of the official dedication ceremony.

Connelly Center, March 26th 1979

Connelly Center, March 26th 1979

 

 

 

 

 

 

As the heart of campus, Connelly Center originally opened with a game room, music listening room, ice cream parlor, terrace for entertainment, and lounges. Some of the amenities and look haven’t changed.

 

More photographs of the early days of Connelly Center can be found in the digital library.


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Green Voices of the Past: The Commemoration of Armed Insurrections in the Irish American Club

Posted for: Emily Poteat.

The Irish American Club was a club dedicated to organizing and advocating for issues pertinent to the Irish republican cause. Throughout Minute Book of the Board of Officers for the Irish American Club, one of the most prominent examples of their advocacy and work was through their commemorative celebrations held in remembrance of some of the failed Irish republican uprisings, as well as important figures in Irish republicanism.

One of the first instances of commemorating armed insurrections that appeared in manuscript, was with the mention of a committee on an Emmet celebration on page eight of the manuscript [1]. This celebration was to commemorate the death of the leader of Irish Rebellion of 1803, Robert Emmet. Emmet was born on September 08, 1771, and was the eleventh child of Dr. Robert Emmet and Elizabeth Emmet (née Mason) [2]. Emmet prior to the insurrection was deeply involved in the Society of United Irishmen, which was formed following the French Revolution, and later evolved to advocate to secure a representative government in Ireland. Emmet, initiated the Irish Rebellion on July 23, 1803, and did so in the hope of overthrowing British rule in Ireland and implementing a representative government [4]. The rebellion failed, and on September 20, 1803 Emmet was put to death for his role in the rebellion [5]. On page 68 of the minute book, it becomes clear that the men in the Irish American Club felt a deep commitment to making sure that the celebration in commemoration of Emmet was successful. For example, on page 68 a man identified as “Br Thompson” is described as having “urged the brothers to try and make the coming Emmet celebration a great success”[6]. Further punctuating this was a description of a statement made by a man referred to as “Br Dillon,” who “said that we ought to try and make the Emmet celebration the greatest success we ever had on account on the present situation in Europe”[7]. From these brief mentions of the planning of the Emmet celebration, one gains the sense that the Emmet celebration was of great importance to the men of the Irish American Club. As an important Irish republican figure, the Emmet celebration was brought up yearly in the minute book, and was one of the club’s annual celebrations.

Image showing quote about Emmet celebration

Also commemorated frequently by the Irish American Club, was the 1798 Rebellion. The Irish Rebellion of 1798 was born in the era of the French Revolution.[8] Revolutionary fervor sweeping through France, gave inspiration to Irish republican and Irish nationalist organizers, and this resulted in the reorganization of groups such as the Volunteers, and the creation of the United Irishmen [9]. In early 1798 the United Irishmen made the decision to instigate a domestic uprising, and this rebellion is considered by scholars to have decisively changed Irish society [10]. Primarily, the purpose of the 1798 Rebellion was to overthrow British rule in Ireland. During the rebellion, the rebels had success in County Wexford, in Ireland; however, when the rebels attempted to carry the rebellion to the northern and western regions of Ireland, they failed [11]. It was on June 21, 1798, at Vinegar Hill, where the rebel forces were effectively defeated [12]. From the way that the Irish American Club spoke of the 1798 Rebellion, referred to in the manuscript as “the events of 98,” one gains a sense of the importance of the event to the Irish American community in the late nineteenth century [13]. For example, on page 98, when debating on the plans for the commemorative celebration of the 1798 Rebellion it was recorded by the secretary, that the “Bros Carney and Redmond” had carried out a long debate as to “the most suitable way to celebrate the memory of the men and the events of 98” [14]. Furthermore, the importance of the rebellion and commemorating it, for the club is clear in the language utilized in the minute book, with the words “most suitable” it is clear the men were putting considerable thought into the celebration. Further, according to page 104 of the manuscript, there was considerable anticipation for the commemorative celebration, as it is put forth “Bro MacMahon reported from the committee on the 98 celebration, stating that the prospects for a very impressive demonstration were bright, as all persons who were enthusiastic” [15].

Image showing quote about the 1798 Rebellion

From the commemoration of these two uprisings, one gains the sense of the dedication and the inspiration that the men of the Irish American Club drew from the armed uprisings in Ireland’s history. Moreover, this minute book amplifies the voices of the men who partook in the commemoration of events and a cause they were deeply committed to.

—–

Bibliography

Curtin, Nancy J. “The Transformation of the Society of United Irishmen into a Mass-Based Revolutionary Organization, 1794-6.” Irish Historical Studies 24, no. 96 (1985): 463-492.

Geoghegan, Patrick M. Robert Emmet: A Life. Cornwall, United Kingdom: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2002.

Minute book. Board of Officers Irish American Club. Meeting Minutes. January 19, 1896. Villanova University Digital Library. Accessed September 15, 2021. https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:572888.

Patterson, James G. In the Wake of The Great Rebellion: Republicanism, Agrarianism and Banditry in Ireland after 1798. Manchester, United Kingdom: Manchester University Press, 2008.

Séaghdha, Tomás Ó. “Robert Emmet and the Insurrection of 1803.” The Past: The Organ of the Uí Cinsealaigh Historical Society, no. 22 (2000): 51-66.

—–

Notes

[1] Minute book, Board of Officers, Irish American Club, Meeting Minutes, January 19, 1896. Villanova University Digital Library, accessed September 15, 2021. https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:572888., 8.

[2] Patrick M. Geoghegan, Robert Emmet: A Life. (Cornwall, England: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2002), 51.

[3] Nancy J. Curtin, “The Transformation of the Society of United Irishmen into a Mass-Based Revolutionary Organization, 1794-6,” Irish Historical Studies 24, no. 96 (1985): 463.

[4] Geoghegan, Robert Emmet: A Life, 155-164.

[5] Tomás Ó Séaghdha, “Robert Emmet and the Insurrection of 1803,” The Past: The Organ of the Uí Cinsealaigh Historical Society, no. 22 (2000): 64.

[6] Minute book, Board of Officers, Irish American Club, Meeting Minutes, January 19, 1896. Villanova University Digital Library, accessed September 15, 2021. https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:572888., 68.

[7] Minute book, Board of Officers, Irish American Club, Meeting Minutes, January 19, 1896. Villanova University Digital Library, accessed September 15, 2021. https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:572888., 68.

[8] James G. Patterson, In the Wake of The Great Rebellion: Republicanism, Agrarianism and Banditry in Ireland after 1798 (Manchester, United Kingdom: Manchester University Press, 2008), 1.

[9] Patterson, In the Wake of the Great Rebellion, 1.

[10] Patterson, In the Wake of the Great Rebellion, 3.

[11] Patterson, In the Wake of the Great Rebellion, 3.

[12] Patterson, In the Wake of the Great Rebellion, 3.

[13] Minute book, Board of Officers, Irish American Club, Meeting Minutes, January 19, 1896. Villanova University Digital Library, accessed September 15, 2021. https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:572888, 98.

[14] Minute book, Board of Officers, Irish American Club, Meeting Minutes, January 19, 1896. Villanova University Digital Library, accessed September 15, 2021. https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:572888, 98.

[15] Minute book, Board of Officers, Irish American Club, Meeting Minutes, January 19, 1896. Villanova University Digital Library, accessed September 15, 2021. https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:572888, 104.

——————–
Emily Poteat is a graduate assistant in Irish Studies and Falvey Memorial Library’s Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement Department, and a graduate student in the History Department.


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Content Roundup – First Two Weeks – September 2021

This two week Content Roundup highlights recently digitized materials from the first two weeks of September including more materials from American popular culture and literature.

Dime Novel and Popular Literature

Fiction

Captain Mystery; or, The brave girl of Boulder Bar / by Herbert Bellwood
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:654937]

Holland Library (1 issue added):
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:653031]

Her love or her life? : a sequel to The bride’s ordeal / by E.D.E.N. Southwort
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:654600]

Periodicals

Golden Hours : A Weekly Journal of Good Literature for Young Folks, v. XXI, no. 542, Saturday June 18, 1898

Golden Hours : A Weekly Journal of Good Literature for Young Folks (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:654580]

Frank Leslie’s Chimney Corner, v. X, no. 240, January 1, 1870

Frank Leslie’s Chimney Corner (2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:652643]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:653894]

Selection, front cover, The Girls’ companion, v. VI, no. 12, March 23, 1907

Girls’ Companion (5 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:652562?lookfor=title%3Amarch]

Portland Transcript (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649817?lookfor=title%3Afeb]


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Green Voice of the Past: Women in the Patrick H. Pearse Branch of the Friends of Irish Freedom

Posted for: Emily Poteat.

Often underrepresented in the historical record, women’s voices and experiences offer an important lens through which to view history and the events of the past. While clearly present, and participating throughout historical events of the past, often women’s voices were not as often acknowledged or given the same attention as that of men. Emerging from the Patrick H. Pearse Branch of the Friends of Irish Freedom’s Minute Book are the voices of many women who stridently organized and participated in the movement for Irish Independence during the early twentieth century. Founded during the third Irish Race Convention, held from March 04, 1916 to March 05, 1916, the Friends of Irish Freedom was founded with the aims of both supporting and assisting in the movement for Irish independence.

Title Page of Minute Book

To an extent, the participation of women in the Patrick H. Pearse Branch of the Friends of Irish Freedom was unusual, as women were not often invited or accepted into these types of organizations with men during this time period. Despite this, the Patrick H. Pearse Branch of the Friends of Irish Freedom, according to their minute book, were honored to welcome women into their branch of the organization. This is evident on page thirty of the manuscript where it is stated, “a goodly member of Irish ladies attended the meeting and it is hoped they will continue their visits, and invite others to do the same, as we recognize the fact that from the women of Limerick all the way down the line…women have played a noble part in Irelands fight for Independence.” With word choices such as “noble,” and “goodly” when describing the woman who attended the meeting, one garners the sense that the Patrick H. Pearse Branch of the Friends of Irish Freedom were pleased to have welcomed the woman to their meeting. Furthermore, the secretary directly noted that the organization hoped they would continue to attend and bring more women into the branch.

Page with Nolan Quote

Denoting this openness to women’s involvement in the organization was the way that women were supported throughout the manuscript in not only voicing their opinions on Irish independence, but also in participating and running for elected positions within the branch, as well as taking part in committees. The voice of Mary Nolan emerges strongly from the manuscript, wherein she consistently participated in discussion, was appointed to various important committees, and was elected as Chancellor and later Chairlady of the Ball Committee. From reading the manuscript, one gains the sense that Nolan was well-respected within the branch, along with the other women who joined the branch. Women were referred to as “Sister” and men were referred to as “Brother.” Moreover, the way Nolan was written about further demonstrates the respect that she received from the organization. For example, the secretary wrote on page 33, “Sister Nolan (new member) spoke eloquently on her American birth.” The use of “eloquent” demonstrates that the secretary respected what Nolan had to say, and acknowledged the persuasiveness and clarity of her speech. Also evident from the manuscript, was the dedication that women in the organization felt towards the cause of Irish independence. Nolan, is recorded in the manuscript on page 33 as having conveyed that “she loved that dear land Ireland, that she had never yet seen, but which prayed to see, but not until England was driven from its stock and barrell [sic]. She knew God was a good God, but she believed he would be a sleepy God if he allowed England to come out victorious.” From the passionate wording of Nolan, and the respect with which her oration was recorded, it is evident that women contributed and voiced their beliefs freely within the Patrick H. Pearse Branch of the Friends of Irish Freedom.

Nolan was not the only woman to emerge from the pages of the minute book from the Patrick H. Pearse Branch of the Friends of Irish Freedom. Women such as Margaret Kain, Marie Seary, Annie Doyle, Mary O’Hagan, and many others also appear in the text. With each appearance one sees these women being accepted and actively participating in committees and elections within the organization, and actively contributing to the cause for Irish independence.
——————–
Emily Poteat is a graduate assistant in Irish Studies and Falvey Memorial Library’s Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement Department, and a graduate student in the History Department.


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Content Roundup – Last Week – August 2021

Detail p. 5, The Days’ doings, v. VII, no. 179, November 4, 1871

This week we offer a few more Dime Novels and story paper issues, with more materials coming in the days and weeks ahead.

Dime Novel and Popular Literature

Fiction

Remember the Maine; or, Clif Faraday’s rallying cry / by Ensign Clarke Fitch, U.S.N.

Remember the Maine; or, Clif Faraday’s rallying cry / by Ensign Clarke Fitch, U.S.N.
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:653728]

Captain Sparkle, pirate : or, A hard man to catch / by Nicholas Carter

Captain Sparkle, pirate : or, A hard man to catch / by Nicholas Carter
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:654046]

Periodicals

The Days’ doings, v. VII, no. 179, November 4, 1871

Days’ Doings (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:653820]

Girls’ Companion (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:652562?lookfor=title%3Afebruary]

Detail p. 5, The New York Ledger, v. XXVIII, no. 15, June 1, 1872

New York Ledger (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:650928]

Detail p. 335, The Portland transcript, v. XIX, no. 42, Saturday, Jan. 26, 1856

Portland Transcript (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:652047]

Weekly Novelette (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:651675]


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From the Archives: Welcome to Villanova!

From the University Archives: Welcome to Villanova

A Peek into First Year Orientation

The next installment of the University Archives exploring past traditions of Villanova is how incoming first year students, or also known as Frosh or Yearlings, experienced their first days on campus in the first half of the twentieth century.

Freshman Orientation

Upon arrival incoming students were given logistical and academic information, housing details, class schedule, introductions to faculty and upperclassmen, religious registration, and introduction to student organizations. The first day also required a physical exam by a doctor. All of this would be guided by the Orientation Committee (White Cappers), who were the Sophomores.  The committee who would prepare incoming students with “regs” (dinks, ties, identification buttons, and handbook) and teach them the “Frosh rules and regulations” and the very important Hello Habit.

Much of orientation was like an initiation where cultural aspects to Villanova life were heavily indoctrinated and Freshman learned the college songs, yells, and rules. Orientation Committee reinforced etiquette and rules from day one. Frosh would be taught they would have to partake in trunk carrying (help move-in all students in their dorms), coal shoveling, gridiron marking, and stadium cleaning. Noted in the 1946 Belle Air yearbook, infractions would result in haircuts or being molasses and feathered.

Description of Etiquette Expectations

after we had a chance to become acclimated to the surroundings a series of impromptu meetings were held in the amphitheatre with the white cappers scolding yearlings...bellowing instructions to wear the regs...omit smoking cigarettes...learn the college cheers and songs...carry matches for the upperclassmen...get the "hello habit"...

keep coats buttoned and hands out of pockets...and above all stand erect while in the presence of upper classmen.

 Belle Air, 1937

First day of freshman year

First Day for Yearlings, Belle Air, 1943

 

Frosh being directed to jump

Frosh being directed to jump, Belle Air 1967

…and be sure to remember the “Hello Habit”Hello Habit Request for Freshmen

The Hello Habit was simply students saying hello to each other as they passed each other on campus. The gesture was serious business for upperclassmen as they would patrol the halls making sure Frosh did it as well as lament in The Owl and Villanovan for years how the time-honored tradition was at constant risk because of freshmen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Owl, 1931

 

It was later in the school year Freshmen got  “revenge” on the Sophomores during annual Frosh-Soph field day called “Muff Day” and annual Tug-O-War in the Spring.

Frosh-Soph game

tug of war

Belle Air, 1938

Changes

Many of the rituals, dress, initiations, and student hierarchies were abandoned by the late 1960s. Mostly because the university had become co-ed, the student body became more diverse, and the styles and trends of a college student focused more on individualism. In the 1980s, Villanova saw a significant cultural shift as orientation became more about preparing students for their college experience as a whole, including how to navigate the academic rigor and learn the support systems throughout campus.

For more images of campus life: https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Collection/vudl:171664

 

 


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Content Roundup – Third Week – August 2021

Typescript, Letter, To: Fr. Falvey. From: Éamon de Valera, March 12, 1962

This week we present a host of new materials, including additional Dime Novels and Story Paper issues. In addition, a rare poetry book by Pater Golden from the Joseph McGarrity Collection as well as an important letter about the McGarrity Collection itself are made available online for the first time. Finally the concluding parts of the Nursing Museum’s Jessie Margaret Ada Mutch Collection are available.

Dime Novel and Popular Literature Collection

Fiction

The banker’s heir / by Sylvanus Cobb, Jr.
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649971]

The lone range rider; or, Among the rustlers of the bad lands / by Herbert Bellwood
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:653183]

Gentleman Joe’s moonlight matinee; or, The Wild-cat of Whiskey Gap / by the author of “Gentleman Joe.”
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:653147]

Periodicals

Frank Leslie’s Chimney Corner, v. X, no. 237, December 11, 1869

Frank Leslie’s Chimney Corner (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:652583]

Girls’ Companion (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:653135]

Golden Days (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:651297]

Portland Transcript (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:652059]

Nursing Museum

p. [28], Item 1, front

Jessie Margaret Ada Mutch Collection (1 scrapbook part added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:636114]

Josesph McGarrity Collection

Books

[2] p., The Voice of Ireland / by Peter Golden

The Voice of Ireland / by Peter Golden
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:652895]

Papers

Typescript, Letter, To: Fr. Falvey. From: Éamon de Valera, March 12, 1962
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:653599]

Villanova Digital Collection

Magazines, Newsletters, and Journals

The Villanovan, Vol. 77. No. 3, September 14, 2001.

The Villanovan (2 issues added from September, 2001)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:653624]

Villanova student author

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Dawn Chorus Male Song in Relation to Ancestry in the Black-capped Chickadee x Carolina Chickadee Hybrid Zone / Ariana A. Abbrescia
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:653717]


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Green Voices of the Past: Revisiting Mary Linehan’s Poetry Commonplace Book

Posted for: Emily Poteat.

Poetry commonplace books can be gateways to understanding not only individuals, but also, they can inform on what popular literature was consumed during a specific time period. Mary Linehan’s Poetry Commonplace Book, held by Villanova’s Distinctive Collections, is an example of such a manuscript.

Photograph of Linehan’s Lament of Mary Queen of Scots

While giving a glimpse into the life of Linehan, Linehan’s commonplace book also gives the reader an understanding of what literature was being consumed by Americans in the late 19th century. Linehan’s 19th century commonplace book is filled with numerous poems, and many of which are from an array of American, Scottish, and Irish poets. Temporally, the poetry found in Linehan’s manuscript ranges from the late 16th century all the way to the 19th century. This is significant as it points to the reach of the different types of literature that Irish Americans were being exposed to in the 19th century. From Thomas Moore to a 16th century earl, Wentworth Dillon, 4th Earl of Roscommon, this commonplace books brings features a wide array of poets and poetry styles. Furthermore, the poetry book also features a poem by Robert Burns. Burns was a Scottish poet and lyricist, and his poem “Lament of Mary Queen of Scots,” is one of the poems that Linehan copied into her commonplace book. Burns was well-known for his poetry being in the Scottish dialect, and Burns is known as the pioneer of the Romantic movement. The poem, “Lament of Mary Queen of Scots,” is from the perspective of Mary Queen of Scots, and details the events of her life and her agony of not seeing her son grow up. This poem fits in with the overall theme of loss and sadness that is laden throughout Linehan’s commonplace book. Moreover, the variations in the text from Linehan’s handwritten copied version of the poem to Burns’s original poem is also interesting to note. This is through the way Linehan omitted much of Burns’s Scottish dialect, and opted to substitute the traditional English spelling of the words. However, Linehan did at times maintain the Scottish dialect in the poem and it is hard to discern a pattern in how she chose to keep the Scottish dialect or omit it.

Photograph of Linehan’s biorgraphical information on page 44

This manuscript also allows a deeper understanding of an Irish-American woman during the 19th century. According to the manuscript, as well as state records, Linehan was born in Cork, Ireland c. 1851 to Michael and Catherine Linehan. When Linehan moved to Georgia in the late 19th century, she met her husband John Ring, and on September 27, 1875 Ring and Linehan married. Almost a year after their marriage, both Ring and Linehan died. Ring died on September 04, 1876, and Linehan died September 21, 1876. These events are chronicled by a family member in Linehan’s commonplace book, presumably by a relative, as the page detailing this is marked “J.M. Linehan.” After Linehan’s death, J.M. Linehan, who recorded Mary and her husband’s death in the manuscript, began to record poetry in the book as well. Both selections of poetry made by Mary Linehan and J.M. Linehan, are all seemingly concerned with fidelity, infidelity, and loss. This is important to note, as these themes defined the types of poetry found in the book, and seemingly one could infer that these poems were chosen because of their likeness in theme to one another.

As a whole, Linehan’s poetry commonplace book offers a glimpse into the literature one Irish-American woman was consuming during the 19th century; however, it also offers a deeper understanding as to the types of literature being consumed by the broader 19th century American public.

———–

Emily Poteat is a graduate assistant in Irish Studies and Falvey Memorial Library’s Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement Department, and a graduate student in the History Department.


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Content Roundup – First Two Weeks – August 2021

p. 6, Minute book, Friends of Irish Freedom: Patrick H. Pearse Branch, December 19, 1916-November 21, 1920

Just a few new Dime Novels and Story Papers for your reading and research needs as the summer heat continues! Also completed this is the full and annotated transcription of the Joseph McGarrity Collection Minute book of the Friends of Irish Freedom: Patrick H. Pearse Branch ranging from December 19, 1916 to November 21, 1920.

Dime Novel and Popular Literature

Fiction

Diamond Dick and the safe-crackers; or, Two-spot’s level best / by the author of “Diamond Dick.”

Diamond Dick and the safe-crackers; or, Two-spot’s level best / by the author of “Diamond Dick.”
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:641657]

Rattlesnake Ralph’s lightning pards
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:652663]

Periodicals

The Girls’ companion, v. VI, no. 4, January 26, 1907

Girls’ Companion (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:652562?lookfor=title%3Ajanuary]

Detail, p. 105, Golden Days : for Boys and Girls, v. VIII, no. 7, January 15, 1887

Golden Days (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:651257]

New York Ledger (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:650904]

Detail from p. [313], The Portland transcript, v. XIX, no. 40, Saturday, Jan. 12, 1856

Portland Transcript (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:652035]

Weekly Novelette (1 issue)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:651635]

Joseph McGarrity Collection

Papers

Minute book, Friends of Irish Freedom: Patrick H. Pearse Branch, December 19, 1916-November 21, 1920 (Transcription added under “Downloads”)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:137285]


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Content Roundup – Last Week – July 2021

p. [19], Scrapbook (Part 4) of Jessie Margaret Ada Mutch, January-August 1945

Recently digitized and available for use this week are a number of items from the Museum of Nursing History’s Jessie Margaret Ada Mutch Collection, more Dime Novels and Story Paper issues, and a typescript letter from the James Wheeler Collection of Polar Exploration.

Dime Novel and Popular Literature Collection

Fiction

Diamond Dick’s maverick; or, The secret of Old Copper-Top / by the author of “Diamond Dick.”

Diamond Dick, Jr. (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:644413]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:644453]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:644864]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:652241]

Hank Starr at Pryor Creek; or, Old Jack Drew heard from / by Jim Kearney
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:651445]

Periodicals

Frank Leslie’s Chimney Corner (1 issue + 1 supplement added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:383292?lookfor=title%3A235]

Detail, [1] p., The New York Ledger, v. XXVIII, no. 12, May 11, 1872

New York Ledger (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:650892]

Philadelphia home weekly, v. XXIV, no. 44, October 24, 1866

Philadelphia Home Weekly (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:650728]

Portland Transcript (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:652023]

The Weekly novelette, v. IV, no. 12, Saturday, December 4, 1858

Weekly Novelette (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:651615]

James Wheeler Collection of Polar Exploration

Typescript Letter, To: Mr. Mac’Alister From: Fridtjof Nansen, January 20, 1893
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:652281]

Museum of Nursing History

Jessie Margaret Ada Mutch Collection

“Road Map of France” from Scrapbook (Part 4) of Jessie Margaret Ada Mutch, January-August 1945

Scrapbook (Part 4) of Jessie Margaret Ada Mutch, January-August 1945
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:652293]

Photograph, Jessie Margaret Ada Mutch in nursing cap and uniform, undated
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:652000]

“Nurses Playing Basketball, 1945”

Photographs, Nurses playing basketball, March 7, 1945
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:652006]

Item 28, front, Packet (2) of Jessie Margaret Ada Mutch, 1942 – 1953

Packet (2) of Jessie Margaret Ada Mutch, 1942 – 1953
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:651092]


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Last Modified: July 29, 2021