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Content Roundup – Second Week – November 2019

Photograph, Basketball (Varsity), NCAA Championship Team and President Ronald Reagan at the White House, 1985

For your reading and research pleasure this week we offer a number of newly digitized materials. Especially noteworthy are additional Villanova basketball photographs including the 1985 NCAA championship team, some very early story paper issues, and the newly acquired Astronomical Observations manuscript penned by the noted American writer H.P. Lovecraft.

Americana

H.P. Lovecraft Collection

[17] p. ; Astronomical observations

Astronomical observations / made by H.P. Lovecraft, 598, Angell St, Providence, R.I. U.S.A. years 1909-1915
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:593162]

Dime Novel and Popular Literature

Fiction

The red scourge; or, How Morgan, the buccaneer, stormed the citadel / by an old salt
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:588026]

Periodicals

Boston Weekly Magazine (2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:589417]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:589425]

Chicago Ledger, v. XXXVIII, no. 9, Saturday, February 26, 1910

Chicago Ledger (2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:591497]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:591517]

The Evening fire-side, or Weekly intelligence in the civil, natural, moral, literary and religious worlds, v. I, no. 19, seventh-day, 20th of fourth month, 1805

Evening Fire-side (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:582149]

The Graphic : an illustrated weekly newspaper, v. XVIII, no. 457, Saturday, August 31, 1878

The Graphic (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:583918]

Philadelphia Saturday Courier (2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:591569]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:585462]

The Portland transcript, v. XIV, no. 27, October 19, 1850

Portland Transcript (3 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:592014]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:592026]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:592038]

The weekly museum, v. XVI, no. 15, [whole] no. 796, Saturday, April 14, 1804

Weekly Museum (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:582133]

The John F. Smith, III and Susan B. Smith Antique Map Collection

A map of the country from Rariton River in East Jersey, to Elk Head in Maryland: shewing the several operations of the American & British armies, in 1776 & 1777 / Neele sc., Strand
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:584497]

Philadelphia Ceili Group

Fall Festival 1982, Tape #7, Side One
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:593584]

Villanova Digital Collection

Photograph, Basketball (Varsity), Rollie Massimino, Head Coach, 1980

Basketball Images (13 images added, including the 1985 NCAA championship team)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Collection/vudl:579126]

Falvey Memorial Library

Mosaic: News from Falvey Memorial Library (Fall 2019 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:592895]


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eBook available: Two American Boys with the Allied Armies

Cover imageOur latest Distributed Proofreaders project to become a Project Gutenberg eBook is another World War I juvenile, Two American Boys with the Allied Armies, by “Major Sherman Crockett.” This book is the first in a series, in which two American youths visit the European war zone in search of a missing relative.

Published in 1915, before the United States entered into the conflict, the tone of the book is quite different from war novels of the following years, in which anti-German sentiment was much more explicit. Here, the main characters are careful to maintain neutrality, expressing admiration for bravery on both sides of the conflict, and rendering aid to the injured without prejudice. The portrayal of war is sometimes more nuanced than usual for this type of book as well, making some effort to separate the actions of individuals from those of nations.

However, just because the portrayal of conflict is in some ways more subtle than in other similar books, nothing else about the volume offers much subtlety. The titular boys, a pair of cousins, are drawn with little shading: Jack is always right and does everything perfectly, and Amos simply follow’s Jack’s lead, fawning along the way. Back story tends to be filled in through expositionary dialogue, with absolutely no regard for naturalism. The book also expresses quite strong feelings for the value of unquestioning patriotism.

Along with other series books of this vintage, this title fills in more of the picture of how an active conflict was used to sell books to children in the early 20th century, and what messages publishers thought were appropriate to present in this context.

The entire book is available to read online or download in popular eBook formats through Project Gutenberg.


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Content Roundup – First Week – November 2019

Newly digitized offerings this week include a variety of materials. Especially noteworthy are 3 additional maps from the John F. Smith, III and Susan B. Smith Antique Map Collection and a significant number of story paper and newspaper issues. In addition, more historic Villanova basketball photographs are also available!

Americana

Flyer, Providence Astronomical Society, [1909?]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:591735]

Dime Novel and Popular Literature

Fiction

Iron and steel; or, The Fall of Port Hudson / by Major A. F. Grant
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:588066]

Periodicals

Chicago Ledger (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:590282]

International Weekly Illustrated Ladies’ Journal, part 18, no. 36

International Weekly Illustrated Ladies’ Journal (5 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:583015]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:583035]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:583055]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:589578]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:589598]

The Philadelphia Saturday Courier, v. VII, no. 321, Saturday, May 20, 1837.

Philadelphia Saturday Journal (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:585478]

Portland Transcript (3 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:588118]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:588130]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:588142]

The Household, v. 6, no. 8, August, 1873

Household (3 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:588834]

Judge, v. 23, no. 561, July 16, 1892

Judge (2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:589180]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:589199]

Street and Smith’s New York Weekly : a journal of useful knowledge, romance, amusement, & c. , v. 51, no. 11, January 4, 1896.

New York Weekly (21 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:302221?lookfor=id%3A%5B%22vudl%3A589000%22+TO+%22vudl%3A592000%22%5D]

The Odd fellow, v. XII, no. 21, Wednesday, February 12, 1851

Odd Fellow (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:582105]

Selectin, p. 5, Saturday Night, v. XXXIII, no. 41, Saturday, May 30, 1896

Saturday Night (5 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:570282?lookfor=title%3Amay]

The John F. Smith, III and Susan B. Smith Antique Map Collection

Americae nova tabula / Auct. Guiljelmo Blaeuw
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:579434]

Carte de France : dressée pour l’usage du Roy / par Guillaume Delisle, premier geographe de Sa Majesté, de l’Académie Royale des sciences
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:584492]

The East Indies : including more particularly the British Dominions on the Continent of India / by the Revd. John Blair
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:579439]

Joseph McGarrity Collection

Newspapers

The Gaelic American

4 issues added: 1904
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:589517]

28 issues added: 1918 / 1919
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:266848]

Newspapers

Daily Cleveland Herald (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:580499]

Radnor Historical Society

The Suburban (Wayne Times Edition), v. 24, no. 8, May 22, 1908

The Suburban, Wayne Times Edition (1908: 10 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:581980]

Villanova Digital Collection

Athletics

Basketball Images (5 photographs added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Collection/vudl:579126]


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From the Archives: Special Olympics Celebration!

Skill, Courage, Sharing, Joy – Tenants of the Spirit of Special Olympics

In celebration of Villanova’s Special Olympics Fall Festival, held November 1-3, 2019, University Archives has a small exhibit about Special Olympics at Villanova University on display. Special Olympics events on campus has a long history starting in 1979 to now being known as the largest annual student-run Special Olympics event today.

Case display

The exhibit contains facsimiles of photographs and programs from the early days of the event. All materials are from collections located in the University Archives. The case was curated by Beaudry Allen, Preservation and Digital Archivist.

photographs being prepped for the exhibit.            A print being cut with paper cutter.

Images of putting the exhibit together.

You can check out the case on the 3rd floor of Falvey Library for the rest of the semester.

Photograph of exhibit case

For more information about the Special Olympics and how to get involved, check out the Special Olympic website!


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“Revising the Cold War”: Selections from Distinctive Collections

This Wednesday we will be joining The Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest for the next event in their six-part series on “Revisionist History”: Revising the Cold War. Rebecca Oviedo, Distinctive Collections Coordinator, and Laura Bang, Distinctive Collections Librarian, will be there before the start of the event with some selections from Special Collections to whet your appetite and help get the conversation going. Our Distinctive Collections have plenty of primary sources to offer different perspectives, contemporary insight, and aid “revisionist history.”  Here is a sneak peak of just a few of the items we will be bringing:

 

 

These striking illustrations from popular weekly magazine Collier’s, August 5, 1950 issue depict a burning New York City under nuclear attack. The imagined scenario ran in the article titled, “Hiroshima, U.S.A.: Can Anything be Done About It?,” written by John Lear. The first page of the article explains “the story of this story”:

For five years now the world has lived with the dreadful knowledge that atomic warfare is possible. Since last September, when the President announced publicly that the Russians too had produced an atomic explosion, this nation has lived face to face with the terrifying realization that an attack with atomic weapons could be made against us. But, until now, no responsible voice has evaluated the problem constructively, in words everybody can understand. This article performs that service. Collier’s gives it more than customary space in the conviction that, when the danger is delineated and the means to combat it effectively is made clear, democracy will have an infinitely stronger chance to survive.

The article appeared almost exactly 5 years after the U.S. bombing of Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. Though imaginary, the images and data are still arresting. Today, with advanced technology, computer simulation and interactive maps, users can view the frightening effects of nuclear detonation with panelist Alex Wellerstein’s NukeMap.

 

We’ll also have on hand this 1984 publication, “Watermelons Not War: A Support Book for Parenting in the Nuclear Age.” Published by the Nuclear Education Project (NEP), a group of five women who came together shortly after the accident at Three Mile Island in 1979. Concerned about parenting in a nuclear age, they developed this guide to help parents and others develop a sense of hope and “find ways to answer our children’s soul-shaking questions about the world.”

 

 

Our final sneak-peak is the January 1959 cover of Bohemia magazine, the first of a three-part special “Edicion de la Libertad” (Liberty Issue) published in Havana after the triumph of the Cuban Revolution. A portrait of Fidel Castro accompanies the headline “Honor and Glory to the National Hero” – the first time he was called a hero in any Cuban print media. The three issues together represent a turning point in Cuban history and for the publication as well – Bohemia, a popular weekly journal, was founded in 1908 and is still published today. One million copies of this landmark issue were printed to meet expected demand. With 210 pages, it is filled with graphic images of bloodied corpses and bodies of the dead at the hands of Batista’s regime. The stark images stand out between the advertisements for alcohol, tires, cigarettes, and face cream.[1]

 

“Revising the Cold War” will take place Wednesday evening, November 6, in Driscoll Auditorium. We’ll be there at 6 pm! The event starts at 7 pm. For panelists and more information: https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/artsci/lepage/events/revisionist_history.html 

 

[1]Special Collections holds three issues of Bohemia magazine published in Havana, Cuba in January 1959 upon the occasion of the victory of the revolution. Bound presentation volume of Jose Bustamente with title, date, and “Jose Bustamente” on front cover. All issues of Bohemia published between 1910 and 2013 have been digitized and are available on line through The Digital Library of the Caribbean. See also: Richard Denis, “UNA REVISTA AL SERVICIO DE LA NACIÓN: BOHEMIA AND THE EVOLUTION OF CUBAN JOURNALISM (1908-1960)” MA diss., University of Florida, 2016. Retrieved from https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0050550/00001. And Yoani Sanchez, “Bohemia, Latin America’s Oldest Magazine, Destroyed by Censorship,” HuffPost, https://www.huffpost.com/entry/latin-americas-oldest-mag_b_831747. Accessed November 5, 2019.


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Now Digitized!

Over ten years ago, Distinctive Collections posted a blog post, “THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY…,” about the many materials that are too difficult to digitize. Michael Foight, Director of Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement, described how the unique Special Collections materials sometimes are too fragile or too tightly bound to be properly scanned. Another complication brought to light is how complex materials once digitized can lose its context with each other. For example, digitizing scrapbooks with many components are digitized individually may lose the interrelationships between each other and the scrapbook as a whole.  These obstacles highlight how the argument for “digitize everything” is not so simple or easy. But with the years of upgrades to the Villanova Digital Library we are able to revisit the scrapbooks that could not originally be digitized!

A page from the O'Reilly scrapbook. Includes envelopes sent to O'Reilly.A page of O'Reilly Scrapbook. Includes newspaper articles and envelopes.

Robert Maitland O’Reilly Congratulatory Letters Scrapbook

The Robert Maitland O’Reilly Congratulatory Letters Scrapbook, was mentioned as one such scrapbook that could not be digitized, with over a hundred letters in their original envelopes and many loose newspaper clippings. The scrapbook is a compilation of personal and professional congratulatory correspondence upon his appointment as Surgeon General. The letters and telegrams come from across the globe. As mentioned, the complexity and amount of loose material would be very difficult to scan and retain connection. Today, the digital library allows for pagination for the scrapbook and complex digital objects to be individually scanned yet retain connection as one entire entity in the digital library.

Though the digital library infrastructure did not solve all the problems of digitization. What remained a huge obstacle was the format itself. Over the years the binding of the scrapbook had deteriorated making the pages brittle, so each page had to be handled carefully to not exasperate the pages crumbling in scanning. Even the letters themselves were quite fragile.  Letters were made of different kinds of paper making some delicate or hard to remove from the envelopes. Each letter had to be opened carefully and set down with bone folder creasers so the letters could be open just enough without too much pressure to be scanned without ripping the paper.

A page of the O'Reilly Scrapbook with a letter pulled out.      A letter tightly folded.

 

The entire process was done a couple hours each week and done over the span of eight months. Evoking Edgar Albert Guest’s poem,”It Couldn’t Be Done,” the scrapbook is done and can be viewed in the digital library.

So who is Robert Maitland O’Reilly?

Robert Maitland O’Reilly (January 14, 1845 – November 3, 1912) was the 20th Surgeon General of the United States Army, serving from September 7, 1902 to January 14, 1909. O’Reilly was born in Philadelphia and studied medicine at the University of Pennsylvania when the Civil War broke out. In August 1862, he was appointed as a medical cadet and served in several army hospitals, including Cuyler General Hospital in Philadelphia, a hospital in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and in the office of the medical director of the Army. After the war, O’Reilly return to University of Pennsylvania to finish his studies.  Upon graduation, O’Reilly continued working in the military and was chief surgeon for several units during the Spanish-American War. In addition, O’Reilly held appointments as a physician in the White House during both of President Grover Cleveland’s administrations.

In 1902, O’Reilly was appointed as Surgeon General of the United States Army and he and his administration made significant improvements to the army medical corps and medical research within the Army.

The scrapbook is also on display now in the exhibit, “Scraps for Keeps,” currently open to the public on the first floor of Falvey Library. His personal correspondence is also discoverable in our digital library and his other personal papers can be physically accessed through the American Catholic Historical Society:

O’Reilly, Robert M. Papers, 1864-1916 (MC 34), Philadelphia Archdiocesan Historical Research Center.


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The Shelf List, October 2019

The Shelf List highlights items added to the catalog in the past month. Some of these are new acquisitions and some are items from our backlog. Follow the links to view the full catalog records.

17th-century map of the North Atlantic Ocean.

Terra Nova ac maris tractus circa Novam Franciam, Angliam, Belgium, Venezuelam, Novam Andalusiam, Guianam, et Brasiliam / F. de Wit.

Art Curiosa Collection

Cook, David C. The Boys’ World. Elgin, Ill. ; Chicago: D.C. Cook Pub. Co., 1902.

The Daily Cleveland Herald. Cleveland [Ohio]: Fairbanks, Benedict & Co, 1853.

Irons, Archie C., Old Sleuth, and Spencer Dair. The Boy Rifles, Or, The Underground Camp. Cleveland: Arthur Westbrook Company, 1912.

Postage Stamps of Ireland. Dublin: Republic of Ireland, 1922-2018.

Young Broadbrim Weekly. New York, N.Y.: Street & Smith, 1903. [20 issues added]

 

Early American Imprints

Rutland Herald. Rutland, Vt.: William Fay, 1823.

 

The John F. Smith, III and Susan B. Smith Antique Map Collection

Blair, John, and Thomas Kitchin. The East Indies: Including More Particularly the British Dominions On the Continent of India. [London]: [s.n.], 1773.

Blaeu, Willem Janszoon. Americae Nova Tabula. [S.l.]: [s.n.], 1642.

Jefferys, Thomas. The Island of Cuba With Part of the Bahama Banks & the Martyrs. London: Printed for Robt. Sayer, Map & Printseller, No. 53, in Fleet Street, 1775.

Jefferys, Thomas, and Robert Baker. Antigua Surveyed By Robert Baker, Surveyor General of That Island. “Improved edition 1810.”. London: Laurie & Whittle, 53 Fleet Street, 1810.

L’Isle, Guillaume de. Carte De France: Dressée Pour L’usage Du Roy. Paris: Chez l’auteur sur le quai de l’Horloge, 1721.

La Pérouse, Jean-François de Galaup. Carte Particuliere De La Côte Du Nord-ouest De L’Amérique Reconnue Par Les Frégates Françaises La Boussole Et L’Astrolabe En 1786. London: G.G. & J. Robinson, Paternoster Row, 1798.

Wit, Frederik de. Terra Nova Ac Maris Tractus Circa Novam Franciam, Angliam, Belgium, Venezuelam, Novam Andalusiam, Guianam, Et Brasiliam. t’Amsterdam: Gedruckt by Fredrick de Wit in de Kalverstraet, 1675.

 

Villanova Collection

Millares Vázquez, Manuel., and Nacho C. Beiro. 21 Años: (novela). Edición non venal. [Boiro]: A.C. Barbantia, 2018.

 

If you are interested in viewing any Special Collections materials, you can schedule an appointment with our staff.


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Halloween tricks and treats with Distinctive Collections staff

Distinctive Collections staff hosted a Halloween Open House yesterday, with spooky treasures on display in the Rare Book Room and treats in Room 206 across the hall. Laura Bang, Distinctive Collections Librarian, and Rebecca Oviedo, Distinctive Collections Coordinator, welcomed visitors in the Rare Book Room while Beaudry Rae Allen, Preservation & Digital Archivist, dished up treats in Room 206. Our featured treat was a Prohibition-era mocktail called the St. Augustine. We also had people point out spooky spots on a campus map. It was a spooktacular event! (Click the images below to see them larger.)

Halloween event sign next to the door.

The entrance to the Rare Book Room.

Two students looking at material in cases.

We had spooky treasures on display in cases and on a table in the Rare Book Room.

Four people looking at books on a table.

Three students looking at books on a table.

Meanwhile, across the hall in Room 206, we had lots of treats.

Beaudry served up our featured treat, the St. Augustine mocktail (vanilla ice cream, vanilla and strawberry syrups, and club soda).

Visitors added stickers to a map of Villanova to mark haunted spots on campus.

The map with spooky spots. Beware!

Library staff in costumes, left to right: Chris Hallberg, Sarah Wingo, Kallie Stahl, Laura Bang, Rebecca Oviedo, Beaudry Rae Allen, Shawn Proctor.

Thank you to everyone who stopped by! You can find many of the materials that were on display in the Rare Book Room in our Digital Library.

Photos in this post were taken by Laura Bang, Annabelle Humiston, Rebecca Oviedo, and Daniella Snyder.


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A mini-podcast of Halloween treats!

Happy Halloween! We have a short podcast of Halloween treats, featuring poems and a story from our Digital Library.

“All-Hallowe’en” by Thomas Dickson Finletter, in Pennsylvania’s Verse, p. 109.

“Under the Trysting Tree” in The New York family story paper, v. XXIII, no. 1151, Saturday, October 26, 1895, p. 8.

“The Uninvited Hallowe’en Guest: A Mysterious Fatality” by Lydia M. Dunham O’Neil, in Comfort, v. XXIV, no. 12, October 1912, p. 2,4.

This podcast featured the voice talents of Emma Poley, Demian Katz, and Caroline Sipio. The audio was edited and produced by Gabriella Bernocco, and executive produced by Laura Bang.


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When the stars are right: H.P. Lovecraft’s astronomical manuscript added to Distinctive Collections

Front cover

The latest manuscript added to Villanova University’s Distinctive Collections is the rare astronomical observation notebook by the noted horror author H.P. Lovecraft from the years 1909-1915. Observing from his Providence, Rhode Island home, Lovecraft noted, and then drew, various celestial phenomena including passing comets.

The notable Lovecraft story, The Colour Out of Space, published in September 1927 in Amazing Stories features a malevolent entity from space, and perhaps influenced from a comet or meteorite Lovecraft observed and depicted in his own hand in this manuscript; a film adaption of this story, Color out of Space, staring the prolific Nicolas Cage is currently in theaters.

Lovecraft’s stories were most notably featured in his lifetime in the pulp magazine Weird Tales, along with other authors such as Robert Howard (author of the Conan stories) and Clark Ashton Smith.

The October 1949 issue of the rare publication The Lovecraft Collector featured a partial transcription of the manuscript, by the then-owner David Keller, but this merely whetted the appetite of scholars eager to fully examine the manuscript which had been in private collections and unavailable for access.

The manuscript is currently on display in the Rare Book Room of Falvey Memorial Library along with supplemental materials through October. Slated for digitization in November and full transcription by a notable Lovecraft scholar soon after, this manuscript will bring added attention to astronomy on campus by documenting a notable American amateur astronomer’s work observing the heavens, especially given the significance of Villanova University’s Department of Astrophysics & Planetary Science and their open public observatory.

Rare Book Room, Falvey Memorial Library, Villanova University


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Last Modified: October 30, 2019