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From the Archives: AIDS Awareness Week

AIDS Ribbon Illustration, 1995

In continuation of presenting traditions of the past, the University Archives draws attention to Villanova’s AIDS Awareness Week held in the early 1990s. June as Pride Month is a celebration of the progress of LGBTQIA+ community and the COVID-19 pandemic amplifies a time of reflection of forty years ago when the world started to live through another epidemic that suffered from rampant misinformation and government inaction. Just like with COVID-19, health inequities and social injustices, stigma, fear and bigotry around HIV/AIDS fueled the spread and destruction of so many lives. AIDS remains decades on an unspoken epidemic, but is so clearly entrenched in our history and its affects reverberate through the LGBTQIA+ community and beyond.

Through articles from the Villanovan, the University Archives highlights how Villanova community responded to the AIDS crisis. Villanova established an AIDS task force in the 1980s as the virus was gaining media traction. Into the late eighties, lectures and panel discussions would be sponsored by student organizations or departments on campus about the virus and transmission. Though, through perceived lack of interest and advocacy, the task force faded away by the end of the eighties. The necessity to address the crisis really emerged in the early 1990s and the task force was reorganized in 1992 (Compitiello, 1992). By the early 1990s, AIDS cases had peaked and college campus across the nation were faced with the reality of positive cases on campus (CDC, 2001).

In 1991, the University started AIDS Awareness day, which expanded into AIDS Awareness Week in 1993. Awareness Week included invited speakers, panel discussions, student performances, masses, and vigils. The main goals were,

Raise awareness about the impact of HIV/AIDS; to offer HIV/AIDS educational programs during the week; to create an opportunity for spiritual reflection on the impact of HIV/AIDS upon the University community at the beginning of the Lenten season; to provide members of the University community with opportunities for reconciliation and for consideration of their own personal outreach in the context of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and to raise money for local HIV/AIDS care advocates and provider (Lee, 1994).

Panel discussions and lectures would cover questions related to AIDS in relation to discrimination, health care, and how perception is affected by the Church and what is the Church’s response to HIV/AIDS.

One of the most longstanding traditions has been selected panels of the Names Projects AIDS Memorial Quilt on display at the Connelly Center (which continued in to the 2000s).

In 1994, Villanova started to contribute to the quilting project. Here are images from the “Have a Heart” Quilting Bee campaign in 1995. Students could help with quilting and banner making at St.Mary’s Library.

For more information on the AIDS Awareness events on campus, visit the Villanovan in the Digital Library: https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:183783

 

 


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eBook available: On Time; or, Bound to Get There

Once again, a book from our Digital Library has been released as a Project Gutenberg eBook with the help of the Distributed Proofreaders project. The latest release is On Time; or, Bound to Get There, by Oliver Optic.

Oliver Optic was a popular and prolific author of juvenile fiction during the second half of the 20th century, who was often published alongside his slightly better-remembered contemporary, Horatio Alger, Jr. Both Alger and Optic wrote stories about ethical behavior and the rewards of hard work, and their output influenced generations of young readers and helped to define the idealized view of “American values.”

On Time is the third volume of Optic’s “Lake Shore Series,” which focuses on the fictitious Lake Ucayga and surrounding towns like the also-fictitious Ruoara. In this particular adventure, a competition has heated up between a rail service (run by a Captain Toppleton) and a ferry service (belonging to a Colonel Wimpleton), both of which are trying to deliver passengers to their destinations as efficiently (and profitably) as possible. The book’s young protagonist, Wolf Penniman, joins the fray on the side of the ferry, determined to win out through fair play and honesty.

The book is certainly not subtle about its moral lessons, but its very deliberate preaching is accompanied by some colorful (or at very least colorfully-named) characters and places, and a plot that portrays a reasonably engaging (if not particularly dramatic) battle of wits between rival 19th-century capitalists.

You can read the whole book (or download it in popular eBook formats) through Project Gutenberg.


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Content Roundup – First week – June 2021

Engraving, [Home Rule], 1882.

This week just a few new digital materials for your review, including additional 2021 undergraduate honors theses, more story paper issues and a few Dime Novels.

Dime Novel and Popular Literature

Fiction

The artist’s love / by Emma D.E.N. Southworth.
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649899]

Diamond Dick’s divvy; or, The rival outlaw chiefs / by W. B. Lawson
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:641433]

Diamond Dick, Jr.’s prize tangle; or, A queer play at cross purposes / by W.B. Lawson
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:650131]

Tom Wright at Bartlett’s Ranch; or, Bucking the cowboys of the great Lone Land / by Robert Steel
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649697]

Periodicals

Boys’ World (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:647293]

[33] p., Frank Leslie’s Chimney Corner, v. IX, no. 211, June 12, 1869

Frank Leslie’s Chimney Corner (2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649008]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649028]

Golden Days : for Boys and Girls, v. VIII, no. 1, December 4, 1886

Golden Days (volume index + 2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Collection/vudl:650112]

New York Ledger (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:648147]

Front cover, detail, Saturday Night, v. V, no. 52, Saturday, September 19, 1868

Saturday Night (1 issue)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649170]

People’s Home Journal (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:648299]

Portland Transcript (4 issues)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649817?lookfor=title%3Ajune]

Image Collection

Engraving, “Home Rule”, 1882
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:650589]

Villanova Student author collection

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Thesis (15 added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Search/NewItem?range=5&department=&filter%5B%5D=format%3A%22Villanova+Student+Authorship%22]

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Falvey Then and Now, Through the lens of an Intern

  In my senior year of college, I found myself in a stressful living situation and so became a frequent visitor to the basement reading room of Falvey Library. We became fast friends since we spent so much time together (the moment it opened until its closing). At a time of immense confusion and uncertainty, Falvey embraced me with a quiet, steady sense of permanence that I so desperately needed. Yes, it was an escape, but it was also the perfect place for reflection without distraction. It was where a young woman could uncover her inner strength and achieve academic success through focus and fortitude. These very qualities would help me get through the tragedy of the 9-11 terrorist attacks that I experienced in New York, not long after graduation.  

  Twenty years later, the library beckons again, this time as an intern finishing up a Master’s in Library and Information Science from Clarion University. It’s proven to be a very different experience than as an undergrad, especially amidst a pandemic where movement is limited. Students and faculty are finding their own ways through another stressful period of history, and the library evolves. There’s still permanence in those physical walls, though they’ve become less significant for me. Indeed, what I’ve learned most is that the library has played a key role in tearing down metaphorical walls in order to improve access to information. Of course, it’s not just the building itself that holds weight, but the precious information it maintains waiting for students and faculty to discover. 

  With urgency, the pandemic has revealed the importance of information without barriers and the speed in which researchers and scientists need unencumbered access to digital journal articles, studies, and data sets. These concepts drive the Open Access publishing movement, which has been of particular interest to me as information needs change amidst this pandemic. I was thrilled to have the opportunity to work with Sarah Wipperman in the Scholarly Communications Department on a guide to Open Access (OA). Sarah was generous with her time, patient with questions, and incredibly knowledgeable about copyright, fair use, and scholarly publishing in general. We explored big picture concepts pertaining to new ways of publishing such as: What is Open Access? How can it affect stakeholders? What OA options and funding are available at Villanova and beyond? How will publishing in various ways affect the breadth of readership? The guide we developed presents students and faculty with information regarding different avenues for publishing their work. Each scholarly publishing experience is unique, but arming writers and researchers with quality information and options prior to signing agreements and publishing is essential. We hope that the document we created will be a useful tool in helping Villanovans make pivotal publishing decisions now and into the future.  

  While this internship hasn’t been in person, I still hear the student and faculty voices, this time in the articles I’ve read and archived for Beaudry Allen with the Documenting Covid Digital Archives project. While I archived articles about significant events in the past year which seem indelibly linked to the COVID-19 pandemic such as lockdowns, local BLM protests, themes of racial inequity, sexual assaults, vaccination efforts, effects on learning and the economy, I found myself eventually gravitating toward the stories told by individuals, which vary according to experience and societal lens. A look back on the year from the Villanovan Magazine, “A Letter to the Class of 2021”, Philadelphia Magazine’s “Coronavirus Pandemic Impact Stories” provide the viewpoints of regular Villanovans and Philadelphians struggling to see the light at the end of the tunnel in this pandemic. We hope that the content captured during this difficult time will provide future generations with a balanced perspective and general history, as well as a means of processing the events of these last 18 months. Afterall, the effects of the pandemic reach well beyond the virus itself. Experience has shown this Villanovan that while we cannot control negative events that arise, we can process and learn from them, and try to make sense of what has occurred. In due course, these experiences will shape us, and the university itself, in ways we’d never imagine.  

_________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*The intern, age 9, joined by the Wildcat, at Sibling’s Weekend (circa 1986) with a lifetime ahead of her. 

By Anne Walkenhorst                                                                                               

Scholarly Communications and Digital Archive Intern 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania (ALA accredited) MLS spring 2021 

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eBook available: Guide to Fortune-Telling by Dreams

The latest eBook added to Project Gutenberg using scans from our Digital Library (processed by the Distributed Proofreaders project) is Guide to Fortune-Telling by Dreams, another issue of the “Multum in Parvo Library,” a series of chapbooks billed as the “smallest magazine in the world.”

This particular issue provides interpretations of a variety of dream themes and images, organized alphabetically. Since this is a fortune-telling book, the interpretations are not focused on psychological implications, but rather on how these serve as good or bad omens. Some suggested implications are surprising — apparently dreaming of beans is more likely to signal doom than dreaming of beheading — but most of the predictions are fairly similar and fall into a small number of general categories.

Needless to say, the modern reader is not going to find this very useful; for that matter, it’s questionable whether the 19th-century reader would have found it useful either. However, like the other books in this series, it serves as a potentially interesting cultural artifact.

If you want to take a look for yourself, the full text can be read online or downloaded in popular eBook formats from Project Gutenberg.


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From the Archives: New Exhibit, Old Tradition

By Beaudry Rae Allen

Junior Week Committee, 1934

Distinctive Collections is excited to announce our new Spring exhibit, Blazers & Class Rings: Junior Week at Villanova.

Corsage pinning, 1951

Corsage pinning, 1951

Take a peek into Villanova traditions from the past with this digital exhibit that explores Junior Week, one of the most popular week-long events on campus. The honored tradition of Juniors receiving their senior blazers and class ring, celebrating all things Junior, and, of course, a special visit from Mother. All the items in the exhibit are from the University Archives.

Junior Week Mascot, 1948

Junior Week Mascot, 1948


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Content Roundup – Mid May – 2021

More newly digitized content from the end of the spring 2021 semester including more story paper issues, more dime novels, an early driving map of the Philly area from 1884, a few items from the Society of The Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, some of the 2021 Undergraduate Honors Theses, and some photographs of the Villanova Wildcat.

Dime Novel and Popular Literature

Fiction

Diamond Dick’s deuce-ace; or, The freebooters of Flathead Lake / by W. B. Lawson

Diamond Dick, Jr. (3 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:646199]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:641270]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:641473]

Betrothed for a day : or, Queenie Trevalyn’s Love Test / by Laura Jean Libbey.
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:647722]

Love’s labor won / by E.D.E.N. Southworth.
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:646739]

Phil at bay; or, True Yankee grit / by the author of “Phil and Ralph.”
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:643503]

Gentleman Joe’s long shot; or, Defying death in duty’s name / by the author of “Gentleman Joe”.
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649659]

Non-Fiction

Some castles in Spain / by Geo. William Curtis
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:648191]

Periodicals

Frank Leslie’s Chimney Corner, v. IX, no. 209, May 29, 1869

Frank Leslie’s Chimney Corner (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:648988]

New York Ledger (3 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:648123]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:646287]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:648135]

Philadelphia Home Weekly (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:648980]

Portland Transcript (volume index + 7 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649817]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:642691]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649817?lookfor=title%3Amay]

Selection, p. [1], Saturday Night, v. V, no. 51, Saturday, September 12, 1868

Saturday Night (2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:647315]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649158]

Police News (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:386627]

The Weekly Novelette (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:647249]

Leisure Hours (1 issue added):
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:638341]

Boy’s World (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:646299]

The Society of The Friendly Sons of St. Patrick for The Relief of Emigrants from Ireland

Program, Testimonial Dinner to The Honorable Robert E. Briscoe, Lord Mayor of Dublin, Ireland, April 23, 1957

Program, Testimonial Dinner to The Honorable Robert E. Briscoe, Lord Mayor of Dublin, Ireland, April 23, 1957
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649846]

Program, 139th Annual Banquet, Society of the Friendly Sons of Saint Patrick, March 17, 1910
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649818]

Photograph, 185th Annual Banquet, Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, March 17, 1956
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649858]

Rambles, Travels, and Maps

Southwest segment, Map, New driving map of Philadelphia and surroundings, 1884

Map, New driving map of Philadelphia and surroundings, 1884
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649866]

Villanova student author

Undergraduate Honors Theses

2021 Theses (6 added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:650093]

Villanova Digital Collection

Villanova Wildcat

https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649158

Villanova Wildcat (5 items added):
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:620489?type=AllFields&filter%5B%5D=topic_facet%3A%22Wildcat+%28Villanova+University%29+–+Photographs%22]


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Distinctive Summer Reading, 2021 edition

Here are the books that top the reading piles of the Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement staff this summer. Most can by found via stocked online booksellers while some are also available in digital formats for interested readers. And for even more suggests here are the selections for past summers 2019 and 2020,

From Beaudry Allen, Preservation and Digital Archivist:

Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo- Yes, I know it’s on Netflix but I want to read it first.

The Ladies of the Secret Circus by Constance Sayer- It’s about a family curse spanning decades with the circus as the backdrop.

Violette Noziere, A Story of Murder in 1930s Paris By Sarah Maza- About the case of eighteen year old Violette Noziere, which became a French obsession in 1933, poisoning her parents.

Sexual Citizens: A Landmark Study of Sex, Power, and Assault on Campus by Jennifer Hirsch and Shamus Khan- A recommendation from Dr. Amy Way, who had this book part of her COM 3490 course.

Death and the Pearl Maiden: Plague, Poetry, England by David Coley- I am EZBorrowing this book about England’s literary response to the plague.

From Laura Bang, Distinctive Collections Librarian Archivist:

Fiction

A Master of Djinn by P. Djèlí Clark.

How to Catch a Queen by Alyssa Cole.

A Cuban Girl’s Guide to Tea and Tomorrow by Laura Taylor Namey.

Nonfiction

Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning by Cathy Park Hong.

Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest by Suzanne Simard.

Goodbye, Again: Essays, Reflections, and Illustrations by Jonny Sun.

From Michael Foight, Director Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement:

The Filing Cabinet: a vertical history of information by Craig Robertson – a history of the ubiquitous filing cabinet (an essay based on the book is available online).

Hearing Homer’s Song: The Brief Life and Big Idea of Milman Parry by Robert Kanigel – biography of the “Darwin of Homeric Studies”.

Information: A Historical Companion, edited by by Ann Blair, Paul Duguid, Anja-Silvia Goeing, and Anthony Grafton – a wapping 904 pages containing the latest on book history and theory ranging from the history of horoscopes to the role of notaries in contemporary society.

Stuart Style: Monarchy, Dress and the Scottish Male Elite by Maria Hayward – one of the first treatments of royal men’s clothing in 17th-century Scotland and its influence on the history of fashion.

Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe by Niall Ferguson – noted historian looks at how governments deal with disaster.

Dress Codes: How the Laws of Fashion Made History by Richard Thompson Ford – law professor looks at formal and informal dress codes especially in current American culture.

Doomed Romance: Broken Hearts, Lost Souls, and Sexual Tumult in Nineteenth-Century America by Christine Leigh Heyrman – excerpted from recovered letters, the story of the teacher Martha Parker and her romance with two men resulting in a love triangle, highlights the roles of duty and love in 19th century America.

From Rebecca Oviedo, Distinctive Collections Librarian Archivist:

Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home by Richard Bell.

The Vanishing Half: A Novel by Brit Bennett

Such a Fun Age by Kiley Reid

Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell


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From The Archives: Spring Zine

The University Archives Spring Zine is Here!

Zine cover

Spring Zine Volume 2, Issue 2 Cover

Oh what a school year it has been!  Under the weight of all the massive changes, chaos, and continued uncertainty, this issue is a brief summary of the Documenting COVID-19 project and other collecting initiatives around the pandemic. It is also a peek into all the new Spring digital exhibits  going live this month from Distinctive Collections.

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eBook available: How to Get Rich

The latest eBook to arrive at Project Gutenberg from our Digital Library (with help from the Distributed Proofreaders project) is How to Get Rich, another title from the “Multum in Parvo Library” series of chapbooks marketed as “the smallest magazine in the world.”

While the title might imply a book full of financial advice, this text really offers just one strategy for getting rich: produce consumable household goods and sell them at a profit. Thus, it turns out to be a collection of recipes.

Books from the late nineteenth century obviously show their age in the twenty-first, but recipe books suffer more than most. The names of ingredients and units of measurement are unfamiliar to the modern reader, and some of the recipes even include materials like lead and mercury which have fallen out of favor due to their harmful effects on human health. It is quite unlikely that anyone will get rich from reading this book. However, they might learn a little bit about advertising, manufacturing and publishing practices of the past, and for this, the book may reward a quick glance.

If you want to take a look for yourself, the full text can be read online or downloaded in popular eBook formats from Project Gutenberg.


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Last Modified: May 12, 2021