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A New Look for An Old Friend: World Shakespeare Bibliography Online

 

drawing of william shakespeare

 

The World Shakespeare Bibliography Online (WSB) is a searchable electronic database consisting of the most comprehensive record of Shakespeare-related scholarship and theatrical productions published or produced worldwide from 1960 to the present. Villanova students can access it through Databases A-Z on Falvey’s website.

If you haven’t ventured over to the WSB in a while you may not be aware that Oxford University Press has taken over publication, as of July 2019. With this change, WSB has undergone some significant cosmetic updates and at least one functional improvement, which will hopefully make the resource easier to navigate.

The most meaningful change for Villanova students is that Falvey’s “Find it” button works for articles in WSB now. Previously WSB was just a bibliography—if someone found an article in it they wanted to check out, they would still need to search for it in Journal Finder or the library’s main search.

When students click on “Find It” now, just like they would to access an article in any of the Library’s other databases, they either be directed to the article or, if Falvey does not have digital access, be given the option to request a scan through interlibrary loan.

 


Sarah Wingo, librarian

Sarah Wingo, MA, MSI, is Liaison Librarian for English Literature, Theatre & Romance Languages at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Distinctive Collections – Preserving our most valued past

By Nathaniel Haeberle-Gosweiler

Villanova University has a lot of history. However, some students and patrons are not aware just how much history is kept by the office of Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement (DCDE) at Falvey Memorial Library. Located on the second floor of the library, DCDE archives and displays books, articles, and artifacts that preserve and maintain history and cultural heritage.

Many people would be surprised what is available to view upon appointment, leading to experiences that Michael Foight, Director of Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement, says are critical for Villanova’s globally-minded students.

“The experience of touching an item that is hundreds if not thousands of years old can change a person’s life. It creates an appreciation of the ephemeral nature of our digital lives. Often it leads to students thinking about how to preserve their communication, whether that be emails or even tweets, for their children and generations to come,” he explains.

Maintaining this collection, containing thousands of historically valuable and culturally important materials, is just one more way Falvey Memorial Library provides a valuable context to academic research.

“For faculty, being able to talk about the history of printing calls to mind the period in which those people were teaching. For example, being able to peruse the first edition of St. Augustine’s The Confessions can lend students increased historical sensitivity when they are reading the book. Teachers making assignments with those artifacts, including transcribing or translating documents, gives back to the greater historical culture,” Michael Foight adds.


Here are some of the notable inclusions of the collections from DCDE, many of which might just surprise you!


What’s the oldest item in the Distinctive Collections?

cunniform tabletA Sumerian clay cuneiform tablet, est. 2000 B.C.E., detailing the taxes paid on a cow!

 

What are the most requested items in Distinctive Collections?

Sherman's legendary frock

Special Collections:

  • William T. Sherman’s frock coat from 1864 (pictured above)
  • Gregor Mendel’s Experiments on Plant Hybridization paper
  • Codex Atlanticus / Leonardo da Vinci (facsimile)
  • John Maynard Keynes’sThe economic consequences of the peace

    Reap Collection:
     
  • Commemorative Box with Sake cup—Celebrating the Invasion of Nanking, China–Seabag

    University Archives Collections:
  • Belle Air yearbooks
  • Commencement Programs
  • Villanovan issues

Nate GosweilerNathaniel Haeberle-Gosweiler is a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Department at Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in Communication at Villanova University.


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TBT: Manifold Blessings

Photo courtesy of Villanova University Digital Library

“Never has America had greater occasion for Thanksgiving than today. Think of the manifold blessings for which we should be profoundly grateful…”

Leslie’s illustrated weekly newspaper, v. 127, no. 3298, November 23, 1918, details the ending of World War I. View the full newspaper on Villanova University’s Digital Library.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.


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New Resources: Taylor and Francis Collections

The Villanova community now also has access to many journals that were previously unavailable. Falvey Library recently acquired three large collections from Taylor and Francis.taylor and francis website

Previously, the library subscribed to fewer than 200 Taylor and Francis journals. But now, Villanovans have access to the complete Social Science and Humanities Library (~1,400 titles), the Science and Technology Library (~500 titles), and the Medical Library (~190 titles).  These collections contain articles published since 1997.


Alfred Fry is Science & Engineering Librarian at Falvey Library.


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New Resources: Forbes Magazine, Fortune Magazine

people working at notebooks on computers

Photo by Helloquence on Unsplash.

The library recently added two foundational business magazine archives to our collection: Forbes and Fortune.

Our coverage of Fortune, founded by Henry Luce, begins with the first issue published during the Great Depression in 1930. Fortune was recognized for departing from dry and statistic heavy business reporting by using images and words to communicate “the dignity and beauty, and smartness and excitement of modern industry” (Miller, 2003).

Steve Forbes, the current editor in chief and great grandson of founder Bertie Charles Forbes, remarked that since 1917 Forbes has “always focus[ed] on the people” and the other constant is Forbes unwavering commitment to “provid[ing] the tools for people who want to get ahead, who want to do business, who want to invest”(Talking Biz, 2017).Forbes Cover

These collections can be used as primary sources for American studies, journalism and business history in general including company histories, wealth studies, as well as for chronicling economic and management trends.  Forbes lists (Billions, Highest Paid, Best Employers and Fortune rankings (Most Admired, Greatest Leaders & 500) are often used as jumping off points by scholars, but the content of Fortune and Forbes magazines are also the subject of numerous scholarly studies in different disciplines including the following:

The full text of both magazines is searchable. Fortune offers some additional nice search features, such as limiting to advertisements, illustrations, and cover stories. Forbes supports searching by some features, such as quotations or poems or images.

Access to these databases is from the Journal Finder or a Books and more search.  Dedicated links are also posted on the Business Subject page.


Linda Hauck is the Business Librarian at Falvey Library.

Works Cited


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New Resources for LGBTQ Research: LGBT Magazine Archive and LGBTQ Thought and Culture

LGBTQ Resources ScreenshotThe library has recently purchased access to two essential LGBTQ+ research resources: Alexander Street’s LGBT Thought and Culture and Proquest’s LGBT Magazine archive. These new additions will greatly bolster the University’s LGBTQ+ research resources and help fill important gaps in our LGBTQ+ and Gender and Women’s Studies collections.

LGBT Thought and Culture provides coverage of the essential works and archival documents of the global LGBTQ+ movement. It includes the Pat Rocco and Jeanne Cordova collections, which contain speeches, correspondences, and ephemeral from these important LGBTQ+ activists. The collection also includes the Magnus Hirshfeld collection, which includes professional correspondence, confidential reports, and court documents from the renowned early 20th century sex researcher.

The collection includes a huge array of limiters including subject heading, archival collections, and media-type, allowing researchers to hone in on very specific aspects of LGBTQ+ culture. Whenever possible the resource includes a high definition direct scan of the source material with a sidebar table of contents for the scanned resource.

The LGBT Magazine Archive feature full coverage of 26 of the most influential LGBTQ+ magazine and newspapers. This archive also includes, for the first time, the entire run of the Advocate from its inception in 1967 to the present. The ProQuest interface allows researchers to search all the tiles simultaneously or restrict their searching to a specific title or titles. A place of publication limiter also allows researchers to search by region.

Both resources will provide researchers with long overdue access to a huge store of LGBTQ+ primary resources.

For any research-related questions regarding LGBTQ+ or gender studies, contact Susan Turkel,  the Sociology & Criminology, Global Interdisciplinary Studies, and Gender & Women’s Studies librarian.


Rob LeBlanc is First year Experience Librarian at Falvey Library.


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Discover Amazing Historical Treasures with AM Explorer

The Library has trial access to the complete Adam Matthew digital archive until December 14. The archive includes over sixty unique digital collections spanning from the 15th to the 21st century. Contents include documents, manuscripts, letters, historical books, newspapers, magazines, films, images, posters, and audio files. All collections are curated by academic editorial boards and include contextual essays written by recognized scholars and in some cases video interviews. These introductory materials facilitate access to the collections for undergraduate students. The sheer size of the archive makes it impossible to describe it in a short blog post. The collections highlighted here are by no means representative. Interested readers can find a complete list of available collections online.

Socialism on Film (1918-1988) is a collection of newsreels, documentaries, and feature films from the Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, the former GDR, China, Vietnam, Korea, and Latin America. Sourced from the archives of the British Film Institute, this collection features the films gathered by British communist Stanley Forman. The films in the collection are dubbed in English for distribution in the West. Scholars can assemble their own playlists and link to preselected snapshots or excerpts of each film. They can also create their own custom clips. Each film includes a transcript. For example, the Lenin & the Russian Revolution sub-collection “features over 80 documentary and feature films that present and explore the dramatic rise of communism and formation of the Soviet Union under the leadership of Vladimir Lenin. Created to bolster and celebrate the communist cause, as well as to kindle and ignite the political passions of new generations of revolutionaries, these films make for powerful propaganda tools.” [Excerpt from the collection description] Denise J. Youngblook (University of Vermont) contributed an essay on “The Soviet Documentary and Cold War Propaganda” to the collection.

Under the Banner of Peace still image

Under the Banner of Peace, 1969, Moscow Popular Science Film Studio.

The Food and Drink in History collection was sourced from a wide range of institutions world-wide including two local archives: The Winterthur Library and the Hagley Museum & Library. Primary sources in the collection range from the 16th century to the early 21st century and include a variety of formats such as cookbooks, food marketing materials, trade cards, food labels, and cooking magazines. Beth M. Forrest (Culinary Institute of America) contributed an essay that discusses “Performing History Through Food: Interpreting Recipes and Cookbooks.”

Save Waste Fats for Explosives, poster,

Save Waste Fats for Explosives, poster, color, 20 x 28 in., USGPO, 1943.

Everyday Life & Women in America “comprises thousands of fully searchable images of monographs, pamphlets, periodicals and broadsides addressing 19th and early 20th century political, social and gender issues, religion, race, education, employment, marriage, sexuality, home and family life, health, and pastimes. The collection is especially rich in conduct of life and domestic management literature, offering vivid insights into the daily lives of women and men, as well as emphasizing contrasts in regional, urban and rural cultures.” [Excerpt from the collection description] The primary sources featured in this collection come from the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History at Duke University and The New York Public Library. Judith Mattson Bean contributed an essay about “Women Talking about Themselves: Changing Discourse in American Advice Literature.”

Race Relations in America explores “three pivotal decades in the struggle for civil rights in America through the eyes and work of sociologists, activists, psychologists, teachers, ministers, students and housewives. Sourced from the records of the Race Relations Department of the United Church Board for Homeland Ministries, housed at the Amistad Research Center in New Orleans, this resource provides access to a wealth of documents highlighting different responses to the challenges of overcoming prejudice, segregation and racial tensions. These range from survey material, including interviews and statistics, to educational pamphlets, administrative correspondence, and photographs and speeches from the Annual Race Relations Institutes.” [Excerpt from the collection description] The collection includes an interactive chronology and a map that allows the reader to identify primary sources by geographic location. An essay by Katrina M. Sanders (University of Iowa) delineates the history of the Race Relations Institute at Fisk University.

Race Relations in America Map

A word of warning before you start exploring the Adam Matthew Explorer archive. Don’t enter unless you have plenty of free time on hand. It is easy to lose track of time and get lost in the wealth of primary sources. Contact Jutta Seibert (jutta.seibert@villanova.edu) if you would like to recommend the complete archive or selected collections for acquisition. Trial access to the archive will be available until December 14. The link to the collection is available under Databases A-Z on the Library website for the duration of the trial: http://www.am-explorer.com/. Enter PALCI2019 as user name and as password.


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Try This Database: SPORTDiscus with Full Text

sport Discus screen shot

Are you interested in sports medicine? Athletics marketing and advertising? Sports psychology? The sociology of sport? Sports studies is an interdisciplinary field and it can be hard to know where to search for information. Falvey Memorial Library has a solution for you!

We have arranged for campus-wide trial access to SPORTDiscus with Full Text, an online database for articles and other materials on all aspects of the study of sport.

SPORTDiscus provides access to the scholarly and popular literature of sport, including medical, social, biomechanical, business and management, public health, and psychological aspects of the topic. It offers indexing and full text of scholarly journals, magazines, books, conference proceedings, dissertations, and more. Coverage is international and goes back to 1800.

Full text journals covered include everything from NCAA News, Soccer & Society, and the Journal of Sport History, to Kinesiology Review, the International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sports, and the Entertainment & Sports Law Journal.

“Sport studies is a very interdisciplinary area, and until now Villanova hasn’t had a library resource that could help a researcher get access to all facets of the topic at once. SPORTDiscus with Full Text is the premier resource for the study of sport,” says Susan Turkel, Social Sciences Librarian.

To access, click here: SPORTDiscus with Full Text  or navigate to the database from the library’s Databases A-Z listing.

Villanova has trial access to this resource through November 30, 2019. Please contact Susan Turkel (susan.turkel@villanova.edu) or another subject librarian if you’d like to recommend this database for purchase by the library.


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Early Modern History from a Central European Perspective—The Encyclopedia of Early Modern History

encyclopedia modern history imageScholars interested in the early modern period (1450-1850) will appreciate the Encyclopedia of Early Modern History for its interdisciplinary approach, its focus on global connections, and its unique central European viewpoints and voices. Translating the Enzyklopädie der Neuzeit into English for a wider audience was a worthwhile, but difficult project that is still in progress. The Library offers trial access to the partial translation of the Enzyklopädie. At this time entries up until “La” have been published by Brill and can be consulted in English. Articles not yet translated are already cross referenced and will be published shortly.

Although much of the scholarship referenced in this publication is in languages other than English, there are nevertheless a fair amount of English language sources cited. Indeed, one of the strengths of the Encyclopedia is the network of international scholarship it presents.

Most articles are concise and to the point. They are cross referenced with a core of in-depth key articles that deal with overarching concepts such as knowledge, culture, nationalism, race, colonialism, the environment, the Atlantic world, and the everyday world to name just a few of the over one hundred key articles. While most article titles are translated into English, in some cases editors decided to retain German terminology for the sake of clarity (e.g., Bildungsbürgertum and Frauenzimmer).

Painting: “The Castle of Batavia” by Andries Beeckman

“The Castle of Batavia” by Andries Beeckman 108 x 151.5 cm, oil on canvas, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1901318

Trial access is available until November 8. Contact Jutta Seibert to recommend this resource for the permanent collection.


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Falvey Library Open Access Success: A Look at the Numbers

open access banner

Falvey Library is committed to support open access journal publication through the Scholarship Open Access Reserve (SOAR) Fund. This program is designed to provide financial support to Villanova faculty who are interested in publishing in high quality open access journals. Faculty may be eligible to have article processing fees incurred for publishing in open access journals paid by the library.

“On a grand scale, Open Access is important because it advances the dissemination of scholarship and knowledge, paving the way for solving problems big and small and improving and even saving lives,” says Linda Hauck, Business Librarian, Falvey Library.

The program in 2018-19 funded 9 papers and supported 17 Villanovans’ research. Departments served (below) included eight from across three of the University’s Colleges.

SOAR departments helped

The average award for Article Processing Charges (APC) ranged from $554 to $5,200, with an average of $1190. Five of those APCs were shared with other centers.

“On the local level, the revenue model for scholarly publication is perverse and from the perspective of academic libraries unsustainable. I’m really excited that one of Falvey Library’s key values is ‘openness,’ because it helps propel Falvey into advancing OA on multiple dimensions,” Hauck adds.


headshot of Shawn Proctor

 

Shawn Proctor is Communication and Marketing Manager at Falvey Memorial Library.


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Last Modified: October 22, 2019