Skip Navigation
Falvey Memorial Library
Advanced
You are exploring: Home > Blogs

New Resources: Taylor and Francis Collections

The Villanova community now also has access to many journals that were previously unavailable. Falvey Library recently acquired three large collections from Taylor and Francis.taylor and francis website

Previously, the library subscribed to fewer than 200 Taylor and Francis journals. But now, Villanovans have access to the complete Social Science and Humanities Library (~1,400 titles), the Science and Technology Library (~500 titles), and the Medical Library (~190 titles).  These collections contain articles published since 1997.


Alfred Fry is Science & Engineering Librarian at Falvey Library.


Like

New Resources: Forbes Magazine, Fortune Magazine

people working at notebooks on computers

Photo by Helloquence on Unsplash.

The library recently added two foundational business magazine archives to our collection: Forbes and Fortune.

Our coverage of Fortune, founded by Henry Luce, begins with the first issue published during the Great Depression in 1930. Fortune was recognized for departing from dry and statistic heavy business reporting by using images and words to communicate “the dignity and beauty, and smartness and excitement of modern industry” (Miller, 2003).

Steve Forbes, the current editor in chief and great grandson of founder Bertie Charles Forbes, remarked that since 1917 Forbes has “always focus[ed] on the people” and the other constant is Forbes unwavering commitment to “provid[ing] the tools for people who want to get ahead, who want to do business, who want to invest”(Talking Biz, 2017).Forbes Cover

These collections can be used as primary sources for American studies, journalism and business history in general including company histories, wealth studies, as well as for chronicling economic and management trends.  Forbes lists (Billions, Highest Paid, Best Employers and Fortune rankings (Most Admired, Greatest Leaders & 500) are often used as jumping off points by scholars, but the content of Fortune and Forbes magazines are also the subject of numerous scholarly studies in different disciplines including the following:

The full text of both magazines is searchable. Fortune offers some additional nice search features, such as limiting to advertisements, illustrations, and cover stories. Forbes supports searching by some features, such as quotations or poems or images.

Access to these databases is from the Journal Finder or a Books and more search.  Dedicated links are also posted on the Business Subject page.


Linda Hauck is the Business Librarian at Falvey Library.

Works Cited


Like

New Resources for LGBTQ Research: LGBT Magazine Archive and LGBTQ Thought and Culture

LGBTQ Resources ScreenshotThe library has recently purchased access to two essential LGBTQ+ research resources: Alexander Street’s LGBT Thought and Culture and Proquest’s LGBT Magazine archive. These new additions will greatly bolster the University’s LGBTQ+ research resources and help fill important gaps in our LGBTQ+ and Gender and Women’s Studies collections.

LGBT Thought and Culture provides coverage of the essential works and archival documents of the global LGBTQ+ movement. It includes the Pat Rocco and Jeanne Cordova collections, which contain speeches, correspondences, and ephemeral from these important LGBTQ+ activists. The collection also includes the Magnus Hirshfeld collection, which includes professional correspondence, confidential reports, and court documents from the renowned early 20th century sex researcher.

The collection includes a huge array of limiters including subject heading, archival collections, and media-type, allowing researchers to hone in on very specific aspects of LGBTQ+ culture. Whenever possible the resource includes a high definition direct scan of the source material with a sidebar table of contents for the scanned resource.

The LGBT Magazine Archive feature full coverage of 26 of the most influential LGBTQ+ magazine and newspapers. This archive also includes, for the first time, the entire run of the Advocate from its inception in 1967 to the present. The ProQuest interface allows researchers to search all the tiles simultaneously or restrict their searching to a specific title or titles. A place of publication limiter also allows researchers to search by region.

Both resources will provide researchers with long overdue access to a huge store of LGBTQ+ primary resources.

For any research-related questions regarding LGBTQ+ or gender studies, contact Susan Turkel,  the Sociology & Criminology, Global Interdisciplinary Studies, and Gender & Women’s Studies librarian.


Rob LeBlanc is First year Experience Librarian at Falvey Library.


Like
1 People Like This Post

Discover Amazing Historical Treasures with AM Explorer

The Library has trial access to the complete Adam Matthew digital archive until December 14. The archive includes over sixty unique digital collections spanning from the 15th to the 21st century. Contents include documents, manuscripts, letters, historical books, newspapers, magazines, films, images, posters, and audio files. All collections are curated by academic editorial boards and include contextual essays written by recognized scholars and in some cases video interviews. These introductory materials facilitate access to the collections for undergraduate students. The sheer size of the archive makes it impossible to describe it in a short blog post. The collections highlighted here are by no means representative. Interested readers can find a complete list of available collections online.

Socialism on Film (1918-1988) is a collection of newsreels, documentaries, and feature films from the Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, the former GDR, China, Vietnam, Korea, and Latin America. Sourced from the archives of the British Film Institute, this collection features the films gathered by British communist Stanley Forman. The films in the collection are dubbed in English for distribution in the West. Scholars can assemble their own playlists and link to preselected snapshots or excerpts of each film. They can also create their own custom clips. Each film includes a transcript. For example, the Lenin & the Russian Revolution sub-collection “features over 80 documentary and feature films that present and explore the dramatic rise of communism and formation of the Soviet Union under the leadership of Vladimir Lenin. Created to bolster and celebrate the communist cause, as well as to kindle and ignite the political passions of new generations of revolutionaries, these films make for powerful propaganda tools.” [Excerpt from the collection description] Denise J. Youngblook (University of Vermont) contributed an essay on “The Soviet Documentary and Cold War Propaganda” to the collection.

Under the Banner of Peace still image

Under the Banner of Peace, 1969, Moscow Popular Science Film Studio.

The Food and Drink in History collection was sourced from a wide range of institutions world-wide including two local archives: The Winterthur Library and the Hagley Museum & Library. Primary sources in the collection range from the 16th century to the early 21st century and include a variety of formats such as cookbooks, food marketing materials, trade cards, food labels, and cooking magazines. Beth M. Forrest (Culinary Institute of America) contributed an essay that discusses “Performing History Through Food: Interpreting Recipes and Cookbooks.”

Save Waste Fats for Explosives, poster,

Save Waste Fats for Explosives, poster, color, 20 x 28 in., USGPO, 1943.

Everyday Life & Women in America “comprises thousands of fully searchable images of monographs, pamphlets, periodicals and broadsides addressing 19th and early 20th century political, social and gender issues, religion, race, education, employment, marriage, sexuality, home and family life, health, and pastimes. The collection is especially rich in conduct of life and domestic management literature, offering vivid insights into the daily lives of women and men, as well as emphasizing contrasts in regional, urban and rural cultures.” [Excerpt from the collection description] The primary sources featured in this collection come from the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History at Duke University and The New York Public Library. Judith Mattson Bean contributed an essay about “Women Talking about Themselves: Changing Discourse in American Advice Literature.”

Race Relations in America explores “three pivotal decades in the struggle for civil rights in America through the eyes and work of sociologists, activists, psychologists, teachers, ministers, students and housewives. Sourced from the records of the Race Relations Department of the United Church Board for Homeland Ministries, housed at the Amistad Research Center in New Orleans, this resource provides access to a wealth of documents highlighting different responses to the challenges of overcoming prejudice, segregation and racial tensions. These range from survey material, including interviews and statistics, to educational pamphlets, administrative correspondence, and photographs and speeches from the Annual Race Relations Institutes.” [Excerpt from the collection description] The collection includes an interactive chronology and a map that allows the reader to identify primary sources by geographic location. An essay by Katrina M. Sanders (University of Iowa) delineates the history of the Race Relations Institute at Fisk University.

Race Relations in America Map

A word of warning before you start exploring the Adam Matthew Explorer archive. Don’t enter unless you have plenty of free time on hand. It is easy to lose track of time and get lost in the wealth of primary sources. Contact Jutta Seibert (jutta.seibert@villanova.edu) if you would like to recommend the complete archive or selected collections for acquisition. Trial access to the archive will be available until December 14. The link to the collection is available under Databases A-Z on the Library website for the duration of the trial: http://www.am-explorer.com/. Enter PALCI2019 as user name and as password.


Like

Try This Database: SPORTDiscus with Full Text

sport Discus screen shot

Are you interested in sports medicine? Athletics marketing and advertising? Sports psychology? The sociology of sport? Sports studies is an interdisciplinary field and it can be hard to know where to search for information. Falvey Memorial Library has a solution for you!

We have arranged for campus-wide trial access to SPORTDiscus with Full Text, an online database for articles and other materials on all aspects of the study of sport.

SPORTDiscus provides access to the scholarly and popular literature of sport, including medical, social, biomechanical, business and management, public health, and psychological aspects of the topic. It offers indexing and full text of scholarly journals, magazines, books, conference proceedings, dissertations, and more. Coverage is international and goes back to 1800.

Full text journals covered include everything from NCAA News, Soccer & Society, and the Journal of Sport History, to Kinesiology Review, the International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sports, and the Entertainment & Sports Law Journal.

“Sport studies is a very interdisciplinary area, and until now Villanova hasn’t had a library resource that could help a researcher get access to all facets of the topic at once. SPORTDiscus with Full Text is the premier resource for the study of sport,” says Susan Turkel, Social Sciences Librarian.

To access, click here: SPORTDiscus with Full Text  or navigate to the database from the library’s Databases A-Z listing.

Villanova has trial access to this resource through November 30, 2019. Please contact Susan Turkel (susan.turkel@villanova.edu) or another subject librarian if you’d like to recommend this database for purchase by the library.


Like

Early Modern History from a Central European Perspective—The Encyclopedia of Early Modern History

encyclopedia modern history imageScholars interested in the early modern period (1450-1850) will appreciate the Encyclopedia of Early Modern History for its interdisciplinary approach, its focus on global connections, and its unique central European viewpoints and voices. Translating the Enzyklopädie der Neuzeit into English for a wider audience was a worthwhile, but difficult project that is still in progress. The Library offers trial access to the partial translation of the Enzyklopädie. At this time entries up until “La” have been published by Brill and can be consulted in English. Articles not yet translated are already cross referenced and will be published shortly.

Although much of the scholarship referenced in this publication is in languages other than English, there are nevertheless a fair amount of English language sources cited. Indeed, one of the strengths of the Encyclopedia is the network of international scholarship it presents.

Most articles are concise and to the point. They are cross referenced with a core of in-depth key articles that deal with overarching concepts such as knowledge, culture, nationalism, race, colonialism, the environment, the Atlantic world, and the everyday world to name just a few of the over one hundred key articles. While most article titles are translated into English, in some cases editors decided to retain German terminology for the sake of clarity (e.g., Bildungsbürgertum and Frauenzimmer).

Painting: “The Castle of Batavia” by Andries Beeckman

“The Castle of Batavia” by Andries Beeckman 108 x 151.5 cm, oil on canvas, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1901318

Trial access is available until November 8. Contact Jutta Seibert to recommend this resource for the permanent collection.


Like

Falvey Library Open Access Success: A Look at the Numbers

open access banner

Falvey Library is committed to support open access journal publication through the Scholarship Open Access Reserve (SOAR) Fund. This program is designed to provide financial support to Villanova faculty who are interested in publishing in high quality open access journals. Faculty may be eligible to have article processing fees incurred for publishing in open access journals paid by the library.

“On a grand scale, Open Access is important because it advances the dissemination of scholarship and knowledge, paving the way for solving problems big and small and improving and even saving lives,” says Linda Hauck, Business Librarian, Falvey Library.

The program in 2018-19 funded 9 papers and supported 17 Villanovans’ research. Departments served (below) included eight from across three of the University’s Colleges.

SOAR departments helped

The average award for Article Processing Charges (APC) ranged from $554 to $5,200, with an average of $1190. Five of those APCs were shared with other centers.

“On the local level, the revenue model for scholarly publication is perverse and from the perspective of academic libraries unsustainable. I’m really excited that one of Falvey Library’s key values is ‘openness,’ because it helps propel Falvey into advancing OA on multiple dimensions,” Hauck adds.


headshot of Shawn Proctor

 

Shawn Proctor is Communication and Marketing Manager at Falvey Memorial Library.


Like

Faculty Panel: The 2020 Census

On Wednesday, Oct. 23, at 4 p.m., in Falvey’s Speakers’ Corner, join a faculty panel for conversation and questions about the upcoming decennial census on April 1, 2020. Discussion will aim to provide context and insight into the history of the Census, its use in research and policy-making, and issues particular to the 2020 Census. Faculty panelists include Camille Burge, PhD, Political Science; Judith Giesberg, PhD, History; Rory Kramer, PhD, Sociology and Criminology; and Stephen Strader, PhD, Geography and the Environment. This ACS approved event, sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library with support from librarians Deborah Bishov and Merrill Stein, is free and open to the public.

Every 10 years, the U.S. Census Bureau counts the populations in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and five U.S. territories (Puerto Rico, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). Mandated by the Constitution, the results determine the number of seats each state will have in the U.S. House of Representatives and provide helpful data for public service/administration members and local communities.

Traditionally, Census respondents completed a short questionnaire by phone or mail. This year, individuals will be able to complete the questionnaire online or through their mobile device. For additional information and ways in which you can get involved, visit the United States Census Bureau website.

Dig deeper: Check out the links below to learn more about the Census. Resources courtesy of Librarian Merrill Stein.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Like

Falvey Brown Bag Lunch Series: Fall 2019

Please join us for the Falvey Brown Bag Lunch Series. Sessions will begin at 12:00 p.m. in Falvey’s room 205.

Text Analysis 101 (Tuesday, Sept. 24)

Analyzing textual data with computational tools can aid in both reading and interpretation, allowing us to discover patterns and trends across large volumes of text. Come learn more about text analysis and introductory software for text and data mining like AntConc and Voyant Tools. Session will be led by Librarian Erica Hayes.

Measures of Impact (Wednesday, Sept. 25)

Learn about impact factors, fake impact factors, other citation measures, and altmetrics. (Also offered Oct. 29). Session will be led by Librarians Deborah Bishov and Alfred Fry.

Affordable Materials Project @ Villanova University (Wednesday, Oct. 2)

Join us for a discussion about library supported (licensed books and articles, copyright “fair use”, course reserves and OER) and bookstore offered (early adoption, Follett Discover, course packs) mechanisms for keeping a check on the cost of course materials. Session will be led by Librarian Linda Hauck and Bernadette Mania, Villanova Bookstore Course Materials Manager. Preregistration required: https://bit.ly/2jZS1ae

You may also join this session remotely via Zoom: https://villanova.zoom.us/j/496692906

Capturing the Web: Introduction to Web Archiving (Thursday, Oct. 3)

Get a foundational view of web archiving and learn ways to leverage the Wayback Machine and other web preservation tools in your scholarship and teaching. Session will be led by Archivist Beaudry Allen.

Data Visualization with Tableau (Wednesday, Oct. 16, Griffin Room, 10:00 a.m.)

What makes a good data visualization? In this session, we will discuss how to tell a compelling story using effective visual elements. We will also provide a gentle introduction to using Tableau Desktop Public, a free software that allows individuals to publish interactive data visualizations on the web. Session will be led by Librarian Erica Hayes.

Open Educational Resources (Wednesday, Oct. 23) 

Open Educational Resources (OER) can reduce textbook costs for students and push publishers to reconsider their textbook publishing models. If you are not entirely satisfied with the textbook you are using and are interested in learning about options, this workshop is for you! Session will be led by Librarians Linda Hauck and Sarah Hughes. Preregistration required: https://bit.ly/2kyNg7O

You may also join this session remotely via Zoom: https://villanova.zoom.us/j/887238686

The 2020 Census (Wednesday, Oct. 23, Speakers’ Corner, 4:00 p.m.)

Expert panel with Camille Burge, Political Science; Judith Giesberg, History; Rory Kramer, Sociology and Criminology; and Stephen Strader, Geography and the Environment. Ahead of Census 2020, coming up this spring, faculty experts will provide context and insight into the history of the Census, its use in research and policy-making, and issues particular to this upcoming Census. Session will be led by Librarians Deborah Bishov and Merrill Stein.

Measures of Impact (Tuesday, Oct. 29)

Learn about impact factors, fake impact factors, other citation measures, and altmetrics. Session will be led by Librarians Deborah Bishov and Alfred Fry.

Storytelling and GIS (Wednesday, Oct. 30)

While maps have been around for centuries, the digital age has given them new meaning. GIS software offers users the potential to visualize, analyze, and tell spatial stories. Learn more about GIS and the many online mapping platforms out there, including Esri Story Maps, Social Explorer, and StoryMapJS. Session will be led by Librarians Deborah Bishov and Erica Hayes.

Chicago-Style Resource Formatting and Management: Best Practices and Recent Updates (Wednesday, Nov. 6)

Learn about changes proposed in the 17th edition, best practices and tools to manage sources, and how to navigate the content-rich CMOS online platform. Session will be led by Librarian Jutta Seibert.

Staying Alert: Tracking New Books and Publications in Your Field (Thursday, Nov. 7) 

Let your inbox be your watchdog and get notified of new publications on your interests or new citations of your work. Session will be led by Librarians Sarah Hughes and Susan Turkel.

Citation Wrangling (Tuesday, Nov. 12)

Serious research projects call for no-nonsense tools for taming citations. Learn how to use Zotero and Mendeley to save, organize and share references. Session will be led by Librarians Nik Fogle and Alfred Fry.

Introduction to Data Management (Wednesday, Nov. 13)

Learn about data management plans and best practices. Session will be led by Librarian Alfred Fry.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.


Like

Finding Villanova Theses and Dissertations – A new guide

photo of books

Photo by Jan Mellström on Unsplash.

Are you looking for a Villanova thesis or dissertation? You’ve come to the right place! Falvey Memorial Library has been collecting masters theses and doctoral dissertations written by Villanova students since 1920!

However, they’re not always so easy to find…

  • Some dissertations and theses are held in print on library shelves, although they’re housed in a locked area and must be retrieved by Access Services staff.
  • Others are online, some of which are in the Villanova Digital Library and others of which are accessible via ProQuest.
  • A portion of the print copies housed in Falvey are represented in the online library catalog, while others are not.
  • We also hold undergraduate honors theses from the most recent 20 years, and a small number of other undergraduate theses, in our online collections.

It’s confusing.

To facilitate access to these Villanova-authored materials, we have created a quick guide to finding dissertations and theses at Falvey Memorial Library, organized by school/college and by year of publication. You can access the guide here (https://library.villanova.edu/research/self-help/general-tutorials/finding-villanova-theses-and-dissertations). Follow the steps described, and you’ll be blissfully reading that thesis in no time.

If you need more help finding dissertations or theses, please contact your friendly librarian. We are always happy to help!

 


Susan Turkel headshot

Susan Turkel, MA, MLS, is the Social Sciences Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.


Like

Next Page »

 


Last Modified: September 10, 2019