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How-to-Guide: Selecting a Journal for Publication

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By Alfred Fry

Do you have trouble selecting a journal for your publication?  Should you publish in that journal that sent you an email? Falvey Memorial Library has created a “How-to Guide” called “Selecting a Journal for Publication” that will help you on this topic.

The guide has several sections. Identifying Journals provides several tools that will suggest journals in your field.  Journal Metrics provides you with tools for assessing journals.  Open Access Publishing will introduce you to journals with a different funding model. Author’s Rights will help you understand the rights you have and might be signing away when you publish. Finally, Writing Guides will link you to physical and electronic books that will help you write for publication.

This is just one of the new or updated How-to Guides.

 


 

Alfred Fry is Science and Engineering Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 



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Bloomsbury Cultural Histories on Trial

By Jutta Seibert

Bloomsbury Academic has given the Villanova community generous trial access to the Bloomsbury Cultural Histories book series until May 31. While the community has temporarily lost access to the print titles in the Library’s collection, it has gained electronic access to all titles published in the series.

If you are not familiar with Bloomsbury Cultural Histories, here is what you need to know in a nutshell. Each six-volume set explores a theme from antiquity to the present. Bloomsbury has published 16 sets so far. Topics include, among others, childhood and family, dress and fashion, the human body, the senses, western empires, work, and women. New this academic year are the six-volume Cultural History of Money and the Cultural History of Emotions. Announced for later this year are the Cultural History of Disability, the Cultural History of Marriage, and the Cultural History of Tragedy. Forthcoming themes include color, education, home, medicine, and sports.

Each six-volume set presents an authoritative survey of scholarship on a single topic through time. For example, each volume of the Cultural History of Western Empire has a chapter about race to allow readers to follow the topic through time. The first volume covers race in antiquity, followed by the medieval age, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and the age of empire. The last volume covers race in the modern age.

The collection also includes a selection of cultural and social history books from Bloomsbury Academic, Berg, and Continuum. My personal favorites are Alison David’s Fashion Victims: The Dangers of Dress Past and Present, Rudy Koshar’s German Travel Cultures. Leisure, Consumption and Culture, and David Sutton’s Remembrance of Repasts: An Anthropology of Food and Memory.

Visual resources from the Wellcome Collection, the Rijksmuseum, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art round out the collection, which also includes an interactive timeline and lesson plans for the undergraduate classroom. Remote access is provided from the Library’s Databases A-Z list.

Let us know if you want to recommend this collection for permanent access.


Jutta Seibert is Director of Research Services & Scholarly Engagement at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 



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Archival Research from a Distance: New Adam Matthew Digital Collections

By Jutta Seibert

The Library recently acquired over sixty unique digital primary source collections produced by Adam Matthew Digital.

The collections, which span from the 15th to the 21st century, can be accessed from the AM Explorer platform. Contents include documents, manuscripts, letters, books, newspapers, magazines, films, images, posters, and audio files. Each collection is curated by an editorial board, made up of leading experts in the field who contributed essays and, in a few cases, video interviews. The essays and interviews contextualize the materials offered in a collection.

The sheer size of the archive makes it impossible to do it justice in a short blog post, and the collections highlighted here are by no means representative. Interested readers can find a complete list of available collections online. Selected collections will be featured in future posts.

Socialism on Film (1918-1988) is a collection of newsreels, documentaries, and feature films from the Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, the former GDR, China, Vietnam, Korea, and Latin America.

Sourced from the archives of the British Film Institute, this collection features films gathered by British communist Stanley Forman. The films in the collection were versioned into English for distribution in the West. Scholars can assemble their own playlists and link to preselected snapshots or excerpts. Each film includes a transcript in English.

For example, the Lenin & the Russian Revolution sub-collection “features over 80 documentary and feature films that present and explore the dramatic rise of communism and formation of the Soviet Union under the leadership of Vladimir Lenin. Created to bolster and celebrate the communist cause, as well as to kindle and ignite the political passions of new generations of revolutionaries, these films make for powerful propaganda tools.” [Excerpt from the collection description]

The essay “‘See the Other Half of the World’: Stanley Forman, Educational and Television Films and Left Film Culture in Britain” by Alan Burton (University of Leicester) explores the history of Plato Films and its successor, Education and Television Films (ETV), two companies founded by Stanley Forman to distribute films from socialist countries in Britain. The Plato/ETV film library and archive was transferred to the British Film Institute National Archive after Forman’s retirement.

In “Documentary Film and the Role of Women in the USSR” Melanie Ilic (University of Gloucestershire) introduces the history of women in the USSR, encompassing women’s daily life and political progress. Graham Roberts (Leeds Trinity University) contributed an essay about “Ideology and Imagery in Socialism on Film,” in which he analyzes the ways in which ideology is presented in selected films from the collection. Besides the topical essays, the collection also features video interviews with leading experts who analyze selected films.

Popular Medicine in America (1800-1900) documents the history of popular remedies and treatments in nineteenth century America, including botanicals, homeopathy, phrenology, electrotherapy, hydrotherapy, and sexual health. Sourced from the Library Company of Philadelphia and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the primary sources brought together in this collection range from print books, trade cards, and pamphlets to broadsides, posters, advertisements, and anatomy guides. The visually rich collection presents materials intended for the lay person rather than the medical professional.

Interested readers should start with a tour of the collection and read “Advertising Health to the People” by William H. Helfand, an essay originally written for the Library Company of Philadelphia exhibition “Every Man His Own Doctor.”

The collection includes a visual gallery of illustrations, advertisements, and posters as well as a glossary of medical terms including terms that are no longer part of everyday speech, such as Bright’s disease, chilblains, and iridology. Online exhibitions on “Family Health,” “Alternative Medical Practices,” and “From Nature to Manufacture” combine visual sources with primary documents and contextual information. The interactive chronology charts key dates in the history of popular medicine and links out to related source materials in the collection.

Explore other collections on the AM Explorer platform, or jump off the deep end and search across all collections. Links for AM Explorer, Socialism on Film, and Popular Medicine in America can be found on the Library’s Databases A-Z list.


Jutta Seibert is Director of Research Services & Scholarly Engagement at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 

 



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Remote Access to the great works of ancient Greece and Rome

By Darren Poley

BrokenSphere CC BY-SA (httpscreativecommons.orglicensesby-sa3.0)

For over 100 years, the Loeb Classical Library has filled a void by supplying critical editions of Greek and Latin texts with a readable English translation with minimal notes done by venerable scholars on the facing pages. This distinctive series of small volumes with their green for Greek and red for Latin covers have, in many cases, been recast with updated texts and fresh translations in recent years, so that the collection still serves the original vision of its namesake.

James Loeb, the Harvard alum and  philanthropist who originally backed the establishment of the Loeb Classical Library, wrote he wanted: “To make the beauty and learning, the philosophy and wit of the great writers of ancient Greece and Rome once more accessible by means of translations that are in themselves real pieces of literature, a thing to be read for the pure joy of it.”

Making the writings of the classical world accessible has been a boon to students and scholars alike for over a century. While the Library does have the books in its print collection, Falvey also provides access to the corpus via the Loeb Classical Library Online (LCL). An author search of the Library’s catalog using “Loeb Online” will result in a list of 220 records with links to the online versions of the close to 550 volumes in the Loeb Classical Library series.

The Villanova University community can access the LCL remotely be means of the Databases A-Z list.


Darren G. Poley is Associate Director of Research Services and Scholarly Engagement, and Theology, Humanities, and Classical Studies Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library. 

 

 



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Staff Pick: Biblical Studies Bibliographies

By Darren G. Poley

Several guides are linked to the Theology & Religious Studies Subject Guide. One titled Bible Basics is designed to aid navigation of the sacred scriptures of the Judeo-Christian tradition and locating biblical commentaries in Falvey. Also listed is the Biblical Studies guide. On it there is a section called Advanced Research Tools. Among those tools are some which the Library has acquired and others which are open access.

Recently Falvey obtained many of the Oxford Bibliographies (Oxford University Press) which present peer-reviewed, annotated bibliographies and expert commentary on current scholarship in selected disciplines, including Biblical Studies. Two open access online resources which were recently added to the Biblical Studies guide are Biblical Bibliography of Lausanne – BiBIL (University of Lausanne) and BIBLindex (French Institute of Christian Sources).

Biblical Bibliography of Lausanne – BiBIL presents bibliographical data about books, monographs, serials, and journal articles on biblical and related studies. It has French, English, and German search interfaces. Materials cataloged are in a variety of languages. Often it has an abstract and occasionally a link to the full text.

BIBLindex provides a growing online inventory of biblical quotations and allusions, primarily from Early Greek and Latin Christian literature. Includes biblical texts written in both ancient and modern languages. The project goal is to create a searchable database of biblical quotations from all Christian literature of Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages (from the beginning of the Common Era until 1400). You must create a free user account in order to access the search function in BIBLindex.


Darren G. Poley is Associate Director of Research Services and Scholarly Engagement, and Theology, Humanities, and Classical Studies Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library. You can access these bibliographies from the Databases A-Z page on the Library Website.

 



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New Online Resources On Diverse Religious Traditions

By Darren Poley

Seeking out authoritative encyclopedia articles to become familiar with a topic or the vocabulary scholars use to discuss a subject is an important step when starting a research project.

It has become commonplace for researchers to access reference tools such as encyclopedias via the Web. Brill, a respected academic publisher, has transitioned many of its offerings in the field of religion to the digital format.

Falvey now provides access to some new online resources on a diversity of religions. So whether you are interested in Judaism, Hinduism, Early Christianity, or comparing various religious traditions, the Encyclopedia of Jewish History and Culture Online, Brill’s Encyclopedia of Hinduism Online, and the Brill Encyclopedia of Early Christianity Online are great places to start.

The authoritative Enzyklopädie jüdischer Geschichte und Kultur in German is currently being translated into English. The result is the ongoing publication of the Encyclopedia of Jewish History and Culture Online. Right now, only entries from A to L are available in English. Falvey will add updates as newly translated content is made available.

The Enzyklopädie jüdischer Geschichte und Kultur Online is fully available. This reference work covers many aspects of the modern life of European and American Jewry and the non-European Jewish Diaspora, from the mid-eighteenth century and the Jewish Enlightenment to the mid-twentieth century and the establishment of the modern state of Israel.

Falvey has in print the 6-volume Brill’s Encyclopedia of Hinduism (call number: BL1105 .B75 2009). It now also offers the content from this major work on the many facets of the Hindu traditions via Brill’s Encyclopedia of Hinduism Online. Some of what it covers is divinities, sacred texts and languages, ritual and religious traditions, ancient and modern teachers, its migration and communities outside south Asia, and Hindu engagement with contemporary moral issues.

The term Christian applied mono-culturally seems to imply a homogeneity within the Christian religious tradition of the first six centuries of the common era that was just not the case. In the period of the early church there is a rich multicultural heritage filled with controversies and ecumenism.

The Brill Encyclopedia of Early Christianity focuses on the most important authors, texts, ideas, and places that played a role in the history of the development of Christianity up to the period of Late Antiquity. It gives an understanding of the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts. And incorporates elements from the specialized areas of New Testament Studies, Patristics, and modern historical scholarship.

 


Darren G. Poley is Associate Director of Research Services and Scholarly Engagement, and Theology, Humanities, and Classical Studies Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library. You can access these encyclopedias and other online reference tools from the Theology and Religious Studies Subject Guide on the Library Website.

 



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New Nursing Resource: Ovid Emcare

By Sarah Hughes

Falvey Memorial Library recently added Ovid Emcare to its database collection. Emcare is scholarly nursing and allied health database that largely encompasses evidence-based care clinical content.

It contains abstracts and indexing from a large variety of peer-reviewed journals and is fully integrated with Falvey’s Ovid full-text journal collection, allowing users to go beyond citation gathering to gain full-text PDFs when available.

Access to Ovid Emcare can be found in Databases A to Z or on the Falvey Library Nursing Guide.

One of the more unique features about Emcare is that it provides international journal coverage not found in other nursing and healthcare-related databases.

Other notable features include:

  • Access to over 3,700 international indexed peer-reviewed journals
  • Over 5 million records dating back to 1995
  • Ability to limit search results to systematic reviews, clinical trials, and more
  • Natural language searching making it easier for search queries

Whether you are a seasoned nursing researcher, or an undergraduate nursing student, Ovid Emcare can help you dig deeper in your research to find the best evidence-based literature on a variety of nursing topics.

 


Sarah Hughes is Nursing & Life Sciences Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 

 


 


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Where Research Starts: Oxford Bibliographies

By Jutta Seibert

Looking for expert guidance to help you locate the scholarly literature on an unfamiliar topic? Dreading the time consuming process of identifying and then sifting through mountains of research? Oxford Bibliographies could be the answer you’re seeking.

With Oxford Bibliographies, Oxford University Press has redefined the staid, old print bibliography concept and taken a fresh look at the research needs of today’s scholars. While bibliographies traditionally aimed for comprehensive coverage, Oxford Bibliographies was conceived as a selective bibliography meant to steer the reader towards the most critical publications on a topic.

Its success proves that these bibliographies fill an unmet need. They are selective and are regularly reviewed and updated. Through open link resolver technology, scholars can search their local library catalog for recommended readings or request them from other libraries in a few simple steps.

Villanova has acquired most of the available subject collections; they may be accessed via the link under “O” on the Databases A-Z listing. Individual articles in each subject collection vary in how they are organized, but they are all authored by recognized academic authorities. The works of many faculty authors are listed in various bibliographies reflecting on the growing influence of scholarship coming out of the Villanova community.

Ready to take a closer look? Start by browsing one of the 22 subject collections open to the Villanova community, including Atlantic History, Islamic Studies, and Medieval Studies, or search for a topic near and dear to your heart, or take a look at the most popular bibliography in the collection, Racist Jokes by Claire Horisk from the Philosophy collection. The Oxford Bibliography platform includes a guided tour and other tools that introduce interested scholars to a range of helpful features.

What else could one possibly ask for? I, for one, wish there were one for every topic.


Jutta Seibert is Director of Research Services & Scholarly Engagement at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 



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Bloomberg Businessweek Archive

Logo for Bloomberg Businessweek from wikimedia commonsThe library has added the Bloomberg Businessweek Archive to the collection. Researchers no longer have to rely on inconvenient microfilm for historical research in this quintessential source of business journalism.

The acquisition also rounds out our historical business collections. Last year we added the Forbes & Fortune Archives and backfiles of company annual reports and SEC filings from Mergent.

The archives cover the first issue that hit the stands as simply Businessweek in 1929, just in time for the stock market crash, heralding the Great Depression, and ends in 2000.  To search more recent issues from 2000 to present, use Business Source Premier or link to full text from the Journal Finder. Whatever the decade, Bloomberg Businessweek is ever relevant, covering the cultural and social issues impacting business. Ironically, the cover story of the inaugural issue was titled “Taking the Fear out of Flying;” the final issue of 2019 offered an in-depth look at Boeing and “Where the 737 Went Off Course.”

It’s fair to say we can look forward to a piece on how the COVID-19 is impacting the airline business soon. (Update: Bloomberg Businessweek published “Global Airlines Face the Worst Demand Decline on Record” March 12.)

 


face shot of business librarian

 

Linda Hauck, MLS, MBA, is the Business Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.

 


 


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Falvey Now Video Streaming Documentaries

By Darren Poley

The Docuseek2 Complete Collection (second edition) currently offers over 1,600 issues-based documentaries from leading film producers and distributors, and independent filmmakers from around the world. The streamed videos in this collection cover subjects such as global, area and women’s studies, psychology, health, environmental studies and sciences, history, political science, sociology and criminal justice, and the arts.

The other streaming video collections from Alexander Street Press made available by Falvey, in addition to Docuseek2 Complete, are Academic Video Online, Broadway HD, Counseling & Therapy in Video, and Filmakers Library Online. Surf the channels to browse thematically. Channels include Science, Nursing, Engineering, History, Global Issues, Literature, Theatre, Psychology, and Religion and Thought.

Read another recent post about Academic Video Online (AVON) and other streaming video collections available via Falvey Memorial Library.

 


Darren G. Poley is Associate Director of Research Services and Scholarly Engagement, and Theology, Humanities, and Classical Studies Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library. 

 

 



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Last Modified: March 13, 2020