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PhD Summer School, The Regulative Capacity of Knowledge Objects

The Post‐Graduate Program in Philosophy, Science and Values (University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, and National Autonomous University of Mexico, UNAM) and the Institute for Technology Assessment and Systems Analysis (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology) invite PhD students to apply for the interdisciplinary and international Summer School:

The Regulative Capacity of Knowledge Objects: Opening the Black Box of Knowledge Governance

Think of Climate Change, Wikileaks, nanotechnology, Responsible Innovation, neural implants, Linux, GMOs or the German Energy Transition. But when we think about it, do they actually exist? And if they do what should they be like in the future? What exactly are they? Are they symbols, technical artifacts, discourses, constellations of actors, scientific disputes? Are they political issues, societal problems, human-nonhuman-hybrids, modifiers of existence, problems for governance and regulation? In a way, they are all of these things and less – and probably more.

They are what this Summer School refers to as “knowledge objects”. These objects are peculiar, blurry, constantly unfolding and transforming entities that increasingly challenge contemporary societies and sciences and our understanding of knowledge. The knowledge in knowledge objects is always plural: scientific, public, mundane, interdisciplinary, speculative, uncertain. It is heterogeneously produced about, with, through or in them and contributes to their identification, contestation and transformation.

Yet, knowledge objects are also enablers of such knowledge productions and the societal controversies that go along with them. This intricate entanglement of knowledge objects and society poses various normative and regulative questions – which are part of these objects and due to them the problems societies face. This entanglement could be viewed as a fundamental challenge for knowledge governance. To address these complex challenges to societies and sciences, the Summer School aims to bring together two strands of science and technology studies (STS) which so far haven’t combined: the focus on “knowledge objects” and the perspective of “knowledge governance”.

The starting point of this summer school is the assumption that knowledge objects are subject and object of knowledge governance. They create the need for and they enable various forms of knowledge governance. In a way, this synchrony is a black box of knowledge governance. The Summer School proposes that this “governance black box” can be opened by focusing on an extended concept of knowledge objects and by analyzing their governance dimensions.

Keynotes by:
David Guston, PhD, Professor of Political Science, Arizona State University, US
Graham Harman, PhD, Professor of Philosophy, American University, Cairo, Egypt
Karin Knorr-Cetina, PhD, Professor emeritus of Sociology, University of Constance, Germany, and George
Wells Beadle Distinguished Service Professor, University of Chicago, US
Noortje Marres, PhD, Senior Lecturer, Goldsmiths University of London, UK

Applications are due by 28th March 2014.

Find out all the details at: http://www.itas.kit.edu/english/events_2014_summerschool.php


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Summer School on “The Neurobiology of Emotions and Feelings” with António Damasió

The Forum Scientiarum of the University of Tübingen, Germany, is organizing a one-week International Interdisciplinary Summer School on “The Neurobiology of Emotions and Feelings” with António Damasió and Sabine Döring.

Time: June 2nd –  June 6th, 2014.

For further information please see http://www.unseld-lectures.de/cfa

Call for applications: UL2014_Call4Applications.

Deadline for the receipt of complete applications (application form,  CV, essay) is February 31th, 2014.


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Oxford Internet Institute: Summer Doctoral Program 2014

We are delighted to announce that the twelfth Oxford Internet Institute (OII) Summer Doctoral Programme (SDP) will be held at the OII from 7-18 July 2014.

The aim of the program is to bring together up to 30 advanced doctoral students engaged in dissertation research relating to the Internet and other ICTs. By sharing their work and learning from leading academics in the field, students can enhance the quality and significance of their thesis research and create a peer network of excellent young researchers. There will also be an opportunity to connect with alumni from previous years, ensuring that the benefits of the OII SDP network are passed on to this year’s cohort.

The 2014 Summer Doctoral Programme will build upon the research strengths of the OII, involving many of our Fellows from across multiple disciplines as well as bringing in guest speakers from a variety of institutions. It will emphasize methodological innovation and good practice in research design, and will expose students to the benefits of discussing their research in a multi-disciplinary teaching environment. The overall aims are to help improve students’ dissertations and to develop a cohesive peer network for future collaboration and support.

For further information on this year’s SDP, including application instructions, please see our website.

Here you can find more general info, the SDP blog and a great video by the 2013 crowd.

If you have any questions, feel free to e-mail: victoria.nash@oii.ox.ac.uk


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Save the dates: Two upcoming project launches

Aurelius logo with party hatWe’ve got our party hats on! Last semester, we assisted with two undergrad DH courses and we’re excited to show the finished products this spring!

We’ll have more detailed information as the launch parties get closer, but for now, here’s a preview:

On Tuesday, March 11, at 11:30am, Dr. Craig Bailey will unveil his History class’s historical profile of Ardmore. In this class, students looked at the 1920 census and compiled some of their research into a website, which will feature an interactive historical map of Ardmore and profiles of some notable community members.

On Wednesday, April 2, at 4:00pm, Dr. Chad Leahy will show his Spanish class’s digital scholarly edition of a Special Collections manuscript on the history of Peru. In this class, students learned about the process of creating scholarly editions of texts and were able to put that knowledge to use in transcribing and annotating a Spanish-language Peruvian manuscript.

Both of these events will take place in Room 204 in the Library’s second-floor Learning Commons. If you have any questions about either event, please get in touch at digitalhumanities@villanova.edu.


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Mapping a DH Future: Brief notes from the Aurelius launch party

Last Tuesday, April 30, was the formal launch party for the Aurelius Digital Humanities Initiative. We had a “soft launch” in the fall to let people know Aurelius existed, but Tuesday’s event was a glimpse into two of the projects that we are currently working on. (Both of these projects happen to be mapping projects, but we’re certainly open to other kinds of projects!) I gave a brief introduction about the definitions of DH and the kinds of projects Aurelius can support, then I turned it over to our speakers.

Our first presenter was Dr. Annika Thiem, an assistant professor in the Department of Philosophy. Annika’s project will investigate the role of New York City as a “shadow-protagonist” in Uwe Johnson’s Jahrestage (Anniversaries) tetralogy (published from 1970-1983), in which the main character Gesine Cresspahl navigates her way around the city while relating her own and her family’s memories. The idea for this project is to create a searchable, interactive map of locations, historical layers, and topics. This project is in its earliest stages, so we do not have a projected launch date, but you can see a screencap of the mockup website below.

Anniversaries project screenshot

The second presenter was Dr. Craig Bailey, an associate professor in the Department of History. Last year, Craig taught a junior research seminar that focused on local history and this year we’ll be bringing that course into the digital realm. Students will have the opportunity to explore the history of Ardmore, PA, through census data, maps, and other archival materials and use their findings to compile an interactive map of the region. We’ll be working with Craig to develop the course so that students will get hands-on experience in Falvey Library’s Special Collections and Digital Library. We’ll be running this course in the fall semester, so stay tuned for more details. For now, you can see a screencap of the website mockup below.

Ardmore map project screenshot

David Uspal, Aurelius’s Digital Humanities Technology Developer, then gave a brief overview of some of the technology he’s been developing to support these two projects, including the interactive map and timeline tools.

I was very excited to see such a great turnout and interest for this event. Stay tuned to hear more as these projects progress and please be in touch if you have your own DH project idea you’d like to collaborate on!


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Save the date: Aurelius launch on April 30

Aurelius Launch Party

The Library will be celebrating the formal inauguration of Aurelius with a launch party scheduled for Tuesday, April 30 at 1:00pm in Room 205 in the second floor Learning Commons of the Library. The event will feature a discussion of the definition of “digital humanities” and how Aurelius will support this emerging trend in scholarly practice, as well as work-in-progress project overviews from Dr. Craig Bailey (History) and Dr. Annika Thiem (Philosophy). Light refreshments will be served. This event is open to the public.

More information about Aurelius can be found on our website.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to get in touch!


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Chris Marker Events at Slought

Ciné-Cat: Marking the City
Stop going to see films and make a film of the city!

Wednesday, March 06, 2013; 6:30-8:00pm
at Slought, 4017 Walnut Street

http://slought.org/content/11511/

Slought Foundation is pleased to announce Ciné-Cat: Marking the City, a street art project across Philadelphia beginning in March 2013. In the film The Case of the Grinning Cat (2004), Chris Marker becomes intrigued by the sudden appearance of painted grinning yellow cats on the streets of Paris. Documentation of these images and personal commentary throughout the film are joined by discussion of political events of the time.

Join us for a public workshop at Slought on Wednesday March 6th from 6:30-8pm to make meaning of the grinning yellow cat. The workshop, led by Slought Fellow Rachel Heidenry, will begin with a brief discussion of Chris Marker’s work, followed by an overview of street art practices and hands-on stenciling demonstrations. Templates and supplies will be provided in the workshop. Following the workshop, participants will be invited to add their grinning cat to Philadelphia’s built landscape.

Rules for Ciné-Cat Participants
– Be creative. The templates are only guides. We encourage you to adapt the grinning cats to your individual style and medium.
– Please document your street art creations and send us your grinning cats at: info@sloughtfoundation.org
– All public works must be executed in adherence to the City of Philadelphia laws.
– We encourage the use of non-permanent materials, such as chalk, removable spray, washable paint, and tape when creating in public places.
– Permanent materials, such as industrial paints and aerosol sprays, may only be used on condemned structures or with formal consent of property owners.
– Slought and its affiliates are not responsible for any participant who does not adhere to these rules or the law.
– Celebrate Chris Marker!

Recommended Street Art Templates
Grinning Cats Template #1
Grinning Cats Template #2

Agnès Varda in Philadelphia
in conversation with Molly Nesbit

Wednesday, March 13, 2013; 6:00-7:30pm
at Meyerson Hall B1, University of Pennsylvania

http://slought.org/content/11514/

Slought is pleased to announce a public conversation with Agnès Varda and Molly Nesbit on March 13, 2013 from 6-7:30pm in Meyerson Hall at the University of Pennsylvania (210 S. 34th St).

Agnès Varda is one of the leading filmmakers of our time. Her self-funded debut, the 1956 fiction-documentary hybrid La Pointe Courte is often considered the unofficial first New Wave film. In 1962, she released the seminal nouvelle vague film Cléo from 5 to 7. Over the coming decades, Varda became a force in art cinema, conceiving many of her films as political and feminist statements, and using a radical objectivity to create her unforgettable characters. She describes her style as cinécriture, and it can be seen in audacious fictions like Le bonheur andVagabond as well as revealing autobiographical documentaries like The Gleaners and I and The Beaches of Agnès.

Molly Nesbit is Chair and Professor in the Department of Art at Vassar College as well as a contributing editor ofArtforum. Since 2002, together with Hans Ulrich Obrist and Rirkrit Tiravanija, she has tri-curated Utopia Station, an ongoing book, exhibition, seminar, website and street project.

This program is made possible thanks to the generous support of University of Pennsylvania’s Cinema Studies Program, Department of Fine Arts, Emily and Jerry Spiegel Fund to Support Contemporary Culture and Visual Art, Slought Foundation, and Temple University’s Department of Film and Media Arts. Additional support has been provided by University of Pennsylvania’s Department of French Studies, Department of English, Penn Humanities Forum, and School of Arts and Sciences. We also acknowledge the collaboration of the International House of Philadelphia and Scribe Video Center.

Jointly organized by Nora M. Alter, Timothy Corrigan, Nicola Gentili, Aaron Levy, and Jean-Michel Rabaté.

Total Installation, Public Project
Ilya and Emilia Kabakov in Conversation

Thursday, March 14, 2013; 5:30-7:00pm
at Slought, 4017 Walnut Street

http://slought.org/content/11516/

Slought Foundation is pleased to announce Total Installation, Public Project: Ilya and Emilia Kabakov in Conversation, a public conversation with artists Ilya and Emilia Kabakov, on Thursday, March 14, 2013 from 5:30-7pm. The event will be introduced and moderated by Matthew Jesse Jackson, and has been organized by Kevin M.F. Platt and Christine Poggi.

Ilya and Emilia Kabakov create large-scale environments, “total installations,” that orchestrate elements of the Everyday within an atmosphere of the Extraordinary. While rooted in their experience of life in the Soviet Union, the Kabakovs’ art strives to reach a plane of transcultural significance, to penetrate to the core of the desires and fears that mold our present world. An ever-changing, ambitious project designed to reintegrate contemporary art into the public imagination, the Kabakovs’ art challenges its viewers to become utopians without any allegiance to any utopia.

Ilya Kabakov was born in Dnepropetrovsk, Soviet Union, in 1933. He studied art in Moscow, and began his career as a children’s book illustrator during the 1950’s. He was part of a group of Conceptual artists in Moscow who worked outside the official Soviet art system. In 1985 he received his first solo show exhibition at Dina Vierny Gallery, Paris, and he moved to the West two years later. His installations speak as much about conditions in post-Stalinist Russia as they do about the human condition universally. Emilia Kabakov (nee Kanevsky) was born in Dnepropetrovsk, Soviet Union, in 1945. She studied in Irkutsk and Moscow, immigrating to Israel in 1973, and moved to New York in 1975, where she worked as a curator and art dealer. In 1988, Ilya and Emilia began their collaborative projects together. Their work has been shown in such venues as the Museum of Modern Art, the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington DC, the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, Documenta IX, at the Whitney Biennial in 1997 and the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg among others. In 1993 they represented Russia at the 45th Venice Biennale with their installation The Red Pavilion. This program is made possible in part through the generous support of the Sachs Programming Fund and the Departments of the History of Art and Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pennsylvania.

Things That Quicken the Heart- 
Chris Marker: A Symposium

Friday, March 15 to Saturday, March 16, 2013
at Slought, 4017 Walnut Street

http://slought.org/content/11510/

Slought Foundation is pleased to announce Things That Quicken the Heart- Chris Marker: a Symposiumon March 15-16, 2013.

Organized by the Department of Film and Media Arts at Temple University, the Cinema Studies Program at the University of Pennsylvania, and Slought Foundation, the symposium will explore the work of the late French filmmaker Chris Marker, who passed away in July 2012 at the age of 91 and is widely acknowledged as one of the most prolific and inventive media artists in the history of cinema. Working continually since the 1940s, Marker directed some of the most important films in the history of world cinema, including La jetée (1962), A Grin without a Cat (1997), Sans Soleil (1982), and multi-media projects Level 5 (1996) and Immemory (1998, 2008).

The symposium will feature a variety of speakers in conversation, including Agnès Varda, Raymond Bellour, Bill Horrigan, Sam Di Iorio, Lynne Sachs, Hito Steyerl, Renée Green, Dominique Blüher, Rick Warner, Christa Blümlinger, and Gertrud Koch.

It will be accompanied by an exhibition of photographs by Chris Marker documenting political protests and friends who shared Marker’s political leanings (Courtesy of Mari and Peter Shaw).

Symposium Schedule

Reservations recommended but not required:
http://chrismarker.eventbrite.com/

Friday, March 15th, 2013 
Panel 1: Cats
Marker Forever

Opening Remarks by Nora M. Alter and Timothy Corrigan
Moderated by Molly Nesbit; Presentations by Raymond Bellour and Agnès Varda
5:30-7pm
Reception to follow

Saturday, March 16th, 2013 
Panel 2: Elephants
An Auteur without an Image: Marker in History

Moderated by Louis Massiah; Presentations by Dominique Blüher, Sam Di Iorio, and Rick Warner
10-12pm 

Panel 3: Owls
Remembrance of Films to Come: Marker and Future Media

Moderated by Timothy Corrigan; Presentations by Christa Blümlinger, Gertrud Koch, and Bill Horrigan
1:30-3:30pm 

Panel 4: Wolves
The Cinema Rolls On: Filmmakers Under the Influence

Moderated by Rea Tajiri; Presentations by Renée Green, Lynne Sachs, Hito Steyerl
4-6pm

Other Screenings and Events

March 14, 1-4pm at Scribe Video Center (4212 Chestnut Street, 3rd Fl)
Master class with Agnès Varda

March 16, 5pm at International House, 3701 Chestnut St
Screenings of Chris Marker’s Early Collaborations:
Walerian Borowczyk, Les Astronautes (1959, 12 min)
Alain Resnais and Chris Marker, Toute la mémoire du monde (1956, 21 min, French w/ English subtitles)
Alain Resnais and Chris Marker, Les Statues meurent aussi (1953, 30 min, French w/ English subtitles)
Alain Resnais, Night and Fog – Nuit et brouillard (1955, 31 min, French w/ English subtitles)


Acknowledgements

This program is made possible thanks to the generous support of University of Pennsylvania’s Cinema Studies Program, Department of Fine Arts, Emily and Jerry Spiegel Fund to Support Contemporary Culture and Visual Art, Slought Foundation, and Temple University’s Department of Film and Media Arts. Additional support has been provided by University of Pennsylvania’s Department of French Studies, Department of English, Penn Humanities Forum, and School of Arts and Sciences. We also acknowledge the collaboration of the International House of Philadelphia and Scribe Video Center.

Jointly organized by Nora M. Alter, Timothy Corrigan, Nicola Gentili, Aaron Levy, and Jean-Michel Rabaté.

Slought
Slought.org

4017 Walnut Street, Philadelphia PA 19104
Tel: 215.701.4627
Fax: 215.764.5783


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Through Hell to the stars

Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita
mi ritrovai per una selva oscura,
ché la diritta via era smarrita. (I.1-3)
Midway in our life’s journey, I went astray
from the straight road and woke to find myself
alone in a dark wood.

Lasciate ogne speranza, voi ch'intrate (Abandon every hope, who enter here)
Lasciate ogne speranza, voi ch’intrate. (III.9)
Abandon all Hope ye who enter here.

On February 12, the Digital Library Team led a journey through Hell in the form of a marathon reading of Dante’s Inferno. The event was supported by the Library’s Scholarly Outreach Team, and co-sponsored by the Italian Club, the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, and the Villanova Center for Liberal Education. Reading began at 10am and continued through all 34 cantos to about 4pm, with cantos being read in English and Italian.

Mini exhibit of Dante-related books and movies.
Dante-related materials from a mini-exhibit.

This event was originally dreamed up by Dr. Diane Biunno, an assistant professor in the Italian Department and a Digital Library Intern for Summer 2012 (Diane is currently working on a Masters of Library Science at Drexel University), and Michael Foight, Digital Library & Special Collections Coordinator. As her internship project, Diane curated the online exhibit “Dante’s Illustrated Adventure” (you can read Diane’s post about her exhibit here). The marathon reading was originally scheduled for October 30, 2012, but was canceled due to the inclement weather produced by Hurricane Sandy. There was a lot of excitement for the event, however, so we rescheduled it for the February date.

Diane Biunno, dressed as "Beatrice," started the reading with Canto I.
Diane Biunno, dressed as “Beatrice,” started the reading with Canto I.

Diane provided a brief welcome and began the reading in Italian shortly after 10am. Volunteers were then asked to read each subsequent canto, with a choice of reading in either Italian or English. If a canto was read in Italian, the next reader would read the same canto in English, so that everyone could follow along. The English translation that we used for the day was John Ciardi’s (which is also used for the English translations within this post). There was a good turnout throughout the day and among the readers were students from Italian classes of various levels, faculty from the Department of Romance Languages & Literatures, and several others. All participants had a fun time, partaking of thematic snacks along the way, and we emerged on the other side of Hell at the end of Canto XXXIV just after 4pm.

E quindi uscimmo a riveder le stelle. (XXXIV.139) And we walked out once more beneath the Stars.

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Last Modified: February 18, 2013