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Finals Stress Busting Events–Another Way Falvey Helps Students Relax and Achieve

Every fall and spring, students come face to face with finals. The finals countdown. The finals destination. For students, finals are the ultimate test. (Literally, since they often have the ultimate test of the semester.)

Everything is on the line academically. That’s why Falvey Memorial Library staff members give students the chance each semester to chill and chow in a more low stakes line, one that winds around bars filled with nachos, Tater Tots, and desserts. Because four out of five students know that the first step toward a well-fed mind is a well-fed body.

photo of dessert bar

Dessert Bar, spring 2019: Donuts, cupcakes, and cookies–oh my!

 

Tater Tot Bar, fall 2017: The grade students gave this event was “snacktacular!”

 

Cereal Bar, Spring 2018: Spoonfuls of relaxation.


MLA International Bibliography has moved to EBSCO

On 26 June, 2018, the editor of the MLA International Bibliography (MLAIB) announced to subscribers that beginning this summer EBSCO would be the single vendor for this resource and the accompanying MLA Directory of Periodicals (MLADP).

MLA has now switched over from ProQuest to EBSCO and the appropriate links on the library’s website have been changed.

MLA International Bibliography with Full Text: https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?authtype=ip,uid&custid=s8877782&groupid=main&profile=ehost&defaultdb=mlf

MLA International Bibliography covers literature, language and linguistics, folklore, film, literary theory and criticism, dramatic arts, as well as the historical aspects of printing and publishing. Listings on rhetoric and composition and the history, theory, and practice of teaching language and literature are also included.

In addition to the bibliography, the database includes the MLA Directory of Periodicals, the association’s proprietary thesaurus used to assign descriptors to each record in the bibliography. It also provides a proprietary, searchable directory of noted authors’ names with links to brief descriptive notes.

As usual, the EBSCOhost MLA International Bibliography and Directory of Periodicals databases are cross-searchable with other EBSCOhost databases via the Choose Databases link at the top of the screen.

Research users will need to download any saved searches and documents from their My Research account (ProQuest). Similar options for saving documents and searches are available via a My EBSCOhost account. Additionally, users wishing to retain any alerts will need to set these up in a My EBSCOhost account.

EBSCOhost has made several video tutorials on using the MLA International Bibliography on EBSCO available here: (https://connect.ebsco.com/s/article/MLA-International-Bibliography-on-EBSCOhost-Tutorials?language=en_US ).


 

 

 

 

Sarah Wingo, MA, MSI, is the Liaison Librarian for English Lit, Theatre,  & Romance Languages at Falvey Memorial Library.


FotoFriday: Transforming the Bard’s Work Into Art

Alice Dailey contemplates the art project that will transform Shakespeare books into art mourning the passing of time.

“As a scholar, I recognize the labor and time that goes into the composition of these #books. Each book is a unit of human time. I’m searching for a way to acknowledge what it means for that time to be over.”–Professor Alice Dailey, discussing her art project, which will transform nearly 500 deselected #shakespeare books into #art reflecting the passing of time


“Did You Ever Read…?” — Falvey Library Invites New Resource Recommendations From Faculty and Students

Did you know that Falvey Memorial Library has more than one million books, periodicals, and other resources?
book recommendations screen shot

Still, the collection at the Library is always a work-in-progress, adapting to meet the needs of the University’s faculty and students. If you review the Library’s holdings and find there is a useful book or resource missing from the collection, please be sure to submit a request so we can continue to evaluate and tweak our collection.

While checking out the website, we also recommend you browse our “trending” and “newly added.” There are a ton of great books just waiting for a great reader (like you)!


Shawn Proctor

Shawn Proctor, MFA, is communications and marketing program manager at Falvey Memorial Library.


Confronting the Legacy of Slavery: Villanova Students Uncover Fragments of American Family Histories

Tomorrow, July 2, marks the 55th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act, enacting landmark legislation that prohibited racial discrimination in employment and education. It also outlawed racial segregation in public spaces. The act laid the groundwork for the country to progress forward toward equality, yet the wounds caused by slavery’s past remain even today.

This past spring, a group of Villanova students in Professor Judith Giesberg’s Slavery in the Modern World course attempted to piece together the separated strands of African-American families torn apart prior to and during the Civil War, when family members were sold away, escaped to the North, or joined the Union army.

After the Civil War and following the abolition of slavery, African-Americans began to look for loved ones with the help of newspaper ads. Although historical evidence tracing the lives of former slaves is limited, there is census evidence that some families reunited with the help of these ads. Based on life records found through Ancestry Library, students crafted digital timelines that narrated the lives of the individuals identified in the ads. Some of these stories have what appear to be happy endings; in other cases, individuals seem to have disappeared from the historical record.

last seen headline image

Dr. Giesberg is the driving force behind the Last Seen: Finding Family After Slavery project which collates, publishes, and transcribes this kind of newspaper ad. The digital project website is supported by the Department of History, the Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest, and the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Villanova University, as well as by Mother Bethel AME Church and the Pennsylvania Abolition Society. Villanova graduate students browsed through countless reels of microfilm in their search for personal ads placed by African-Americans looking for lost family members and friends, scanned the ads, and posted them to the website. Transcription of the ads is crowd-sourced and depends entirely on volunteers. Many of these ads are easy enough to identify by the recurring Information Wanted headline.

spreadsheet of Last Seen entries

Students in Dr. Giesberg’s course used the Last Seen website to find a personal ad that piqued their curiosity. They learned the basics of the Timeline JS software in a library research workshop. Timeline JS is free software created and maintained by Knight Lab at Northwestern University. All story elements for the timeline including images, maps, and text are captured in a Google spreadsheet. This sounds simple enough, but students spent considerable time researching and presenting the histories hidden behind a single short personal ad.

slavery in the modern world 2019 timeline projects

They researched historical context such as geographic locations and regional slave laws and they identified appropriate and copyright free images to make their timelines visually pleasing. In short, they learned a lot about the research and publishing process. Then, two days before their final deadline, Google changed its software and broke every student’s timeline in the process. Everyone held their breath, not sure if functionality would be restored before the projects were due. With only eight hours to spare, the problem was fixed thanks to the advocacy of the folks at Knight Lab.

Links to the student projects have been posted to the Library’s website together with projects from prior years. Library resources used by the students include Ancestry Library, the African-American Studies Center, and African-American Newspapers: The 19th Century. For images students mostly relied on Wikimedia Commons which includes images from the National Archives, the Library of Congress and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. Interested readers are invited to explore these at times bittersweet, at times uplifting, and at times devastatingly sad narratives of African American lives in the 19th century.

Learn more about the Last Seen Project.


Jutta Seibert is Director of Research Services & Scholarly Engagement at Falvey Memorial Library.


Welcome to Falvey: John Banionis Joins Resource Management and Description


John Banionis recently joined the Resource Management and Description Department as the Metrics and Assessment Librarian. Part of Collections and Stewardship, the Resource Management and Description Department assists in building healthy and robust library collections through active conversations with campus communities and strong collaborations with internal and external partners.

“My role relates to the business end of the library. I look at the usage of library materials and develop a comprehensive cost-per-use methodology to support data-driven decision making about Falvey’s resources. I gather data and analyze specific interest points in order to help showcase the value of Falvey and its initiatives to the larger community.”

A native of Philadelphia, Banionis earned a Bachelor of Arts in Religious Studies from Penn State University, a Certificate in Copyright Leadership and Management from the University of Maryland, and a Master of Science in Library and Information Science from Drexel University. Working in sales for numerous journal publishers before transitioning to Falvey Memorial Library, Banionis always had an interest in scholarly publishing.

“I’m excited to move to the library side of the equation, to develop customized solutions for Falvey and integrate data analysis into the library’s workflow.”

Though Banionis typically works with Falvey Library staff, he encourages Villanova faculty and students to reach out to him if they have any specific questions about resource usage levels (using actual data numbers) for determining what resources might be of most interest to students and faculty in a specific department/college.

He also encourages faculty to converse with him about publishing options: “I can provide metrics for academic journals, including alternate venues in which faculty might want to seek publication.”

Another resource he suggests faculty and students utilize is the Affordable Materials Project (AMP). AMP is a university-wide collaboration between the bookstore, Falvey Library, the Center for Access, Success and Achievement, and the Office of the Provost to provide faculty with resources and options for selecting high quality course materials while reducing the cost for students.

“The data I’ve seen already from AMP shows real value. Some of Falvey’s most highly used resources are coming from AMP,” he says. “The overall cost benefit is great because these resources are continually being used by multiple students year after year.”

In his free time, Banionis enjoys tailgating at Penn State football games, playing strategy board games, and spending time with his black cat, Millie. An avid singer (tenor), he is a member of multiple choirs including the Chester County Choral Society, Daylesford Abbey, and a small ad hoc eight-person choir titled Sine Nomine, which translates from Latin as “without a name.”

As Villanova is an R2: doctoral university, Banionis recognizes the opportunity to continue to globally expand research output.

“There are so many great plans and proposals happening at Villanova and at Falvey Library. There’s a lot more research output and an increased need for research support that the library can assist with. Falvey is the university’s steward of scholarly information–fuel for the academic engine.”

Banionis’ office is located in Collections on the second floor of Falvey. 610-519-4282. Email: john.banionis@villanova.edu.


Kallie Stahl, MA ’17 CLAS, is communication and marketing specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.


Reading Toni: Explore Morrison’s Body of Work Before New Biopic “The Pieces I Am” Premieres in Theaters

Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures.

Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am, a new biographical film about the Nobel Prize-winning author premiers in select theaters Friday, June 21. Whether you’re familiar with Morrison’s narratives, looking to re-experience her storytelling before the film, or new to the author’s work, Falvey Memorial Library has a number of Morrison’s novels for you to explore:

    • The Bluest Eye (1972) The story of eleven-year-old Pecola Breedlover—a black girl in an America whose love for its blond, blue-eyed children can devastate all others–who prays for her eyes to turn blue: so that she will be beautiful, so that people will look at her, so that her world will be different.
    • Sula (1973) Two girls who grow up to become women. Two friends who become something worse than enemies.
    • Song of Solomon (1977) With this brilliantly imagined novel, Morrison transfigures the coming-of-age story as audaciously as Saul Bellow or Gabriel García Márquez. As she follows Milkman from his rustbelt city to the place of his family’s origins, Morrison introduces an entire cast of strivers and seeresses, liars, and assassins…inhabitants of a fully realized black world.
    • Tar Baby (1981) The place is a Caribbean island. In their mansion overlooking the sea, the cultivated millionaire Valerian Street, now retired, and his pretty, younger wife, Margaret, go through rituals of living, as if in a trance.
    • Beloved (1987) Set in rural Ohio several years after the Civil War, this profoundly affecting chronicle of slavery and its aftermath is considered to be Toni Morrison’s greatest novel and the most spellbinding reading experience of the decade.
    • Jazz (1992) This passionate, profound story of love and obsession moves back and forth in time, as a narrative is assembled from the emotions, hopes, fears, and deep realities of Black urban life.
    • Paradise (1997) In prose that soars with the rhythms, grandeur, and tragic arc of an epic poem, Morrison challenges our most fiercely held beliefs as she weaves folklore and history, memory and myth into an unforgettable meditation on race, religion, gender, and a far-off past that is ever present. 
    • Love (2003) A Faulknerian symphony of passion and hatred, power and perversity, color and class that spans three generations of black women in a fading beach town.
    • A Mercy (2008) Reveals what lies beneath the surface of slavery. But at its heart, it is the ambivalent, disturbing story of a mother and a daughter—a mother who casts off her daughter in order to save her, and a daughter who may never exorcise that abandonment.
    • Home (2012) The story of a Korean war veteran on a quest to save his younger sister. Frank Money is an angry, broken veteran of the Korean War who, after traumatic experiences on the front lines, finds himself back in racist America with more than just physical scars. He is shocked out of his crippling apathy by the need to rescue his medically abused younger sister and take her back to the small Georgia town they come from that he’s hated all his life.
    • God Help the Child (2015) A tale about the way the sufferings of childhood can shape, and misshape, the life of the adult. At the center: a young woman who calls herself Bride, whose stunning blue-black skin is only one element of her beauty, her boldness and confidence, her success in life, but which caused her light-skinned mother to deny her even the simplest forms of love.

Kallie Stahl, MA ’17 CLAS, is communication and marketing specialist at Falvey Memorial Library. Her favorite Toni Morrison novel is The Bluest Eye.


The Curious ‘Cat: Happily Forever After

Celebrating the installation of Distinctive Collections’ newest exhibit, “Happily Forever After,” the Curious ‘Cat asked the curators,

“What is your favorite fairy tale?”

Beaudry Allen, Preservation and Digital Archivist:

Goldilocks and the Three Bears.”

Rebecca Oviedo, Distinctive Collections Coordinator:

Beauty and the Beast.”


Stop by Falvey’s first floor to explore a selection of fairy tales in Distinctive Collections’ new exhibit, “Happily Forever After: The Timeless Relevance of Fairy Tales.” Curated by Rebecca Oviedo, Distinctive Collections Coordinator, and Beaudry Allen, Preservation and Digital Archivist, the exhibit is open to the public throughout the summer.

Jack and the Beanstalk

Cinderella

Little Red Riding Hood


Kallie Stahl, MA ’17 CLAS, is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library. Her favorite fairy tale is The Ugly Duckling. 


Recommended Reading: Remembering the 75th Anniversary of D-Day

Remembering the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion in Normandy, June 6, 1944, Falvey Memorial Library Staff shared their recommended reading on the battle and World War II.

sophie scholl and the white roseGeoff Scholl: Sophie Scholl and the White Rose by Annette Dumbach and Jud Newborn

Dave Burke: Stalingrad by Anthony Beevor; Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

Michael Foight: Manzanar by Peter Wright, photography by Ansel Adams

Sarah Wingo: City of Thieves by David Benioff

Linda HauckAll The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

Marianne Watson: Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand unbroken

Darren Poley: The Myth of Hitler’s Pope: Pope Pius XII And His Secret War Against Nazi Germany by David Dalin

The Night Trilogy: Night, Dawn, Day  by Elie Wiesel

On Trial at Nuremberg by Airey Neave

Helmet for My Pillow: From Parris Island to the Pacific by Robert Leckie

Run Silent, Run Deep by Edward Beach

The Shadow of His Wings: The True Story of Fr. Gereon Goldmann, OFM by Gereon Goldmann

The Great Escape by Paul Brickhill

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

Guadalcanal Diary by Richard Tregaskis

thirty seconds over tokyoThirty Seconds Over Tokyo by Ted W. Lawson and Robert Considine

Letters and Papers from Prison by Dietrich Bonhoeffer

The Longest Day by Cornelius Ryan

D-Day, June 6, 1944: The Climactic Battle of World War II by Stephen Ambrose

D-Day: The Battle for Normandy by Antony Beevor

The Cruel Sea by Nicholas Monsarrat

At Dawn We Slept: The Untold Story of Pearl Harbor by Gordon Prange, Donald Goldstein, and Katherine Dillon

Miracle at Midway by Gordon Prange, Donald Goldstein, and Katherine Dillon

Mister Roberts: Play in Two Acts by Thomas Heggen and Joshua Logan

The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial: A Drama In Two Acts by Herman Wouk

Joanne Quinn: Armageddon: A Novel of Berlin by Leon Uris

Maus: A Survivor’s Tale by Art Spiegelman

Shawn Proctor: Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut


Marc Gallicchio, PhD, professor and chair of the Department of History, who was named a winner of the prestigious Bancroft Prize in American History and Diplomacy for his book Implacable Foes: War in the Pacific, 1944-1945, recommended American films that deal with aspects of war not normally captured on film. Below he shares his D-Day film recommendations:

 

The Longest Day (1962) “Offers the most comprehensive multi-national look at the different operations and services involved in bringing off the invasion. The Germans receive even-handed treatment and the scene of thousands of GIs moving ahead on Omaha beach outdoes in power similar scenes from Saving Private Ryan.

“Five directors worked on the film and they employed a star-studded international cast. The movie follows the story presented in Cornelius Ryan’s book of the same name. (Ryan also wrote A Bridge Too Far, which became a very good movie but which gave us one of the most vapid and overused clichés in the English language.)”

 

Saving Private RyanSteven Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan (1998) “Best remembered for its first thirty minutes in which viewers find themselves suddenly thrust into the terrifying experience of the GIs on Omaha Beach.

“The remainder of the movie unfolds like an extended episode of the 1960s television show Combat, except that the guest stars aren’t the only ones who get killed.”

 

Sam Fuller’s memoir/movie, The Big Red One (1980) “Has a brief segment on D-Day. The film shows how Fuller’s unit got to Normandy by way of North Africa and Italy and follows it through the campaign in France and into Germany to the end of the war.

“Although the violence does not come close to reaching the Tarantino levels of Saving Private Ryan,  The Big Red One is more disturbing and thought provoking than Spielberg’s blockbuster.”

 

The dark comedy/farce The Americanization of Emily (1964) “Hollywood’s most subversive movie, takes place in England during the build-up for the invasion but concludes with a memorable scene on Omaha Beach.”

 


Kallie Stahl, MA ’17 CLAS, is communication and marketing specialist at Falvey Memorial Library. 


Dig Deeper: Award-winning History Professor Recommends Films Exploring Rarely Seen Sides of World War II

Marc Gallicchio

In celebration of the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion in Normandy, June 6, 1944, first we take a look at World War II with Marc Gallicchio, PhD, professor and chair of the Department of History, who was named a winner of the prestigious Bancroft Prize in American History and Diplomacy for his book Implacable Foes: War in the Pacific, 1944-1945.

Implaceable Foes Book Cover

Dr. Gallicchio, who is not a fan of actual war films, offered recommendations for American films that deal with aspects of war not normally captured on film. (Films are in chronological order by subject portrayed.)

The Last Emperor (1987). “This lavish film is based on the memoir of Puyi, the last emperor of China and the nominal ruler of the Japanese-created puppet state of Manchukuo. The movie takes viewers from the overthrow of the Qing dynasty in 1911 to a few years after the creation of the People’s Republic of China in 1949.

“The parts of the movie dealing with Japan’s takeover of Manchuria in 1931 and the subsequent creation of Manchukuo, the first acts in Japan’s invasion of China, are particularly well done.”

(AVAILABLE VIA INTERLIBRARY LOAN.)

Empire of the Sun (1987) “Directed by Steven Spielberg, the movie is based on the autobiographical novel by the same name by British science fiction writer J.G. Ballard. This movie begins just before the attack on Pearl Harbor when Japan has already been at war with China for four years.”

“As the movie opens, its central figure, a young boy named Jaime (played by Christian Bale), is living the privileged life of Englishmen in the Shanghai International Settlement. That existence abruptly ends with Japan’s attack on American and European possessions throughout the Pacific, including the Shanghai International Settlement. I included this film because it vividly portrays that period before the war before U.S. entry that many Americans rarely see depicted in film.”

(AVAILABLE VIA INTERLIBRARY LOAN.)

Letters from Iwo Jima (2006) “This is the companion film to Flags of Our Fathers, both of which were directed by Clint Eastwood. Letters from Iwo Jima tells the story of the battle from the Japanese perspective. By this time in the war, February 1945, the main Japanese objective in continuing the fighting was to make the war as costly for the Americans as they could.”

“The Japanese had long lost any hope of victory in the war. Their ultimate goal was to stave off unconditional defeat by bringing a war-weary United States to the negotiating table.  The movie does an excellent job of depicting the Japanese defensive strategy based on heavy fortification inland from the beaches. The whole island had been turned into a fortress by the time the Americans attacked.”

(AVAILABLE IN THE LIBRARY’S DVD COLLECTION.)

The Americanization of Emily (1964). “Vanity Fair called this little known gem one of the most subversive American films ever made. It stars James Garner and Julie Andrews and was based on a novel by journalist William Bradford Huie, who, coincidentally, was a war correspondent on Iwo Jima.”

“Garner plays a confirmed coward who got his first and last taste of war in the assault on Tarawa in the Pacific. From that point on, he ingeniously avoids combat and becomes an adjutant to rear admiral stationed in London before the Normandy invasion. The movie is a dark comedy enlivened by sharp provocative dialogue.”

(AVAILABLE VIA INTERLIBRARY LOAN.)


Shawn Proctor

Shawn Proctor, MFA, is communications and marketing program manager at Falvey Memorial Library, and is proud to have watched half of these films in the theater as a kid.


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Last Modified: June 5, 2019