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Welcome to Falvey: Iliana Chaleva Joins Resource Management & Description

Iliana Chaleva

Lia Chaleva, Acquisitions & Licensing Librarian. Photo by Kallie Stahl, Communication & Marketing Specialist.


Iliana “Lia” Chaleva recently joined Resource Management and Description as Acquisitions & Licensing Librarian. Resource Management & Description “builds and cultivates collections through acquisitions, licensing, description, discovery, and access to resources for Villanova scholars and community.”

Before joining the Falvey Library staff, Chaleva was the e-Resource Librarian at West Chester University. She also worked as an e-Resource Librarian at Bryn Mawr College for nearly 15 years. After coming across the job posting for Falvey Library, Chaleva knew she wanted to explore the opportunity at Villanova University. “I live on the Main Line and I’ve always had an affinity for Villanova’s campus. Especially these last few years, driving past and seeing all the progress that has been made. Its such an inviting place.”

Originally from Bulgaria, Chaleva earned her Master’s in Library & Information Science (LIS) from Rutgers University. She received a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and International Relations from the American University in Bulgaria. Her interest in LIS began when she worked at the European Union (EU) Information Center in Bulgaria after graduating from the American University in Bulgaria. “The space had a small library with documents about the EU, work stations, free brochures. I worked at the public information desk answering questions: It felt like I was working in a mini library. I became interested in learning how to effectively organize information. Rutgers University was a perfect fit for me. I was able to conduct research and work on a variety of library information projects while completing my degree.”

Chaleva compliments her colleagues when discussing her role as Acquisitions & Licensing Librarian. “I work with a wonderful team. We are always working to get access for all users. I am responsible for reviewing current contracts with publishers and ensuring those terms and conditions are favorable for the Villanova community. My role entails a lot of technical information, but ultimately those technicalities can benefit Falvey Library patrons. Acquiring new resources is a collaborative process. Everyone has input, and we all work together to ensure we are obtaining the best information from vendors.”

In her free time, Chaleva enjoys spending time with her family and watching her children’s sporting events. “My family and I like to be outside. We like to kayak, hike, and fish. (‘We catch the fish, but always put them back!)'” She enjoys reading and watching historical movies. Her reading recommendations for Falvey patrons: Antarctica by David Day, Pennsylvania Good Eats by Brian Yarvin, and True Crime Philadelphia by Kathryn Caravan.

Chaleva’s office is located on the second floor of Falvey Library, room 232. Email iliana.chaleva@villanova.edu; 610-519-4731.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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OER Faculty Adoption Award Forum

banner for OER Forum

The OER (Open Educational Resources) Faculty Adoption Award Forum, held virtually on March 9, highlighted the diverse and flexible nature of openly licensed course materials and shined a light on student’s preference for free digital materials.

Professor Jeanne Liedtka, JD, received the award to transition the Law of Contracts and Sales elective to using OER. Not a newcomer to OER, she had previously used OER in the popular Intellectual Property (IP) Law for Business course. Liedtka compared and contrasted both successful experiences. IP is a dynamic branch of law heavily dependent on case law.  A law school text, Boyle & Jenkins’ Intellectual Property:  Law and the Information Society: Cases and Materials, served as the backbone of the course.  Her undergraduate student’s weren’t phased by materials designed for law school students, but Liedtka did go the extra mile to supplement the text with articles centering business perspectives on IP issues and recent cases in the public domain.  Liedtka noted that contract law is less dynamic field, and she had well developed lectures notes that served as the core of the course, so Introduction to Contracts, Sales & Product Liabilitywritten for undergraduates, was a serviceable reference.  She encouraged faculty interested in exploring OER adoptions to contact their subject librarians who can map available OER to course outlines and syllabi.

Valentina DeNardis, PhD, shared her personal and professional reasons for adopting Dickinson College Commentaries, to the Classics course, Readings in Authors. As a first generation student herself, Dr. DeNardis recalled feeling overwhelmed by the cost of texts and being stressed when the edition of a text she needed to use far exceeded the price for alternatives. In a grad school class, where she met her husband, she had to purchase a very costly scholarly monograph that was never even used, so now they have two pristine copies in their home. From a teaching perspective, Dr. DeNardis noted that affordability isn’t the only reason to choose openly licensed materials. Digital is convenient, flexible, and accessible. Because classics studies require a wide range of very expensive materials including texts, dictionaries, grammar books, translations, and essays, the Commentaries supplemented with Library-subscribed content was ideal.  Dr. DeNardis built a Microsoft OneNote notebook to deliver the content and as a forum for student collaboration.

A panel of students spoke to the social and academic benefits that flowed from using OER. Olivia noted that the online platform was better for visual learners because it facilitated looking up maps, videos, and images. Lauren felt that digital materials made it easier to do translations, because she could easily toggle between dictionaries. Anna liked digital sticky notes, which are environmentally friendly! From a pocket book point of view, Valeria noted that in fields with rapidly evolving developments having a current text is important, but it is distressing that the resale value of commercial textbooks diminish fast due to constant updates. Tuition increases and expensive textbooks can make it hard for some students to stay in college. She felt that using OER allowed everyone to be in the conversation and made class debates fun.

When asked about their overall experience with college textbooks, Olivia recommended frequent and early alerts about required books because discounted books sell out fast and delays in shipping can cause students to fall behind in their work. It was a relief to Lauren to find out on the first day of class that she didn’t have to pay for any books. Valeria said “eliminating the economic barrier of buying books gets everyone involved..[which] helps professors and students.” She observed that students can be discouraged from taking a class or  minoring in a subject because of expensive materials, whereas free or low cost books promote exploration. One student asked if professors are required to assign textbooks, even when they don’t intend to rely on them heavily, and wished that they would let students know up front when that is the case.

Dr. DeNardis explained that she hopes the effort she made finding and using affordable materials will serve as a model for her peers. Liedtka explained that at VSB faculty teaching core courses are encouraged to use the same text to ensure a consistent student experience, and that faculty have the freedom to design the course around the textbook, sometimes using relying on it heavily or sometimes only as a reference.

The forum concluded with a discussion about how to advance the use of OER at Villanova. On the demand side, both Dr. DeNardis and Liedtka recommended awards and grants, faculty surveys, forums and programs, and library services. On the demand side, both suggested encouragement and support for Villanova faculty authoring OER. They observed that authoring OER ensures the availability of great content and noted that it would enhance University branding and raise the profile of programs.

The 2022-23 Faculty Adoption Grant is accepting applications.  Visit this site to apply.

A recording of the OER Faculty Adoption Award Forum is available.


Linda Hauck is the Business Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library and Affordable Materials Project member.

 


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Caturday: Peace on Earth

angel and Villanova "V" ornament

“I pray my wish will come true
For my child and your child too
He’ll see the day of glory
See the day when men of good will
Live in peace, live in peace again”

—”Peace on Earth/Little Drummer Boy” by David Bowie and Bing Crosby

For those who want to reflect on how to bring peace to earth, consider reading Pope John XXIII’s encyclical letter in Falvey’s Memorial Library’s holdings.


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Kick back with Falvey’s summer word search!

By Daniella Snyder

Hey Wildcats, looking for something fun to do today and over your long Memorial Day Weekend?

You can get all the summer vibes from Falvey’s summer word search. I recommend you print it, take it outside, and find all the words while sitting underneath the sun while drinking a glass of lemonade. (Hammock optional, but highly recommended!)

picture of word search

 


Daniella Snyder HeadshotDaniella Snyder is a former graduate assistant at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 

 

 


 


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This Cat is Signing Off!

By Daniella Snyder

I’m Daniella Snyder, a graduate student at Villanova University, and your ‘Cat in the Library’s Stacks. I’ll be posting about academics–from research to study habits and everything in between–and how Falvey can play a large role in your success here on campus!

Hello, Wildcats!

For the last two years, it has been a pleasure to serve as Falvey Memorial Library’s ‘Cat in the Stacks. I’ve shared stories, books, and studying tips. I’ve discussed finals stress, the fantastic productions put on in Vasey Theatre, and I’ve researched important holidays, such as Women’s History Month and Indigenous Peoples’ Day. I’ve certainly learned a lot, and I hope you have, too!

For my last blog post, I thought I’d take some time to share my gratitude for some of the many people who have made my time at Falvey Memorial Library so special.

To the Holy Grounds employees: Thank you for always serving me the midday black coffee and sugary donut! My productivity during my usual 1-2 p.m. slump can be attributed to you!

To the subject librarians: Thank you for being available to talk, give advice, or listen. I will miss our regular conversations about Matt LeBlanc and The Golden Compass, and I will definitely miss your warm and helpful emails.

To the IT department: It was a delight to sit near you all. Thank you for your patience while I talked about The Bachelor all Tuesday morning, and thank you for not laughing at me every time I had a minor computer problem.

To Kayla at the front desk: Catching your infectious positivity at the front desk was a great way to start my work shift. I know we’ll both be leaving the library, but I hope to see you again soon!

To Allie, Annabelle, Kelly, and the rest of the student staff: You ladies are superstars, and I will miss you immensely. I know you only spent a small portion of your Villanova experience with me, but you all made 100% of my Villanova experience what it was. Never hesitate to call or text me. Promise you won’t like the next grad assistant more than you like me?

To Nate: You’re the Dwight to my Jim. I know you wouldn’t like it if I wrote anything emotional or corny, so I’ll just say you’ve been a great co-worker, and I’m sure we’ll see each other soon.

To Shawn: You’ve been a great writing mentor for my last year in the office, and I’m sure you’ll be the same for the next set of GAs. Your big ideas are great, and I can’t wait to see a Tiny Front Desk Concert soon.

To Kallie: I will miss you, your spunk, and your Monday morning affirmations. You’ve been a fantastic mentor, and I’ve always appreciated your advice, whether it was about school, work, or life.

To Gina: You are a superhero, and I don’t know where any of us would be without you. You inspire me to always see the glass half full and to see the good in everything. I will miss you!

To Joanne: Thank you for your guidance throughout these last two years, and thank you for allowing our big ideas to come to life, like creating a podcast or recording the GlobalSmackDown. You were a great mentor, and I can only hope that my next supervisor will be as great as you!

Signing off,

Daniella


Daniella Snyder HeadshotDaniella is a graduate student in the English department and a (former) graduate assistant for Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 

 

 


 


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What’s on my summer reading list?

By Daniella Snyder

I’m Daniella Snyder, a graduate student at Villanova University, and your ‘Cat in Falvey’s Stacks. I’ll be posting about academics–from research to study habits and everything in between–and how the  Library can play a large role in your success here on campus!

Wildcats, this will sound nerdy, but one of my favorite parts of the summer is crafting a list of the books I plan to read over the next few months. Like a good playlist, my summer reading list must have a combination of different genres. It needs something academic, something funny, and I always add something that I should’ve read by now, but haven’t. I think you can tell a lot about a person by what books they read, so I thought I’d share this summer’s reading list.

Slaughterhouse-Five book cover

Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

Even though I know that Vonnegut’s a famous author, and Slaughterhouse-Five is a classic novel, I’ve never actually read it, and I’m pretty late to the Vonnegut game. I started reading his novels in college, but have only read two or three of his works. Slaughterhouse-Five is like, the Shawshank Redemption of books. Everyone’s read it, so I should too.

 

I Might Regret this book cover

I Might Regret This: Essays, Drawing, Vulnerabilities, and Other Stuff by Abbi Jacobson

Abbi Jacobson is a comedic genius. If you’ve seen Broad City, you know what I mean. With this book, I think I’ll be LQTM (laughing quietly to myself) at the beach, at the park, and on the train.

 

Wow, no thank you book cover

Wow, No Thank You. by Samantha Irby

I was supposed to hear Samantha Irby read at the Free Library of Philadelphia in April, but reading her newest collection of essays will make up for the missed experience. Irby’s writing is biting and hysterical. I’d recommend this one to any of your funny friends.

 

How to Do Nothing book cover

How To Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy by Jenny Odell

//I don’t really like self-help books, but I think this is different. Odell writes a book that helps us think about efficiency and attention in a new way.

 

Life of the party book cover

Life of the Party by Olivia Gatwood

I had to have at least one poetry collection on the list, and Olivia Gatwood is so cool. Seriously, though. I stalk her on Instagram, and think she’s so rad. So, I have to imagine that her poetry will be relatable, interesting, and bold.

 

Such a Fun Age book cover

Such a Fun Age by Kiley Reid

This has been a highly-anticipated book of 2020, and I don’t know much about it, other than my friends have read it and liked it, so I should read it, too.

 

The Beautiful and Damned book cover

The Beautiful and Damned by F. Scott Fitzgerald

I took a Fitzgerald course in college, and I still never managed to read this novel. Since Gatsby is still one of my favorite books of all time (basic, I know) I think it’s only right that I read the rest of the Fitzgerald canon.

 

Sing, Unburied, Sing book cover

Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward

Honestly, how haven’t I read this book yet? It was named a top book of the last decade. Decade! Enough said.

 

Playing to the Gallery book cover

Playing to the Gallery: Helping Contemporary Art in its Struggle to Be Understood by Grayson Perry

If you’ve known me for 15+ minutes, you would know that I studied art history in college, because I somehow incorporate that fact into every conversation I’ve ever had. This book has been on my list for a while.

 


Daniella Snyder HeadshotDaniella Snyder is a former graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library. This week, she’s reading The Upside of Being Down by Jen Gotch.

 

 

 

 


 


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Request a workshop!

LEARN

Image courtesy of Pixabay via pexels.com

By Susan Turkel

Have you seen announcements for Falvey Brown Bags, but found that you couldn’t attend due to scheduling conflicts? No worries—we will bring the brown bag to you!

Library Workshops and Presentations request form

The librarians at Falvey invite you to request a workshop on journal publishing, data visualization, citation management, fair use, or any of a host of other topics. Check out our offerings, or suggest a topic of your own!

Our “on demand” workshops can be customized to your needs. The time and place are flexible as well: we can host the workshop at the library, or we can bring the show on the road and meet with your group at your location on campus.

We’re happy to present to your lab group, your class, or a gathering of your colleagues.

Of course, our subject librarians are also happy to present a course-related information literacy instruction session; fill out this form or reach out to your librarian directly.

We look forward to working with you!


Susan Turkel headshotSusan Turkel, MA, MLS, is a Social Sciences Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Celebrate Black History Month: READ!

By Daniella Snyder

'Cat In the Stacks Logo and Banner

I’m Daniella Snyder, a graduate student at Villanova University, and your ’Cat in Falvey Memorial Library’s Stacks. I’ll be posting about academics–from research to study habits and everything in between–and how the Falvey can play a large role in your success here on campus!

Hey, Wildcats, big things are happening next week in Falvey for Black History Month.

On Tuesday, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., join members of the Villanova community in Speakers’ Corner for the African American Read-In. We’ll be listening to and reading cherished texts aloud. Falvey will have materials available to read, from poetry to scientific papers, but you should feel free to bring your own book.

The Read-In is sponsored by the Department of Education and Counseling; Falvey Memorial Library; the Department of English; the Department of Communication; the Gender and Women’s Studies Program and CLAS Diversity; and the Equity and Inclusion Committee. The African American Read-In is affiliated with the National Council of Teachers of English and Villanova University’s Black History Month.

Here at Falvey, we’ve been gathering library goers’ favorite books by authors of color. Here are some of the more popular recommendations that are available in our stacks:

the bluest eye cover

The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

In Toni Morrison’s first novel, published in 1970, she tells the story of Pecola Breedlove growing up during the years following the Great Depression. Morrison, a Nobel Prize and Pulitzer Prize-winning author, was (and still is) an American literary genius and hero.

The Fire Next Time

The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin

James Baldwin wrote this nonfiction book in 1963. It contains two essays, each of them relating to the role of race in the United States and religion. Along with essays, Baldwin also wrote fiction and plays, and his writing addresses the intersections of race and masculinity, sexuality, spirituality, and class.

sister outside

Sister Outsider by Audre Lorde

Audre Lorde, feminist icon, composed a collection of essays and speeches dating from 1976 to 1984, and speaks to her identity as a black woman, lesbian, and mother. The essays in this collection are considered landmark works that have inspired decades of third and fourth-wave feminist thought.

Between the World and Me

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Coates drew from his own life growing up in Baltimore to write this nonfiction book in 2015 . Inspired by the structure of Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time, Coates wrote the book in the form of a letter to his teenage son in an attempt to explain to him the racist violence that has become woven into American culture. It was named one of the best books of the decade in The New York Times.

What will you be reading for the African American Read-In? Tell us @villanovalibrary on Instagram or tweet us @falveylibrary!


Daniella Snyder HeadshotDaniella Snyder, graduate assistant in the Communication & Marketing Department, recommends reading [insert] boy by Danez Smith for Black History Month.

 

 


 


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Access the U.S. Presidential Impeachment Library, Courtesy of the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law

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Photo by Michael on Unsplash.

BY MERRILL STEIN 

Did you know? HeinOnline, a robust legal database, now offers a new collection: U.S. Presidential Impeachment Library.

The collection, organized based on the four affected Presidents, brings together a variety of documents, both contemporaneous and asynchronous to each President’s impeachment. It presents a snapshot of the political climate as each impeachment played out as well as the long view history has taken of each proceeding.

Accessible from the Falvey Library homepage

Subscription is courtesy of the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law.


Merrill Stein is Political Science Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Falvey wants you to stress less.

I’m Daniella Snyder, a second-year graduate student at Villanova University, and your ’Cat in Falvey Library’s Stacks. I’ll be posting about academics–from books, to research, to study habits and everything in between–and how the Falvey Library can play a large role in your success here on campus!

Wildcats, it’s the Final(s) Countdown. *cue rock song*

Falvey believes that paying attention to your mental health becomes increasingly more important during these few weeks, which is why we are hosting a bunch of stress relief events in order to help you stay happy and healthy.

Mark your calendar with these:

Thursday, Dec. 12, 1-3 PM, Holy Grounds: Vinyls for Finals

That’s right, we’re back with Falvey’s famous semi-annual stress bustin’ event. This year’s event will feature a soundtrack from vinyl records, pizza, and games!

Thursday, Dec. 12, 4-6 PM, Speakers’ Corner: Stress-Relief Scrapbooking

Come take a break from finals stress and create a scrapbook with your own photos and art supplies, provided by the yearbook/CAT.

Friday, Dec. 13, 12-2 PM, Room 205: Happy Healthy Hours/Pals for Life

You know the deal. Therapy. Dogs. Cuddles.

Beyond hosting these events, we want to make you that you know how to cope with stress on your own, especially during hard times. Follow our list of advice to make your finals a little more manageable.

    1. Plan, plan, plan. Research has made it clear that stress can be managed through planning. Make daily and weekly to-do lists, set reminders on your phone, or use a handy paper planner. Personally, I make every large assignment due date as the first “event” in my Outlook calendar, so when I wake up in the morning and look at my schedule, I know exactly what’s due that day.
    2. Meditate. It’s obvious that meditation has incredible health benefits including clarity of mind, reduced anxiety, and minimal stress. Can’t sit still that long by yourself? Use the app Headspace (free to download!) to guide you through 5, 10, and 15-minute meditation sessions.
    3. OHIO. No, not the state. It stands for “Only handle it once.” Don’t think it’s a big deal if you let that email sit for a few days? Wrong. Having a million tasks– even if they’re small– is like having a million mental tabs open. If you remember that you haven’t spoken to your family in 2 weeks, don’t put it on the ever-expanding to-do list. Only handle it once…meaning, just do it immediately. Keeping a short list of things to do will reduce your stress in the long run.
    4. Positive affirmations. Instead of just checking things off a to-do list, people can often find it beneficial to write an “I’ve Done” list. Write a list of things you accomplished that day, along with things you did really well. Even if it’s a small task (like taking out the garbage) reminding yourself of your accomplishments can have seriously positive effects!
    5. Spend time with friends. Isolating yourself is guaranteed to amplify all negative and stressful emotions you have during exams week. Eat with people, study with people, get coffee with people. Do not (I repeat: do NOT) lock yourself up in your room or apartment alone. You need your people, especially when things get tough.
    6. Sleep, eat, and shower. While this seems obvious, students often fail to prioritize basic human necessities during stressful academic weeks. Please…take care of yourself. Sleep 7-8 hours a night, drink your water, eat food, and shower. Your body and mind will thank you when this is all over.
    7. Seek counseling. If you feel like college always makes you finals-level stressed, you might want to consider talking to a professional about more effective and long-term ways to manage stress or anxiety. Visit the Counseling Center’s website here.

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Last Modified: December 11, 2019