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Join Us for Mindfulness Mondays this Fall

mindfulness mondays poster

 

This fall, we invite the Villanova community to join us for a taste of mindfulness meditation on Mondays from 12:30- 1 p.m. This virtual series will begin with the first meditation on Monday, Aug.17 and run on Monday afternoons throughout the semester.

Mindfulness Mondays will offer a comfortable space where you are guided and encouraged to stop and focus on the “here and now.” Mindfulness is proven to reduce stress and enhance well being, which can be beneficial to all faculty, staff, and students.

Sessions will take place each week via Zoom. Please follow this link to join each week:

https://villanova.zoom.us/j/99265795994

Mindfulness Mondays are presented by Campus Ministry and co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library. Registration is not required. All are welcome to attend these ACS-approved events!

Please join us!

 

 

 

 

 

 


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To learn more about the practice and benefits of mindfulness meditation, we invite you to read some of the following e-books which are part of Falvey Library’s collection:

These e-books are available to any student, faculty, or staff with a valid Villanova email address.

Please also check out these helpful resources being offered by Campus Ministry:


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Regina Duffy is a Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 

 


 


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The Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Conversation Series Explores White Fragility, Anti-Racist Issues

banner with conversation series events

 

During the month of July, Falvey Library was honored to work with Villanova’s Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (ODEI) to help promote their conversation series based off of Robin DiAngelo’s book White Fragility. The series was open to the Villanova Community and featured three opportunities for participation and dialogue on important topics.

At the first event, facilitators from ODEI led small group conversations based on an interview with the author of White Fragility, titled “Teaching Tolerance Interviews Robin DiAngelo: White Fragility in the Classroom.” Throughout the interview, DiAngelo talked about how white people are shaped by racist systems and have to actively work to break out of this cycle.

She also stressed that silence on topics of race communicates hostility to people of color and that “just being nice” is not enough. Through the small group discussion recap at the end of the event, it was determined that we need to talk about issues of race and continue the discussion. You can watch the interview with Robin DiAngelo here.

podcast participants

Alex Iannucci, EdD; Hibba Abugideiri, PhD; Ariella Robins; and Teresa Nance, PhD, participated in the podcast event.

At the following event in the series, ODEI held a community-wide podcast featuring Alex Iannucci, EdD, Director of Strategic Initiatives, Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, as well as Hibba Abugideiri,PhD, Associate Professor, Department of History, who discussed important ideas found in White Fragility.

Dr. Iannucci talked about their personal experiences with realizing their race and privilege and discussed what it really means to be an ally to people of color.

Ariella Robins, MS, Training Manager, Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, and Teresa Nance, PhD, Associate Vice Provost for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, Chief Diversity Officer, Associate Professor also gave some remarks during the event.

(You can listen to the podcast here.)

The final event in the series featured small facilitated group conversations based on themes found in chapter 12 of White Fragility, titled “Where Do We Go From Here?” At this event, small groups discussed how to accept feedback about their own racism without being defensive, how to take responsibility and process their offenses to people of color fully, and work to remedy their actions. Faculty, staff, and students with an active Villanova email account can view the full text of White Fragility here.

The conversation series is only a starting point. It is not just the work of ODEI, but the effort of the entire community that is needed to ensure that we are working towards making Villanova a welcoming place for people of color. We must speak up when we witness acts of racism, and accept feedback without getting defensive, and continue to educate ourselves.

If we want to be true antiracists, we must realize our learning is never done.

This event series was a part of the Living Race—Transforming Community campaign and was organized by members of ODEI, including Dr. Nance; Dr. Iannucci; Sheryl Perlmutter Bowen, PhD, Faculty Director of the Program on Intergroup Relations, Associate Professor, Department of Communication; Robbins; and Alberta Parsons, Program Coordinator, Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion.

Visit the ODEI webpage for more information on Villanova’s diversity initiatives and campus resources. Explore DiAngelo’s work and scholarship on her website. Please contact  Diversity@villanova.edu with any questions about the series.

 


headshot picture of regina duffy

 

Regina Duffy is a communication and marketing program manager at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Ready for Fall: Falvey 205 Sports a New Look

an overhead of the workers installing the flooring Falvey Memorial Library’s 205 is well known for its highly functional space, which can host as many as 60 people in lecture or group meeting configurations. It allows for highly flexible presentations, with two white boards and a large monitor, as well as a podium with HDMI and VGA inputs.

This summer the multi-purpose room received new mother-of-pearl paint on the walls and a striking laminate flooring. The refresh of 205 was only just complete when it welcomed a week-long orientation event ahead of our students return.

If it’s possible, 205 might be an even more popular events space this upcoming academic year!

 

a worker installs the floor

The New Look 205 space

 


Shawn Proctor, MFA, is communications and marketing program manager at Falvey Memorial Library.


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A “Friendly” Evening in Photos

On Tuesday, March 26, we celebrated the 248-year history of the Philadelphia Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick for the Relief of Emigrants from Ireland with music, talks, and an exhibit. Founded in Philadelphia in 1771, the Society is the second-oldest, continuously meeting Irish organization in the United States. The Society has made a number of contributions to Villanova University and recently partnered with the Library’s Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement department to digitize their historical materials, which can be viewed in the Digital Library.

The evening began with a social hour at 5pm, featuring refreshments and live Irish music from the band Irish Mist, featuring featuring Tom McLaughlin on banjo and spoons; Mary Tracy on fiddle, and Paul Harris on bass and guitar.

Photo of two men, one on banjo and one on guitar, and one woman on fiddle.

Live Irish music was provided by the band Irish Mist, featuring (from left to right) Tom McLaughlin, Paul Harris, and Mary Tracy.

A man on a banjo with a crowd of people in the background.

Tom McLaughlin of Irish Mist, looking toward the camera at left, and some of the attendees.

Talks began shortly after 6pm. As the exhibit curator and event organizer, I opened with a brief overview of some of the Irish connections in Falvey’s Distinctive Collections.

A woman speaking at a podium in front of a seated crowd.

Laura Bang giving an overview of Irish collections.

Dr. Joseph Lennon, Associate Dean of International and Interdisciplinary Initiatives and Emily C. Riley Director of Irish Studies, then spoke about the value to scholars of digitizing collections and making them freely available online.

A man speaking at a podium in front of a seated crowd.

Dr. Joseph Lennon speaking about the value of digitized collections.

Finally, our main speaker was Joseph P. Heenan, Past President of the Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick and current Chair of the Scholarship Committee and Chair of the Society’s Historical Records. Heenan gave an overview of the Society’s history and accomplishments.

A man speaking at a podium.

Joseph P. Heenan describing the Society’s history.

Left to right: Michael Foight, Laura Bang, Joseph P. Heenan, Joseph Lennon.

After the talks, people had the opportunity to mingle some more and examine the materials in the exhibit cases. Everyone enjoyed a fun evening in honor of the Friendly Sons!

A group of people talking.

A group of attendees.

A woman stands beside a sign advertising the exhibit and event.

Among the attendees, we were excited to meet Mary Clare Hogan, the daughter of Father Falvey’s (after whom Falvey Memorial Library is named) first cousin. A Falvey celebrity!

A man looking at an exhibit case.

One of the exhibit cases and the exhibit poster. (Photo by Laura Bang.)

The exhibit will be on display through the end of May. If you can’t make it to the library to see the exhibit, Society materials that have been digitized so far are viewable online in the Digital Library with more to come.

All photos courtesy of Regina Duffy, unless otherwise noted.


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Save the date: Intro to DH session, 9/30 11am

Introduction to Digital Humanities

Digital Humanities is an active and dynamic area of scholarship that brings together digital technologies and the humanities disciplines. Librarian Laura Bang will lead a session to provide some definitions of the digital humanities (DH), a look at some example DH projects, and an introduction to the Library’s digital scholarship work. This session will meet on Friday, September 30 at 11:00am in Room 204 on the 2nd floor of Falvey Memorial Library. This event is open to anyone interested in the digital humanities.


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Dig Deeper: Replacement Parts

replacement parts caplanA Scholarship@Villanova lecture featuring Arthur L. Caplan, PhD; The Rev. James J. McCartney, OSA; and Daniel P. Reid ‘14 CLAS will take place today at 3:00 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner of Falvey Memorial Library. Dr. Caplan, an internationally recognized bioethicist, along with co-editors Father McCartney and Reid, will discuss their collection of essays from medicine, philosophy, economics and religion that address the ethical challenges raised by organ transplantation.

Their book, Replacement Parts, takes an interdisciplinary approach to fundamental issues like the determination of death and the dead donor rule; the divisive case of using anencephalic infants as organ donors; the sale of cadaveric or live organs; possible strategies for increasing the number of available organs, including market solutions and the idea of presumed consent; and questions surrounding transplant tourism and “gaming the system” by using the media to gain access to organs.

The author, Arthur L. Caplan, PhD, is the head of the Division of Bioethics at New York University’s Langone Medical Center and the author or editor of over thirty books and six hundred articles. Co-editor Father James J. McCartney is an associate professor in the Department of Philosophy at Villanova University and an adjunct professor in its School of Law. In the past he has been the ethics consultant for several major health systems in the United States. Daniel P. Reid, co-editor, is a recent graduate of Villanova University.

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of Philosophy, is free and open to the public.

To learn more about the ethical issues surrounding organ donation, check out the following resources provided by Robin Bowles, subject librarian for science, biology, and nursing.


Dig Deeper

 Falvey Memorial Library resource list featuring 13 Falvey holdings:

Replacement Parts

Highlight of the list: Transplantation Ethics by Robert M. Veatch

book cover Robert M. Veatch Transplantation Ethics

Further resources:

Gale Opposing Viewpoints In Context—Topic: Organ Donation
A collection of news articles, editorials, Academic articles, and other related information covering the topic of Organ Donation for the undergraduate.

Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics (2nd ed.)

Encyclopedia of Bioethics


RS4532_FML164_RobinBowles_019_EDITDig Deeper links selected by Robin Bowles, liaison librarian for science, biology, and nursing.


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5th ICTs and Society-Conference: The Internet and Social Media at a Crossroads: Capitalism or Commonism?

5th ICTs and Society-Conference: The Internet and Social Media at a Crossroads: Capitalism or Commonism? Perspectives for Critical Political Economy and Critical Theory.

http://icts-and-society.net/events/5th-icts-and-society-conference/

Part of the ISIS Summit Vienna 2015: Information Society at a Crossroads: Response and Responsibility of the Sciences of Information

Vienna University of Technology.

Vienna, Austria

June 3-7, 2015.

The information society has come with the promise  to restore information as a commons. The promise has not yet proven true. Instead, we face trends towards the commercialisation and commoditisation of all information; towards the totalisation of surveillance and the extension of the battlefield to civil society through information warfare; towards disinfotainment overflow; towards a collapse of the technological civilisation itself.

The Vienna Summit is a multi-conference and is at the same time the 5th ICTs and Society-Conference:

The Internet and Social Media at a Crossroads: Capitalism or Commonism? Perspectives for Critical Political Economy and Critical Theory

Given that the information society and the study of information face a world of crisis today and are at a crossroads, also the future of the Internet and social media are in question. The 5th ICTs and Society Conference therefore wants to focus on the questions: What are the main challenges that the Internet and social media are facing in capitalism today? What potentials for an alternative, commonist Internet are there?

What are existing hindrances for such an Internet? What is the relationship of power structures, protest movements, societal developments, struggles, radical reforms, etc. to the Internet? How can critical political economy and critical theory best study the Internet and social media today?

Presentations and submissions are organised in the form of 23 panel topics (ICT&S1-ICT&S23; please indicate the panel identification number to which you submit in your submisison):

* ICT&S1 The Internet and Critical Theory:

What does it mean to study the Internet, social media and society today in a critical way? What are Critical Internet Studies, Critical Political Economy and Critical Theories of Social Media?

* ICT&S2 The Internet, Karl Marx, and Marxist Theory:

How can classical forms of critical theory and critical political economy – e.g. the works of e.g. Karl Marx, the Frankfurt School, Critical Political Economy of the Media and Communication, Critical and Marxist Cultural Studies, Socialist Feminism, Theories of Imperialism, Raymond Williams’ cultural materialism, etc – be used for understanding the Internet and social media today?

* ICT&S3 The Internet, Commodities and Capitalism:

What is the role of the Internet and social media in the context of the commodity logic in contemporary capitalism?

* ICT&S4 The Political Economy of Online Advertising How can we best critically understand, analyse and combat the role of advertising on the Internet and the role of online advertising in capitalism? What are the problems of online advertising culture? How would a world without advertising and an advertising-free Internet look like?

* ICT&S5 The Internet and Power:

How do power structures, exploitation, domination, class, digital labour, commodification of the communication commons, ideology, and audience/user commodification, and surveillance shape the Internet and social media? What is the relationship of exploitation and domination on the Internet?

* ICT&S6 Raymond Williams’ Cultural Materialism and the Internet:

How can we use theoretical insights from Raymond Williams’ cultural materialism for critically understanding the Internet and social media today?

* ICT&S7 Dallas Smythe and the Internet:

How can we use insights from Dallas Smythe’s political economy of communication for critically understanding the Internet and social media today?

* ICT&S8 Critical Cultural Studies Today: Stuart Hall, Richard Hoggart and the Internet:

What is the legacy of Stuart Hall and Richard Hoggart’s versions of cultural studies for critically understanding the Internet? What kind of cultural studies do we need in the 21st century? And what is in this context the relationship of culture and capitalism and the relationship of critical cultural studies to Marxist theory?

* ICT&S9 The Frankfurt School and the Internet:

How can insights of various generations of the Frankfurt School be used for critically theorising the Internet? What are commonalities and differences between a Frankfurt School approach and other forms of critical theory for understanding the Internet?

* ICT&S10 Marxist Semiotics, Marxist Linguistics, Critical Psychology, Marxism and the Internet:

How can Marxist semiotics and Marxist theories of language, information, psychology and communication (e.g. Ferruccio Rossi-Landi, Valentin Voloshinov, Klaus Holzkamp, Georg Klaus, Lev Vygotsky, Aleksei Leontiev, Mikhail Bakhtin, etc.) be used today for critically understanding the Internet?

* ICT&S11 The Internet and Global Capitalism:

What is the role of the Internet and social media in contemporary global capitalism? What is the role of developing countries, especially Africa, and emerging economies such as China and India in the world of the Internet and social media?

* ICT&S12 The Internet and Neoliberalism with Chinese Characteristics:

Chinese WWW platforms such as Baidu, Taobao, Qq, Sina, Weibo, etc. are besides Californian platforms the most prominent ones on the web. What is the role of social media in Chinese capitalism? What is the role of the Internet in networked working class struggles in China?

* ICT&S13 The Political Economy of Digital Labour:

What is digital labour and how do exploitation and surplus-value generation work on the Internet? Which forms of exploitation and class structuration do we find on the Internet, how do they work, what are their commonalities and differences? How does the relation between toil and play change in a digital world? How do classes and class struggles look like in 21st century informational capitalism?

* ICT&S14 The Political Economy of the Internet and the Capitalist State

Today: How does the relationship of capitalism, state power, and the Internet look like today? What is the role of state surveillance and surveillance ideologies in policing the crisis of capitalism? How does the relationship of the Internet and state power’s various forms of regulation, control, repression, violence and surveillance look like and what is the influence of capitalism on state power and vice versa in the context of the Internet?

* ICT&S15 Ideology Critique 2.0: Ideologies of and on the Internet:

What are ideologies of and on the Internet, web 2.0, and social media, how do they work, and how can they be deconstructed and criticised?

* ICT&S16 Hegel 2.0: Dialectical Philosophy and the Internet:

What contradictions, conflicts, ambiguities, and dialectics shape 21st century information society and social media? How can we use Hegel and Marxist interpretations of Hegel for critically understanding Internet dialectics?

* ICT&S17 Capitalism and Open Access Publishing:

What changes has academic publishing been undergoing in contemporary capitalism? What are the potentials of academic open access publishing for the re-organisation of the publishing world ? What problems do non-commercial open access publishing face in capitalism and capitalist academia? How can these problems be overcome? What are the problems of capitalist forms of open access publishing? What progressive political measures and demands should be made in order to foster non-commercial open access publishing?

* ICT&S18 Class Struggles, Social Struggles and the Internet:

What is the role of counter-power, resistance, struggles, social movements, civil society, rebellions, uproars, riots, revolutions, and political transformations in 21st century information society and how (if at all) are they connected to social media? What struggles are needed in order to establish a commonist Internet and a 21st century democratic-commonist society? How can we use critical theory for interpreting phenomena such as online leaking, Edward Snowden, WikiLeaks, Wikipedia, federated social networks, Anonymous, hacktivism, Pirate Parties, privacy advocates, the free/libre/open source (FLOSS) movement, the open source, open hardware and open content movement, etc., and what is the relationships of such political expressions to capitalism, anti-capitalism, liberalism, and socialism?

* ICT&S19 Critical/Radical Internet Studies, the University and Academia

Today: What are the challenges and problems for teaching and conducting research about the Internet a critical and radical perspective? What can be done to overcome existing limits and problems?

* ICT&S20 The Internet and the Left:

How could a 21st century Left best look like and what is the role of the Internet for such a Left? What is the historical, contemporary, and possible future relationship of Critical Internet Studies and the Left?

What is the role of the Internet in left-wing movements? What problems do such movements face in relation to the media, communications, the Internet, and social media?

* ICT&S21 Anti-Capitalist Feminism and the Internet Today:

What is the role of and relationship of identity politics and anti-capitalism for feminist studies of the Internet today? How can we best study capitalist patriarchy in the context of the Internet and social media?

* ICT&S22 The Internet, Right-Wing Extremism and Fascism Today:

How do far-right movements and parties use the Internet and social media? How should a left-wing anti-fascist strategy that combats online right-wing extremism look like?

* ICT&S23 An Alternative Internet:

What is a commonist/communist Internet? What is an alternative Internet?

What are alternative social media? How do they relate to the commons and commonism as a 21st century form of communism? Which problems do alternative Internet platforms face? What needs to be done in order to overcome these problems?

Online SUBMISSION:

http://sciforum.net/conference/isis-summit-vienna-2015/icts

http://sciforum.net/conference/isis-summit-vienna-2015/page/instructions

Please submit an extended abstract of 750-2000 words:

First register and then select the conference “ISIS Summit Vienna 2015”

and the conference stream “ICTS 2015”

Only one submission per person will be considered Please indicate the number/ID of the panel to which you are submitting at the start of your abstract (ICTSxx). Submissions without panel identifier or that fall outside the topics covered by the 23 panels will not be further considered.

Submission deadline:

February 27, 201

Registration Fee:

120 Euros (early bird registration in the ICTs and Society conference stream, registration no later than April 3, 2015)

_______________________________________________

Announce-iacap.org mailing list

Announce-iacap.org@iacap.org

http://iacap.org:8081/mailman/listinfo/announce-iacap.org


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Schedule for Fall Professionalization Workshops

Welcome back, everyone! The schedule for fall professionalization workshops is now complete. You can find it on the department website, and right here:

Policies/Progress
Friday, September 5th, 2014, 3pm. Old Falvey Reading Room (enter through Old Falvey)

Getting published
Thursday, October 2nd, 2014, 11:30am. Hypatia Editorial Suite, Falvey 1st floor

Dissertation planning
Friday, November 7th, 2014, 3pm. Falvey 204

Keeping All The Balls in the Air: Prioritizing Your Tasks, Defining Your Goals
Wednesday, November 19th, 2014, 11:30am. Falvey 205

If you have any questions about these events, just let me know. I can be reached at nikolaus.fogle@villanova.edu, or (610) 519-5182.

 


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An InExact Science Podcast – Lisa Cantrell

Hi all,

I am creating a podcast called An InExact Science that features psychological and cognitive research! I have launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for the project.  I need support and help in spreading the word! Please pitch in and share the info with others!

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1864204081/we-are-all-creating-an-inexact-science

Lisa Cantrell
Graduate Student
Cognitive Development Lab
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences
Indiana University
812-855-8256
http://mypage.iu.edu/~cantrell


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Workshop: Marx’s Labour Theory of Value in the Digital Age

Workshop: Marx’s Labour Theory of Value in the Digital Age

COST Action IS1202 “Dynamics of Virtual Work”, http://dynamicsofvirtualwork.com/ The Open University of Israel

June 15-17, 2014

Recent developments in digital technology, from “social media”/”web 2.0” such as Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Weibo, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Foursquare, etc to mobile devices, have spurred new forms of production.

A variety of terms has been used to describe new production practices and new products enabled by the Internet: participatory culture, co-creation, mass collaboration, social production, commons-based peer production, mass customization, prosumption, produsage, crowdsourcing, open source, social production, user-generated content, user participation, folksonomics, wikinomics, collaborative innovation, open innovation, user innovation.

These terms and debates are often over-optimistic, celebratory and lack a critical understanding of “social media” – they do not engage with the social problem-dimension of the “social”. The multiplicity of neologisms is also a symptom of a “technologistic” outlook, which assumes that each technical innovation brings about a paradigmatic change in culture and in society and more democracy and a better society. While such multiplicity of terms attests to a phenomenology of technological innovation and diversity, it is also an analytical and theoretical liability. Concurrent with this dominant approach, there have been attempts for a systematic critical analysis of new forms of online production, digital labour and commodification on social media through the prism of the labour theory of value. Such theoretical approaches attempt to apply a unified conceptual framework in order to gain better understanding of the socio-economic foundations of digital media and the social relations, power relations and class relations that they facilitate. They also help to connect these new productive practices with a longstanding theoretical tradition emerging from Marxian political economy.

The role of Marx’s labour theory of value for understanding the political economy of digital and social media has been a topic of intense work and debates in recent years, particularly concerning the appropriateness of using Marxian concepts, such as: value, surplus-value, exploitation, class, abstract and concrete labour, alienation, commodities, the dialectic, work and labour, use- and exchange-value, General Intellect, labour time, labour power, the law of value, necessary and surplus labour time, absolute and relative surplus value production, primitive accumulation, rent, reproductive labour, formal and real subsumption of labour under capital, species-being, collective worker, etc.

The critical conceptualization of digital labour has been approached from a variety of critical approaches, such as Marx’s theory, Dallas Smythe’s theory of audience commodification, Critical Theory, Autonomous Marxism, feminist political economy, labour process theory, etc. In this workshop we explore current interventions to the digital labour theory of value. Such interventions propose theoretical and empirical work that contributes to our understanding of the Marx’s labour theory of value, how the nexus of labour and value are transformed under virtual conditions, or they employ the theory in order to shed light on specific practices.

The Israeli location will provide an opportunity to explore some issues pertinent to digital technology in the local context, including a lecture on the Palestinian Internet and a tour exploring techniques of separation and control along the separation wall in Jerusalem.

Keynote talks:

Noam Yoran: The Labour Theory of Television, or, Why is Television Still Around Christian Fuchs: The Digital Labour Theory of Value and Karl Marx in the Age of Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and Weibo Anat Ben David: The Palestinian Internet

The programme features the following talks:

* Andrea Fumagalli: The concept of life subsumption in cognitive bio-capitalism: valorization and governance

* Bingqing Xia: Marx’s in Chinese online space: some thoughts on the labour problem in Chinese Internet industries

* Brice Nixon: The Exploitation of Audience Labour: A Missing Perspective on Communication and Capital in the Digital Era

* Bruce Robinson: Marx’s categories of labour, value production and digital work

* Eran Fisher: Audience labour: empirical inquiry into the missing link of subjectivity

* Frederick Harry Pitts: Form-giving fire: creative industries as Marx’s ‘work of combustion’”

* Jakob Rigi: The Crisis of the Law of Value? The Marxian Concept of Rent and a Critique of Antonio Negri`s and his Associates` Approach Towards the Marxian Law of Value

* Jernej Prodnik: Media products and (digital) labour in global capitalist accumulation: A preliminary study

* Kylie Jarrett: The Uses of Use-Value: A Marxist-Feminist contribution to understanding digital media

* Marisol Sandoval: The Dark Side of the Information Age – Arguments for an Extended Definition of Digital Labour

* Olivier Frayssé: Cyberspace ground rent, surplus value extraction, realization, and general surplus value apportionment

* Sebastian Sevignani: Productive prosumption, primitive accumulation, or rent? Problematising exploitation 2.0

* Thomas Allmer: Digital and Social Media Between Emancipation and Commodification: Dialectical and Critical Perspectives

* Yuqi Na: Capital accumulation of targeted advertising-based capitalist social media. What do people in the UK and China think about it and why? A Marxist perspective

If you wish to attend the workshop, please contact RSVP Eran Fisher: eranfisher@gmail.com

 


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Last Modified: May 26, 2014