Skip Navigation
Falvey Library
Advanced
You are exploring: Home > Blogs

Announcing the ’24 Love Data Week Events

Love Data Week Events


The Villanova Community is invited to join us for our exciting line-up of Love Data Week events during the week of Feb. 12!

Love Data Week 2024 is about highlighting the various representations of “my data,” such as showcasing the work that goes into making data, recognizing data equity and inclusion factors for the people participating in or affected by data, and documenting the data standards from (inter)disciplinary communities. This year we’re focused on helping new and seasoned data users find data training and other resources that can help them work with their kind of data.

Please register for the upcoming Love Data Week Events:

  • Introduction to Data Visualization: Monday, Feb. 12, 12–1 p.m. (Virtual) REGISTER HERE
  • Intro to Python: New Date! Tuesday, Feb. 20, 10–11 a.m. (Virtual) REGISTER HERE
  • Excel for the Humanities:  New Date! Tuesday, Feb. 20, 12–1 p.m. (Virtual) REGISTER HERE
  • Scraping Data from the Web (into R): Wednesday, Feb. 14, 12–1 p.m.(Virtually or Room 205) REGISTER HERE
  • Introduction to Citation Metrics and Research Impact: Wednesday Feb. 14, 4–5 p.m. (Virtual) REGISTER HERE
  • Text Analysis: Gale’s Digital Scholar Lab and Copyright: Thursday, Feb. 15, 12–1 p.m. (Virtual) REGISTER HERE
  • Falvey Data Visualization Competition Awards Ceremony on Friday, Feb. 16, 10–11 a.m. (Speakers’ Corner) Registration is not required for this event.

There will also be interactive tabling on Falvey’s first floor throughout the week.


 


Like

Announcing the Fall 2023 Falvey Forum Workshop Series!

Falvey Forum Fall 2023 poster


The Fall 2023 Falvey Forum is a series of virtual workshops dedicated to advancing research tips, techniques, and technologies. Drawn from Falvey Library’s successful Brown Bag seminar series, the conference’s sessions will cover a wide variety of research and library-oriented information aimed at invigorating and improving research, informing new pedagogy, and encouraging the integration of advanced academic research into personal and professional lives.

Join us! Events in the series will take place from 12-1 p.m. and will be virtual with the exception of the “Introduction to Transkribus” workshop, which will take place in Falvey 205.

All events in the Falvey Forum Series are sponsored by Falvey Library and are ACS-approved.

Please visit Falvey Forum webpage to register!

 


headshot picture of regina duffy

Regina Duffy is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Library.

 


 


Like

Register for our Virtual Falvey Forum Workshops on “Dealing with Data”

Fall 2022 Falvey Forum Poster

 


Join us on Wednesdays this fall for the virtual Falvey Falvey Forum series from 12-1 p.m. This year’s theme is “Dealing with Data.” We officially kickoff the series on Wednesday, Sept. 21 as Sarah Hughes, Nursing and Life Sciences Librarian, leads a session on “Using Zotero Citation Manager.”

The Falvey Forum is a series of virtual workshops dedicated to advancing research tips, techniques, and technologies. Drawn from Falvey Memorial Library’s successful Brown Bag seminar series, the conference’s sessions will cover a wide variety of research and library-oriented information aimed at invigorating and improving research, informing new pedagogy, and encouraging the integration of advanced academic research into personal and professional lives.

All events in the Falvey Forum Series are ACS-approved and sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library! Be sure to check them out and recommend them to anyone you think may be interested.

See our Falvey Forum page for a full listing of workshop topics and to register! 


 


Like

Peek at the Week: April 25

By Jenna Renaud

""

Word of the Week: Nudiustertian  

(adj) of or relating to the day before yesterday 

Maybe you’re thinking to yourself “Why wouldn’t I just say the day before yesterday or the name of the day?” And that’s a valid point. But if you want to impress your friends and family with your extensive vocabulary, throw nudiustertian into conversation.  

For example, “I really should have done more studying nudiustertian morning for my upcoming finals.”  


This Week at Falvey  

NOW–Wednesday, June 15 

“That Fairyland of Ice”: Polar Exploration in Mind and Memory Exhibit | Falvey First Floor & Virtual | Free & Open to the Public 

Monday, April 25 

Russia’s War on Ukraine: Historical Turning Points | 6–7 p.m. | Virtual | Register Here 

Wednesday, April 27   

2022 Falvey Forum Workshop Series: Bringing Historical Maps into GIS | 12–1 p.m. | Virtual | Register Here 

Thursday, April 28

Alfred F. Mannella and Rose T. Lauria-Mannella Endowed Distinguished Speak Series Lecture Featuring Poet Maria Famà | 2:30–3:45 p.m. | Register Here 

Friday, April 29

Falvey Library’s Semi-Annual Stress Busting Open House: Make Finals a Grand Slam | 11 a.m.–1 p.m. | Free & Open to all Villanova Students 


This Week in History 

April 29th, 2004– World War II monument opens in Washington D.C. 

18 years ago today the World War II monument opened in Washington D.C. providing recognition of the 16 million U.S. men and women who served in the war.  

The monument was formally dedicated by US President George W. Bush, although the memorial was inspired decades earlier by veteran Roger Durbin. Durbin served under Gen. George S. Patton and in February 1987 he asked US Rep Marcy Kaptur why there was no memorial on the National Mall to honor World War II veterans. Kaptur then introduced legislation to build one, initiating the 17-year journey until it opened.  

The World War II monument is my favorite memorial in Washington D.C. In high school, I spent part of one summer exploring Washington D.C. and taking a writing seminar. As part of the seminar, we had to choose a monument to visit, reflect on, and then write about. I have always taken an interest in World War II, in part due to my Jewish heritage and the atrocities my Great Aunt lived through as a young girl in Romania during the Holocaust. When it came time to choose a monument, I was immediately drawn to the World War II monument.  

What has always struck me about the World War II monument is all the symbolism and how each detail and piece represented something about the war and the many lives lost. From representing the war in Europe to the war in the Pacific to the hundreds of thousands of American lives lost, the monument produces a sobering effect. Read this article from the National Park Service talking about the various aspects of the monument to learn more. 

Read more about the monument’s opening from History.com. 


Jenna Renaud is a graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication Department.


Like

Peek at the Week: April 19

By Jenna Renaud

""

Word of the Week: Type II Fun 

Maybe you’re thinking, “I know what fun is,” but did you know that there are different types of fun?  

Type II fun usually feels terrible while you’re doing it, like climbing up a mountain in the freezing cold, running an ultra-marathon, or standing in line at Disney World in the blazing sun, but when it’s over, your memory erases the miserable parts, and you would do it again for fun.  

This is all based on the “fun scale,” typically used by outdoor enthusiasts. You can read more about it in this article from REI. But in summary the other types of fun are: 

Type I Fun – Enjoyable when it’s happening. Simply fun. Eating good food with good friends. Celebrating birthdays or holidays with family. Movie nights.  

Type III Fun – Not actually fun at all. While you’re doing it or in retrospect. Maybe you’re waiting for the Type II fun effect to hit, but it never does. 

For many people, Type II fun is the sweet spot. It’s challenging but isn’t actually putting your life at risk. With finals right around the corner, consider planning some Type II adventures for this summer. 


This Week at Falvey  

NOW–Wednesday, Jun. 15th  

“That Fairyland of Ice”: Polar Exploration in Mind and Memory Exhibit | Falvey First Floor & Virtual | Free & Open to the Public 

Tuesday, April 19th  

Polar Voyaging and the Humanities | 4–5 p.m. | Virtual | https://villanova.zoom.us/j/98337578849 

Wednesday, April 20th   

2022 Falvey Forum Workshop Series: Capturing the Web – Introduction to Web Archiving | 12–1 p.m. | Virtual | Register Here 

“The Politics of the Irish Harp Symbol from Henry VIII to Brexit” Lecture & Harp Performance with Mary Louise O’Donnell | 4 p.m. | Speakers’ Corner | Learn More Here 

Thursday, April 21st 

2022 Literary Festival: Tiphanie Yanique | 7–8:30 p.m. | Speakers’ Corner | Free & Open to the Public | Find more info here 

Friday, April 22nd  

Villanova Gaming Society Meeting | 2:30–4:30 p.m. | Speakers’ Corner | Free & Open to the Public 

2022 Falvey Scholars Virtual Research Presentation and Awards Ceremony | 10 a.m. | Virtual | Register Here 

2022 Concept Virtual Recognition Ceremony | 1–2 p.m. | Virtual | Register Here 


This Week in History 

April 22nd, 1970 – First Earth Day was celebrated 

Earth Day is an annual event used to demonstrate support for environmental protection and bring awareness to a wide range of environmental issues. 2022 marks the 52nd celebration of the holiday.  

Earth Day was started by Senator Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin, an environmentalist who wanted to increase awareness and provide unity to the environmental movement. “The objective was to get a nationwide demonstration of concern for the environment so large that it would shake the political establishment out of its lethargy,” Senator Nelson said, “and, finally, force this issue permanently onto the national political agenda.” 

Earth Day has contributed to the passage of the Clean Water and Endangered Species Act. Each year the holiday is recognized by 192 different countries. 

Read more from History.com. 


Jenna Renaud is a graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication Department.


Like

Join Us for the Remaining Lineup of Spring Events

Happy April, Wildcats! The end of the semester is quickly approaching. Be sure to check out one (or a few) of the remaining events at Falvey Memorial Library. All events are ACS-approved and open to the Villanova University community. The lineup of events are listed below.


2022 Villanova University Literary Festival: Tiphanie Yanique

  • Thursday, April 21, at 7 p.m. in Falvey Library’s Speakers’ Corner.
  • Livestream link.
  • Tiphanie Yanique is a novelist, poet, essayist, and short story writer. She is the author of the poetry collection, Wife, which won the 2016 Bocas Prize in Caribbean poetry and the United Kingdom’s 2016 Forward/Felix Dennis Prize for a First Collection. Tiphanie is also the author of the novel, Land of Love and Drowning, which won the 2014   Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Award from the Center for Fiction, the Phillis Wheatley Award for Pan-African Literature, and the American Academy of Arts   and Letters Rosenthal Family Foundation Award, and was listed by NPR as one of the Best Books of 2014. Land of Love and Drowning was also a finalist for the Orion Award in Environmental Literature and the Hurston-Wright Legacy Award. She is a tenured associate professor at Emory University.
  • For more information on Yanique, please visit her website.
  • This event is co-sponsored by the English Department, the Creative Writing Program, Global Interdisciplinary Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies, the Center for Irish Studies, and Falvey Library.

Polar Voyaging and the Humanities

  • Tuesday, April 19, at 4 p.m.
  • Virtual lecture on Zoom. Register here.
  • Lecture by Hester Blum, PhD, Professor of English at Penn State.
  • In the summer of 2019 Blum was the lone humanities scholar on a scientific expedition tracking climate change in the Northwest Passage. Drawn from her experience on the Arctic icebreaker (and on an Antarctic expedition), as well as her research on nineteenth-century polar expeditions, Blum’s talk offers a meditation on ice as a measure for visualizing, writing about, mourning, and mediating the state of the climate in an age of ecological and institutional crisis.
  • This event is offered in support of Falvey Memorial Library’s current exhibit “That Fairyland of Ice”: Polar Exploration in Mind and Memoryand is included alongside Earth Week events.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Office of Sustainability, the Department of Geography and the Environment, the Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest, and the Department of English.

2022 Falvey Forum Workshop Series: Capturing the Web: Introduction to Web Archiving

  • Wednesday, April 20, at 12 p.m.
  • Virtual workshop on Zoom. Register here.
  • Workshop led by Beaudry Rae Allen, Preservation and Digital Archivist.
  • Web archiving is the process of gathering up data that has been recorded on the World Wide Web, storing it, ensuring the data is preserved in an archive, and making the collected data available for future research. Get a foundational overview of web archiving in this workshop and learn ways to leverage the Wayback Machine and other web preservation tools in your scholarship and teaching.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Library and the Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest.

 


“The Politics of the Irish Harp Symbol from Henry VIII to Brexit” Lecture and Harp Performance with Mary Louise O’Donnell

  • Wednesday, April 20, at 4 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner.
  • Mary Louise O’Donnell, PhD, will discuss the origin of the Irish harp symbol and its history and significance in Irish political iconography through the centuries.
  • Dr. O’Donnell is a harpist, musicologist, and Fulbright scholar 2019/2020. She holds a doctorate from the University of Limerick and is a former Irish Research Council postgraduate scholar and postdoctoral fellow. Her first book Ireland’s Harp: the Shaping of Irish Identity c.1770 to 1880 was published by UCD Press in 2014. She has also published widely on topics relating to Irish cultural history, semiotics, and performance studies. Some of her most recent research can be found in Musicians and their Audiences: New Approaches to a Timeless Division (Ashgate, 2016) and Thomas Moore and Romantic Inspiration (Routledge, 2017). Dr. O’Donnell has performed extensively throughout Ireland, Europe, Africa, and Asia as a soloist and with various ensembles; she has also appeared on BBC, RTÉ, CNN, and NHK (Japan). Working alongside her sister, Dr. O’Donnell recently recorded an album which includes compositions for pedal harp, portable Irish harp, and voice to harp accompaniment by the nineteenth-century Irish composer Charles Egan.
  • This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Irish Studies and Falvey Library.

2022 Falvey Forum Workshop Series: Bringing Historical Maps into GIS

  • Wednesday, April 27, at 12 p.m.
  • Virtual workshop on Zoom. Register here.
  • Workshop led by Erica Hayes, Digital Scholarship Librarian.
  • Georeferencing is the process of connecting images (e.g., scanned historical maps, aerial and satellite photographs) to their geographic locations, so that they can be used as spatial layers in GIS software. Using tools like Map Warper and ArcGIS Online, this workshop will provide participants with the steps to align geographic coordinates to a scanned historical map and display them online to examine how locations have changed over time.
  • Falvey Scholars will give short presentations on the content and findings of the research involved in the writing of the thesis or in the creation of the project report.

 


Russia’s War on Ukraine: Historical Turning Points

  • Monday, April 25, from 6-7 p.m.
  • Virtual lecture on Zoom. Register here.
  • A conversation about the ongoing war in Ukraine.
  • Dr. Adele Lindenmeyr, Historian of Russia and the USSR, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Villanova University, and Dr. Mike Westrate, Historian of Ukraine and the USSR, Assistant Vice Provost, Graduate Education and Research, Villanova University, will discuss the turning points that led to Russia’s invasion.
  • What were the historical turning points that led to Russia’s current war on Ukraine and its people? Join us for a discussion of the Ukrainian-Russian relationship, including: the Holodomor, WWII and its aftermath, the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Budapest Memorandum, the Russian war on Georgia, and the illegal annexation of Crimea.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Library and the Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest.

2021-2022 Alfred F. Mannella and Rose T. Lauria-Mannella Endowed Distinguished Speaker Series Lecture featuring Poet Maria Famà

  • Thursday, April 28, at 2:30 p.m.
  • Virtual lecture on Zoom. Register here.
  • Lecture by Poet Maria Famà.
  • Famà’s talk is titled, “Mining an Italian Heritage for Poems.” As a poet of Sicilian descent, she mines the richness of the oral culture that has been passed down by her family of storytellers. Famà writes her poems to preserve family tales, personalities, sufferings, joys, and wisdom for future generations.  In her presentation, she will give examples of her poems from her various books and explain how they came into being.
  • For more information on Famà, please visit her website.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Library, the Italian Studies Program, the Department of English, and the Creative Writing Program.

Falvey Library’s Semi-Annual Stress Busting Open House: Make Finals a Grand Slamphoto of the Philadelphia Phillies stadium

  • Friday, April 29 (Reading Day) from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. or until supplies last on the Old Falvey patio.
  • Stop by for some major (league) fun and treats to make these finals a grand slam!
  • Pals for Life therapy animals will be there to help you during the 7th inning stretch of the semester.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Library, the Office of Health Promotion, and POWER.

 

 


2022 Falvey Scholars Awards Presentation and Reception Ceremony

  • Friday, April 22, at 10 a.m.
  • Virtual lecture on Zoom. Register here.
  • The 2022 Falvey Scholar award winners: Nadjulia Constant, Daryl Jucar, Christopher DiLullo, Addison Drone, Nicole Garcia, Alec Henderson, Mai Khuc, and Erica Mallon.
  • Falvey Scholars is an annual program that recognizes outstanding undergraduate research by senior students at Villanova University.
  • Falvey Scholars will give short presentations on the content and findings of the research involved in the writing of the thesis or in the creation of the project report.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Library and the Center for Research and Fellowships.

CONCEPT Virtual Recognition CeremonyConcept poster

  • Friday, April 22, at 1 p.m.
  • Virtual lecture on Zoom. Register here.
  • Join us as we celebrate the official launch of the 2022 issue of CONCEPT, the interdisciplinary journal of graduate students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
  • The ceremony will recognize this year’s Graduate Research Prize for top paper, along with all of the student authors and editors, faculty editors, and peer reviewers.
  • CONCEPT accepts submissions from Villanova graduate students in all fields of the arts and sciences and is an opportunity for them to share their scholarship and research.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Library and the Office of Graduate Studies in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
  • Visit the CONCEPT website to learn more about the journal and to browse past volumes.

Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.


Like

Peek at the Week: April 4

By Jenna Renaud

""

Word of the Week: Abibliophobia 

(n) Someone who is afraid of running out of things to read 

I’ve definitely experienced this fear before, especially when getting ready to travel. I’ve always been anti-Kindle and pro-physical books, which has occasionally made it difficult to gauge how many books I need to bring with me when traveling, especially for long flights.  

The good thing about being on campus though is that there’s never a shortage of books in the Falvey collection. Stop in to pick up your next book before your abibliophobia kicks in.  


This Week at Falvey  

NOW–Wednesday, June 15

“That Fairyland of Ice:” Polar Exploration in Mind and Memory Exhibit | Falvey First Floor & Virtual | Free & Open to the Public 

Monday, April 4

Mindfulness Mondays | 1–1:30 p.m. | Virtual | https://villanova.zoom.us/j/98337578849 

Monday, April 4

Conversation with the 2022 Charles A. Heimbold, Jr. Chair, Emma Dabiri| 6–8 p.m. | Speakers’ Corner| Free & Open to the Public | Find more info here 

Wednesday, April 6  

2022 Falvey Forum Workshop Series: Getting Started with Building Digital Exhibits in Omeka | 12–1 p.m. | Virtual | Register Here 

Friday, April 8

Villanova Gaming Society Meeting | 2:30–4:30 p.m. | Speakers’ Corner | Free & Open to the Public 


This Week in History 

April 4th, 1968 – Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. assassinated 

Just after 6 p.m. on April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. was fatally shot standing on his second-story balcony at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn. King, age 39, was in Memphis to support a sanitation workers’ strike and was on his way to dinner when he was shot. He was pronounced dead upon arrival at the hospital. 

The day before, on April 3, King gave his last sermon in Memphis, saying, “We’ve got some difficult days ahead. But it really doesn’t matter with me now, because I’ve been to the mountaintop … And He’s allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I’ve looked over, and I’ve seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight that we, as a people, will get to the promised land.”

Today, movements such as Black Lives Matter continue to highlight racism, discrimination, and inequality experienced by Black people. 

The assassination was traced back to escaped convict James Earl Ray. Ray was arrested after being found in a London airport in early June. He was then sentenced to 99 years in prison.

Read more from History.com. 


Jenna Renaud is a graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication Department.


Like
1 People Like This Post

Peek at the Week: March 28

By Jenna Renaud

""

Word of the Week: Offensive efficiency 

Villanova is in the Final Four, so we’re back with more basketball terminology this week. Offensive efficiency is the number of points scored per 100 offensive possessions. Currently, according to the popular KenPom Ratings, Villanova has a top-10 offense, despite relying heavily on defense in this past weekend’s win against Houston.  

Fingers crossed for another big win this Saturday against the Kansas Jayhawks! If we secure the win, I will be back again next week with more basketball vocabulary as we move into the finals. 


This Week at Falvey  

NOW–Wednesday, Jun. 15th  

“That Fairyland of Ice”: Polar Exploration in Mind and Memory Exhibit | Falvey First Floor & Virtual | Free & Open to the Public 

Monday, March 28th   

2021 Outstanding Faculty Research Award Lecture Featuring Christopher Kilby, PhD, and Samantha K. Chapman, PhD | 1–3 p.m. | Room 205 | Free & Open to the Public | Find more info here 

Tuesday, March 29th   

2022 Literary Festival Schedule: Camille Dungy | 7–8:30 p.m. | Speakers’ Corner | Free & Open to the Public | Find more info here 

Wednesday, March 30th   

2022 Falvey Forum Workshop Series: Photo Management with Tropy for Archival Research | 12–1 p.m. | Virtual | Register Here 

Thursday, March 31st   

Spring 2022 Digital Seeds Lecture: David R. Ambaras, PhD, and Kate McDonald, PhD on “Bodies and Structures 2.0: Scalar and the Practice of Digital Spatial History | 4 p.m. | Virtual | Register Here 

Friday, April 1st   

Villanova Gaming Society Meeting | 2:30–4:30 p.m. | Speakers’ Corner | Free & Open to the Public 


This Week in History 

March 31st, 1889 – Eiffel Tower opens  

For this week’s “This Week in History” we’re traveling across the Atlantic Ocean over to Europe, specifically, Paris, France. On March 31st, 1889, the Eiffel Tower is dedicated in Paris. Gustave Eiffel, the tower’s designer, French Prime Minister Pierre Tirard, various other dignitaries, and over 200 construction workers were in attendance.  

The Eiffel Tower is 984 feet tall and boasts an iron framework supported on four masonry piers, from which rise four columns that unite to create a single vertical tower. There are observation decks on each of the three levels.  

Despite now being regarded as an architectural masterpiece, the project was originally met with some resistance, in part due to concerns it would be structurally unsound. At the time, it was the largest man-made structure in the world, a title it held until the New York Crysler building was completed in 1930.  

Read more from History.com. 


Jenna Renaud is a Graduate Assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a Graduate Student in the Communication Department.

 


Like

Peek at the Week: March 21

Word of the Week: Vernal Equinox (also known as: Spring Equinox, March Equinox) 

Yesterday marked the official first day of Spring! Each year spring is marked by the vernal equinox, which falls around March 20 or 21 and is when the Sun crosses the celestial equator going north. 

Equinoxes occur when the axis of rotation of the earth is exactly parallel to the direction of motion of the earth around the sun. Day and night are about the same length on this day, hence the name “equinox.” The name is derived from the Latin aequus (equal) and nox (night). 

Now that we’ve passed the vernal equinox, be prepared for earlier sunrises, later sunsets, softer winds, and sprouting plantsall signs that Spring is here.  


This Week at Falvey  

NOW–Wednesday, June 15

“That Fairyland of Ice”: Polar Exploration in Mind and Memory Exhibit | Falvey First Floor & Virtual | Free & Open to the Public 

Monday, March 21 

Mindfulness Mondays | 1–1:30 p.m. | Virtual | https://villanova.zoom.us/j/98337578849 

Monday, March 21 

The Interfaith Human Library: Where Books Talk and We All Learn About Life in a Multi-Faith World | 4:30–6 p.m. | Speakers’ Corner | Register Here 

Tuesday, March 22 

Scholarship@VillanovaBillie Murray, PhD, on Combating Hate: A Framework for Direct Action | 4–5:15 p.m. | Room 205 | Find more info here 

Wednesday, March 23

2022 Falvey Forum Workshop Series: Introduction to Digital Archives and Research | 12–1 p.m. | Virtual | Register Here 

Thursday, March 24  

Spring 2022 Digital Seeds Lecture: Matthew Bui, PhD, on “Toward Urban Data Justice: Auditing the Racial Politics of Data” | 4 p.m. | Virtual | Register Here 

Friday, March 25

Villanova Gaming Society Meeting | 2:30–4:30 p.m. | Speakers’ Corner | Free & Open to the Public 


This Week in History 

March 23, 1839 – “OK” enters national vernacular  

On March 23, 1839, the initials “O.K.” are first published in The Boston Morning Post, partially as a joke. It was meant as an abbreviation for “oll korrect,” a popular slang misspelling of “all correct.” However, “OK” then steadily made its way into the everyday speech of Americans. 

In the late 1830s, many younger people would misspell words intentionally, then abbreviate them and use them as slang. Some examples include “KY” for “no use” (“know yuse”) and “OW” for all right (“oll wright”).  

OK rose above the rest and made its way into common vernacular even to this day in part thanks to the Boston Morning Post. From there, its popularity continued when it was picked up by politicians at the time. 

Read more from History.com. 


Jenna Renaud is a Graduate Assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a Graduate Student in the Communication Department.

 


Like
1 People Like This Post

Peek at the Week: March 14

By Jenna Renaud

""

Word of the Week: March Madness 

This week instead of strictly defining a word, we’re talking about the origin of the phrase March Madness in honor of the tournament kicking off!  

March Madness originated from the phrase “mad as March here”; however, it did not come from the NCAA tournament, but rather Henry Porter, an Illinois high school athletics administrator in 1939. In the 1940s, March Madness was used for Illinois state basketball tournaments, before spreading elsewhere in the Midwest region. 

40 years later in the 1980s, March Madness came to be associated with the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament, an association many credit to commentator Brent Musburger. 


This Week at Falvey  

NOW–Wednesday, Jun. 15th  

“That Fairyland of Ice”: Polar Exploration in Mind and Memory Exhibit | Falvey First Floor & Virtual | Free & Open to the Public 

Monday, March 14th 

Mindfulness Mondays | 1–1:30 p.m. | Virtual | https://villanova.zoom.us/j/98337578849 

Wednesday, March 16th 

2022 Falvey Forum Workshop Series: Mastering the Labyrinth: NewspaperMagazine Archives | 12–1 p.m. | Virtual | https://villanova.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMsfuqsrTsvG9BvwhHkwcD9LIxFsFF0yACe  

Friday, March 18th  

Villanova Gaming Society Meeting | 2:30–4:30 p.m. | Speakers’ Corner | Free & Open to the Public 


This Week in History 

February 15th, 44 B.C. – Assassination of Julius Caesar  

“Beware of the ides of March” 

2,066 years ago on March 15th, Julius Caesar, dictator of Rome, is stabbed to death in the Roman Senate house by 60 conspirators led by Marcus Junius Brutus and Gaius Cassius Longinus. This day then infamously came to be known as the “Ides of March.”  

Despite now being associated with a more ominous connotation, the ides of March has a tamer origin. Ides simply referred to the first new moon of a given month, with each month having its own ides, typically falling between the 13th and the 15th. The ides of March was the 74th day in the Roman calendar and traditionally associated with religious celebrations and at one point, the new year. 


Jenna Renaud is a Graduate Assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a Graduate Student in the Communication Department.

 


Like

Next Page »

 


Last Modified: March 14, 2022

Ask Us: Live Chat
Back to Top