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Cat in the Stax: Books & Board Games – Seven Perfect Pairings

Some people pair peanut butter and jelly, others pair wine and cheese, but in my opinion the perfect pairing is books and board games. Taking some time curled up with a good book and then meeting up with close friends and family in the evening to play a tabletop game constitutes a perfectly relaxing day. Below, I paired books and games together for a variety of different interests!

If you like pirates… you should read Black Flags, Blue Waters: The Epic History of America’s Most Notorious Pirates by Eric Jay Dolin and you should play Pirate’s Cove.

If you like zombies… you should read Zone One by Colson Whitehead and you should play Dead of Winter.

If you like spies and espionage… you should read The Spy Who Came in from the Cold by John le Carré and you should play Code Names.

If you like vampires… you should read My Soul to Keep by Tananarive Due and play Fury of Dracula.

If you like the woods… you should read A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson and you should play Parks.

If you like classic adventure… you should read On The Road by Jack Kerouac and you should play Ticket to Ride.

If you like horror… you should read The Shining by Stephen King and you should play Betrayal at the House on the Hill.

Can you think of any other book and board game pairings I missed?


Jenna Newman is a graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication Department.


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The Falvey FAQ: Everything You Need to Know to School Spring Semester

Click above for Falvey’s Frequently Asked Question page.

By Shawn Proctor

  • Where can I study in the Library?
  • When are my books due back?
  • How do I request a book from the collection?
  • How do I set up a meeting with a librarian?

Happy first day of the new semester, Wildcats! When you visit the Library, you will notice that we’ve updated our look for the spring, adding new study spaces on the first floor. We also made tweaks to services, based on your needs.

So be sure to stop by Falvey’s fabulous FAQ page early and often so you can take full advantage of all the Library has to offer, including online events, digital resources, and, of course, books!

 


Shawn Proctor

Shawn Proctor, MFA, Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library, is super excited the students are back!

 

 

 


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Cat in the Stax: Book Gift Guide

I always love getting presents for all the important people in my life, but sometimes it can be hard to figure out exactly what to get for each person. You want the gift to be meaningful, but also easy to get and not something that’s going to break the bank. My go-to for gifts is always books. I can find a perfect book, whether long or short, for about practically any interest! Plus, it gives me an excuse to visit my local bookstore.

Below is my Holiday Book Gift Guide for all of the important people in your life.

Books for Cooks If you have any cooks in your life, they probably don’t need a step-by-step cook book, but they could always use some inspiration! Below are two books that could provide good inspiration for the foodies in your life:

 

Books for Sports-Lovers Maybe the sports-lovers are interested in the biography of their favorite coach or player or just the history of their favorite sport. Here are a couple of books for all those Wildcat basketball fans out there:

 

Books for Outdoorsy People With the cold weather ever-approaching, all outdoor lovers and preparing for another winter of going stir-crazy. Here are two book gift ideas that can help them explore outside while staying in or plan their next adventure:


Books for People ALWAYS Buying Decor
You know? Those people that are always going to Target or Hobby Lobby to buy new decor? The ones that rearrange their house every couple months? Below are two books for those people in your life:

 

Coffee Table Books A couple years ago for Christmas, I got “coffee table books” for all of my future in-laws. These are essentially books that you rarely sit down and read through, but they sit on a coffee table or an end table in the living room for people to casually flip through. These are great gifts because they really can speak to any interest. Honestly, a lot of the ideas listed above can fall under the category of “coffee table books.” Usually, around the Holidays, Barnes and Noble has a whole table or section online dedicated to these kinds of books…go there to get inspired!

If you’re like me and trying to shop small this Christmas, but don’t have a local bookstore in the area that you love, check out Bookshop. They are an online bookstore that supports local, independent book stores through your sales going to an earnings pool that’s then distributed to bookstores nation-wide!

Share with us below any Holiday book shopping tips you have and happy shopping!

 


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If you have books on loan and are worried about returning them, don’t stress.

""

We recognize the University closure and travel restrictions will prevent many students and faculty from returning loaned books by their due dates.

Here is what you need to know:

  • The Library has stopped assessing overdue fines on Falvey materials.
  • Students who are moving out of the residence halls should leave their Library materials in their rooms for future collection by University staff.
  • Students who graduated in spring 2020 should request pre-paid return shipping labels for the books that need to be returned.
  • Otherwise, books checked out from the Falvey collection, Interlibrary Loan, or E-ZBorrow should be held by Library patrons until such time as the University returns to normal operations.
  • Physical materials from the Falvey collections, E-ZBorrow, Inter-library loan, as well as scanning from the Falvey collections, are not available.

Other questions?

Contact the Falvey Service Desk at circ@villanova.edu


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What I’m Watching from Home: Little Fires Everywhere

By Daniella Snyder

Cat in the Stacks Header Image

I’m Daniella Snyder, a graduate student at Villanova University, and your ‘Cat in Falvey’s Stacks. I’ll be posting about academics–from research to study habits and everything in between–and how the Library can play a large role in your success at Villanova (and while you’re away from campus!)

Hey, Wildcats,

This is a chaotic and uncertain moment right now. Firstly, I want to wish you all the best, and I hope that you’re all staying safe and healthy, wherever you might be as you read this blog.

This week, I thought about writing a blog post about how to manage anxiety surrounding COVID-19, how to work from home productively, and other tips and tricks about how to manage online classes.

However, I thought I should be more honest and candid about what it’s been like for the last few days working remotely. Probably like you, I’m trying to take each day at a time. I’m trying to keep my spirits up while I get adjusted to this new lifestyle. For me, that means I’m reading for fun, catching up on TV and movies, and calling friends in my downtime.

So, I thought I’d share the top item on my watch list this week: the new TV adaptation of Little Fires Everywhere.

Little Fires Everywhere book cover

One of my all-time favorite reads of 2019 was the instant New York Times bestseller Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng. In 2017, it was named one of the best books of the year by NPR, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Entertainment Weekly, The Guardian, Buzzfeed, Esquire, and The Washington Post.

Ng tells the story of two families in the suburbs of Cleveland, Ohio, in 1997, exploring the weight of secrets, the nature of art and identity, and the power of motherhood. For a full summary, visit Ng’s website.

Today, an eight-episode miniseries of the novel will be released on Hulu, with the two main characters played by Reese Witherspoon and Kerry Washington. The show tackles issues of abortion, LGBTQA rights, immigration, and police brutality circa 1997, but still feels intensely relevant to our current moment.

I hope you’ll tune in tonight and watch with me. Regardless, try to make the best of the uncertainty right now by doing things that make you happy, healthy, and hopeful.

What are you reading and watching from home? Let us know! DM us @villanovalibrary on Instagram or tweet us @FalveyLibrary.

 


Daniella Snyder Headshot

Daniella Snyder is a graduate assistant for Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the English department. This week, she’s reading Followers by Villanova alumna Megan Angelo and trying out new recipes.

 

 


 


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Love is in the stacks!

By Daniella Snyder

I’m Daniella Snyder, a graduate student at Villanova University, and your ‘Cat in Falvey Library’s Stacks. I’ll be posting about academics– from research to study habits and everything in between– and how the Falvey Library can play a large role in your success here on campus!

Happy Valentine’s Day, Wildcats! Whether you’re celebrating with your sweetheart, your gal pals, or your dog…the day is meant to be filled with love, happiness, and appreciation for those you love the most.

This week, I pulled some books out of the stack that attempt to demystify the mysterious and elusive feeling of love: why we feel it, how it affects us, and why it matters at all. There’s a book for every person’s unique interests, including computer science, economics, mathematics, chemistry, history, sociology, and psychology. This week, curl up with a good book to learn what love is all about.

cover image for "love, a history"

Source: Amazon.com

Love: A History by Simon May

May covers over 2,500 years of human history in his book, offering an in-depth and critical historical look at love. May turns to cultural studies, philosophy, literature and more, dissecting love and all its forms.

cover image of "the art of loving"

Source: Amazon.com

The Art of Loving by Erich Fromm

Social psychologist Erich Fromm gives a sociological overview of the cultural forces influencing the way we think about “true love.” Then, he shares how we can best carry out the “pragmatic art” of loving others, which involves discipline, patience, courage, and other daily practices.

cover image of "consuming the romantic utopia"

Source: Amazon.com

 

Consuming the Romantic Utopia: Love & the Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism by Eva Illouz

Illouz, a sociologist, believes that feelings of love are subconsciously influenced by social trends, and in particular, capitalism and consumer culture. In Consuming the Romantic Utopia, Illouz explores the ways in which modern capitalist societies have endorsed “grand ideals of love” upon us, in books, magazines, television, movies, and music.

cover image for "the mathematics of love"

Source: Amazon.com

The Mathematics of Love: Patterns, Proofs, and the Search for the Ultimate Equation by Hannah Fry

Fry writes a “compulsively readable examination” behind the statistics of love, from dating to divorce, and everything in between. Fry uses mathematical patterns to predict the unpredictable: love.

Cover image for "the chemistry been us"

Source: Amazon.com

Chemistry Between Us by Larry Young, Ph.D and Brian Alexander

Young and Alexander explore the theory of love that we often ignore: the chemicals in our brains that drive attraction, sexual orientation, and desire.

cover image for "data, a love story"

Source: Amazon.com

Data, A Love Story: How I Cracked the Online Dating Code to Meet My Match by Amy Webb

Webb writes about her own experiences with the modern online dating work, and how she found true and lasting love. This book is a perfect read for anyone trying to find love in our current technological world.


Daniella Snyder HeadshotDaniella Snyder’s favorite book about love? all about love by bell hooks.


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Flick or Flip: Atonement

By Allie Reczek

Header for Flick or Flip blog post. Young woman juggling a phone, laptop, tablet, and two books.

Welcome to Falvey’s Flick or Flip? My name is Allie Reczek, and I am a sophomore undergrad and student worker in the Library. For this blog, I will pick a book that has been turned into a movie, and argue which I thought was better.

Welcome back to Falvey Flips or Flicks!

This week, I will be discussing Atonement, by Ian McEwan, published in 2001. This novel first takes place in 1935 England, later fast-forwarding to 1940 during World War II, and then decades later for the epilogue.

This book tells the story of Briony Tallis, a 13-year-old girl, her older sister, Cecilia, and Robbie Turner, the family gardener and Cecilia’s secret lover. With a misunderstanding that spirals out of control, Briony becomes the instigator for a lie that results in the imprisonment of Robbie. This puts an end to his relationship with Cecilia, resulting in a deep hatred that leaves Cecilia in such anguish that she refuses to speak to Briony ever again, unable to forgive her for her false accusations.

For the entirety of the novel, readers follow Briony’s life as she grows up, where she realizes the mistake she made in her adolescence and sets out to make matters right. Later on, we find out that Briony “wrote” this book as a way to atone for her faults, yet it is not published until it is too late and nothing can be fixed. 

The movie adaptation, directed by Joe Wright and released in 2007, parallels the novel with some minor changes. 

After reading the book and watching the movie, I feel that the movie best told this romance/war story. The novel I found to be rather dry, delving too far into unnecessary details, such as the position of the grass in the garden and the design on a vase. It took a large part of the book to truly get into the plot and reach the climax, whereas the movie keeps viewers engaged and wanting more.

Additionally, I feel that with a war story such as this one, it is more meaningful and impactful to see the characters and their struggles as opposed to reading it, which can leave significant moments open to interpretation.

However, whether you have just a few hours or a couple of days to spare, Atonement tells an unforgettable story that teaches us the hard truth that sometimes it is too late to apologize for our actions. 

 

SO… FLICK OR FLIP?

FLICK!


Hi! My name is Allie Reczek, and I am a sophomore Psychology Major. I work as a Marketing and Communication Assistant in Falvey. Hope you enjoy this blog! Which flips or flicks should I debate in the future? Message @villanovalibrary on Instagram or tweet us @FalveyLibrary!


 


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Celebrate Black History Month: READ!

By Daniella Snyder

'Cat In the Stacks Logo and Banner

I’m Daniella Snyder, a graduate student at Villanova University, and your ’Cat in Falvey Memorial Library’s Stacks. I’ll be posting about academics–from research to study habits and everything in between–and how the Falvey can play a large role in your success here on campus!

Hey, Wildcats, big things are happening next week in Falvey for Black History Month.

On Tuesday, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., join members of the Villanova community in Speakers’ Corner for the African American Read-In. We’ll be listening to and reading cherished texts aloud. Falvey will have materials available to read, from poetry to scientific papers, but you should feel free to bring your own book.

The Read-In is sponsored by the Department of Education and Counseling; Falvey Memorial Library; the Department of English; the Department of Communication; the Gender and Women’s Studies Program and CLAS Diversity; and the Equity and Inclusion Committee. The African American Read-In is affiliated with the National Council of Teachers of English and Villanova University’s Black History Month.

Here at Falvey, we’ve been gathering library goers’ favorite books by authors of color. Here are some of the more popular recommendations that are available in our stacks:

the bluest eye cover

The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

In Toni Morrison’s first novel, published in 1970, she tells the story of Pecola Breedlove growing up during the years following the Great Depression. Morrison, a Nobel Prize and Pulitzer Prize-winning author, was (and still is) an American literary genius and hero.

The Fire Next Time

The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin

James Baldwin wrote this nonfiction book in 1963. It contains two essays, each of them relating to the role of race in the United States and religion. Along with essays, Baldwin also wrote fiction and plays, and his writing addresses the intersections of race and masculinity, sexuality, spirituality, and class.

sister outside

Sister Outsider by Audre Lorde

Audre Lorde, feminist icon, composed a collection of essays and speeches dating from 1976 to 1984, and speaks to her identity as a black woman, lesbian, and mother. The essays in this collection are considered landmark works that have inspired decades of third and fourth-wave feminist thought.

Between the World and Me

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Coates drew from his own life growing up in Baltimore to write this nonfiction book in 2015 . Inspired by the structure of Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time, Coates wrote the book in the form of a letter to his teenage son in an attempt to explain to him the racist violence that has become woven into American culture. It was named one of the best books of the decade in The New York Times.

What will you be reading for the African American Read-In? Tell us @villanovalibrary on Instagram or tweet us @falveylibrary!


Daniella Snyder HeadshotDaniella Snyder, graduate assistant in the Communication & Marketing Department, recommends reading [insert] boy by Danez Smith for Black History Month.

 

 


 


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New Year’s “Readsolutions”

By Daniella Snyder

I’m Daniella Snyder, a graduate student at Villanova University, and your ‘Cat in Falvey Library’s Stacks. I’ll be posting about academics–from research to study habits and everything in between–and how the Falvey Library can play a large role in your success here on campus!

My favorite part of a new year is asking people about their resolutions. You can learn a lot about a person through their goals: what their passions are, what they’re afraid of, or the kind of person they want to become over the next 365 days.

This year, I made some resolutions I’ve never made before. Since I love to cook and try new things, I promised myself to try one new food every week. My mom and I are happiest when we travel together, and this year I hope to travel to four new states with her. Finally, in an attempt to be a “mature adult,” I will start investing my money this year.

However, each year, I always make a “readsolution:” a resolutionfor books! In 2020, I am committed to reading 50 books. While I do not make a strict list of what those 50 books will be, I always like to begin the new year by researching the best books of the last year as well as the most anticipated books in the year to come, and you’ll find some of those books below.

Do you have any “readsolutions?” Tell us! Message us at @villanovalibrary on Instagram or @falveylibrary on Twitter for a chance to be featured!

 

The Topeka School by Ben Lerner is not only one of Barack Obama’s favorite books of 2019, the novel also made the list of “Top 10 Books of 2019” on the list published by The New York Times and The Washington Post. Lerner writes a tender and expansive family drama set in the American Midwest at the turn of the century: “a tale of adolescence, transgression, and the conditions that have given rise to the trolls and tyrants of the New Right” (Amazon.com).

little women book cover

 

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott isn’t a new book, but there’s been a buzz surrounding the classic book because of the brand new and (already critically acclaimed) movie starring Laura Dern, Timothee Chalamet, Saoirse Ronan, Emma Watson, and Florence Pugh. If you haven’t read this book since middle school (like me), maybe the book deserves a fresh read.

 

 

 

Literary genius Zora Neale Hurston passed away in 1960, but Genevieve West edited and compiled 21 found short stories of Hurston’s to create the new Hitting A Straight Lick with a Crooked Stick: Stories from the Harlem Renaissance. The book is “an outstanding collection of stories about love and migration, gender and class, racism and sexism that proudly reflect African American folk culture that enriches our understanding and appreciation of this exceptional writer’s voice and her contributions to America’s literary traditions” (Google Books). To read an excerpt from the book, check out the New York Times article here.

 

 

Voyage of the Sable Venus and Other Poems is the debut collection of poetry by Robin Coste Lewis. The Collection won the National Book Award for Poetry in 2015, the first debut collection to win the award since 1974. Coste Lewis will be visiting campus on April 21 as part of Villanova University’s 22nd annual Literary Festival. She will speak at 7 p.m. in Falvey’s Speakers’ Corner, and the event will be followed by a reception and book signing. To learn more about the other authors coming to Lit Fest, click here.

(Images sourced from Amazon.com.)

 


Daniella Snyder HeadshotDaniella Snyder, Graduate Assistant in the Communication & Marketing department at Falvey, read 47 books in 2019. Some of her favorite 2019 reads were Educated by Tara Westover, The Female Persuasion by Meg Wolitzer, To The Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf, Becoming by Michelle Obama, and Three Women by Lisa Taddeo.

 


 


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Foto Friday: Spine-Tingling Thrillers

Less than a week until Halloween! Celebrate spooky season and pick up a spine-tingling read at Falvey Memorial Library. Display by Allie Reczek, CLAS ’22.

Stop by the library for a Halloween Open House on 10/31 from 12-2 p.m. View spooky highlights from the collections in the Rare Book Room on the second floor and enjoy ghostly activities and treats!

 

 

 


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.


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Last Modified: October 25, 2019