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Summer Research: Irish Nurses of 1916

Yesterday, we had a visit from an international researcher who was excited to go through our Joseph McGarrity Collection. He was looking for materials related to Irish nurses who participated in the Easter Rising of 1916.

One of the items in the collection is In Times of Peril, which contains excerpts from the diary of nurse Linda Kearns.

Cover of In Times of Peril, featuring a photo of Linda Kearns

Our copy is especially noteworthy as it belonged to Éamon de Valera (to whom the book was dedicated) and bears his signature on the title page. De Valera served as the first president of the Irish Republic (1921-1922) and the third president of the modern Republic of Ireland (1959-1973).

Signature of Eamon de Valera on title page of In Times of Peril.

An excerpt from Kearns’ diary is one of the readings featured in the fifth episode of our Mail Call podcast.

Our researcher had a very productive visit. It is always thrilling to see researchers examining primary sources and bringing new connections to light. You can view a list of published resources that have used materials from our collections in our Zotero library.


The 8:30: Things to know before you go (1/19)

flat 830 format


SAVE THE DATE…

Replacement Parts. The Ethics of Procuring and Replacing Organs in Humans. Friday, January 29 at 3:00 p.m. in Room 205. Scholarship@Villanova lecture featuring Arthur L. Caplan, PhD; The Rev. James J. McCartney, OSA; and Daniel P. Reid ‘14 CLAS. Dr. Caplan, an internationally recognized bioethicist, along with co-editors Father McCartney and Reid, will discuss their collection of essays from medicine, philosophy, economics and religion that address the ethical challenges raised by organ transplantation. Questions? Contact: Sally Scholz


Happening @ ‘Nova

Be sure to check out these noteworthy events that are taking place on Villanova’s campus this week!

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemoration: 1/19
Join the Center for Peace and Justice Education as they welcome MK Asante as the 2016 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. keynote speaker on Tuesday, Jan. 19 at 5 p.m. in the Villanova Room. MK Asante is an associate professor of English (Morgan State), author, filmmaker, and rapper. He is most well-known for his best-selling memoir, Buck. Questions? Contact: Sharon Discher

Dispatch from the Climate Summit: 1/19
Hear first-hand about the agreement coming out of December’s Paris Climate Summit. Anthony Giancatarino, Policy Director for the Center for Inclusion in NYC, participated in the Summit and will discuss his experience. This is the first event in a series titled “Care for our Common Home: Multi-faith Views on Climate Justice.” The event will take place on Tuesday, Jan. 19, 12:45-2 p.m., St. Rita Community Center. A light Lunch provided – RSVP to julia.sheetz@villanova.edu Questions? Contact: Julia Sheetz

Spring Career Fairs: 2/2 & 2/3
The Career Center is hosting the 2016 Spring Career Fairs on 2/2 and 2/3. Tuesday, Feb. 2: 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Communication, Marketing & Media; Tuesday, Feb. 2: 3–6 p.m. Finance, Accounting & Consulting; Wednesday, Feb. 3: 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Engineering, Science, & Technology. All fairs are held in The Villanova Room. Questions? Contact: Sheila Doherty


What Could Be Better Than Two New Printers?

Three new printers have replaced the two public printers on Falvey’s first floor. Although the new printers are smaller than the previous ones, their speed is about the same. Most importantly, three machines provide a much greater capacity.

If a printer needs paper, has an error message, has a paper jam, or has any other problem, please notify the Service Desk Supervisor.

Falvey staff received specialized training from the supplier on how to service these new machines. Having only trained personnel service the printers will ensure that repairs are accurate and quick and that the printers will avoid chronic problems in the future.

Library staff welcome this improvement to our services and remain committed to your success!


PICTURES FOR DAYS

Do you like images? How about high quality, copyright-free images? Do you want them right now!? Check out what the New York Public Library has to offer. Spoiler alert: they have 180,000 high resolution images in public domain easily accessible from their website, featuring items from their New York City collection, historical maps, illustrations, texts – “just go forth and reuse!” they say. You can check out Walt Whitman’s manuscript, medieval and Renaissance illuminated manuscripts, and 19th-20th century stereoscopic views.


neologisms

DID YOU KNOW you could be the one who names the next neologism?

With the new year come lists, especially lists of new words or terms. The Oxford English Dictionary documents words added in 2015, such as phablet, waybread, and “the bank of mom and dad.”

From across the pond, Cambridge Dictionaries Online includes the following from 2015:
digital amnesia (“the inability to remember basic things, such as telephone numbers, dates, etc. as a result of over-reliance on mobile phones, the Internet etc. for storing information”),
fitspo (“informal short for ‘fitspiration’; the inspiration to get fit and strong”) and
simulator sickness (“a nauseous feeling caused by moving your head too fast while playing a virtual reality, simulation, game”).

Banished words?—Perhaps calling them “overused” would be more accurate. Lake Superior State University in Michigan publishes a list of words and phrases that should be retired, including manspreading, physicality and “break the internet.”

Whether you’re a logophile, a neophile or just a curious person, you’ll be entertained by these lists of latecomers to our lexicon.


birth of the intellectualsNEW MEDIA NEWS

“Who exactly are the ‘intellectuals’?” Human beings have possessed an intelligence beyond that of animals for millions of years. So what separates the intellectuals from the rest of humanity? According to the author of Birth of the Intellectuals, Christophe Charle, the term came into use with the Dreyfus Affair, a political scandal in France that divided the country for more than 50 years, and “signified a cultural and political vanguard who dared to challenge the status quo.”


QUOTE OF THE DAY

Poet and author Edgar Allan Poe was born on this day in 1809 in Boston, Massachusetts. Perhaps you are familiar with “The Raven,” “The Tell-Tale Heart,” or “The Fall of the House of Usher.” He is known for his dark, mysterious, and sometimes macabre stories. Did you know there is an Edgar Allan Poe museum in Richmond, Virginia?

edgar allan poe

“Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,

Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore—

While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,

As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door—

“‘Tis some visitor,” I muttered, “tapping at my chamber door—

Only this and nothing more.”

from “The Raven”

 


Have an excellent day! Feel free to comment your thoughts and ideas for future editions of The 8:30 below.


‘Caturday: Service ‘Cats

MLK 2016

(Left to right) Maleah Bradley, Christina Sebastiao, Cordesia Pope

Thanks to Fiona Chambers, a student leader on the Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service Committee, library staff did their part to draw attention to the MLK Day of Service by wearing t-shirts provided by the committee.

The Library also served as one of the MLK Day of Service Coat Drive locations on campus after being contacted by Rebecca Lin, another student leader on the MLK Day of Service Committee.

The Library will be closed on Monday, Jan. 18, to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and to allow library staff and students to participate in MLK Day of Service events.


Oxford History Handbooks Online

oho

Falvey Library recently acquired the Oxford Handbooks Online history subject collection. The print editions of the Oxford Handbooks have long been popular for their thorough research reviews. It came as no surprise that history faculty expressed strong interest in a switch to the online platform.

The history subject collection currently consists of twenty-eight complete handbooks, but also includes numerous chapters from forthcoming print handbooks. Oxford University Press publishes chapters of handbooks which are still in production on its online platform often long before the print edition becomes available. Thus, Dr. Hartnett’s students are able to read a selection of chapters from the Oxford Handbook of Modern Russian History this fall even though the handbook has not yet been published in print. Unfortunately, students and faculty cannot readily discover this exclusive online content as forthcoming handbooks are neither cataloged in the library’s catalog nor indexed in the library’s article database.

OHO exampleThe Oxford Handbook of the French Revolution and two volumes of the Oxford Handbook of Early Modern European History will be completed this year. The Oxford Handbook of Modern Russian History, the Oxford Handbook of Europe 1914-45 and the Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Middle-Eastern and North African History are currently in production with available online content. Planned for the future are handbooks about Asian American history, the New Deal, World War II, American political history, the history of race and the history of education.

The library’s catalog provides links to all complete handbooks. Links to individual chapters can readily be created with the help of the digital object identifier (DOI) included in the chapter citations. Copy and paste the number into the library’s link builder application and share the URL via email, syllabus or online classroom. Links are currently the best method to share chapters with students because of known problems with the publisher’s pdf server. Oxford University Press is aware of this problem and will upgrade its server in October. Contact the library if you need pdfs for individual chapters. We will gladly assist you.

doi

Questions or comments? Share them with us online or via email.


Investigating the Investigators: The U.S. Bureau of Investigation Case Files Archives

case files

Founded in 1908 as the investigative branch of the Justice Department against the opposition of Congress by executive order of President Theodore Roosevelt, the U.S. Bureau of Investigation was charged with the investigation of violations of federal statutes. As its powers and influence increased in the face of internal and external threads, the Bureau was repeatedly accused of acting outside the law. Eight years later the Bureau employed three hundred agents, a steep increase from the modest thirty-eight investigators hired in 1908. In 1916 the Bureau was charged with counterintelligence and the investigation of radical activities in the U.S. J. Edgar Hoover, who was appointed as the director of the Bureau of Investigation in 1924, cleansed the Bureau of its corrupt elements. He remained in his position when the Bureau was renamed the Federal Bureau of Investigation in 1935.

The Bureau of Investigation case files are hosted on the EBSCO Fold3 platform. The files are labeled as FBI case files while the collection itself is called Bureau of Investigation case files. It consists of four series, Bureau Section Files, Mexican Files, Miscellaneous Files and Old German Files. Although browsing is an option, it is not a productive approach as file names consist mostly of numbers and personal names. The basic keyword search is a good starting point. Results can be filtered and searches can easily be modified. Scanning documents is at times challenging as the pages of some files are lined up from right to left.

pamphletThe case files cover the years 1909 through 1921 and contain reports and documents related to World War I and the surveillance of groups suspected of un-American activities. The Bureau’s agents regularly reported about labor organizations, the radical press and “Negro subversion.” The case files include pamphlets and magazines published by the “radical press,” such as complete issues of The Masses. Interesting examples from the collection include Babe Ruth, who was investigated as an “alleged slacker,” a.k.a. draft dodger, Joseph McGarrity, whose surveillance files are part of the Old German Files as he was considered a friend of the Germans, and Emma Goldman, the well known anarchist.  Margaret Sanger’s activities were closely watched as well. Her files include pamphlets about her speaking engagements and some of her publications. The short but politically turbulent time period covered by the case files will guarantee many interesting discoveries.

Links to the collection can be found in the online catalog, on the Databases A-Z list and on the history subject guide. Questions or comments? Contact me directly (jutta.seibert@villanova.edu) or post your comments online.


Human Rights Studies Online and on trial

HumRights

A trial subscription of Human Rights Studies Online, from Alexander Street Press, is available until March 2. Human Rights Studies Online is a unique database of streaming video and text materials providing comprehensive, comparative documentation, analysis, and interpretation of major human rights violations and atrocity crimes worldwide currently covering the years1900-2010.  The collection includes primary and secondary materials (some publicly available materials) across multiple media formats and content types for each selected event, including Armenia, the Holocaust, Cambodia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Rwanda, Darfur, and more than thirty additional subjects.

Resources for each topic guide users through the full scope of the event, from the historical context that made such violations possible through the international response, prosecution of perpetrators, and steps toward rebuilding. Materials are meant to work together to help explore significant questions and themes, such as how human rights atrocities could have been prevented, common patterns associated with human rights crimes, and the impact that is made by government intervention.  Alexander Street Press reports that “the collection is growing to include 75,000 pages of text and 150 hours of video that give voice to the countless victims of human rights crimes in the 20th and early 21st centuries.”

Additional information is available online and in brochure form. A bibliography of documents currently included in the database is also available. Advanced search capabilities allow for seeking words anywhere, fulltext/transcripts, title/series, date written, date published, language and sorting options. Further search help is accessible.

Explore other Alexander Street Press subscriptions available through Falvey, such as Counseling and Therapy in Video, PBS Video Collection, Digital Karl Barth Library, North American Theatre Online , and search Oxford Bibliographies – Political Science, International Relations, also in trial subscription this semester.

For more information or comments, contact Falvey subject liaison Merrill Stein.


Oxford Bibliographies: A Point of Departure

Depositphotos_17700057_m

Explore the political science and international relations bibliographies from Oxford University Press now through the 2014 academic year.  The bibliographies have their own editors, are peer-reviewed, annotated by leading scholars and designed to be starting points for research.

You can search one of these bibliographies by visiting the Databases A-Z list on the library homepage.

 OXBIB

 The bibliographies can:

* Introduce a research topicSimple and advanced search capabilities are available.  Subject bibliographies are browsable together or individually (political science or international relations) and updated approximately three times per year.

Search results can be exported to citation management tools such as EndNote, RefWorks, and Zotero.

* Provide examples of annotated bibliographiesSearch responses include an introduction and general overview, citations to the best articles, books, and a range of other online sources centered on a topic. 

 Where available, journal citations are linked to full-text via the  link and book citations are linked to Falvey via the  link.

* Direct researchers to multiple types of contentSearch responses can include books, journals, web resources, multimedia, primary documents, forthcoming and related articles.

The My OBO feature allows the user to set up a free account to save and annotate search results. Results are available online.

________________

Oxford Bibliographies was named one of the Top 10 Internet Resources of 2013 by CHOICE Reviews Online

Don’t forget to use other popular Oxford resources, available from Falvey Library,  such as Oxford Islamic Studies Online, select political science Oxford handbooks and history Oxford handbooks.

Find out more about it: from Falvey subject liaison Merrill Stein.


The International Encyclopedia of Revolution and Protest

intencofrevandprotestThe International Encyclopedia of Revolution and Protest covers all aspects of resistance, rebellion and revolution over the past 500 years with over 1,500 entries ranging from 250 to 5,000 words about events, people, organizations and movements. Annual updates ensure coverage of current events. Recent updates included articles about the Tea Party and Howard Zinn.

Entries range from the Prague Spring to the Velvet Revolution, from May Day to Solidarnosc, from Utopian communities to anarchism, from Greenpeace to Earth First!, and from civil disobedience and non-violence to fascism and terrorism. While most biographies are on the shorter end of the spectrum, those about key actors and thinkers from Marx  to Lenin and Mao provide a good overview. Major revolutions are well covered and linked to numerous related entries. In the case of the French Revolution these include separate articles on the counterrevolution, radical factions and organizations, women, and historians’ interpretations. The Encyclopedia is particularly helpful in researching more unfamiliar protest movements, such as Native American protests, the Québécois independence movement or the events of the red summer of 1919.

Contents are accessible via the A-Z list as well as through keyword searching. Search results can be narrowed by subject, place, period, people and key topics. The “China” place facet narrows the keyword search for China from 191 results to 41. This approach makes it easy for students to move beyond the article on the Chinese Communist Revolution to a quick review of the history of protest movements in China.

Current events seem to be adequately covered although the Encyclopedia lacks an entry about the Arab Spring while there are entries covering al-Qaeda, Hamas, the Muslim Brotherhood and the Taliban. In a nod to the current interest in film studies, the reader will find articles about such classics as the Battle of Algiers, Battleship Potemkin and October. References and suggested reading lists are up-to-date and a great starting point for undergraduate students. Access to the online Encyclopedia is provided through the library’s catalog.

Questions or Comments? Don’t hesitate to contact us.


Trial Access to the Stalin Digital Archive

stalin

The Stalin Digital Archive contains 29,000 selected documents from the Russian State Archive of Social and Political History (RGASPI). RGASPI and Yale University Press collaborated in the selection and digitization. At the core of the digital archive are documents written by Stalin from 1889 to 1952, books from Stalin’s personal library with his marginalia and biographical materials.

Yale University Press also contributed digitized editions of its Annals of Communism series. Books in the series contain selected primary sources in the original Russian language together with English translations and editorial comments. For more information about contents, search interface and the document viewer, please consult the online Stalin Digital Archive User Guide.

Trial access to the Stalin Digital Archive will be available until March 23. We are looking forward to your feedback.

Related resources:
Print editions of the Annals of Communism series at Falvey.
The Current Digest of the Russian Press, 1949-


New & Noteworthy: History Books Hot off the Press

Every month Falvey Memorial Library acquires new history books based on faculty recommendations and curriculum needs. Some of the new titles featured in this post have been hand-picked by the Department of History. Take a quick look and maybe one of them will inspire you to read outside your area of expertise. Use the New Items search feature of the library’s catalog to browse the complete list of new history books.

hunsKim, Hyun Jin. The Huns, Rome and the Birth of Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013.
“This book argues that the steppes of Inner Asia were far from ‘backward’ and that the image of the primitive Huns is vastly misleading. They already possessed a highly sophisticated political culture while still in Inner Asia and, far from being passive recipients of advanced culture from the West, they passed on important elements of Central Eurasian culture to early medieval Europe, which they helped create.”  From the publisher’s web site.
Available online via Cambridge University Press.

thirdRabinbach, Anson, and Sander L Gilman. The Third Reich Sourcebook. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2013.
The impressive selection of documents in English translation in this hefty volume (923 pages) covers all aspects of life in Nazi Germany. Its companion volume, The Weimar Republic Sourcebook is likewise available at Falvey. Both titles are part of the Weimar and Now series published by the University of California Press.

suezLaron, Guy. Origins of the Suez Crisis: Postwar Development Diplomacy and the Struggle Over Third World Industrialization, 1945-1956. Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 2013.
Origins of the Suez Crisis describes the long run-up to the 1956 Suez Crisis and the crisis itself by focusing on politics, economics, and foreign policy decisions in Egypt, Britain, the United States, and the Soviet Union. Based on Arabic source material, as well as multilingual documents from Israeli, Soviet, Czech, American, Indian, and British archives, this is the first historical narrative to discuss the interaction among all of the players involved-rather than simply British and U.S. perspectives.”  From the publisher’s web site.

ruleMcMahon, Keith. Women Shall Not Rule: Imperial Wives and Concubines in China From Han to Liao. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, 2013.
“Keith McMahon, a leading expert on the history of gender in China, draws upon decades of research to describe the values and ideals of imperial polygamy and the ways in which it worked and did not work in real life. His rich sources are both historical and fictional, including poetic accounts and sensational stories told in pornographic detail. Displaying rare historical breadth, his lively and fascinating study will be invaluable as a comprehensive and authoritative resource for all readers interested in the domestic life of royal palaces across the world.”  From the publisher’s web site.

frenchParker, Lindsay A. H. Writing the Revolution: A French Woman’s History in Letters. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.
Writing the Revolution is a microhistory of a middle-class Parisian woman, Rosalie Jullien, whose nearly 1,000 familiar letters have never before been studied. […] Her correspondence allows readers to enter her private world and see the intellectual, emotional, and familial life of a revolutionary in all of its complexity.”  From the publisher’s web site.
Jullien’s letters were published in Paris in 1881 under the title Journal d’une Bourgeoise Pendant la Revolution. An English translation of her letters appeared in the same year under the title The Great French Revolution, 1785-1793. Both books are available as free PDF files on Google Books.

chicagoDurica, Paul, and Bill Savage. Chicago By Day and Night: The Pleasure Seeker’s Guide to the Paris of America. Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press, 2013.
Originally published in 1892 for visitors of the 1893 World’s fair. This “unofficial guide to the world beyond the fair [describes] pleasures [that] range from the respectable (theater, architecture, parks, churches and synagogues) to the illicit – drink, gambling, and sex.” From the publisher’s web site.
A digitized version of one of the 1892 copies is freely available from Hathi Trust.

vsiLast but not least, here is a selection of recent additions to the Very Short Introductions series by Oxford University Press: The British Empire, Diaspora, Colonial America, and The Silk Road. I invite you to consult the catalog for a list of titles available at the Library. This series lives up to its promise with concise and up-to-date introductions for the neophyte.


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Last Modified: October 1, 2013