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A Closer Look at the Papers of Ulysses S. Grant

By Jutta Seibert

Locating and working with the papers of American presidents can be unexpectedly difficult. Copies are generally easy enough to locate, but sifting through the plethora of resources and finding the best format for a specific research question can be a veritable challenge. The papers of Ulysses S. Grant are a case in point. They are easy enough to find with a simple internet search, but it takes some patience to understand what is available.

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Ulysses S. Grant (portrait by Walter Allen, 1901)

There are the original manuscripts of his correspondence, speeches, military records, and other types of documents, which are spread across many libraries, historical societies, and personal collections, among them the Library of Congress and the Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Library at the University of Mississippi. The Library of Congress digitized all its Ulysses S. Grant papers and made the digital facsimiles available online. The unique merits of this collection include marginalia, unique handwriting characteristics, and other information gleaned from the physical artifacts. However, this collection does not allow full text searching and lacks transcriptions and annotations.

Most research needs are better met by a comprehensive, annotated, and transcribed edition prepared by academic specialists. Such an editorial project was undertaken by the Ulysses S. Grant Association (USGA) in 1967, under the leadership of John Y. Simon, and completed in 2012. The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant were published over a span of 45 years by Southern Illinois University Press. The Library has all 32 volumes of the print edition featuring over 30,0000 individual documents. The Papers are organized in chronological order and do not include facsimiles of the original documents. Each volume includes transcribed documents, annotations, and an index. This massive editorial project is unsurpassed and served as the basis for the digital edition published by the Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Library at the University of Mississippi and the one published by the University of Virginia Press as part of its American History Collection.

Scan showing Ulysses S. Grant’s assignment to command the armies of the United States

Ulysses S. Grant’s assignment to command the armies of the United States,
signed by President Abraham Lincoln, March 10, 1864.
(Image courtesy of the Library of Congress)

The digital edition of the Papers of Ulysses S. Grant published by the USGA and available via the website of the Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Library is a facsimile of the print edition. The advanced search options allows a search of all volumes simultaneously and groups search results by volume. Readers can download individual pages as well as PDF files of complete volumes. (Note: readers should be aware that the USGA retains its copyright to all content.)

The Library recently acquired the digital edition of the Papers of Ulysses S. Grant, published by the University of Virginia Press. The collection is part of the American History Collection on the Rotunda gateway. It has some unique features that the free version published by the USGA lacks. The HTML text is easy to read, and annotations are hyperlinked in the text. Page breaks are clearly identified and link back to facsimiles of the original print edition. The advanced search capabilities of the Press’s Rotunda gateway include faceting that limits search results to the text or the annotation apparatus, controlled author and recipient lists to disambiguate individual names, date limits, and date and relevance ranking of results. It also includes an index with hyperlinked page numbers as an additional access point. Most of all, the collection can be searched simultaneously with all or selected collections on the Rotunda gateway. For example, readers can select the papers of Ulysses S. Grant, Andrew Jackson, and Daniel Webster and search all three collections for shared keywords or correspondents. The Rotunda gateway also includes the text of Grant’s Personal Memoirs, which are in the public domain and available online in numerous archives. Falvey also owns the annotated edition, which was produced under the aegis of the USGA and published in 2017.

For a quick overview of Grant’s life consult James M. McPherson’s short biography in American National Biography Online. Other collections available through the Library on the Rotunda gateway include the papers of John and John Quincy Adams, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, James and Dolly Madison, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, John Marshall, Andrew Jackson, Eliza Lucas Pinckney and Harriot Pinckney Horry, and the diaries of Gouverneur Morris.


Jutta Seibert is Director of Research Services & Scholarly Engagement at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 

 


 


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Distinctive Collections – Preserving our most valued past

By Nathaniel Haeberle-Gosweiler

Villanova University has a lot of history. However, some students and patrons are not aware just how much history is kept by the office of Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement (DCDE) at Falvey Memorial Library. Located on the second floor of the library, DCDE archives and displays books, articles, and artifacts that preserve and maintain history and cultural heritage.

Many people would be surprised what is available to view upon appointment, leading to experiences that Michael Foight, Director of Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement, says are critical for Villanova’s globally-minded students.

“The experience of touching an item that is hundreds if not thousands of years old can change a person’s life. It creates an appreciation of the ephemeral nature of our digital lives. Often it leads to students thinking about how to preserve their communication, whether that be emails or even tweets, for their children and generations to come,” he explains.

Maintaining this collection, containing thousands of historically valuable and culturally important materials, is just one more way Falvey Memorial Library provides a valuable context to academic research.

“For faculty, being able to talk about the history of printing calls to mind the period in which those people were teaching. For example, being able to peruse the first edition of St. Augustine’s The Confessions can lend students increased historical sensitivity when they are reading the book. Teachers making assignments with those artifacts, including transcribing or translating documents, gives back to the greater historical culture,” Michael Foight adds.


Here are some of the notable inclusions of the collections from DCDE, many of which might just surprise you!


What’s the oldest item in the Distinctive Collections?

cunniform tabletA Sumerian clay cuneiform tablet, est. 2000 B.C.E., detailing the taxes paid on a cow!

 

What are the most requested items in Distinctive Collections?

Sherman's legendary frock

Special Collections:

  • William T. Sherman’s frock coat from 1864 (pictured above)
  • Gregor Mendel’s Experiments on Plant Hybridization paper
  • Codex Atlanticus / Leonardo da Vinci (facsimile)
  • John Maynard Keynes’sThe economic consequences of the peace

    Reap Collection:
     
  • Commemorative Box with Sake cup—Celebrating the Invasion of Nanking, China–Seabag

    University Archives Collections:
  • Belle Air yearbooks
  • Commencement Programs
  • Villanovan issues

Nate GosweilerNathaniel Haeberle-Gosweiler is a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Department at Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in Communication at Villanova University.


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Researching Hallowed Ground: Meet Jubilee Marshall, 2019 Falvey Scholar

Jubliee wins Falvey Scholar Award

Jubilee Marshall receives the Falvey Scholar Award from Associate University Librarian for Collections and Stewardship Jeehyun “Jee” Davis.

BY SHAWN PROCTOR

This is part 3 of a 6-part series featuring the 2019 Falvey Scholars. Read more about them every Tuesday and in the upcoming issue of Mosaic: the library’s bi-annual publication.

 

Scholarly Stats:

Jubilee Marshall ’19 CLAS

Hometown: Washington, D.C.

Faculty Mentor: Whitney Martinko, PhD, assistant professor of History

Research: Public Health and Urban Space in Philadelphia’s Black Burial Grounds, 1750-1850, presented at the American Historical Association’s 2019 annual meeting and the Organization of American Historians’ 2019 conference

Other Honors: Fulbright U.S. Student Program award winner, Villanova Undergraduate Research Fellowship

In her own words:

Jubilee’s Research:

I began this research project in the fall semester of 2017, in the History department’s Junior Research Seminar, where I conducted a broad literature review to help narrow my topic, and wrote a Villanova Undergraduate Research Fellowship grant application for the summer of 2018.

During the summer, I focused on primary source research, and met with countless historians, archivists, and site managers (including Dr. Aaron Wunsch, Terry Buckalew, Adrienne Whaley, and Dr. Nicole Dressler) to get a sense of the landscape of churches and burials in Philadelphia in the revolutionary period. I spent a lot of time in archives.

Jubilee Marshall

There, I examined newspapers, church records, death records, land deeds, board of health regulations, maps, and other historical documents. In conducting this primary source research, I worked to identify trends and themes and in doing so eventually came to recognize that public health was a major concern for Philadelphians in the era.

Upon the completion of the summer grant period, I then spent the fall semester of my senior year completing supplementary secondary source research to get a broader understanding of how public health and urbanization may have affected black residents of the city from 1750-1850. In the spring semester, I wrote my thesis.

This process, which I’ve undertaken with extensive guidance from my advisor, Dr. Martinko, culminated in a 60-page, two-chapter thesis that I defended and plan to submit for publication.


Jubilee’s
“Falvey Experience”:

I could not have completed this project without Falvey Memorial Library. Much of my research depended on access to online databases, such as JSTOR and Accessible Archives. Over the summer, I met with a research librarian who helped me to navigate the specific databases I was using for my project which allowed me to locate and analyze sources I would not have been able to find on my own.

I checked out countless monographs from Falvey’s own collection, and regularly used EZ-Borrow and Interlibrary Loan to access other relevant texts that were not available in the stacks. Having access to this network of libraries allowed me to incorporate secondary source works that ended up being central to my broader argument. I also learned from the research librarian that I could request microfilm through ILL and view it in the library.

This was very helpful as I relied heavily on church records, many of which have been transferred to microfilm but are not yet available on the web. In addition to these services, I also used the library for my logistical needs. It provided me with a place to work, and with crucial access to a disk drive — my computer does not have one, and local historians frequently sent me CDs full of historical data. Falvey Memorial Library not only enhanced my project but made it possible, providing me with the resources and active guidance necessary to ensure my work would be well-supported.


The Impact on Her:
Jubilee Marshall

I have learned a lot and developed a wide array of skills from my research experience. In addition to learning how to locate, organize, and analyze sources, I have also learned how to navigate physical and digital archives; how to network with other historians in order to tap into existing networks of shared knowledge surrounding my research topic; how to successfully manage a long-term project; what work style best suits my needs and habits; how to apply for grant money; how to think broadly about historical evidence and think creatively about how to answer questions when the answers are not immediately evident in the historical records; how to write a thesis-length paper; and, finally, how to present my information and argument in multiple mediums in a way that is both engaging and convincing.

In addition to these skills, this research experience has also enable me to present my research at professional conferences, including the American Historical Association’s 2019 Annual Meeting and the Organization of American Historian’s 2019 conference, which has given me insight into the world of academia and helped to inform my post-graduate plans.


What’s Next:

Jubilee will work as a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant in the Czech Republic. Upon completion of her Fulbright year, she intends to pursue a graduate degree in the field of Public History.

 


Shawn Proctor

Shawn Proctor, MFA, is communications and marketing program manager at Falvey Memorial Library.


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Happily Forever After: The Timeless Relevance of Fairy Tales

Distinctive Collections’ new exhibit on the “moral of the story”

From a treacherous trip to grandma’s house, rags to riches, escaping a witch’s oven, a trickster cat that brings good fortune—these are the tales and imagery that shape our happily ever afters and childhood. These tales seem to not fade away but inspire many generations of retellings and adaptions. While we have Charles Perrault, Madam d’Aulnoy, Hans Christian Andersen, and Grimm Brothers to thank for the dissemination of these beloved works, these tales have enduring presence in our society because the morals and lessons continue to have relevance in our culture today. Beyond the imagination of benevolent godmothers and a goose that lays golden eggs, the core conflicts, struggles, and messages of the stories remain reflective of our world. It is why fairy tale imagery is so popular beyond entertainment, but conspicuous in our everyday lives.  

Distinctive Collections invites you to explore the world of fairy tales and examine the importance of morals in the tales with the new exhibit, Happily Forever After: The Timeless Relevance of Fairy Tales. Curated by Rebecca Oviedo, Distinctive Collections Coordinator, and Beaudry Allen, Preservation and Digital Archivist, the exhibit showcases a selection of fairy tales and fairy tale inspired works from Falvey Memorial Library and Special Collections. The exhibit is located on the first floor of Falvey Memorial Library and open to the public throughout the summer. 


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Dig Deeper: Award-winning History Professor Recommends Films Exploring Rarely Seen Sides of World War II

Marc Gallicchio

In celebration of the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion in Normandy, June 6, 1944, first we take a look at World War II with Marc Gallicchio, PhD, professor and chair of the Department of History, who was named a winner of the prestigious Bancroft Prize in American History and Diplomacy for his book Implacable Foes: War in the Pacific, 1944-1945.

Implaceable Foes Book Cover

Dr. Gallicchio, who is not a fan of actual war films, offered recommendations for American films that deal with aspects of war not normally captured on film. (Films are in chronological order by subject portrayed.)

The Last Emperor (1987). “This lavish film is based on the memoir of Puyi, the last emperor of China and the nominal ruler of the Japanese-created puppet state of Manchukuo. The movie takes viewers from the overthrow of the Qing dynasty in 1911 to a few years after the creation of the People’s Republic of China in 1949.

“The parts of the movie dealing with Japan’s takeover of Manchuria in 1931 and the subsequent creation of Manchukuo, the first acts in Japan’s invasion of China, are particularly well done.”

(AVAILABLE VIA INTERLIBRARY LOAN.)

Empire of the Sun (1987) “Directed by Steven Spielberg, the movie is based on the autobiographical novel by the same name by British science fiction writer J.G. Ballard. This movie begins just before the attack on Pearl Harbor when Japan has already been at war with China for four years.”

“As the movie opens, its central figure, a young boy named Jaime (played by Christian Bale), is living the privileged life of Englishmen in the Shanghai International Settlement. That existence abruptly ends with Japan’s attack on American and European possessions throughout the Pacific, including the Shanghai International Settlement. I included this film because it vividly portrays that period before the war before U.S. entry that many Americans rarely see depicted in film.”

(AVAILABLE VIA INTERLIBRARY LOAN.)

Letters from Iwo Jima (2006) “This is the companion film to Flags of Our Fathers, both of which were directed by Clint Eastwood. Letters from Iwo Jima tells the story of the battle from the Japanese perspective. By this time in the war, February 1945, the main Japanese objective in continuing the fighting was to make the war as costly for the Americans as they could.”

“The Japanese had long lost any hope of victory in the war. Their ultimate goal was to stave off unconditional defeat by bringing a war-weary United States to the negotiating table.  The movie does an excellent job of depicting the Japanese defensive strategy based on heavy fortification inland from the beaches. The whole island had been turned into a fortress by the time the Americans attacked.”

(AVAILABLE IN THE LIBRARY’S DVD COLLECTION.)

The Americanization of Emily (1964). “Vanity Fair called this little known gem one of the most subversive American films ever made. It stars James Garner and Julie Andrews and was based on a novel by journalist William Bradford Huie, who, coincidentally, was a war correspondent on Iwo Jima.”

“Garner plays a confirmed coward who got his first and last taste of war in the assault on Tarawa in the Pacific. From that point on, he ingeniously avoids combat and becomes an adjutant to rear admiral stationed in London before the Normandy invasion. The movie is a dark comedy enlivened by sharp provocative dialogue.”

(AVAILABLE VIA INTERLIBRARY LOAN.)


Shawn Proctor

Shawn Proctor, MFA, is communications and marketing program manager at Falvey Memorial Library, and is proud to have watched half of these films in the theater as a kid.


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University Archives Acquisition: Ann Marie Cammarota Research Records

Pages from the archives

The University Archives recently acquired the research materials compiled by alumnus Ann Marie Cammarota for her 1985 Master Thesis, Consideration of the American Press Coverage of the Cuban Political Situation from 1952 to 1958 and its Influence of the United States Foreign Policy. Cammarota’s thesis investigated if American press coverage of Batista’s government influenced the State Department’s policies at the time. The papers include declassified memoranda from the State Department regarding Cuban activities between 1957 and 1958. The documents reveal the State Department’s growing apprehension surrounding escalating violence and the United States’ international reputation.

After completing her Masters in 1985, Cammarota continued her studies at Temple University for a PhD in History. She has been an instructor Neuman College, St. Joseph’s University, and Rosemont College. In addition to teaching, she has published a book, Pavements in the Garden: The Suburbanization of Southern New Jersey, Adjacent to the City of Philadelphia, 1769 to Present, which is also available in our general stacks.

The University Archives is excited for the new addition to the collections because the documents serve as significant primary sources for US-Cuban relations as well as highlight the work of our former students. The documents have been added to VUA 32 Alumni Records and available for research.


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Summer Research: Irish Nurses of 1916

Yesterday, we had a visit from an international researcher who was excited to go through our Joseph McGarrity Collection. He was looking for materials related to Irish nurses who participated in the Easter Rising of 1916.

One of the items in the collection is In Times of Peril, which contains excerpts from the diary of nurse Linda Kearns.

Cover of In Times of Peril, featuring a photo of Linda Kearns

Our copy is especially noteworthy as it belonged to Éamon de Valera (to whom the book was dedicated) and bears his signature on the title page. De Valera served as the first president of the Irish Republic (1921-1922) and the third president of the modern Republic of Ireland (1959-1973).

Signature of Eamon de Valera on title page of In Times of Peril.

An excerpt from Kearns’ diary is one of the readings featured in the fifth episode of our Mail Call podcast.

Our researcher had a very productive visit. It is always thrilling to see researchers examining primary sources and bringing new connections to light. You can view a list of published resources that have used materials from our collections in our Zotero library.


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The 8:30: Things to know before you go (1/19)

flat 830 format


SAVE THE DATE…

Replacement Parts. The Ethics of Procuring and Replacing Organs in Humans. Friday, January 29 at 3:00 p.m. in Room 205. Scholarship@Villanova lecture featuring Arthur L. Caplan, PhD; The Rev. James J. McCartney, OSA; and Daniel P. Reid ‘14 CLAS. Dr. Caplan, an internationally recognized bioethicist, along with co-editors Father McCartney and Reid, will discuss their collection of essays from medicine, philosophy, economics and religion that address the ethical challenges raised by organ transplantation. Questions? Contact: Sally Scholz


Happening @ ‘Nova

Be sure to check out these noteworthy events that are taking place on Villanova’s campus this week!

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemoration: 1/19
Join the Center for Peace and Justice Education as they welcome MK Asante as the 2016 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. keynote speaker on Tuesday, Jan. 19 at 5 p.m. in the Villanova Room. MK Asante is an associate professor of English (Morgan State), author, filmmaker, and rapper. He is most well-known for his best-selling memoir, Buck. Questions? Contact: Sharon Discher

Dispatch from the Climate Summit: 1/19
Hear first-hand about the agreement coming out of December’s Paris Climate Summit. Anthony Giancatarino, Policy Director for the Center for Inclusion in NYC, participated in the Summit and will discuss his experience. This is the first event in a series titled “Care for our Common Home: Multi-faith Views on Climate Justice.” The event will take place on Tuesday, Jan. 19, 12:45-2 p.m., St. Rita Community Center. A light Lunch provided – RSVP to julia.sheetz@villanova.edu Questions? Contact: Julia Sheetz

Spring Career Fairs: 2/2 & 2/3
The Career Center is hosting the 2016 Spring Career Fairs on 2/2 and 2/3. Tuesday, Feb. 2: 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Communication, Marketing & Media; Tuesday, Feb. 2: 3–6 p.m. Finance, Accounting & Consulting; Wednesday, Feb. 3: 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Engineering, Science, & Technology. All fairs are held in The Villanova Room. Questions? Contact: Sheila Doherty


What Could Be Better Than Two New Printers?

Three new printers have replaced the two public printers on Falvey’s first floor. Although the new printers are smaller than the previous ones, their speed is about the same. Most importantly, three machines provide a much greater capacity.

If a printer needs paper, has an error message, has a paper jam, or has any other problem, please notify the Service Desk Supervisor.

Falvey staff received specialized training from the supplier on how to service these new machines. Having only trained personnel service the printers will ensure that repairs are accurate and quick and that the printers will avoid chronic problems in the future.

Library staff welcome this improvement to our services and remain committed to your success!


PICTURES FOR DAYS

Do you like images? How about high quality, copyright-free images? Do you want them right now!? Check out what the New York Public Library has to offer. Spoiler alert: they have 180,000 high resolution images in public domain easily accessible from their website, featuring items from their New York City collection, historical maps, illustrations, texts – “just go forth and reuse!” they say. You can check out Walt Whitman’s manuscript, medieval and Renaissance illuminated manuscripts, and 19th-20th century stereoscopic views.


neologisms

DID YOU KNOW you could be the one who names the next neologism?

With the new year come lists, especially lists of new words or terms. The Oxford English Dictionary documents words added in 2015, such as phablet, waybread, and “the bank of mom and dad.”

From across the pond, Cambridge Dictionaries Online includes the following from 2015:
digital amnesia (“the inability to remember basic things, such as telephone numbers, dates, etc. as a result of over-reliance on mobile phones, the Internet etc. for storing information”),
fitspo (“informal short for ‘fitspiration’; the inspiration to get fit and strong”) and
simulator sickness (“a nauseous feeling caused by moving your head too fast while playing a virtual reality, simulation, game”).

Banished words?—Perhaps calling them “overused” would be more accurate. Lake Superior State University in Michigan publishes a list of words and phrases that should be retired, including manspreading, physicality and “break the internet.”

Whether you’re a logophile, a neophile or just a curious person, you’ll be entertained by these lists of latecomers to our lexicon.


birth of the intellectualsNEW MEDIA NEWS

“Who exactly are the ‘intellectuals’?” Human beings have possessed an intelligence beyond that of animals for millions of years. So what separates the intellectuals from the rest of humanity? According to the author of Birth of the Intellectuals, Christophe Charle, the term came into use with the Dreyfus Affair, a political scandal in France that divided the country for more than 50 years, and “signified a cultural and political vanguard who dared to challenge the status quo.”


QUOTE OF THE DAY

Poet and author Edgar Allan Poe was born on this day in 1809 in Boston, Massachusetts. Perhaps you are familiar with “The Raven,” “The Tell-Tale Heart,” or “The Fall of the House of Usher.” He is known for his dark, mysterious, and sometimes macabre stories. Did you know there is an Edgar Allan Poe museum in Richmond, Virginia?

edgar allan poe

“Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,

Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore—

While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,

As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door—

“‘Tis some visitor,” I muttered, “tapping at my chamber door—

Only this and nothing more.”

from “The Raven”

 


Have an excellent day! Feel free to comment your thoughts and ideas for future editions of The 8:30 below.


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‘Caturday: Service ‘Cats

MLK 2016

(Left to right) Maleah Bradley, Christina Sebastiao, Cordesia Pope

Thanks to Fiona Chambers, a student leader on the Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service Committee, library staff did their part to draw attention to the MLK Day of Service by wearing t-shirts provided by the committee.

The Library also served as one of the MLK Day of Service Coat Drive locations on campus after being contacted by Rebecca Lin, another student leader on the MLK Day of Service Committee.

The Library will be closed on Monday, Jan. 18, to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and to allow library staff and students to participate in MLK Day of Service events.


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Oxford History Handbooks Online

oho

Falvey Library recently acquired the Oxford Handbooks Online history subject collection. The print editions of the Oxford Handbooks have long been popular for their thorough research reviews. It came as no surprise that history faculty expressed strong interest in a switch to the online platform.

The history subject collection currently consists of twenty-eight complete handbooks, but also includes numerous chapters from forthcoming print handbooks. Oxford University Press publishes chapters of handbooks which are still in production on its online platform often long before the print edition becomes available. Thus, Dr. Hartnett’s students are able to read a selection of chapters from the Oxford Handbook of Modern Russian History this fall even though the handbook has not yet been published in print. Unfortunately, students and faculty cannot readily discover this exclusive online content as forthcoming handbooks are neither cataloged in the library’s catalog nor indexed in the library’s article database.

OHO exampleThe Oxford Handbook of the French Revolution and two volumes of the Oxford Handbook of Early Modern European History will be completed this year. The Oxford Handbook of Modern Russian History, the Oxford Handbook of Europe 1914-45 and the Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Middle-Eastern and North African History are currently in production with available online content. Planned for the future are handbooks about Asian American history, the New Deal, World War II, American political history, the history of race and the history of education.

The library’s catalog provides links to all complete handbooks. Links to individual chapters can readily be created with the help of the digital object identifier (DOI) included in the chapter citations. Copy and paste the number into the library’s link builder application and share the URL via email, syllabus or online classroom. Links are currently the best method to share chapters with students because of known problems with the publisher’s pdf server. Oxford University Press is aware of this problem and will upgrade its server in October. Contact the library if you need pdfs for individual chapters. We will gladly assist you.

doi

Questions or comments? Share them with us online or via email.


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Last Modified: September 9, 2015