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Photo Friday: Stand With Ukraine


 


Falvey Memorial Library stands in support with the people of Ukraine. Featured in the display on the first floor are library resources on Ukraine—history, literature, geography, and more. No list could ever be comprehensive, but we hope the information listed below and in the display will serve as a starting point. Be sure to stop by the display on your next visit to Falvey Library.

How you can help and support Ukrainians:

How to remain informed about the conflict:

Resources on Ukraine:

 

 


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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TBT: The Bicycle Highwaymen of Coney Island

Old Broadbrim Weekly, no. 30, April 25, 1903. Photo courtesy of the Villanova University Digital Library.

Old Broadbrim Weekly, no. 30, April 25, 1903. Photo courtesy of the Villanova University Digital Library.


On this day in history (June 16, 1884), the first roller coaster in America opened at Coney Island, in Brooklyn, New York. “Known as a switchback railway, it was the brainchild of LaMarcus Thompson, traveled approximately six miles per hour and cost a nickel to ride.” This week’s “Throwback Thursday” (TBT) is a dime novel from Falvey’s Dime Novel and Popular Literature collection. Follow Detective Josiah Broadbrim as he looks to solve a mystery on Coney Island. Read the full story here.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library. Her favorite amusement park is Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio.

 

 


 


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Falvey Memorial Library Shares Resources for Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

Image courtesy of The Library of Congress.

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month—Celebrating the “histories of Americans hailing from across the Asian continent and from the Pacific islands of Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia.” This month was selected to commemorate AAPI heritage as the first Japanese immigrants migrated to the United States on May 7, 1842. The transcontinental railroad was also completed on May 10, 1869—the majority of the construction completed by thousands of Chinese immigrants.

AAPI Heritage Month was originally a commemorative week, with President Jimmy Carter signing House Joint Resolution 1007 (becoming Public Law 95-419) on October 5, 1978, proclaiming the “7 day period beginning on May 4, 1979 as ‘Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week.'” Congress passed Public Law 101-283 on May 9, 1990, extending the observance to a month, and on Oct. 23, 1992, passed Public Law 102-450 annually designating May as Asian Pacific American Heritage Month.

As we celebrate the heritage of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders, we must combat continued racism against the AAPI community. Last year Stop AAPI Hatereported over 2,800 hate incidents across the United States since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.” Falvey Memorial Library condemns anti-Asian racial discrimination and violence. We stand with the AAPI members of our Villanova community and all AAPI members in solidarity.

The Federal Asian Pacific American Council selected “Advancing Leaders Through Collaboration” as the theme for May 2022. In this spirit, we are happy to share AAPI resources available at Falvey Memorial Library. The works listed below are only a snapshot of scholarship on AAPI heritage. No list of this nature could ever be comprehensive, but we hope that this list, will serve as a starting point.

Curated by Jutta Seibert, subject librarian for Global Interdisciplinary Studies, the Asian Studies research guide and the Chinese Culture research guide are excellent resources. Seibert is available for research consultations.

Asian Studies Research Guide

Academic Journals

Newspapers and Magazines

Primary Sources

Encyclopedias, Handbooks, and Companions

Books and Book Chapters

Chinese Culture Research Guide 

Encyclopedias, Handbooks, and Companions

Secondary Sources

Streaming Video

Primary Sources

Be sure to explore scholarship from faculty in Villanova University’s Asian Studies Program:

Andrew B. Liu, Assistant Professor of History

Nathan Badenoch, PhD, Associate Professor of Japanese and Asian Studies

Kayo Shintaku, PhD, Assistant Teaching Professor, Coordinator of Japanese Language & Cultural Studies

Davey K. Tomlinson, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy

Qi Wang, PhD, Associate Professor, Area Coordinator, Interpersonal Communication

Jie Xu, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Communication

Naomi Yamakawa, Japanese Instructor, Department of Global Interdisciplinary Studies

For more books and other resources by and about people of Asian-Pacific ancestry check out this blog by Erica Hayes, Digital Scholarship Librarian, and Deborah Bishov published on May 10, 2021.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library. 

 

 

 

References:

Congress, T. L. of, Administration, N. A. and R., Humanities, N. E. for the, Art, N. G. of, Service, N. P., Institution, U. S., & Museum, U. H. M.  Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2022 (n.d.). Retrieved May 9, 2022, from https://asianpacificheritage.gov/

FAPAC – FAPAC Announces Theme for the 2022 Asian American Native Hawaiian Pacific Islander Heritage Month. (n.d.). Retrieved May 9, 2022, from https://fapac.org/pressreleases/12235330

The Rise In Anti-Asian Attacks During The COVID-19 Pandemic. NPR. Retrieved May 9, 2022, from  https://www.npr.org/2021/03/10/975722882/the-rise-of-anti-asian-attacks-during-the-covid-19-pandemic

The story behind Asian Pacific American Heritage, and why it’s celebrated in May. (n.d.). NPR.Org. Retrieved May 9, 2022, from https://www.npr.org/2022/05/02/1095812576/aapi-asian-pacific-heritage-month-origin-may-why

 


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Dig Deeper: Earth Day Video Offering

 Image courtesy of NASA Earth Observations. Image is of four world globes overlapping.

Image courtesy of NASA Earth Observations.


A brief sampling of Falvey Library online video related to Earth Day and our rapidly changing planet:

For Falvey Library video subscribed content visit an introduction to Streaming Video at Falvey or try one of the selected library subject headings below:

For more video dig further in:


""Merrill Stein is Political Science Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Dig Deeper: Women, Climate Change, Law and Data

By Merrill Stein 

As we approach the end of March, Women’s History Month and look towards Earth Day in April, consider listening to this recent podcast from the OECD, Women, climate change and data: Why we need to better understand the environment-gender nexus.

Take a moment to consider these research guides and YouTube videos from the Library of Congress, Smithsonian and U.S. National Archives.

Examine the Woman in the Law (Peggy) resource in the HeinOnline database, a  subscription courtesy of the Charles Widger School of Law Library. The “Peggy” collection features more than one million pages of contemporary and historical works related to women’s roles in society and the law.

Give thought to any possible gender gaps in common resources to which we interact with frequently, as indicated by this recent study from the University of Pennsylvania. Read about women in the digital world in the special issue of Information, Communication & Society, Volume 24, Issue 14 (2021).

 

Dig Deeper resources:


""Merrill Stein is Political Science Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.


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View a Replica of The Lincoln Bible This Presidents’ Day

Image of the Lincoln Bible replica.

Replica of The Lincoln Bible.

This Presidents’ Day, stop by Falvey Memorial Library’s first floor to view a replica of “The Lincoln Bible.” Used during his inauguration in 1861, the Lincoln Bible didn’t actually belong to the President. The clerk of the Supreme Court, William Thomas Carroll, was the owner of the Bible Lincoln placed his hand upon. The Bible remained in Carroll’s possession until it was acquired by the Lincoln family sometime after the president’s assassination in 1865. Now known as “The Lincoln Bible,” the original copy is currently housed in the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. The Lincoln Bible was used by President Barack Obama at his inaugurations in 2009 and 2013. President Donald Trump also used the Bible at his inauguration in 2017.

The replica mirrors The Lincoln Bible as it appeared in 1861, as it was not possible to duplicate the wear and fading of the original copy. More features of the replica are listed below:

  • 280-page, 1853 Oxford University Edition.
  • Inscription of William Thomas Carroll, complete with the seal of the Supreme Court.
  • Velvet-covered; framed with brass borders and has a brass clasp, authentic gilded edges, and two ribbon markers.

The Lincoln Bible will be on display in the Library’s first floor Wednesday, Feb. 16, through Monday, Feb. 28.

Mary Lincoln gave the Bible to the Rev. Noyes W. Miner, a friend of the President, seven years after her husband’s death. Having been passed down through the generations, Miner’s descendants recently disclosed its existence and donated it to the public.

For more on President Lincoln, whose 213th birthday is Feb. 12, check out the links below:

Looking for a specific resource on President Lincoln? Contact, Jutta Seibert, History Librarian. A special thank you to Andrew McKeough, ’19 CLAS for the exhibit concept.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


References:


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Dig Deeper: In Memoriam—Anne Rice

Picture of Anne Rice at home in Palm Springs. Photograph by Dan Tuffs for the Guardian.

Anne Rice at home in Palm Springs. Photograph: Dan Tuffs for the Guardian.


Every writer knows fear and discouragement. Just write. The world is crying for new writing. It is crying for fresh and original voices and new characters and new stories. If you won’t write the classics of tomorrow, well, we will not have any.” —Anne Rice

Author of more than 30 novels, Anne Rice was born Howard Allen O’Brien and raised in New Orleans. Changing her name to Anne in the first grade, Rice lived with her parents and three sisters in New Orleans until her mother passed away when she was 15. Her father remarried and moved the family to Richardson, Texas. She attended Texas Woman’s University for a time before marrying Stan Rice, whom she had met in high school. After their marriage in 1961, the couple moved to San Francisco, and attended San Francisco State University where Rice earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science (and later a Master’s Degree in English and Creative Writing in 1972).

In 1966, the couple’s daughter Michele was born. After relocating to Berkeley, Calif., in 1969, Rice wrote the short story Interview With the Vampire. In 1970, Michele was diagnosed with leukemia and passed away in 1972. The following year, Rice worked to make Interview With the Vampire into a novel (published in 1976). Struggling with the loss of her daughter, “she conjured up the vampire Lestat [Interview‘s main character] out of her grief.”

Her son Christopher was born in 1978 and in 1980 she and her husband moved to San Francisco and returned to New Orleans in 1988. In 1994, the film adaptation of Interview With the Vampire was released. Directed by Neil Jordan, the movie starred Brad Pitt and Tom Cruise. Antonio Banderas, Kirsten Dunst, Helen McCrory, Thandiwe Newton, and Christian Slater also starred. Interview With the Vampire was the first of 13 novels in The Vampire Chronicles series that became “one of the most popular and profitable vampire properties of all time; selling upwards of 80 million copies worldwide.”

Rice is the author of numerous standalone novels and books series including The Wolf Gift chronicles, The Mayfair Witches, The Sleeping Beauty series, among others. Her novel, Feast of All Saints became a Showtime mini series in 2001. Rice adored her fans, telling the ABC News program Day One in 1993, “When I go to my signings…Everybody else is dripping with velvet and lace, and bringing me dead roses wrapped in leather handcuffs, and I love it.” Her fans in New Orleans, part of the Vampire Lestat Fan Club, host numerous events including an annual Anne Rice Vampire Ball. A local celebrity in her hometown, Rice was know to show up to local book signings in a coffin. Rice passed away on Saturday, Dec. 11, 2021, in Rancho Mirage, Calif., from complications of a stroke.

Rice was hopeful her legacy would live on—”I want to be loved and never forgotten…I’m really greedy, you know? I want to be immortal.” Rice’s life and legacy remains though her family, her fans and her writing. Acquiring Rice’s major literary works in 2020, AMC Networks plans to adapt Interview With The Vampire in an upcoming TV series on AMC and AMC+ set to premiere in 2022.

Explore some of Rice’s work below:

Autobiography:

Standalone novels:

The Wolf Gift Chronicles:

The Vampire Chronicles:

New Tales of the Vampires:

The Mayfair Witches:

The Vampire Chronicles/The Mayfair Witches Crossover:

The Life of Christ:

Songs of the Seraphim:

Ramses the Damned:

Further reading:


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 

 

References:

Anne Rice Dies: “Interview With the Vampire” Author Was 80. https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/books/2021/12/12/anne-rice-interview-with-a-vampire-author-dies-at-80/6484438001/. Accessed 15 Dec. 2021.

Genzlinger, Neil. “Anne Rice, Who Spun Gothic Tales of Vampires, Dies at 80.” The New York Times, 12 Dec. 2021, https://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/12/books/anne-rice-dead.html.

Welcome To Anne Rice.Com! http://annerice.com/Chamber-Biography.html. Accessed 15 Dec. 2021.

 


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Call for Papers: Villanova Gender and Women’s Studies Annual Spring Conference

Informational poster on Villanova University's Gender and Women's Studies Conference.


The 32nd annual Gender and Women’s Studies (GWS) Conference will take place on Friday, March 25 at Villanova University. Looking to showcase your work? Villanova graduates and undergraduates may submit papers or alternative forms of expression (poetry, performances, films, etc.) by Friday, February 11. Applicant’s work must engage gender, sexuality, or feminist theories. All papers must have been written during spring or fall 2020, 2021  (or written specifically for the GWS conference). Scholars can submit their work in one of the following three categories:

1. Papers or creative works by first year undergraduates (4-10 pages)
2. Papers or creative works by sophomores, juniors, and seniors (5-20 pages)
3. Papers or creative works by graduate students (12-30 pages)

View full submission guidelines here. Questions? Email gws@villanova.edu. For the latest updates on the 2022 GWS conference visit the program webpage.

Looking for more GWS resources? Explore the GWS research guide or contact Jutta Seibert, Director of Research Services & Scholarly Engagement, GWS Librarian, for a research consultation.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Try These Books Turned Hallmark Movies This Holiday Season

Poster of the Movie Guide—Countdown to Christmas 2021. Image courtesy of Hallmark Channel.

Movie Guide—Countdown to Christmas 2021. Image courtesy of Hallmark Channel.


Who doesn’t love Hallmark movies…Okay, I know not everyone likes Hallmark movies. So if you don’t like cheesy holiday cheer, this isn’t the blog for you. If you’re one of the people who likes Hallmark’s holiday classics (or someone who doesn’t publicly share their Hallmark fandom) you’re going to want to keep reading.

Now, before I continue with this article, I fully acknowledge that Hallmark movies are not Oscar-worthy films. Almost all of them feature over-the-top acting, quirky characters, overused clichés, and the same predictable plotlines. However, that formulized narrative is what makes them so appealing. “The human brain loves patterns and the predictability is cognitively rewarding,” explains Pamela Rutledge, Behavioral Scientist, Director of the Media Psychology Research Center and Media Psychology faculty at Fielding Graduate University. “Those predictable story arcs that draw on the standard patterns we recognize from fairytales offer comfort by presenting life as simple and moralistic…The movies provide simplistic solutions to all those stressors that the holidays can bring: family conflict, isolation or financial pressures.” 

That suspension of reality, as with any entertainment, is a form of escapism for viewers. So, while I may not inherit millions of dollars from a long-lost relative and move to a small town, and then proceed to save said small town from from financial difficulty, all the while meeting the love of my life during the Christmas season—I can reduce my stress level by getting lost in a fictional reality full of hopeful optimism.

While Hallmark is famous for its “Countdown to Christmas,” and Lifetime for “Its a Wonderful Lifetime,” many streaming platforms have also begun to produce holiday-themed films and mini-series that mirror Hallmark’s movie format. We all celebrate the holidays differently, and if Hallmark movies, or similar films, are part of your festivities—embrace and enjoy the cheesy cheerfulness. If not, make some hot chocolate, change the channel, and find another movie that will help you decompress.

If you prefer the page to the screen, try reading a book (or two) that Hallmark films are based upon this holiday season:


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library. Her favorite Hallmark Movie is The Christmas Card.

 

 

References: Page, D. (2019, November 16). Here’s why it feels so good to watch those Hallmark holiday movies. NBC News. Retrieved November 19, 2021, from https://www.nbcnews.com/better/lifestyle/here-s-why-it-feels-so-good-watch-those-hallmark-ncna1080841


 

 


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Remembering Ray Heitzmann, PhD

 

Headshot of Dr. Ray Heitzmann.

Photo courtesy of Dr. Heitzmann’s family. Featured in The Philadelphia Inquirer.


Professor, coach, academic adviser, and all-around Wildcats booster,” Dr. Ray Heitzmann, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Education and Counseling at Villanova, passed away on July 11, 2020. Author of more than 50 books, Dr. Heitzmann was a faculty member at Villanova University for 40 years. Celebrating Dr. Heitzmann’s life and legacy, the Villanova community is invited to a memorial mass on Friday, Oct. 22 at 12:05 p.m. in St. Thomas of Villanova Church. A reception will follow in the East Lounge of Dougherty Hall.

Dr. Heitzmann‘s obituary can be found here.

Explore some of Dr. Heitzmann’s works at Falvey Memorial Library: 


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 

 


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Last Modified: October 22, 2021