Skip Navigation
Falvey Memorial Library
Advanced
You are exploring: Home > Blogs

Weekend Recs: MLB

By Jenna Renaud

Happy Friday, Wildcats! Falvey Memorial Library is delivering you another semester of Weekend Recs, a blog dedicated to filling you in on what to read, listen to, and watch over the weekend. Jenna, a graduate assistant from the Communication department, scours the internet, peruses the news, and digs through book stacks to find new, relevant, and thought-provoking content that will challenge you and prepare you for the upcoming week. 

The MLB season is finally upon us, despite delays that pushed opening day from Thursday, March 31, to Thursday, April 7. The 2021-22 MLB lockout was the first since 1994; however, negotiations have now been settled, and the season can begin!

So let’s root, root, root for the home team (Go, Phillies!) and learn a little more about what’s happening currently in baseball with this week’s weekend recs, whether you have two minutes or an entire afternoon. 

If you have 2 minutes… read about MLB Opening Day and the decline in ticket sales. 

If you have 7 minutes and 39 seconds… watch this video from December breaking down the MLB lockout, what both sides want, and what the consequences are. 

Bonus: Watch this 8-minute-and-37-second video updating people on the MLB lockout. 

If you have 1 hour and 48 minutes… watch “Bull Durham,” arguably the best baseball movie of all time. 

If you have 8 hours and 20 minutes… read Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, the story about the Oakland Athletics baseball team and its general manager Billy Beane. 

If you have the afternoon… buy tickets to support Philadelphia’s very own Phillies in their opening weekend games against the Oakland Athletics.  


Jenna Renaud is a graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication Department.


Like

View a Replica of The Lincoln Bible This Presidents’ Day

Image of the Lincoln Bible replica.

Replica of The Lincoln Bible.

This Presidents’ Day, stop by Falvey Memorial Library’s first floor to view a replica of “The Lincoln Bible.” Used during his inauguration in 1861, the Lincoln Bible didn’t actually belong to the President. The clerk of the Supreme Court, William Thomas Carroll, was the owner of the Bible Lincoln placed his hand upon. The Bible remained in Carroll’s possession until it was acquired by the Lincoln family sometime after the president’s assassination in 1865. Now known as “The Lincoln Bible,” the original copy is currently housed in the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. The Lincoln Bible was used by President Barack Obama at his inaugurations in 2009 and 2013. President Donald Trump also used the Bible at his inauguration in 2017.

The replica mirrors The Lincoln Bible as it appeared in 1861, as it was not possible to duplicate the wear and fading of the original copy. More features of the replica are listed below:

  • 280-page, 1853 Oxford University Edition.
  • Inscription of William Thomas Carroll, complete with the seal of the Supreme Court.
  • Velvet-covered; framed with brass borders and has a brass clasp, authentic gilded edges, and two ribbon markers.

The Lincoln Bible will be on display in the Library’s first floor Wednesday, Feb. 16, through Monday, Feb. 28.

Mary Lincoln gave the Bible to the Rev. Noyes W. Miner, a friend of the President, seven years after her husband’s death. Having been passed down through the generations, Miner’s descendants recently disclosed its existence and donated it to the public.

For more on President Lincoln, whose 213th birthday is Feb. 12, check out the links below:

Looking for a specific resource on President Lincoln? Contact, Jutta Seibert, History Librarian. A special thank you to Andrew McKeough, ’19 CLAS for the exhibit concept.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


References:


Like

Dig Deeper: Hunger & Homelessness Awareness Week

By Jenna Renaud 

Villanova University is celebrating the 46th Annual Hunger & Homelessness Awareness Week (HHAW) from Sunday, November 14 through Saturday, November 20. To kick off the week, we dug deeper into the history of HHAW and provided resources to help you learn more about homelessness, hunger, and poverty.  

Did you know? 

  • 37.2 million Americans live below the poverty level
  • 580,000 Americans are homeless on a typical night
  • 44 million Americans are at risk of suffering from hunger
  • 1 in 6 children in the U.S. live in poverty 

Hunger & homelessness. Hunger Homelessness Awareness Week. (n.d.). Retrieved November 15, 2021, from https://hhweek.org/hunger-and-homelessness/. 

History of HHAW 

HHAW was started in 1975 by Augustinian priest the Rev. Ray Jackson, OSA, and a group of Villanova students operating on their three pillars of education, advocacy, and service. The ultimate goal? Zero people affected by hunger and homelessness. Although starting at Villanova University, HHAW has since expanded to over 700 campuses and communities nationwide! Each year, HHAW has hundreds of thousands of participants that raise millions of dollars for local service providers.  

To learn more about HHAW at Villanova visit: https://vuhungerweek.wixsite.com/mysite  

To learn more about HHAW nationwide visit: https://hhweek.org/  

HHAW Villanova Events 

Monday, Nov. 15
Postgraduate Service Fair; Villanova Room-Connelly Center, 5–7 p.m.
Postgraduate Service Chat; The Refectory, 8-9:30 p.m. 

Wednesday, Nov. 17
Fair Trade Craft Fair; Connelly Center Ground Floor Atrium, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.
Keynote Event: The Heart of Camden, the Story of Father Michael Doyle; Connelly Cinema, 7 p.m. 

Thursday, Nov. 18
Donate A Meal; Campus Dining Halls, Lunch
The HHAW is hosting its annual Fast Day. For every meal donation collected, Dining Services will donate an amount for each meal to partner organizations helping those experiencing hunger and homelessness. 

Solidarity Vigil, The Grotto; 7 p.m. 

Saturday, Nov. 20
Back On My Feet Turkey Trot 5K; The Oreo, 9:30 a.m. 

For more information on HHAW and its schedule of events for 2021, visit the HHAW site. 

Book Recommendations 

All books are currently displayed outside of Holy Grounds on the first floor of Falvey. Books will be available for check-out starting next week.

Poverty and the underclass: changing perceptions of the poor in America by William Alton Kelso 

Confronting homelessness: poverty, politics, and the failure of social policy by David Wagner 

Homeless not hopeless: the survival networks of Latino and African American men by Edna Maritza Molina-Jackson 

Tell them who I am: The Lives of Homeless Women by Elliot Liebow 

All You Can Eat: How Hungry is America? by Joel Berg 

Local HHAW Events & Initiatives

Below is a list of ways to get involved in HHAW in Philly. Click on the following link to view more information and a full description of events: https://www.phila.gov/2021-11-08-hunger-and-homelessness-awareness-week-2021-philly-events-and-information/


jenna newman headshotJenna Renaud is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library.


Like

Women’s History Month—The Civil War Diaries of Emilie Davis

Image courtesy of Memorable Days: The Emilie Davis Diaries.

Celebrate Women’s History Month by exploring transcripts of Emilie Davis’ diaries. Davis was an African American woman living in Philadelphia during the U.S. Civil War. In three of her pocket diaries (1863, 1864, and 1865) she “recounts black Philadelphians’ celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation, nervous excitement during the battle of Gettysburg, and their collective mourning of President Lincoln.” Her diaries provide readers the opportunity to “experience the Civil War in real time as events unfolded for Americans.”

The original diaries, part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania’s (HSP) collections, were transcribed by Villanova students for The People’s Contest: A Civil War Era Digital Archiving Project. Working to advance scholarship on Pennsylvania during the Civil War era, the Richards Civil War Era Center, The Pennsylvania State University Libraries, Senator John Heinz History Center, and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania curated The People’s Contest to highlight archives and special collections throughout the commonwealth.

Led by Judith Giesberg, PhD, Robert M. Birmingham Chair in the Humanities, Professor of History at Villanova University, Memorable Days: The Emilie Davis Diaries project features scans and transcriptions from Emilie’s pocket diaries. Support for the website project was provided by Villanova University’s Falvey Memorial Library, The Department of History, Department of Communication, and the Villanova Institute for Teaching and Learning. Transcriptions and annotations were conduction by Villanova students. View the full list of contributors on the project webpage. Website development was provided by Michael Mafodda, MBA, and Samantha Viani ’14 CLAS.

Read Davis’ diaries here. For additional resources visit the links below:

Explore more Women’s History Month resources in this blog by Susan Turkel, Social Sciences Librarian, and this resource list by Merrill Stein, Political Science Librarian. For help with your research, please contact the Gender and Women’s Studies Librarian Jutta Seibert.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library. 

 

 


 


Like
1 People Like This Post

Walter Wallace Jr and West Philly History

By Beaudry Rae Allen, Laura Bang, and Deborah Bishov

 

Illustration of a smiling young Black man with shoulder-length locs. Text says “Walter Wallace Jr.” and “Black Disabled Lives Matter”

Illustration of a smiling young Black man with shoulder-length locs with text saying “Walter Wallace Jr.” and “Black Disabled Lives Matter” By Micah Bazant

This week we mourn and once again must grapple with the senseless killing of a black person by the police, this time in Philadelphia. Walter Wallace Jr. was gunned down by Philadelphia Police on the 6100 block of Locust Street, despite the fact that his family had called for an ambulance and begged the police not to shoot, because he was experiencing a mental health crisis. The events unfolding are not a microcosm, but they highlight issues around race, police brutality, and mental health services in our communities.

The use of excessive force by the police, particularly in this geographic location, is sadly not an anomaly and sparks a reminder of the Philadelphia Police Department’s sordid history with the West Philadelphia community. Only a few blocks from the site of Wallace’s murder is the site of the 1985 MOVE bombing in which Philadelphia Police dropped a bomb on a residential home of the black liberation group MOVE. The bombing killed 6 adults and 5 children as well as destroying many homes in the area. If this is your first time reading about the MOVE bombings the library has many resources available to learn more about the events and how Philadelphia has been shaped by the events.

Physical Books Available for Contactless Pickup

Digital Access

Additional resources for support:

Please contact these departments, as they are available for emotional, mental, and spiritual support. Support and services are available to all students, whether on-campus, off-campus, or at home.


Like
1 People Like This Post

#TBT: Commencement in Convention Hall

Photo courtesy of University Archives.


Throwback Thursday

Villanova graduates gathered in Convention Hall in Philadelphia on May 12, 1969, for commencement. The ceremony featured remarks from University President the Reverend Robert J. Welsh, OSA, and commencement speaker the Honorable A. Leon Higginbotham Jr. of the United States District Court.


Like

'Caturday: Pope Francis Draws Wildcats from Near and Far

Wildcats are traveling from the suburbs and cities to participate in the World Meeting of Families and to see Pope Francis this weekend. Here’s one Wildcat’s-eye view of the train station activity in Paoli, PA, one of two SEPTA regional rail stations on the Paoli Thorndale line that will accept passengers with special passes to Philadelphia today and tomorrow. We hope everyone enjoys the Francis Festival and the address by Pope Francis at Independence Hall!

Read all of our Pope Francis and World Meeting of Families blogs that were published this week.

Pope Paoli train

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Like

The Catholic Church’s World Meeting of Families: a retrospective

 

world-meeting-of-familes-logo-717x450

There is a palpable buzz about the World Meeting of Families (WMOF) in Philadelphia September 22 to 27. Not just because of the disruption to a typical week at Villanova University and the numbers of anticipated pilgrims from around the world to the region, but because this is truly a historical event with an interesting past.


A MAP SHOWING PAST WMOF LOCATIONS


 

Vatican Pope Babies

Here is a list of the 8 WMOFs showing the location city, year, theme, and a fun fact:

· World Meeting of the Holy Father with Families (Rome: 1994) “Family: Heart of the Civilization of Love.” Part of the International Year of the Family, and occasion for Letter to Families from St. Pope John Paul II

· World Meeting of the Holy Father with Families (Rio de Janeiro: 1997) “The Family: Gift and Commitment, Hope for Humanity.” Like other WMOFs, it was in conjunction with an international theological-pastoral congress, this time resulting in The Rio Declaration on the Family.

· World Meeting of the Holy Father with Families (Rome: 2000) “Children, springtime of the family and society.” WMOF 2000 was a part of the larger celebration the Jubilee of Families.

· World Meeting of the Families (Manila: 2003) “The Christian Family: good news for the Third Millennium.” St. Pope John Paul II’s speech was streamed live to the event from Rome since the Pope was too ill to attend in person.

· World Meeting of the Families (Valencia: 2006) “The Transmission of Faith in the Family.” WMOFs include preparatory catecheses, reflections meant to teach about the purpose of the meeting.

· World Encounter of Families (Mexico City: 2009) “The family, teacher in human and Christian values.” Each WMOF has a unique logo created with a specific significance in mind.

· World Meeting of Families (Milan: 2012) “The Family: work and celebration.” WMOFs are organized by The Pontifical Council for the Family, instituted by St. Pope John Paul II in 1981, which replaced the Committee for the Family created by Pope Paul VI in 1973.

· World Meeting of Families (Philadelphia: 2015) “Love is Our Mission: The Family Fully Alive.” The WMOF and Youth Congress 2015, will culminate with a papal visit by Pope Francis to the city of brotherly love as a part of his Apostolic Journey to the United States.


DarrenPoley

Article by Darren Poley, outreach librarian, theology and humanities subject specialist, and curator for the Augustinian Historical Institute.


Like

Foto Friday: Avoid the crowds; meet with Pope Francis and the World Meeting of Families through the printed page

pope books

Selected books by or about Pope Francis:

  • A big heart open to God : a conversation with Pope Francis / Call Number: BX1378.7 .F712 2013
  • Fioretti : the little flowers of Pope Francis : heartwarming stories of the Gospel in action / Call Number: BX1378.7 .T66513 2014
  • Francis : man of prayer / Call Number: BX1378.7 .E8313 2013
  • I ask you to pray for me : opening a horizon of hope / Call Number: BX1378.7 .A25 2013b
  • The church of mercy : a vision for the church / Call Number: BX1378.7 .A25 2014

 Selected books about marriage and family:

  • A Christian theology of marriage and family / Call Number: BX2250 .R825 2003
  • Marriage : the rock on which the family is built / Call Number: BX2250 .M39 2009
  • Marriage and family : experiencing the Church’s teaching in married life / Call Number: BX2250.M37 1989
  • The splendor of love : John Paul II’s vision for marriage and family / Call Number: BX2250 .S355 2003
  • Vocation to virtue : Christian marriage as a consecrated life / Call Number: BX2250 .L357 2014 Located: Falvey West – 1st Floor

Selected books about conjugal love:

  • Fruitful and responsible love / Call Number: BV4639 .J55 1979
  • On human life : Humanae vitae / Call Number: HQ766.3 .C33 2014
  • Sexuality, marriage, and family : readings in the Catholic tradition / Call Number: BX1795.S48 S53 2001
  • The Catholic Church on marital intercourse : from St. Paul to Pope John Paul II / Call Number: BX1795.S48 O23 2009
  • The nuptial mystery / Call Number: BT701.3 .S3613 2005

Selected books about Theology of the Body:

  • Called to love : approaching John Paul II’s theology of the body / Call Number: BX1795.B63 A53 2009
  • Gift & communion : John Paul II’s Theology of the body / Call Number: BX1795.B63 K8713 2014
  • Men and women are from Eden : a study guide to John Paul II’s Theology of the body / Call Number: BX1795.B63 J6434 2005
  • Theology of the body explained : a commentary on John Paul II’s “gospel of the body” / Call Number: BT741.2.J643 W47 2003

Questions? Email: darren.poley@villanova.edu


Article by Darren Poley, the theology subject specialist, scholarly outreach librarian and curator for the Augustinian Historical Institute. Book collage by Joanne Quinn.Darren

 

 


Like

Pope Francis: Weekend Library Hours

pope a delphia

Robert Indiana, AMOR, 1998, Polychrome aluminum painted red and blue, 72″x72″x36″, © 2015 Morgan Art Foundation, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

For the duration of Pope Francis’ visit to the area, the regular library hours will remain unchanged.

The library will offer basic circulation services. Some processing delays may be experienced by library patrons.

Friday, Sept. 25: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 25: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 26: 12 p.m. – 12 a.m.

A librarian will be on-call Friday, Sept. 25, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and can be reached via the Ask a Librarian chat on our homepage.

We will also have a librarian on call Sunday, Sept. 26, from 1 to 8 p.m., also via the Ask a Librarian chat.

Holy Grounds @ Falvey will maintain the following hours:

Friday, Sept. 25: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 26: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 27: 1 p.m. – 8 p.m.

 

 


Like

Next Page »

 


Last Modified: September 24, 2015