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#ColorOurCollections 2017 Gallery

Here is a round-up of colored images from last week’s #ColorOurCollections extravaganza!

The Bosun and the Comet, colored by Laura B.

The Bosun and the Comet, colored by Laura B.

The Camelopard, colored by Laura B.

The Camelopard, colored by Laura B.

Cover of Comfort, August 1907, colored by Liz A.

Cover of Comfort, August 1907, colored by Liz A.

Cover of Comfort, February 1904, colored by Sue O.

Cover of Comfort, February 1904, colored by Sue O.

Dragons, colored by Sue O.

Dragons, colored by Sue O.

Even though #ColorOurCollections 2017 is over, you can keep coloring all year! Find all of our coloring pages here in the Digital Library.


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#ColorOurCollections 2017!

Photo of coloring pages and colored pencils.

Sharpen your pencils & crayons! It’s time for #ColorOurCollections!

This week marks the return of #ColorOurCollections, a social media campaign that presents coloring pages adapted from the collections of cultural heritage institutions. For today, you can find remastered copies of last year’s coloring books in the Digital Library. These coloring books feature the work of Jack B. Yeats, a selection of fantastic beasts, and a selection of covers from the magazine Comfort.

Coloring page from The Bosun & the Bob-tailed Comet.Coloring page with images of dragons.Coloring page of the cover of Comfort magazine, February 1904.

If you color any of our images, be sure to share your masterpieces on social media using the hashtag #ColorOurCollections and tag us so we don’t miss it! You can find our social media profiles in the “About the Collections” section at the bottom left of the Digital Library home page.

Follow the hashtag across social media or check out the website hub at colorourcollections.org to find more coloring pages from cultural heritage institutions around the world! Thank you to the New York Academy of Medicine for organizing another year of #ColorOurCollections!

Happy coloring! 🙂


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“Hidden treasure” in the library

Back in October, the Library co-sponsored a week-long Harry Potter scavenger hunt and Special Collections was a featured stop (for a Defense Against the Dark Arts lesson). Marianne Donley was one of the seekers who stopped by Special Collections on the scavenger hunt and her visit inspired her to come back to learn more about the collections. As part of an assignment for Jody Ross’s Journalism class, Marianne produced this video that highlights a few of the treasures you can find in Special Collections:

Marianne is a member of the class of 2018 and she is double-majoring in Chemistry and English. Thank you for this wonderful video, Marianne!

If you are intrigued by the treasures featured in the video, please feel free to stop by Special Collections. We love to share our collections with visitors. If you can’t make it in person, though, you can browse our Digital Library to see thousands of digitized books, photographs, manuscripts, and more.


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#ColorOurCollections gallery

During the first week of February, we participated in the #ColorOurCollections social media campaign, providing black-and-white images from our collections for coloring. I finally had a moment to put together this gallery of our finished coloring pages. Thanks to our artists: Laura H., Sue O., and yours truly! If you’d like to to do some coloring yourself, we have three coloring books available here as downloadable PDFs.

Comfort, March 1913 Comfort, December 1911 Turtles Comfort, January 1914 Comfort, April 1912 Comfort, July 1912 Comfort, June 1913 The Bosun and the Bob-Tailed Comet Comfort, February 1904


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#ColorOurCollections coloring books

Although today is the last *official* day of #ColorOurCollections, we’ll wait until next week to post our round-up. You can do some coloring over the weekend if you’ve been too busy during the week!

We now have 3 coloring books for you to choose from:

Comfort Year-Round

The Bosun And The Bob-Tailed Comet

Weird & Wonderful Animals

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Remember to tweet us a photo of your masterpiece(s) including @VillanovaDigLib and #ColorOurCollections in your tweet text. And don’t forget to check out the hashtag #ColorOurCollections on Twitter to see all the great artwork that people have done!

Happy coloring! 🙂


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#ColorOurCollections

This week we’re celebrating some of the cool stuff in our collections by creating coloring books for you to enjoy!

For today, we’ve got a coloring book version of Jack B. Yeats’s The Bosun And The Bob-Tailed Comet (1905). We’d love to see what you color, so tweet an image of your masterpiece and include @VillanovaDigLib and #ColorOurCollections in your tweet text. Stay tuned for more coloring opportunities later this week!

Illustration from "The Bosun And The Bob-Tailed Comet" by Jack B. Yeats.

The New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM) and the Biodiversity Heritage Library came up with the (brilliant!) idea for #ColorOurCollections and you can find lots of cool stuff to color from Special Collections libraries around the world by browsing the hashtag on Twitter! NYAM will also be featuring some of the #ColorOurCollections treasures on their blog.

Happy coloring! 🙂


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'Caturday: The 'Cat and Commodore Barry

In May 2009, Villanova University partnered with the Independence Seaport Museum to digitize the Barry-Hayes Papers. These historic documents relate to Commodore John Barry, an American Revolutionary War hero and “father of the United States navy.” Our most eminent Wildcat, Villanova University President the Rev. Peter M. Donohue, OSA, PhD, ’75 CLAS, Lori Dillard Rech, then president of the Independence Seaport Museum and Niall Burgess, then Consul General of Ireland, were among the dignitaries (pictured left to right) present at the official signing of the partnership agreement.

barry event 2009

 

Flash forward to 6 years later as Father Donohue is awarded the 2015 Barry Award. The award recognizes an American who, “by his or her character and contributions to the Church and community, and by professional accomplishments, has distinguished him/herself.” As noted in the official press release, Father Donohue is “being honored for his dedication to academic excellence and his commitment to seeing Villanova University’s Augustinian ideals put into action on campus and beyond.”

The digitization of the Barry-Hayes Papers is a perfect example of how Father Donohue has impacted the campus and the wider scholarly community.

Read more about the digitization partnership in the Fall 2009 News From Falvey newsletter.

Read the full story of the prestigious Barry award on the Villanova University Media Room website.


Photograph by John Welsh.

‘Caturday post by Luisa Cywinski, writer on the Communication & Service Promotion team and team leader of Access Services.


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (11/30)

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Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

WELCOME BACK!

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Check the homepage for upcoming extended Main Building hours during finals, stress-busting fun and all the ways you can connect with your subject librarian (p.s., the sooner the better!!)


SAVE THE DATE…

Reading Villanova: The Global and the Interdisciplinary ‘Diversity.’ Tuesday, December 1 at 4:30 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner. Camille Burge, PhD, assistant professor, Department of Political Science;Brighid Dwyer, PhD, director, Program on Intergroup Relations, Multicultural Affairs; Katina Sawyer, PhD, assistant professor, Department of Psychology will share their thoughts with us at this event, which is the final event in the Reading Villanova series. ACS Approved!


TERM PAPER MONTH IS UPON US

Is there a secret to developing a superior research paper? This video reveals the answer to that question:

For additional “How to” videos, click the “Help” button on Falvey’s homepage.


LIBRARIES GONE DIGITAL

Check out The Chronicle of Higher Education‘s video interview with Sari Feldman, president of the American Library Association, as she discusses library transformation  – a transformation that Feldman says is “so much about the people who work [at libraries] and the talent they bring to support student research, student researchers, and faculty researchers. The place, the actual library space, is undergoing a transformation because there’s so much more collaborative activity and making.”

Falvey west stacks

 


QUOTE OF THE DAY

Today in 1835, Mark Twain (aka Samuel Langhorne Clemens) was born. Twain, best known for Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, was a man of wit and, one could say, charm. Most of us have read at least one of his classics, but if you haven’t or you want to revisit them, check them out of our stacks today!

“I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.” – Mark Twain

mark twain

image via biography.com


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (10/7)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

SAVE THE DATE…

Cultural Studies Food Week–The Taste of Justice: Rhetoric and Reality. Monday-Friday, Oct. 26-30. In our annual speaker series, students will learn about the politics of food production and consumption as they relate to nutrition and other issues. Each evening’s event will include Q and A for students as well as tasty culinary treats.


Did you know—

Need a Quiet Place to Study? This short video provides a lighthearted look at a resource the Library takes seriously:
quiet study spaces.


NEW MEDIA NEWS

how to do chemical tricksHey, gang! Since you’ll have all kinds of time on your hands next week, why not try out some nifty chemistry projects? The Blue Electrode blog has just what you need! A book that Falvey recently contributed to Project Gutenberg, How To Do Chemical Tricks, is now available for your reading pleasure. It contains “some highly amusing and instructive tricks!” As noted in the review by resident blogger Demian Katz, “some of the experiments might still be fun to perform today (if you can figure out how to modernize the archaic terminology).”

 


READ LOCAL!

Ginger reading book

You’ve heard of eating local – how about reading local?  A handful of libraries are establishing programs of one kind or another to promote local authors to their local patrons. This is, of course, a really great help to burgeoning authors–but it also highlights the ways a public library can be part of a “literary ecosystem” for a particular community.

If you’re interested in the works and writings of people in our Villanova community, check out the Community Bibliography.


HHMPOSTPR PARAGUAY

ABRE LA PUERTA A HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH

It is Hispanic Heritage Month – a celebration that recognizes the contributions of Hispanic and Latino Americans to the United States. Technically a month that straddles two, HHM is celebrated each year between September 15 and October 15,and includes the anniversaries of the independence of five Latin American countries.

The term Hispanic or Latino refers to Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish cultures or origins regardless of race. According to the 2010 Census, 50.5 million Americans identify themselves as Latino or Hispanic, representing a 3% increase since 2000.

Each day this month we will reproduce one of twenty countries represented on a joint poster project sponsored by the library and the Office of Mission and Ministry. Each poster features QR codes linking to premier resources that the library has for researching Hispanic history, culture or language and more importantly, the names of the specialized subject librarians devoted to aspects of these studies. Contact Susan Ottignon (Romance Languages and Literature,) Jutta Seibert (History and Art History) or Merrill Stein (Geography and Political Science) for further research needs or assistance. Posters designed by library Communication team leader, Joanne Quinn, with the assistance of Ottignon and Stein. The library wishes to thank Christopher Janosik, PhD and the Office of Mission & Ministry for their support of this project.


BOOKTOBER – Meet the millennial Forsythe Pendleton Jones III!

1460728658481483042First of all, who’s willing to admit that they knew that was Jughead Jones’ real name? And sure, Archie may be listed first on the comic book marquee, but we all know Juggie is the real star of the show. Perennially cool under pressure – until something comes between him and a stack of cheeseburgers – Jug is always the aloof onlooker, the chill bystander as Arch makes a fool of himself fawning over Betty and/or Veronica. Well, now it’s official – Jughead’s causing a big wave in the comic book world by getting a modern makeover by Chip Zdarsky (Howard the Duck) and artist Erica Henderson (The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl). It comes out today, Riverdale!


QUOTE OF THE DAY
On this day in 2003, Arnold Schwarzenegger was elected governor of California. As most know, Schwarzenegger is a body builder gone action movie star, most well-known for his roles in The Terminator, Predator, and Conan the Barbarian. As most people may not know, Schwarzenegger lurks Reddit fitness threads and has a very cool habit of being a fitspiration for unsuspecting Redditors. Cool dude.

arnold s

“The mind is the limit. As long as the mind can envision the fact that you can do something, you can do it, as long as you really believe 100 percent.” – Arnold Schwarzenegger


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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Commemorating 150 years of the study of genetics: “Gregor Mendel, OSA, and the Origin of Genetics”

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“Gregor Mendel, OSA, and the Origin of Genetics,” an exhibit on Falvey’s first floor, introduces Mendel; commemorates the 150th anniversary of Mendel’s paper, “Experiments in Plant Hybridization” (Versuche Ʊber Pflanzenhybriden); looks at Mendel on campus; and offers a small display related to the Mendel Medal.

The name Mendel is familiar to the Villanova community as the name of a campus building, the Mendel Science Center, usually called Mendel Hall. But how many are aware of the man for whom the building is named? Gregor Mendel (1822-1884) is the acknowledged father of genetics based upon a paper he presented in 1865 and published the following year.

RS9958_DSC_0290-scrHe was born in the German-speaking Austrian Empire (now the Czech Republic) to a farming family. At age twenty one he joined the Augustinian Abbey of St. Thomas in BrƱnn to further his education. The abbot, who was interested in heredity of plants and animals, encouraged Mendel to experiment with plant genetics in the abbey’s five-acre garden. As noted he presented his research, but it was virtually ignored until 1900.

Falvey’s exhibit begins in the vertical case with an introduction to the exhibit and Mendel’s experimentation with plant hybridization using peas. A large eye-catching banner (from University Archives) with a life-like portrait of Gregor Mendel, OSA, commemorates the 80th anniversary of the Mendel Medal. Also in this case are a few books about Mendel and a small framed portrait.

Five more themed cases continue the exhibit, beginning with “Early Life” and ending with “The Mendel Medal.” Illustrating Mendel’s “Early Life” are a children’s book from Special Collections, Gregor Mendel: The Friar Who Grew Peas by Cheryl Bardol; Life of Mendel by Hugo Iltis (Augustinian Historical Institute); views of Brno (location of the Abbey of St. Thomas where Mendel lived and worked); views of the Mendel Museum and the foundations of his greenhouse at the Abbey; and select pages from a manuscript photograph album, The Mendel Tradition in Brno, Czechoslovakia by Herbert Christian Hanson.

The next case, “Versuche Ʊber Pflanzenhybriden (Experiments on Plant Hybridization),” shows a facsimile reprint of Mendel’s paper as it appeared in print in 1866, a program from the presentation of a copy of “Verhandlungen des naturforschenden Vereines in BrƱnn” by the Augustinians of the Province of St. Thomas of Villanova to the University and other related publications. To celebrate the 150th anniversary of Mendel’s paper, “Experiments in Plant Hybridization,” the University will hold a symposium on Monday, Dec. 7.

“After the Pea Paper” case displays assorted publications from the Augustinian Historical Institute and Special Collections, including Mendel’s Dwarf (1998), fiction by Simon Mawer. A placard tells the viewer that Mendel’s paper was almost unknown until the early 1900s.

“Mendel at Villanova” displays copies of the Villanovan with articles about the dedication of the first Mendel Hall in 1929 and the current Mendel Science Center in 1961. This display features photographs of the 1910 statue of Mendel in Brno and of the one on campus beside the Mendel Science Center.

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“The Mendel Medal: Honoring Pioneers in the Sciences” case presents photographs of some of the recipients, programs from the award ceremonies, a 1929 Villanovan article about the presentation of the first Mendel Medal to John A. Kolmer, MD, and an obverse image of the medal as designed and sculpted by John R. Sinnock.

The Mendel Medal, named in honor of Gregor Mendel (1822-1884), OSA, “the father of modern genetics,” is now awarded annually to an outstanding scientist. The award was established in 1928 and given each year until 1943. From 1946 until 1968, the Mendel Medal was awarded only eight times and from 1968 until 1992 there were no awards. In 1992 the Mendel Medal award was reestablished and has been given each year to an outstanding scientist.

This year’s Mendel Medal recipient is the Nobel Prize-winning biochemist, Brian Kobilka, MD, of Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Kobilka will give the 2015 Mendel Medal Lecture at 2:00 p.m., October 2, in the Villanova Room, Connelly Center.

This very educational exhibit about Gregor Mendel, OSA, his important scientific discovery and his relationship with Villanova is well worth visiting several times; there is far more here than can be readily absorbed in just one visit. This exhibit is a collaborative effort, drawing from materials owned by University Archives, Falvey’s Special Collections and the Augustinian Historical Institute. It was planned and materials were curated by Special Collections and Digital Library Coordinator, Michael Foight and Digital & Special Collections Curatorial Assistant Laura Bang. Graphics were designed by Joanne Quinn, Falvey’s graphic designer. The exhibit will be open throughout this semester.

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Alice Bampton is a visual specialist and senior writer on the Communication and Publications Team.


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Last Modified: October 5, 2015