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Summer Research: Irish Nurses of 1916

Yesterday, we had a visit from an international researcher who was excited to go through our Joseph McGarrity Collection. He was looking for materials related to Irish nurses who participated in the Easter Rising of 1916.

One of the items in the collection is In Times of Peril, which contains excerpts from the diary of nurse Linda Kearns.

Cover of In Times of Peril, featuring a photo of Linda Kearns

Our copy is especially noteworthy as it belonged to Éamon de Valera (to whom the book was dedicated) and bears his signature on the title page. De Valera served as the first president of the Irish Republic (1921-1922) and the third president of the modern Republic of Ireland (1959-1973).

Signature of Eamon de Valera on title page of In Times of Peril.

An excerpt from Kearns’ diary is one of the readings featured in the fifth episode of our Mail Call podcast.

Our researcher had a very productive visit. It is always thrilling to see researchers examining primary sources and bringing new connections to light. You can view a list of published resources that have used materials from our collections in our Zotero library.


Congratulations to Falvey Scholars!

Congratulations to the following Falvey Scholars chosen from among several worthy College of Nursing candidates!  And congratulations to their faculty mentors!

Katie Kline on “What to Know About Home Genetic-Test Kits.” Mentor: Dr. Theresa Capriotti, DO, MSN, RN, CRNP

Katie investigated the growing use of these kits, which can be purchased at local pharmacies as well as online.  The producers of the kits claim that by sending them a DNA sample (taken from saliva or the inside of the cheek) individuals can receive a report on ancestry/paternity, drug reactions, and susceptibility to genetic diseases. However, the results raise more questions than they answer, and the reliability and confidentiality of the testing are also in doubt.

Elizabeth Long on “Nurses’ Perceptions of Human Trafficking in an Urban Emergency Department: A Qualitative Study.” Mentor: Dr. Elizabeth B. Dowdell, RN, PhD, FAAN

Elizabeth interviewed a small sample of ED nurses at a major teaching hospital in Philadelphia to find out their perceptions of patients who present with injuries and who may possibly be victims of domestic violence or human trafficking.  She found that while ED nurses are very aware of the existence of human trafficking in the region, most do not recognize trafficked patients as such when they come for emergency treatment.


Best wishes to our CON students who will be taking exams soon, and congrats to our soon-to-be graduates!

Need research assistance for yourself or a student?  Contact me.


Info to Go

Need research assistance stat? Look for the crash cart staffed by Robin or Barbara on Tuesdays and Thursdays at varying locations in Driscoll Hall.

Ask us anything. Seriously. We can get you stats, pertinent journal articles for a paper, or just help you find the odd fact from a reputable source.

Research life support is our specialty!

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Designer data sets at bargain prices

OK, soon there will be no more excuses.  Classes and exams will be over, grades handed in.  Summer break is a great time to explore the wonderful world of health data sets available to you for FREE (beat that price if you can!) from ICPSR, the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research.  Here are just a few of the data collections available in the area of the health sciences.

How could you use some of these data sets for your research?  For projects for your classes?

Health and Medical Care Archive (HMCA) – preserves and disseminates data collected by research projects funded by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the nation’s largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to improving the health and health care of all Americans.

Integrated Fertility Survey Series (IFSS) – offers data and tools for examining issues related to families and fertility in the United States spanning five decades. IFSS encompasses the Growth of American Families (GAF), National Fertility Surveys (NFS), and National Surveys of Family Growth (NSFG), as well as a single dataset of harmonized variables across all ten surveys. Analytic tools make it possible to quickly and easily explore the data and obtain information about changes in behaviors and attitudes across time.

National Addiction & HIV Data Archive Program – NAHDAP acquires, preserves and disseminates data relevant to drug addiction and HIV research. By preserving and making available an easily accessible library of electronic data on drug addiction and HIV infection in the United States, NAHDAP offers scholars the opportunity to conduct secondary analysis on major issues of social and behavioral sciences and public policy.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive (SAMHDA) –  provides public data access and online analysis for important substance abuse and mental health data collections. The project offers variable-level searching, an archive of survey instruments, related literature for data collections, a listserv, disclosure analysis, and traditional data products. SAMHDA was established at ICPSR in 1995 by the Office of Applied Studies (OAS), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

To access ICPSR, start at the library homepage

  • Click Databases A-Z
  • Choose ICPSR
  • Log in with your LDAP ID and password

Questions? Need help? Contact Barbara



Write Better By Talking

Write Better By Talking

by Gina Hiatt, PhD

(via http://www.academicladder.com/)

We Write Alone

Writing is a solitary process. It must be. You’re writing your own ideas. Yes, you are in “conversation” with other scholars, but your writing is your individual contribution to that conversation.

But writing can be very isolating, can’t it? If writing is your primary activity, your days can be pretty lonely. If you are squeezing your writing into a busy day, the solitude can be a relief, but it is still you, writing silently.

IdeasWe urge you to speak up! At some time (usually multiple times!) in every writing project, you need to find a person and actually speak.

Why Should You Talk?

You think while you talk. How often do you say to a friend or family member, “Can I talk this over?” or “Would you like to talk about it?” or “I was saying to our friend….” You do think through your ideas using speech.

But the unwritten rules in academia are “Don’t admit that you’re unsure,” or “Don’t let anyone know what you’re thinking.”

It’s time to contradict those messages! We’re all unsure at some point in our writing! There’s no shame in sharing your partially-formed ideas!

When you speak, you have to make sense. You can hear your unclear places much better when you actually use your voice. That’s the reason that writing experts recommend reading your written work out loud: what makes sense to your eye does not necessarily make sense to your ear.

Talking with someone else also reduces the isolation we can experience. As important as solitude is, and as valuable as written exchanges between scholars are, spoken interaction is one of the best tools in your writing kit.

When Should you Talk?

Talking with another person is a big, scary step, but it pays big dividends. Some strategic points in your writing process that call for conversation are:

  • You are excited about a new idea and thinking through its potential
  • You are stuck in your project and can’t quite work out how to frame a key argument
  • You are debating between two organizational structures
  • You are shifting gears, such as moving to revision
  • The writing will be presented orally, as at a conference or in an interview
  • You are just plain stuck and feel hopeless
Who Should You Talk With?

The best person to talk with depends on the stage of your project. For example:

If……… Find someone who is ……..
You are just starting out, with free writing or a Zero Draft (not even a first draft) …a friend and very gentle and will listen to you charitably as you fumble around
You are figuring out whether you are finished, or whether you need to back to more research …a fellow writer and would know what questions to ask you
You are checking that your major argument fits well in the literature of your discipline …even more well established than you: a mentor or senior colleague
You are framing your focus statement, or the “elevator speech” you use to answer the question, “and what are YOU working on?” …a good listener who loves you. A mom can do it, a spouse if not too busy, and a precocious nine-year old is perfect.
You are almost ready to rehearse your conference or interview presentation …as above. These wonderful folks love graphics too!

What Should You Talk About?

Framing a conversation about your work maximizes its value for you, and also maximizes your chances to ask again. Here are some phrases to employ:

  • Could I talk over my ideas for this project with you?
  • I’d like you to listen and take notes, and then tell me what you heard me saying.
  • If you don’t understand something, would you stop me so I can clarify?
  • These are my goals. After you listen, could you tell me whether you think I met them?
  • I want to talk about this challenge with you. Can I think out loud about the pros and cons?
  • My feelings say this is hopeless, but I believe it is actually feasible. Could you convince me that my feelings are wrong?
  • I will buy the coffee.

It’s time to talk!




Boice, Robert. (2000). Advice for new faculty members: Nihil nimus. Needham Heights MA: Allyn and Bacon.

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Updates: PubMed and EndNote with APA 6th

Introducing PubMed’s Sleek New Interface

PubMed, the National Library of Medicine’s premier database for biomedical information, has unveiled a new search interface.


Although PubMed searching is free to the public, Villanova University users should always access the database by starting at the Falvey homepage, clicking Databases A-Z and then choosing PubMed. This will allow you to link to full text articles included in the library’s online journal subscriptions.

The following YouTube videos will introduce you to PubMed’s new look and  help you locate some of your old favorite search features.

Where did they move my cheese? Comparison of old and new PubMed homepages
(U. of Manitoba)

Saving records from PubMed and importing them into EndNote
(HINT: It changed a bit.)

The new Advanced Search, Part 1
(Health Sciences, U. of California, Davis)

More video guides to the new PubMed interface from UC Davis:


Latest EndNote Release Now Includes APA 6th Output Style

EndNote recently released version X3.0.1 for Windows, incorporating the APA 6th into its output styles. If you already have version X3 installed on your PC or laptop, you can download the update by clicking Start –> Programs –> EndNote –> Update EndNote.


If you do not have EndNote for Windows or if you have version X2 or older, you may take advantage of the free update available on the Falvey website. When on campus, download version X3.0.1 from https://library.villanova.edu/Help/FAQs/EndNote
NOTE: Download will work on campus only! If you wish to install the program on an off campus computer, please borrow the CD available at the Falvey front desk.

Version X3 for Mac is also available at https://library.villanova.edu/Help/FAQs/EndNote or on CD at Falvey front desk.

Need assistance finding information? Contact
Barbara Quintiliano (X95207) barbara.quintiliano@villanova.edu or
Robin Bowles (X8129) robin.bowles@villanova.edu

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New for consulting: Sage Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research Methods

Qualitative methods of research are essential to nursing research. Often denigrated as inferior to quantitative research, qualitative research methods answer “the why questions that researchers have in mind when they develop their projects.”

encyc_qualitative_research_methodsBecome better acquainted with the elements of qualitative research by browsing the Sage Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research Methods, now available online along with  over 200  other specialized and authoritative encyclopedias produced by Sage Publishers.

As an added bonus, the Sage e-reference collection offers a citation tool allowing you to cite encyclopedia articles in correct APA style. Other useful features are the numerous active hyperlinks to supplemental readings, as well as the capability to send articles by   e-mail.

The Sage encyclopedias are accessible via the Library’s subject guides (nursing, medical and health sciences, psychology), the E-Reference Resources list and the online catalog.)

Here are other titles in the Sage collection that you will find invaluable for nursing:



Last Modified: May 12, 2009