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Falvey Fridays: Virtual Workshop Series

Falvey Memorial Library is pleased to announce “Falvey Fridays,” a workshop series drawn from our popular brown bag lunch sessions. Each workshop will provide new and exciting information on research methods, tools, and pedagogies for researchers of all levels. Registration is free and open to the Villanova community.

Please register for workshop sessions below. Once registered, you will be sent a Zoom link to the event.

Tabula: Extracting Tables from PDFs (Friday, March 26; 11 a.m.–12 p.m.)

Workshop led by Erica Hayes, Digital Scholarship Librarian.

If you’ve ever tried to do anything with data provided to you in PDFs, you know there’s no easy way to copy-and-paste rows of data from tables out of PDF files. Come learn more about Tabula, an open source tool for extracting data tables locked inside PDFs and how to import that data easily into a CSV or Microsoft Excel spreadsheet.

Please REGISTER at the following link:

https://villanova.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEld-6qqT0jGtf_gLlSDe1fstCDdj2cNA-

Citation Management using Zotero (Friday, April 9; 11 a.m.–12 p.m.)

Workshop led by Sarah Hughes, Nursing & Life Sciences Librarian.

Serious research projects call for no-nonsense tools for taming citations. Learn how to use Zotero to save, organize, and share references.

Please REGISTER at the following link:

https://villanova.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJ0ud-qurTgqE9eNmezaCgojaU2-bjBTCpD-

Policy Map/Social Explorer (Friday, April 23; 11 a.m.–12 p.m.)

Workshop led by Deborah Bishov, Social Sciences & Instructional Design Librarian and Merrill Stein, Social Sciences Librarian.

Explore features of two easy-to-use, online demographic data mapping tools which draw on a combination of governmental, proprietary and open resources.  Map data of interest and export and save visualizations for research or teaching. Knowledge of GIS (geographical information systems) is not required.

Please REGISTER at the following link:

https://villanova.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEscOGtqTwuGN1SqGzFYONpmNA65dIQ5H_h


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Researcher’s Toolbox: Newspapers and Magazines

Newspapers and magazines are widely used to gauge public attitudes and awareness. These workshops will take a close look at the discovery of national and international news publications. They will cover daily news as well as magazines and newspapers aimed at specific interest groups. Mundane but critical tasks such as locating a cited source, determining the availability of news sources in the local collection, and citing news sources will be addressed as well. Special attention will be paid to digital archives and some of the challenges and opportunities they present.

Join Jutta Seibert, history librarian, for two workshops on newspapers and magazines: Friday, Feb. 12, at 3 p.m. and Wednesday, March 24, at 4 p.m. Both 60-minute workshops are ACS approved.

Please REGISTER HERE for the Feb. 12 workshop. Once registered, you will be sent a link to this event.

Please REGISTER HERE for the March 24 workshop. Once registered, you will be sent a link to this event.


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Falvey Fridays: Workshop Series

Falvey Memorial Library is pleased to announce “Falvey Fridays,” a workshop series drawn from our popular brown bag lunch sessions. Each workshop will provide new and exciting information on research methods, tools, and pedagogies for researchers of all levels. Registration is free and open to the Villanova community.

Please register for workshop sessions below. Once registered, you will be sent a Zoom link to the event.

Reusing Responsibly: Copyright Basics (Friday, Feb. 12; 11 a.m.–12 p.m.)

Workshop led by Sarah Wipperman, Scholarly Communications Librarian.

We create and interact with copyrighted material every day, whether it’s sending an email, replying to a tweet, writing a book, or making a podcast. This presentation will give you the tools you need to better understand what gets copyright and how to reuse copyrighted content responsibly.

Please REGISTER at the following link:

https://villanova.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJctceGvrD0rHtxsV_U_88w-IfV33Ui-T6WE

Bringing Historical Maps into GIS (Friday, Feb. 26; 11 a.m.–12 p.m.)

Workshop led by Erica Hayes, Digital Scholarship Librarian.

Georeferencing is the process of connecting images (e.g. aerial photographs, scanned historical maps, satellite images) to their geographic locations, so that they can be used as spatial layers in GIS software. Using tools like Map Warper and ArcGIS Online, this workshop will provide participants with the steps to align geographic coordinates to a digitized historical map and display them online in order to examine how locations have changed over time.

Please REGISTER at the following link:

https://villanova.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMvcu6qpzwsHNC-PS8AvZfHFufmAel6O5JC

Understanding and Negotiating Publisher Contracts: What to Look for Before You Sign (Friday, March 12; 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m.)

Workshop led by Sarah Wipperman, Scholarly Communication Librarian.

You wrote an article, and it was accepted! The publisher sends you a publishing agreement to sign, but what does that agreement actually say? What rights are you giving away, and what rights do you retain? Can you post your article to your website? Can you use it in the classroom? Can you send it to colleagues? This workshop will look at a variety of agreements across different disciplines; give you tools to understand general journal policies on when and how you can post articles; show you ways that you can negotiate with publishers to retain more rights to your work; and discuss ways that you can share your work more widely.

Please REGISTER at the following link:

https://villanova.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJApduGhrzMuGdOmjWMu0Bc0A8jU5QNQgvwt

Tabula: Extracting Tables from PDFs (Friday, March 26; 11 a.m.–12 p.m.)

Workshop led by Erica Hayes, Digital Scholarship Librarian.

If you’ve ever tried to do anything with data provided to you in PDFs, you know there’s no easy way to copy-and-paste rows of data from tables out of PDF files. Come learn more about Tabula, an open source tool for extracting data tables locked inside PDFs and how to import that data easily into a CSV or Microsoft Excel spreadsheet.

Please REGISTER at the following link:

https://villanova.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEld-6qqT0jGtf_gLlSDe1fstCDdj2cNA-

Citation Management using Zotero (Friday, April 9; 11 a.m.–12 p.m.)

Workshop led by Sarah Hughes, Nursing & Life Sciences Librarian.

Serious research projects call for no-nonsense tools for taming citations. Learn how to use Zotero to save, organize, and share references.

Please REGISTER at the following link:

https://villanova.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJ0ud-qurTgqE9eNmezaCgojaU2-bjBTCpD-

Policy Map/Social Explorer (Friday, April 23; 11 a.m.–12 p.m.)

Workshop led by Deborah Bishov, Social Sciences & Instructional Design Librarian and Merrill Stein, Social Sciences Librarian.

Explore features of two easy-to-use, online demographic data mapping tools which draw on a combination of governmental, proprietary and open resources.  Map data of interest and export and save visualizations for research or teaching. Knowledge of GIS (geographical information systems) is not required.

Please REGISTER at the following link:

https://villanova.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEscOGtqTwuGN1SqGzFYONpmNA65dIQ5H_h


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Revitalize Your Research at the 2020 Falvey Forum

Revitalize your research at the first Falvey Forum—Drawn from Falvey Library’s brown bag lunch workshops, this two-day, six-session virtual event will provide new and exciting information on research methods, tools, and pedagogies for researchers of all levels. Register for one or multiple sessions (outlined below) on Wednesday, Oct. 21, and Thursday, Oct. 22, from 11 a.m.—3 p.m.

“Falvey Forum 2020 represents the best of our research workshops (which can be requested on demand by faculty and departments) rolled into two fun and interesting days. This is an exciting opportunity for Villanova students, faculty and staff as well as members of the general public to deepen their understanding of great academic tools and discover new techniques to meet their research goals,” Rob LeBlanc, First-Year Experience Librarian.

The conference is free and open to Villanova faculty, students, staff, and community members. Visit the Falvey Forum homepage for more details and to register for sessions: https://library.villanova.edu/research/teaching-and-learning/workshops/falveyforum-2020

Conference Workshops

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 21

Citation Wrangling—Presenter: Sarah Hughes (11 a.m.—12 p.m.)

Serious research projects call for no-nonsense tools for taming citations. Learn how to use Zotero to save, organize, and share references.

Data Visualization with Tableau—Presenter: Erica Hayes (12:15 p.m.—1:30 p.m.)

This session will provide a gentle introduction to how to use Tableau Desktop Public, a free software that allows individuals to publish interactive data visualizations and graphs on the web.

Copyright and Publishing 101 — Presenter: Sarah Wipperman (1:45—3:00)       

Academia is full of copyright and publishing questions that are often difficult to answer: Can I use this image in my work? What can I do with my work once it’s published? What does that agreement I signed actually say? Can I post my work on a certain website?

THURSDAY, OCT. 22

Beyond the Archive—Presenter: Beaudry Allen (11 a.m.—12:00 p.m.)

The archive is not a passive, neutral institution, but an active ever-evolving site where social power and memory is negotiated, challenged, and confirmed. This session will explore the history of diversity and social justice on Villanova’s campus through material from the University Archives and illustrate how archival practices and bias shape memory.  It’s is also an opportunity to learn how to do research in an archive.

Storytelling and GIS—Presenter: Erica Hayes (12:15 p.m.—1:30 p.m.)

While maps have been around for centuries, the digital age has given them new meaning. GIS software offers users the potential to visualize, analyze, and tell spatial stories. In this session, you will learn more about ArcGIS Online and Esri Story Maps, a web mapping application that allows you to combine GIS maps, text, images, and video to tell your own geographic story.

Sharing Your Work: Academic Social Networking Sites and Beyond—Presenters: Sarah Wipperman and Dr. Janice Bially Mattern (1:45—3 p.m.)     

Social media sites like Twitter and other online platforms make sharing your work, networking, and raising your visibility easier than ever. But which sites and platforms are most effective? Is it worth the effort? Where should you start? Join Scholarly Communications Librarian, Sarah Wipperman, and Director of Villanova Institute for Research and Scholarship, Dr. Janice Bially Mattern, to learn the techniques and social norms of using these platforms to increase your visibility.

Questions? Contact Rob LeBlanc, First-Year Experience Librarian.

 


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Dig Deeper: How Did Labor Day Begin and Evolve?

Just as Memorial Day marks the unofficial beginning of summer, Labor Day marks its end. Now widely celebrated with picnics and trips to the shore or to the shopping mall, much of the holiday’s original meaning has been forgotten as well as, like Memorial Day, the date on which it was originally celebrated.

The first official Labor Day celebration occurred on a Tuesday; Labor Day is now commemorated on the first Monday of September. On that Tuesday, Sept. 5, 1882, the Central Labor Union (CLU), a New York City area local labor union organized in January 1882, held the first Labor Day parade. The parade began inauspiciously: there were numerous spectators, but only a few marchers and no band. These few were soon joined by 200 members of the Jewelers Union and their band. Next to join were a group of bricklayers and their band. Spectators joined the parade as did another 500 union men. By the end, there were at least 10,000 people, both men and women, marching. Some workmen marched in their traditional work clothes; others wore their best dress garments. Many carried signs such as “Strike with the Ballot,” “Eight Hours for a Legal Day’s Work” (the typical work day was much longer), “Less Work and More Pay,” and “Labor Built This Republic, Labor Shall Rule It.”

a postcard of the first Labor Day parade

A postcard of the first Labor Day parade

The parade ended at Reservoir Park at noon. From there most of the participants went to Wendels’ Elm Park, New York’s largest park at that time, at 92nd Street and 9th Avenue. There, together with their families, union members who had not marched in the parade and others, they enjoyed a picnic, abundant beer and cigars, and speeches by union leaders. This first Labor Day celebrated American workers and their contributions to the prosperity of the United States with a parade and picnic, setting a pattern for those that followed.

The next year, the Central Labor Union held a second Labor Day celebration; this was even larger than the first one. The following year, 1884, the CLU declared the first Monday of September as the official annual Labor Day. That year over 20,000 workers marched. By 1886 Labor Day was celebrated throughout the United States. The following year five states – Oregon, New York, Colorado, Massachusetts, and New Jersey – made Labor Day a state holiday. In 1894, during Grover Cleveland’s presidency, Senator James Henderson Kyle of South Dakota introduced a bill to make the first Monday of September, Labor Day, a legal holiday; the bill passed on June 28. The CLU originally selected a date in September to create a holiday in the long period between July 4 and Thanksgiving.

In 1968, the Senate and House of Representatives passed Public Law 90-363, the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, which listed legal public holidays: New Year’s Day, January 1; Washington’s Birthday (now Presidents’ Day), the third Monday in February; Memorial Day, the last Monday in May; Independence Day, July 4; Labor Day, the first Monday in September; Columbus Day, the second Monday in October; Veterans Day, the fourth Monday in October; Thanksgiving Day, the fourth Thursday in November and Christmas Day, December 25. The law took effect on January 1, 1971.

The Congressional Record of May 6, 1968 explains that the law was established to benefit families: to provide three-day holidays so that families could get together, to allow more leisure time to participate in hobbies, educational and cultural activities; and to “improve commercial and industrial production by minimizing midweek holiday interruptions of production schedules and reducing employee absenteeism before and after midweek holidays.” Both labor and management supported the bill, but its passage meant that those who worked in retail businesses would not receive the holiday.

Labor Day today is mostly celebrated with travel, picnics, the beginning of football season and retailers’ Labor Day sales. However, some churches hold Labor Day services with Blessings of Tools. The tools may be anything used as part of a trade or business, even pencils and keyboards.  So while we have strayed far from the original purpose of Labor Day, vestiges of its history still remain in some of the day’s observances. How will you celebrate the holiday?


Dig Deeper:

All Around the Year: Holidays and Celebrations in American Life (1994). Jack Santino.

Red, White, and Blue Letter Days (2002). Matthew Dennis.

America’s Labor Day: The Dilemma of a Workers’ Celebration.” Michael Kazin and Stephen J. Ross. Journal of American History 78, 4, (March 1992), 1294.

History of Labor Day.” United States Department of Labor.

Labor Day.” Scott Hearn. The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia.


Article by Alice Bampton, Communication and Marketing Department, Falvey Memorial Library. 

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"Very Short Introductions": Concise Information, Perfect for the Train Ride Home

 

This time of year, every minute counts – especially with finals less than two weeks after we return from Thanksgiving holiday – hashtag: for real, dude! Fortunately, the Library has resources designed to pack a lot of information into a little bit of time. So instead of perusing Buzzfeed on the train ride home, buzz through one or two Very Short Introductions to get a head start on crunch time!GIRL TRAIN tr

Sometimes we need background information for a speech or project. Maybe we need to become familiar with a subject before seeking in-depth, scholarly information. Sometimes, we just need a very short introduction. That’s where Oxford University Press’ “Very Short Introductions,” published since 1995, can help. Over 200 of these concise, pithy “pocket-portable introductory lectures” (Guardian Review) covering such topics as archaeology, arts & architecture, biography, business & management, economics & finance history, language & linguistics, law, literature, mathematics & sciences, medicine & health, music, sociology, philosophy, politics, psychology & neuroscience, religion & bibles and the social sciences can be found at Falvey.

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Noted authors in many fields have contributed to these short successful volumes about the world. This series has spawned literary events and lectures on both sides of the Atlantic. So, are you game? Just seeking leadership, or logic? Seeking the more spiritual leadership? Try short introductions to the New TestamentAugustine, or IslamKant, you say? We’ve got that too. Everything from the mystical to the mind bending, consciousness to Christian ethics, from American politics to chaos theory, from relativity to Tocqueville. And we’d bet nine of out ten of you would want to shorten statistics!

However, as a prominent reviewer described one of the series titles “The brevity of this volume is both its strength and its weakness.” Judge for yourself. Find out more about “Very Short Introductions” (VSI) at You Tube. Or learn more from one of the VSI study guides at Oxford University Press.  Better yet, check one out at Falvey.

Updates

The latest editions in our collection are below with attached author biographical information. You’ll find links to our catalog listings. Click the authors’ names to find their other (longer) publications. Author specifics prove that although the introductions are short, the scholarship and authority behind them is not.

American Political History by Donald T. Critchlow (more on Critchlow)

Love by Ronald De Sousa (more on De Sousa)

Ritual by Barry Stephenson (more on Stephenson)

Exploration by Stewart Angas Weaver (more on Weaver)

The United Nations by Jussi M. Hanhimèaki (more on Hanhimèaki)

Ancient Assyria by Karen Radner (more on Radner)

Privacy by Raymond Wacks (more on Wacks)

Liberalism by Michael Freeden (more on Freeden)

The American Revolution by Robert J. Allison (more on Allison)

Myth by Robert Alan Segal (more on Segal)


SteinMerrill Stein is team leader of the Assessment team and liaison to the Department of Political Science.

 

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Celebrating the Glorious Fourth

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The United States celebrates its independence from Great Britain on the 4th of July, the day in 1776 on which the delegates to the Continental Congress ratified the Declaration of Independence.JUTTA-BB

We know from an article which appeared in The Pennsylvania Evening Post on July 5, 1777, that the first Independence Day anniversary was celebrated with the discharge of thirteen cannons in the port of Philadelphia in honor of the original thirteen states. The ships were decorated in red, white and blue streamers. Congress gathered for an elegant dinner to which the president and numerous other guests of honor were invited.

A captured band of Hessian musicians played suitable tunes interrupted by repeated toasts. Bonfires and fireworks lit up the evening sky, and the peals of bells closed out the day.

Not much has changed since then. Food, fireworks, parades and the national colors are still at the center of today’s celebrations, and the Glorious Fourth continues to capture the national imagination. The Library has a wealth of information in both print and electronic form for those who would like to learn more about the history of the Declaration of Independence.

On our shelves:

Andrew Burnstein’s America’s Jubilee takes a critical look at the fifty year anniversary of independence in 1826, which also happens to be the day on which two of the Declaration’s signers, frenemies John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, died. William Hogeland takes a close look at the nine weeks leading up to July 4, 1776, in his Declaration, and Alan Dershowitz follows the sources which influenced Jefferson’s text in America Declares Independence.

David Armitage’s The Declaration of Independence: A Global History delineates the impact of the U.S. Declaration as it resonated around the world. Armitage looks at over one hundred declarations of independence to demonstrate the global influence of the U.S. Declaration, and Alexander Tsesis’ For Liberty and Equality synthesizes the continuing impact of the Declaration on American life.

Online:

Noteworthy among Falvey’s digital primary-source collections are the American Founding Era collection which contains the papers of George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James and Dolley Madison, and Alexander Hamilton; the American State Papers with the executive and legislative documents of the first fourteen U.S. Congresses; and America’s Historical Newspapers, which includes early American newspapers back to 1690.

Happy Independence Day from the staff at Falvey Memorial Library!


Jutta 60x80Jutta Seibert is the director of Academic Integration and the history librarian. Her contact information: Jutta.Seibert@villanova.edu, office-room 228, telephone 610-519-7876.

 


We are committed to accuracy and will make appropriate corrections. We apologize for any errors and always welcome input about news coverage that warrants correction. Messages can be e-mailed to alice.bampton@villanova.edu or call (610)519-6997.


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Today’s database: a powerful tool for research on MLK and African American and African History and Culture

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Falvey Memorial Library is fortunate to be able to provide access to hundreds of instructional databases for the Villanova Community. While the choices may be vast, each searchable collection presents a unique treasure trove of information. Today, in commemoration of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, we’d like to direct your attention to a uniquely browsable resource, the Oxford African American Studies Center. Touted as “the online authority on the African American Experience,” the Oxford AASC provides a wide array of primary source documents, educational resources and articles, and multimedia.

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The database provides students, scholars and librarians with online access to the finest reference resources in African American studies. At its core, AASC features the new Encyclopedia of African American History: 1619-1895, Black Women in America, the highly acclaimed Africana, a five-volume history of the African and African American experience, and the African American National Biography project (estimated at 8 volumes). In addition to these major reference works, AASC offers other key resources from Oxford’s reference program, including the Concise Oxford Companion to African American Literature and selected articles from other reference works.

Feel free to contact a librarian if you’d like further help exploring and utilizing any of Falvey Memorial Library’s databases.



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Bill Greene talks Triceratops, Sci Fi, and 40+ Years at Falvey

Today is a special day at  Falvey Memorial Library as we celebrate the retirement of staff member Bill Greene. Bill’s varied spectrum of interests and skills makes him one awesomely multifaceted person! We are rerunning a ‘Monday Mood Board’ blog post from 2015 to commemorate the day. Read on to learn more about Bill, dinosaurs, science fiction, and to follow some links to great books and resources.


BILL MOODBOARD

Hi, Bill! So I saw on Facebook that you had a major work anniversary recently. How many years have you been here now?

40. It’s hard to believe, isn’t it?

What is your earliest Falvey memory?

Actually, it wasn’t much of a memory, but it was my first day here. I was a student. Way back—I can tell you the date! I was a student. I knew it was gonna be a life-changing thing, y’know. The date was May 7, 1968. It was a Wednesday, and I was working in acquisitions. I was working with books in print. I was checking the orders to make sure they were correct. The whole first day was really strange, because the previous day, I had known nothing about working in a library. But then my mother said to me “[one of our neighbors] called, and she wanted to know if you’d like to work at Villanova’s library. “ So I said, “Yeah, why not?” I just could’ve said, you know, “Nah, forget it, I don’t wanna do that” and that would’ve totally changed my life. But I said yes. Next day, I was in there, that quick. It just grew from there, it wasn’t planned.

And forty years later, look at you!

Yeah, still here!

What are the first three words that come to mind when you think of Falvey Memorial Library?

Fun. Novel.* People.

*”I was considering, I still am, writing a novel with this place as the background. With so many experiences, I have plenty to pick from.”

Read any periodicals, magazines, journals?

I read Discover Magazine, because mainly, it’s science, which I am interested in. It’s science, but they write it so I can understand it. Once in a while I read Scientific American… and I wonder, why did I bother reading this? I didn’t get anything out of it. They’re too technical, I think, in some cases. Discover is a good magazine, especially if you find an article on something you care about.

Smithsonian-Triceratops-skull-cast-0002a

via Wikimedia Commons

What’s your favorite dinosaur?

My favorite dinosaur is Triceratops. Do you have any idea what Triceratops looks like?

 I do!

Very good! I figured you would. He’s one of the more common ones, the three horn face, that’s what it stands for in Latin, I guess. I couldn’t tell you why I like him. My favorite dinosaur is not Tyrannosaurus Rex because that’s who everybody’s favorite dinosaur is. [Triceratops] is always defending himself against Tyrannosaurus Rex, supposedly.

I can’t even pronounce my favorite.

Yeah, what is it?

 I think it’s… Parasaurolophus?

Parasaurolophus, you like him? He’s cool! Thinking about this question [of my favorite dinosaur], he came up. Parasaurolophus is the one with the horn. He’s the one they’re thinking, recently, in the past five years or so, they’re figuring, the reason for the horn? All of the duck-billed dinosaurs, which she is one of, went around making noises and the different noises they made could tell each one what individual was from his group, what species it was from. The air went through the horn, and made all kinds of honking noises.

That would be so neat to hear!

Wouldn’t it? A herd of ‘em?

Kubla_Khan_titlepage

via Wikimedia Commons

Current favorite poet? Any poet you’ve read, new or old, that makes you think “yeah, them!”

One that pops to mind is Coleridge. “Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” “Kubla Khan.” When I was reading him, he hit me right away.

What is your information routine? How do you get news and info?

Most of my news I probably get from TV. I don’t get any papers, because they all come to the library. I don’t have time from it, for one thing. Yeah, the news. Channel 6 is what I usually have on.

Do you visit any websites on a regular basis?

Amazon. Goodreads.

What are you going to do after this interview?

Probably going to continue work. A lot of the things I do, I have to wait for someone to bring it to me, like the mail, and the stuff from UPS, and the stuff that’s over in Garey waiting to come over to be scanned. But chances are pretty good that I’ll probably go down and start scanning stuff. Lot of books to scan, articles.

Can I mention something you haven’t asked me? I’m a big science fiction person.

Great! When did you discover you love science fiction?

I was around 12, give or take a year. I think the first book I read was R is for Rocket by Ray Bradbury, short story collection. And I read the whole book, and I kept thinking – this is just my state of mind at the time, you know, I’m 11 or 12 – I’m thinking, “gee, these are good stories, he writes them so well and they’re good, but they all end badly! I don’t like that, they all end badly!” And now I’m coming from a different perspective, being as old as I am; they do end badly, but you know, they’re really cool stories. I wish I had written them. It doesn’t bother me quite as much, and I can see why he did it the way he did it. ‘Cause it would’ve been a stupid story if it didn’t have a bad ending.

What is your favorite Bradbury work?

Fahrenheit 451, of course.

Any other favorite science fiction authors besides Bradbury?

Alfred BesterTheodore Sturgeon. Any of the best [science fiction] novels are written back in the fifties, I think, because now science fiction just can be anything. How do you define science fiction anymore? There is a definition for it, but a lot of the science fiction today is really on the edge. There’s no science in it! So what if it takes place on Mars? There’s no science in it.

I just read a book called The Book of Strange New Things by Michel Faber. The thing that makes it different is it’s a combination of science fiction and romance, and I’m thinking, I can’t think of any books, good books, like that. I would highly recommend it.

Thanks for chatting with me, Bill!


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.

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The 8:30 | STAR WARS edition (12/11)

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Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

JEDITIPS HEAD

Help out your memory with sensory mnemonics: Chew gum while you study and chew the same flavor during the test. Study in the desk you will take the test in. Use the same color pen on the test that you use to study and practice with.”

Jedi Master Chris Hallberg
Technology Development Team


TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

Stress Free Happy Healthy Hours. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. in room 205 of Falvey Memorial Library. Take a break from studying and enjoy a variety of stress-relieving activities. Each hour will feature a different activity, including coloring books for grown-ups, making your own stress balls, board games and puzzles, a combined yoga mindfulness session, and, of course, plenty of snacks and drinks. Comfort Caring Canines will also be here with therapy dogs from 12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Extended Hours

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To provide students with additional late night study facilities, the main Library will have extended hours beginning Monday, Dec. 7th. We’ll be open most nights until 3:00 a.m.

As always, you can use your Wildcard to swipe into the 24/7 lounge, Falvey Hall lounge and Reading Room after hours. Take advantage of our cozy and inspirational spaces for quiet study. Check the Hours link on the library homepage for a full listing of extended hours.

From everyone at Falvey, good luck on your papers and final exams!


 

QUOTE OF THE DAY

Today is International Mountain Day, and it couldn’t have come at  a better time – I’ll bet it feels like you’re climbing mountains today! This international holiday was established in 2003 by the U.N. General Assembly to promote recognition of mountains and their contribution and importance to life, and to encourage positive ecological steps in mountain regions. Check out our science-oriented mountain holdings today!

Photo via US National Park Service. Denali - Mt. McKinley.

“If you drive to, say, Shenandoah National Park, or the Great Smoky Mountains, you’ll get some appreciation for the scale and beauty of the outdoors. When you walk into it, then you see it in a completely different way. You discover it in a much slower, more majestic sort of way.” – Bill Bryson

Photo via US National Park Service. Denali – Mt. McKinley.


SIGNING OFF FOR THE SEMESTER!

This has been the final 8:30 for the fall 2015 semester. We hope you have an excellent holiday and best of luck with final exams and papers! It has been a pleasure to serve your daily speed-reads.

Photo © Nevit Dilmen

Photo © Nevit Dilmen


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Last Modified: December 11, 2015