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‘Cat in the Stacks: National (Champions) Library Week

CAT-STAX4I’m William Repetto, a second-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is the “‘Cat in the Stacks” column. I’m your ‘cat. I’ll be posting about college life, about learning and growing here at Villanova, and, of course, about the Falvey Memorial Library’s role.


What a whirlwind book it has been, Nova Nation. Our team won the NCAA National Championship a little over a week ago now, spring seems to be finally arriving and we’ve been celebrating National Library Week here at Falvey. Nursing those championship hangovers, while looking forward to what’s next, and trying to appreciate the time and place of the present can be hard work separately – let alone all at once!

Hunter has found time to both celebrate and zen out! Have you read her weekly column, PATW?

We should all be veterans at recovering from a championship celebration. I mean, with the Eagles celebration just behind us, as well as that other NCAA basketball championship and a Flyers Stanley Cup almost certainly on the horizon, how could we not be, here in the city of champions? But getting back on track after the emotional highs of such a great run can still be tough. If you need a little quiet zen before your amazing run to the end of the semester, make sure to stop by one of the library quiet spaces and rediscover your productive side.

Spring offers other opportunities for finding moments of zen. We can finally get outside a bit and enjoy the sunshine, enjoy some outdoor activity, or even discover some new quiet section of campus to hunker down and read. Spring also brings with it new events here at the library. Whether you need some final paper inspiration or simply want to learn about something new, visit our events page and come hang out with your fellow Wildcats, professors or the members of the Falvey Memorial Library Communication and Marketing Department.

Speaking of that wonderful department of marketers and communicators, did you know that this week is National Library Week? We like to remind our visitors every day of how Falvey tries to establish itself as a leader, at the heart of the campus community, but this week has been set aside to celebrate this fact about all libraries. So, whether you come into Falvey or your public library back home in the next couple of days, make sure to stop and thank a librarian for all they do. Speaking on behalf of those librarians here at Falvey, they truly do put their visitors first and make sure you always have the materials you need on hand.

It was my birthday yesterday! While you might think it was my first from this illustration, I actually turned 24. What?!

One of my favorite parts about the springtime is seeing the population on campus ostensibly double as students head back outside to spend some time. The whole Comm. and Marketing Department at Falvey loves bringing you engaging events, and you can always feel free to reach out to us with comments (use the comments below!). Our librarians look forward to hearing from you too as the semester winds down. Consider all three of these things your Gatorade, greasy food, and ginger ale for that Championship hangover!


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University. (Graphics courtesy of Bitmoji, and Hunter and I spending hours perfecting our representations!)


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Highlighter: Catherine Kerrison to Visit Falvey

On Thursday, April 12 at 6:00p.m., Catherine Kerrison, Ph.D., will visit Speakers’ Corner of Falvey Memorial Library. Kerrison recently published Jefferson’s Daughters: Three Sisters, White and Black, in a Young America.  In the collection here at Falvey, with additional copies available through Interlibrary Loan, Jefferson’s Daughters has been called “dogged and thoroughly detailed detective work,” and Kerrison’s writing considered “richly textured,” “recapturing the patterns of Southern women’s lives.”

If you aren’t familiar with Kerrison’s work, you can read these three selections in advance to prepare yourself for the event:

1. “The French Education of Martha Jefferson Randolph

I did not know how curious I could be about the education of a founding father’s daughter until I read this article. You’ll learn about Martha (“Patsy’s”) lavish education at an Enlightenment-inspired girls’ school among a cloister of nuns. Kerrison weaves an approachable style and a truly intriguing topic in this essay to transport you back to immediately pre-Revolutionary France.

2. “Toward an Intellectual History of Early Southern Women

Roughly a hundred years of US history separates vignettes of oppression and stories of highly educated, independent women in this essay by Kerrison. In fact, fortune often favored northerners at the beginning of this time period as well. Over the course of this essay you’ll discover how Southern women changed this northern, masculine-centric paradigm of learning in early American history.

3. “Sally Hemings,” Chapter in A Companion to Thomas Jefferson

Are you familiar with the story of Sally Hemings and Thomas Jefferson’s intimate relationship? Well, Kerrison retells the tale in a new light. She recounts this history from the point of view of Hemings rather than from the perspective of Jefferson and his reputation.


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.

 


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Highlighter: “Much Ado” with this VU Theatre Primer

Welcome to “The Highlighter,” where we’ll be exploring the various new and old services and resources available through the Falvey!


On Wednesday, April 11, “Much Ado About Nothing” opens at the Villanova Theatre. Falvey Memorial Library has a host of resources on Shakespeare, among them Shakespeare in Performance: Prompt Books from the Folger Shakespeare Library. You may use this resource to explore what are called prompt books – it’s right there in the title.

“Much Ado About Nothing” Banner, courtesy of VU Theatre.

What in the world is a prompt book, you might be wondering? If you are at all like me, and find the development of a play from page to production to be absolute magic, you might find that prompt books reveal the mechanisms of that magic.

According to Shakespeare in Performance, a prompt book, “is the production’s bible, containing a wealth of instructions and information alongside the basic text of the play.” In other words, prompt books contain the notes, ideas and thinkings of others who have put on the play before to help the next generation of actors understand and explore the characters, sights and sounds of the play.

For example, in one book for “Hamlet,” you might find that one actor like to hold the skull aloft during the famous “To Be or Not To Be” speech, where another might like to put it down altogether. In a third book still, you might find notes that indicate an actor likes to hold the skull differently. All of these notes help the production staff and performers create a cohesive and purposeful rendition of their show.

A photo of that famous speech, courtesy of Shakespeare in Production.

All of this is to tell you to search “Much Ado” on the database; you’ll get an insider’s look at how directors choose their staging and how performers decide their diction. Then check out “Much Ado” at VU Theatre on April 11-14 and April 17-21 at 8 p.m. or the matinee showings at 2 p.m. on April 15 and 22. You’ll end up with a ton to talk about!


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.

 


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#TBT: March Madness Edition

Welcome to another special March Madness edition of #TBT. This week’s throwback features basketball photos from 1936, 1955, 2006 and 2008!

The 1936 freshman basketball squad. They went undefeated, much like our ‘Cats will for the rest of the tournament!

Al Griffith of the 1955 men’s basketball team puts up a jump shot.

99% of winning the game is up to the players; the other 1% is up to the fans. Check out these fans from 2006.

A Scottie Reynolds photo from 2008, whose team we will be avenging with a win against Kansas this weekend.


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Highlighter: Advocacy Week

Welcome to “The Highlighter,” where we’ll be exploring the various new and old services and resources available through the Falvey!


A very special resource lies at the center of this week’s “Highlighter” – the Diversity and Inclusion Resource Guide. As a part of the University’s Center for Peace & Justice Education and Campus Ministry Service Council’s Advocacy Week, Falvey Memorial Library took our newest resource guide’s mission outside the walls of the library.

Me! Staffing the Advocacy Week table. You can catch me Tuesday & Wednesday from 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., first floor Connolly.

At Advocacy Week, you will find dozens of organizations campaigning for various humanitarian and activist causes. For example, our neighboring table on the first floor of Connolly yesterday were raising awareness about a petition for creating a new safe space on campus. Our work on the Diversity and Inclusion guide is not so much a cause or movement we’re advocating, but we do see our work as similar.

The Diversity and Inclusion Resource Guide includes an important activist aspect. On the top left corner of the landing page, you’ll find a resource submission form – our encouragement to you to share any useful library databases you come across in your courses or elsewhere that you think should be part of the page.

Secondly, we’re using a hashtag to promote the guide, highlight diversity in the library community and contribute to the page. Using #falveyincludes on Twitter, you can add materials to the Diversity and Inclusion Resource Guide that you think are worthy of discussion within the community, e.g. an article, another tweet, or even a photo that calls the library and diversity to mind for you.

The landing page graphic for the new Diversity and Inclusion Resource Guide

Through Advocacy Week and the Diversity and Inclusion Resource Guide, the Falvey staff hopes to show the profound effects that the library community can have beyond the library building itself. During Advocacy Week, we hope you’ll find out about upcoming events and initiatives here at the library that promote diversity and inclusion, and, with the guide, we hope you’ll explore these very elements of the Falvey community beyond simply this week.


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.


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‘Cat in the Stacks: Igloo Building 101

CAT-STAX4I’m William Repetto, a second-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is the “‘Cat in the Stacks” column. I’m your ‘cat. I’ll be posting about college life, about learning and growing here at Villanova, and, of course, about the Falvey Memorial Library’s role.


It’s supposedly spring, ladies and gentlemen. It’s also snowing, cold, and I have yet to see anything bloom. Weeks like these can hamper our productive energies, especially because something long awaited ­– springtime – seems to be putting us off a little longer in favor of chillier climes. This week’s ’Cat in the Stacks will feature some advice about trudging through these last few cold days.

Peek at the Week” author Hunter Houtzer hates the cold weather so much that she has been sending me this bitmoji every hour on the hour with the caption: it’s still cold.

Personally, I love the cold weather! This is not the majority opinion. Getting through these last cold days for me involves me drinking coffee and watching the snow, happily clearing the snow off my car, and settling into my desk and writing. In my mind, it’s all very picturesque.

For others, the picture is much dimmer. Cold days bring long periods stuck inside with local businesses and places to go closed down. Brightening the mood involves using mood lighting or altering settings on screens to a warmer filter. As always, though, Falvey Memorial Library offers options for those fed up with being stuck indoors.

First, you can head on over to the Falvey and hide away from the chilly weather. We’ve prioritized making our study spaces inhabitable for students, e.g. the Dugan Polk Family Reading Room and the new furniture in the First Floor Lounge. Come on in, grab yourself a soup or sandwich from Holy Grounds and watch some of those last few cold hours disappear.

While I’m flying high on the cold weather, I should let you know that we launched our new Diversity and Inclusion Resource Guide last week.

Second, if stepping out again into that frigid weather has become simply unimaginable, curl up with one of our eBooks, or get done some of that research from afar using the databases. (You can even chat with a librarian using the library’s website!) You can also keep up with library happenings via Twitter or Facebook, and, while you’re at it, let us now how you’re passing the last few cold days of the semester.


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University. (Graphics courtesy of Bitmoji, and Hunter and I spending hours perfecting our representations!)


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Highlighter: Godey’s Lady’s Book

Welcome to “The Highlighter,” where we’ll be exploring the various new and old services and resources available through the Falvey!


Last week, Falvey Memorial Library launched the Diversity and Inclusion Resource Guide. In the spirit of that launch, I would like to highlight a resource this week that shows both an example of an early attempt at diversity and inclusion and also how far we’ve come since those early forays – Godey’s Lady’s Book.

Reaching a pre-Civil War circulation of over 150,000, Godey’s Lady’s Book became a locus of American culture by publishing works by such preeminent authors as Harriet Beecher Stowe, Edgar Allen Poe, and Nathaniel Hawthorne. The periodical was published from 1830-1898, and most of its content centered on the empowerment of women.

A fashion plate you’ll find on the landing page for this resource.

What fascinates me so much about this important historical document is just how different of a meaning “empowerment of women” had during the 19th century. In one article, you’re as likely to find the phrase “women, who, weak and helpless by nature, have thus become endued with strength” as “as there is a time to be silent, so it does sometimes happen that there is a time when it becomes a duty to speak.”

In another titled “The Importance of Female Education,” you’ll find a rhetorical curiosity when an author advocates for the prioritization of female education because “The father, necessarily engaged in business the greater part of the day, cannot exert the same influence over his children as the mother, who has had the sole care of tutoring their youthful minds and is constantly with them.”

At the moment that these selections seem to promote speaking up and concentrating resources on the education of women, they also confine women to a particular, helpless, and childbearing sphere. This shows a tradition of feminism that goes back almost 200 years in the United States, but it also shows just how far we’ve come – from those perceptions remaining unchallenged to the modern #MeToo Movement and the push for equal pay.

A face of modern feminism, Lesley Nneka Arimah visited Falvey earlier this year.

Work for gender equality, more than the continuation of a legacy, remains important in today’s world. Become educated by reading Godey’s Lady’s Book; learn to understand by participating in Women’s History Month, and become an activist by submitting to the Diversity and Inclusion Resource Guide.


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.


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Diversity and Inclusion Resource Guide Successfully Launched!

On Wednesday, March 14, Falvey Memorial Library successfully launched its Diversity and Inclusion Resource Guide. As the emcee of the Launch Party and Reception, I wanted to write a feature post here reflecting on the experience.

The day finally came after about a year of development on the page – between ideas, backend development and plans to promote the page. Throughout my afternoon preparing for the event, everybody felt very high energy here on the staff. I read and reread my notes for introducing each person but still feel I didn’t do justice to my amazing co-presenters.

The event poster, designed by Joanne Quinn.

We heard first from University Librarian and Director of Falvey Memorial Library Millicent Gaskell. She reiterated the library’s dedication to including all the various communities on campus. She also thanked English and Theatre Librarian Sarah Wingo as well as me and the entire Communication and Marketing Department, which was a huge honor.

She passed the mic off to Wingo and me to give the page a formal launch. I told the whole story of the page, from bookmark to launch party. It’s an experience I’ve loved reflecting on, and I’m sure will stick with me for years to come. Wingo talked about the significance of these resources to her and gave the audience a thorough click-through of the page.

I then had the honor of introducing Associate Vice Provost for Diversity and Inclusion and Chief Diversity Officer Terry Nance. Nance injected the party with a ton of pathos as she discussed the profound effect libraries had on her life while growing up as young, black woman in a predominantly black neighborhood during the mid-20th century. The sincerity of her voice and the clarity of her purpose are elements of her talk that have stuck with me in the days since, and I’m sure remains fresh on the minds of those who attended.

Terry Nance speaks at the launch party.

After Dr. Nance, various student groups took to the podium to talk about how their groups promote diversity and inclusion on campus. Their quick speeches, one after the other, created a light, welcoming atmosphere that I hope inspired our attendees to seek out more information on these groups.

All in all, the construction of the Diversity and Inclusion Resource Guide has served as a transformative personal experience for me. I hope in its dynamism and community-building mission, the guide serves as a transformative space for the university community as well.


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.


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’Cat in the Stacks: Diversity and Diversifying

CAT-STAX4I’m William Repetto, a second-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is the “‘Cat in the Stacks” column. I’m your ‘cat. I’ll be posting about college life, about learning and growing here at Villanova, and, of course, about the Falvey Memorial Library’s role.


This week has been all about diversity here at Falvey, as we launched our new Diversity and Inclusion Resource Guide. As you know, ’Cat in the Stacks is all about connecting events here at the library with some tiny piece of personal advice. Well, I’d like to use this week’s column to talk about diversity both in terms of within a community and also as diversification within our own lives.

I helped Hunter change up her routine by inviting her over to watch hockey. Her team changed things up by beating the Flyers.

Diversity within a community isn’t important in only some abstract, distant way. The allowance of oneself to encounter voices and personalities that come from some other background is important because it enables that individual to grow. Think about it; how can people gain a truly comprehensive point of view if they surround themselves with only voices that reinforce their own way of thinking?

Being diverse has another implication though doesn’t it? As in: simply showing a degree of variety in how we approach the world. At this time in the semester, we can become stuck into a routine. We’ve figured out, or so we think, the most efficient way of doing things, and the days/weeks start passing by with increasing speed. Falling into this routine can stunt growth as well, as we begin to see the everyday through a narrower and narrower lens.

So here’s my advice for this week’s column: do something different! Talk to someone who you don’t think would share the same point of view as you. Alter your routine – even if it’s something as simple as walking a new route across campus to class. These small things can help you see the world in a new light.

The advice is my favorite part of ‘Cat! I changed things up by wearing an out of town jersey. “Why the Colorado Avalanche?” You might ask. My sister made the biggest change of them all by moving out to Colorado from Philly this week – You go, sisterski!

Here at Falvey, we are always here to help you with diversity. Whether you want to experience resources by, for or about underrepresented voices via the Diversity and Inclusion Guide, or you simply want to change things up and study in a new locale, the faculty and staff at Falvey are here for you.


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University. (Graphics courtesy of Bitmoji, and Hunter and I spending hours perfecting our representations!)


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Highlighter: Colette Bryce

Welcome to “The Highlighter,” where we’ll be exploring the various new and old services and resources available at Falvey!


Thursday, March 15 at 7:00 p.m., the President’s Lounge of the Connelly Center will play host to esteemed poet Colette Bryce as a part of the ongoing 2018 Lit Fest. The author of four poetry collections, Bryce has also spent parts of her career as a writing fellow and as an editor.

Bryce poses for a photo.

In Bryce’s writing, you’ll immediately notice a sense of melody. She once said, “Music is my central preoccupation with writing; I don’t consider any poems to be without form. Successful poems adhere to an inner music, inner forms. Formally, I write more for the ear than for the eye.”

See, or shall we say, hear for yourself, with these books by Bryce available at Falvey!


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant in the Communication and Marketing Dept. at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.


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Last Modified: March 13, 2018