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TBT: Modes of Transportation

Pullman car on a passenger train, ca. 1910s

Pullman car on a passenger train, ca. 1910s.

This year traveling to see family for the Holidays may not look the same with plane rides and road trips, but travel has evolved over the years and continues to evolve to this day.

Travel is becoming more virtual, to which you may think “How? Virtual can’t be traveling!” But through interacting with family via Zoom, reading a travel novel, or taking part in a virtual cross-cultural experience (Airbnb does them a lot) people are finding new ways to explore their world.

Throwing it back to the 1830s, the newest way to travel was by train. Trains made it so that people could get from one place to another in a few hours or days rather than weeks. This made it so that families could see each other, even if just for a weekend, and vacations were not solely month-long affairs. To read more about the history of travel, visit Falvey’s digital exhibit “Are We There Yet?”

Through advancements in technology, traveling is continuing to evolve, this time in a more digital way. Where will you be traveling (either safely in person or virtually) this holiday season?


Jenna Newman is a graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication Department. Current mood: Not ready to virtually travel to work today.


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#TBT: Automobiles Then and Now

advertisement from The Willy-Overland Company2020 Ford commercial shot

This week we’re looking at automobiles advertisements “then and now.” The photo on the left side displays an advertisement for Willys-Overland Company, a car company operating from 1908 through 1963, headquartered in Toledo, Ohio. This advertisement uses color and imagery to draw in the audience and then uses their companies production statistics to try to close a deal. Although The Willys-Overland Company hasn’t been making cars for a long time, one of their main competitors, Ford, is still active in 2020. 

In contrast to the text-heavy ad from 1913, the image on the right shows a 2020 Ford advertisement. Ford has established such a brand presence by 2020, that their tagline “Built Ford Proud” and an image of their newest cars outside in nature, is enough to tell the viewer of the quality that the company provides. To learn more about 20th century advertisements, check out Falvey’s digital exhibit “You can learn a lot from ADVERTISING”.


Jenna Newman is a graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication Department.


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From the University Archives: Celebrate History of Villanova Theatre

By Beaudry Rae Allen

Dramatic Hall, circa 1890s

Dramatic Hall, circa 1890s

 

“…but be not afraid of greatness: Some are born great, others achieve greatness. And others have greatness thrust upon them.”—Shakespeare, Twelfth Night, Act 2 Scene 5

 

Distinctive Collections invites you with a backstage pass to celebrate 150 years of Villanova Theatre with the new digital exhibit “Be Not Afraid of Greatness: Celebrating the History of Villanova Theatre.”

Inspired by the prevalence of Shakespeare in the production history of the Theatre Department, the lines are meant to evoke the profound yet humble legacy of Villanova Theatre, from its earliest days to capturing the essence of what the department is all about: enriching the campus culture and striving for greatness one performance at a time.

Very few may know, but the first appearances of theatre on campus started in 1870, and with this exhibit the University Archives seeks to evoke a sense of celebration of Villanova’s rich history and achievements spanning 150 years.

Take a step inside and explore the many different eras of theatre groups on campus and moments that have helped shape what the graduate program is today.  The exhibit includes many programs and posters from early performances as well as photographs of students in rehearsals from the University Archives. In addition, the exhibit includes special photographs taken by Robert LeBlanc, First Year Experience Librarian, of theater students from fall 2019 and images of costumes on loan from the Villanova Theatre Department.

Rehearsals for Piper-Heidsieck '98, 1950

Rehearsals for Piper-Heidsieck ’98, 1950

Curated by Beaudry Rae Allen and Emma Poley ’21, Villanova Theatre Graduate Student, the digital exhibit is just a snapshot of the physical exhibit that opened March 12, 2020.

 

Poster of Turf and Tinsel Club production, circa 1940s

Poster of Turf and Tinsel Club production, circa 1940s

 

When the University reopens, the main physical exhibit will remain on display.

 


Beaudry Rae Allen is Preservation and Digital Archivist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 

 


 


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A Celebration of Spring

💐 Our latest digital mini exhibit, “A Celebration of Spring,” is just what it sounds like — a selection of lots of flowery images, as well as some bunnies, and even a bit of Irish music. 🎶 We hope this brings you some joy! 💝

Cover, The People’s Home Journal, May 1907.


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New digital mini exhibit highlighting women’s suffrage materials

Header for a special supplement on women’s suffrage in the May 1, 1915 issue of the Ardmore Chronicle.

In honor of Women’s History Month and the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment, we’ve created a digital mini exhibit featuring some of our women’s suffrage materials from Falvey’s Distinctive Collections.

We have two items from the National American Woman Suffrage Association — the published proceedings of their 25th annual convention in 1893 and a program for the 48th annual convention in 1916.

Program, Forty-eighth Annual Convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, New Nixon Theatre, Thursday, Sept. 7, 1916.

Beyond that, we have several articles and advertisements from national and local print media outlets from the early 20th century.

Anderson, James. “The Forty-Year Fight for Suffrage.” Leslie’s Illustrated Weekly Newspaper, 20 Jul. 1918, pp. 87, 89.

 

Advertisement for Shredded Wheat. The Fra: A Journal of Affirmation, Jul. 1913, rear cover.

These materials were originally pulled for a pop-up exhibit to complement the Lepage Center’s “Revising History: Women’s Suffrage” panel discussion that had to be canceled this month. We are thrilled that we can still share these materials digitally.

View our women’s suffrage mini exhibit online here.


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Digital exhibit: “You can learn a lot from ADVERTISING” : the American Paper Experience

Posted for: Susan A. Ottignon

The Digital Library@Villanova University’s newest online exhibit, “You can learn a lot from ADVERTISING”: the American Paper Experience” illustrates advertised products published, in the 19th and early 20th centuries, that the average American read in print newspapers and magazines.

The exhibit’s title comes from a direct quote about advertising published in The Chicago Ledger, March 29, 1919, that encouraged by “reading advertisements” the decision would be informed and make the product “valuable to you as you go through life.” The advertisements for the exhibit were selected to illustrate an assortment of merchandise available to the readers between the years 1858 to 1921.

The selected newspapers are from the Digital Library’s digitized collections. Among the newspapers used are: Ardmore Chronicle, (Ardmore, PA), The Chicago Ledger, (Chicago, IL), The Catholic Standard and Times, (Philadelphia, PA) and others.

This exhibit was curated by Sue Ottignon with assistance from Laura Bang and Michael Foight and graphics by Joanne Quinn.


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Last Modified: January 9, 2017