Skip Navigation
Falvey Memorial Library
Advanced
You are exploring: Home > Blogs

Available for proofreading: Let Us Kiss and Part

Our latest title to join the Distributed Proofreaders project for inclusion in Project Gutenberg is Let Us Kiss and Part; or, A Shattered Tie, another novel by prolific story paper novelist Mrs. Alex. McVeigh Miller, author of The Bride of the Tomb (and countless other melodramas). The story was first serialized in Street & Smith’s New York Weekly story paper from November 20, 1897 to February 12, 1898, but we are working with a later paper-covered reprint from the early 20th century.

You can volunteer to help turn our scans of this long-forgotten work into a new electronic edition of the book — just read our Proofreading the Digital Library blog post to learn how the process works, then sign up at the project page!


Like

Available for proofreading: On Time; or, Bound to Get There

Our latest Distributed Proofreaders project is On Time; or, Bound to Get There, a juvenile novel by Oliver Optic (the pen name of William Taylor Adams), from Street & Smith’s paper-covered Alger Series.

While this book has been out of print for a very long time, Distributed Proofreaders makes it possible for volunteers to help turn scans from our Digital Library into a new electronic edition of the text, which will eventually be released for free through Project Gutenberg.

If you would like to help with the process of creating this eBook, you can read about how it works in Proofreading the Digital Library, and then you can join in at the project page.


Like

eBook available: Midshipman Merrill

Once again, a book from our Digital Library has made its way to Project Gutenberg via the Distributed Proofreaders project. This time, the work is Henry Harrison Lewis’ Midshipman Merrill, the story of a youth’s entry into the United States Navy.

The novel was first serialized in the Good News story paper from October 9 through December 18, 1890, and later reissued in both paper and cloth formats. Its story paper roots show in a simple “talented and determined boy wins at everything” story and a stream-of-consciousness style that suggests the work was completed with minimal pre-planning and few revisions.

It appears that the original story was successful enough to merit a sequel, 1893’s Ensign Merrill; or, The Rovers of the Yellow Sea… but that’s a story for another day! For now, the first adventure is available in full through Project Gutenberg, where it can be read online or downloaded in popular eBook formats.


Like

Available for proofreading: Cliquot

Our latest Distributed Proofreaders project comes from a Philadelphia-published, paper-covered book: Cliquot, “a racing story of ideal beauty” (according to the cover), by Kate Lee Ferguson.

While it has gained some scholarly attention, this particular book has historically been quite difficult to find, as it does not appear to have been printed in hardcover, and few of the paper-covered copies have survived to the present day. By creating a new eBook edition from the scans in our Digital Library, we can help make it significantly more accessible to readers.

If you would like to help with the process of creating this new edition, you can read about how it works in Proofreading the Digital Library, and then you can pitch in at the project page.


Like
1 People Like This Post

Available for proofreading: Camping in the Winter Woods

Our newest book to become available for volunteer proofreading through the Distributed Proofreaders project is Camping in the Winter Woods by Elmer Russell Gregor, a 1912 juvenile adventure story by an author with a strong interest in outdoor life and Native Americans.

You can help produce a new electronic edition of this long-forgotten novel by correcting computer-generated transcriptions of the pages; eventually, the full text will be made available as an eBook on Project Gutenberg.

If you want to join in the fun, you can read our earlier Proofreading the Digital Library post to learn how the process works, and then you can grab an assignment at the project page.


Like
1 People Like This Post

eBook available: Boys of the Central

Our latest Project Gutenberg release, courtesy of Distributed Proofreaders, is the 1896 juvenile novel Boys of the Central, by Ida Treadwell Thurston (writing under her initials, perhaps to obscure her gender).

The book follows a class of high school students through their last two years before graduation. Much of the narrative is focused on the conflict between a student-formed “Law and Order” society, and misbehaving students who prefer “fun” over academics.

While much of the narrative is clearly designed to serve as a moral lesson for its readers, and there are some sensationalized incidents (like the rescue of a little girl from a speeding fire-engine), the book also offers some glimpses into the school and everyday life of late-19th-century high schoolers. Much is said of Latin recitations and military-style drilling; there’s also a whole chapter dedicated to a snowball fight.

If you are interested in reading more, the entire book can be found for online viewing or download through Project Gutenberg.


Like

Available for proofreading: Midshipman Merrill

Our latest Distributed Proofreading project is Midshipman Merrill, a naval adventure novel first serialized in the Good News story paper, later reprinted as a Medal Library dime novel, and finally reprinted in hardcover by Philadelphia publisher David McKay. By volunteering a little bit of your time, you can help the book make one more metamorphosis, into a freely-available eBook at Project Gutenberg!

If you want to help with the proofreading process, you can read our earlier Proofreading the Digital Library post to learn how the process works, and then you can join in the fun at the book’s project page!


Like

eBook available: Jed’s Boy

In April, we started a Distributed Proofreaders project for Jed’s Boy, a juvenile novel of World War I written by Civil War veteran Warren Lee Goss. Because it is a sequel of sorts to the author’s earlier Civil War novel Jed, that makes it a “series book” of sorts, though it is somewhat different in style and tone than many of the more formulaic Great War stories that were specifically written to be packaged into series like the Brighton Boys or Two American Boys.

The novel is written in the first person, which gives it the flavor of a memoir and allows a bit more time to be spent on the protagonist’s interior life than a contemporary third-person narrative would have. Time passes and characters develop at a faster pace than in a typical juvenile series, since there is no apparent desire on the author’s part to stretch the narrative out to multiple books. Of course, some familiar elements from the series books are also on display here: a patriotic tone, a lot more violence than the typical children’s book, and a generally unquestioning portrayal of war.

Given that it was published shortly after the war ended, when readers might not have cared to be reminded of the recent conflict, it is perhaps unsurprising that this book has been mostly forgotten. Nonetheless, for anyone studying juvenile fiction about the war, it fills an interesting space in the landscape: an attempt by a veteran of 19th century warfare to portray the new horrors of the 20th century — gas, lice, machine guns and all — to a young audience.

The entire book can be read online or downloaded in popular eBook formats through Project Gutenberg.


Like

eBook available: Two American Boys in the War Zone

Another book from our Digital Library has passed through the Distributed Proofreaders process and into Project Gutenberg. Like many of our recent releases, this is a juvenile novel written and set during the first World War: Levi Worthington Green’s Two American Boys in the War Zone.

The novel, a direct sequel to the author’s The Boy Fugitives in Mexico, has a pair of brothers separated from their father while on vacation in Russia. The father’s ability to speak German leads to his arrest as a possible spy, and the boys make a long and dangerous journey to find their way home to their mother. While the shadow of the war hangs over the novel and influences some of its major events, the author’s focus seems more on providing an incident-filled travelogue of Russia than on describing key events of the conflict.

This book was marketed to children by a major publisher in 1915, but it would not receive the same treatment today. The author clearly meant to paint the titular siblings in a heroic light, but their depicted attitudes toward race and violence provide a few genuinely shocking moments for the contemporary reader. While the novel is decidedly inappropriate as a piece of family entertainment, it might offer some insight for the cultural historian.

The full text of the book can be read online or downloaded in popular eBook formats through Project Gutenberg.

Like

Available for proofreading: Boys of the Central

Our latest Distributed Proofreaders project is a novel of high school life that was published in Boston in 1896: Boys of the Central, by Ida Treadwell Thurston. This book, mostly forgotten for more than a century, will soon be much more accessible, and you can help make it happen. With the help of a team of volunteers, the page images from our Digital Library will be turned into a Project Gutenberg eBook through a simple web-based process. Anyone can join in and help; it’s simply a matter of reading our Proofreading the Digital Library post and then visiting the project page to begin work. Stay tuned; in a few months, a complete, corrected text will be freely available for anyone to read. At that point, we’ll probably have a bit more to say about the contents of the book!

Like

Next Page »

 


Last Modified: July 10, 2020