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eBook available: All for Love; or, Her Heart’s Sacrifice

Our latest Project Gutenberg release, drawn from our Digital Library and processed through the Distributed Proofreaders project, is another novel by Mrs. Alex. McVeigh Miller: All for Love; or, Her Heart’s Sacrifice, which had previously been serialized in the New York Family Story Paper under the title Berenice Vining’s Romance; or, Love Levels All.

The book chronicles the romance between Berry Vining, a poor and inexperienced girl who eventually becomes a successful actress and playwright, and Charley Bonair, a rich and irresponsibly flirtatious animal lover. It would not be a Mrs. Miller novel without complications, so there is a love triangle with a bloodthirsty heiress, a bear attack, a smallpox outbreak, and plenty of other twists and turns. Other interesting features of the book include a “story-in-the-story” in which Berry’s autobiographical hit play is described in great detail, and occasional hints of conscious humor (such as a recurring joke about Charley’s efforts to give up profanity) that give this a little bit of a “romantic comedy” flavor.

Like many romances of its time, the novel is very interested in class distinctions, and the theme of a romance between rich and poor is hardly a new idea. However, while many books of this type end with the revelation that the “poor” heroine was actually secretly or unknowingly rich all along, this one goes in a different direction, perhaps in an effort to differentiate this as a story in the American rather than the British mold.

If you’re interested in trying this one out for yourself, the entire book can be read online or downloaded in popular eBook formats through Project Gutenberg.


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Villanova Featured on Irish National Website

By Rebecca Oviedo

Front pages of newspapers, The Irish Press, The Gaelic American, and The Clan-na-Gael Journal (Digital Library@Villanova University)

 

Villanova University’s well-known connections to Ireland, Irish and Irish American history, and the Irish diaspora has recently led to an invitation to share more about those connections and our collections on Century Ireland, a website hosted by RTÉ, Ireland’s national television and radio broadcaster.

The featured article is distinguished as being the first in a new series on “Global Archives,” which will highlight the rich historical collections available to researchers of the Irish Revolution in archives around the world.

Read the full article here: https://www.rte.ie/centuryireland/index.php/articles/global-archives-villanova-university.

 


Rebecca Oviedo is Distinctive Collections Librarian/Archivist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 


 

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Content Roundup – Second Week – March 2022

Photograph, Volleyball (Women), 1992

This week we present a number of new materials of note, including additional Dime Novels and Story Paper issues as well two more volumes from the Mendel Collection, and in the Villanova Digital Collection 40 miscellaneous athletics photographs and two basketball scrapbooks!

Dime Novel and Popular Literature

Fiction

Front cover, The murder at Linden Fells, or, The mystery of the cadillac needle / edited by Chickering Carter

Nick Carter Stories (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:627425?lookfor=series%3A[58+TO+62]#]

Front cover, Buffalo Bill’s iron bracelets; or, Dauntless Dell’s daring / by the author of “Buffalo Bill.”

New Buffalo Bill Weekly (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:596124?lookfor=series%3A(155+OR+163+OR+166+OR+167)#]

Periodicals

Golden Era (3 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:689499?lookfor=title%3A(march+OR+april)#]

Portland Transcript (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Collection/vudl:700409]

Weekly Novelette (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:687791?lookfor=title%3Anovember]

Masthead, The New York Ledger, v. XXIII, no. 21, Saturday, July 20, 1867

New York Ledger (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:688217?lookfor=title%3Ajuly]

New York Weekly (2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:699039]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:699051]

Mendel Collection

Front cover, Verhandlungen des naturforschenden Vereines in Brünn, III Band, 1864

Naturforschenden Vereines in Brünn (2 v. added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:693282]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:692362]

Villanova Digital Collection

Photograph, Karate Club, 1989

Miscellaneous Athletics Images (40 photographs added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:700410]

Photograph, Swimming (Women), 1990

Athletics

Scrapbook, Villanova Basketball, 1933-1946
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:695437]

p. [8], Scrapbook, Villanova Basketball, 1946-1951

Scrapbook, Villanova Basketball, 1946-1951
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:698201]


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Content Roundup – First weeks – February 2022

Recently added to the digital library, on offer are more story paper issues, more dime novels, and materials of note including 7 manuscript notebooks of the American popular author Annie Tuttle, 5 notebooks of the poetry and diary entries from James Roger, items from the “Remember the Maine” collection, and photographs from the University Archives collections documenting student and university activities!

Americana

Notebook, “Songs Freedom’s Emblem” / Annie L.Tuttle

Annie L. Tuttle papers (7 notebooks):
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Collection/vudl:684371?recordID=vudl%3A688554]

Historical Sketch From the Destruction of the “Maine” to the Battle of Manila : a short history in memory of the lost heros of the “Maine” / by Otto Volckmer

Remember the Maine Collection (12 items added):
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:684698]

Dime Novel and Popular Literature

Fiction

Nick Carter and Keno M’Call, or, The fate of a stool pigeon / edited by Chickering Carter.

Nick Carter Stories (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:627425?lookfor=series%3A%5B30+TO+34%5D]

Old Broadbrim (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Collection/vudl:287323?recordID=vudl%3A694970]

Sweet love’s atonement : a novel / by Mrs. E.D.E.N. Southworth.

Sweet love’s atonement : a novel / by Mrs. E.D.E.N. Southworth
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:693673]

Periodicals

Golden Era (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:689499?lookfor=title%3Afebruary]

New York Ledger (5 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:688217?lookfor=title%3Ajune]

Street and Smith’s New York Weekly : a journal of useful knowledge, romance, amusement, & c. , v. 49, no. 21, March 17, 1894

New York Weekly (2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:690769]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:690781]

Weekly Novelette (5 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:687791?lookfor=title%3Aoctober]

Villanova Digital Collection

University Functions

Photograph, Black Cultural Society Award, 1981

Photograph, Black Cultural Society Award, 1981
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:656426]

Photograph, Black Cultural Society, 1983-1984
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:656324]

Photograph, Black Cultural Society, 1983-1984
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:656330]

Photograph, Villanova Band, 1940s

Villanova Band (12 photos added):
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649898?type=AllFields&filter%5B%5D=topic_facet%3A%22Villanova+Band%22]

Photograph, Villanova Singers, 1992-1993

Villanova Singers (2 photos added):
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649898?type=AllFields&filter%5B%5D=topic_facet%3A%22Villanova+Singers%22]

World

[1] p., Diary, James Roger, April 1, 1900 – Novermber 30, 1901

James Roger Personal Papers (5 notebooks added):
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Collection/vudl:691783?recordID=vudl%3A692024]


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eBook available: Cavalry Curt; or, The Wizard Scout of the Army

George Waldo Browne’s Cavalry Curt; or, The Wizard Scout of the Army is the latest book from our collection to be transformed into a Project Gutenberg eBook by the Distributed Proofreaders project.

This juvenile dime novel, first published in 1892, tells the story of “Cavalry Curt,” a Union scout trying to survive in Confederate territory during Sherman’s March to the Sea, and Mara Morland, a young woman whose brother is both a Confederate soldier and an old school friend of Curt. Much of the narrative focuses on Mara’s efforts to save Curt’s life at great risk to herself and her family.

Written less than thirty years after the events framing the narrative, the book serves as an interesting example of how the Civil War was portrayed to a young audience while it was still quite fresh in the national memory. Some of the complexities of the situation — particularly the conflicts between personal and political allegiances — are important to the narrative, though the causes and politics of the war are barely discussed, and the book’s portrayal of slavery and enslaved people is the sanitized version common to literature of this period. The book is also noteworthy for its portrayal of Mara Morland, who is an unusually brave and competent female protagonist for a “boys’ story” (though her motivations still largely align with predictable gender stereotypes).

If you would like to read the book for yourself, you can find it for online reading or download in common eBook formats through Project Gutenberg.


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Green Voices of the Past: Joseph McGarrity and the 1939 British Royal Visit to the United States

Posted for: Emily Poteat.

Beginning on June 07, 1939 King George VI, and his wife Queen Elizabeth embarked on the first royal visit to the United States that would endure until June 12, 1939. Joseph McGarrity’s 1939 diary offers intriguing insight into the visit through the lens of an American Irish Republican.

p. 93 clipping unfolded back, “Diary, Joseph McGarrity, 1939.” Joseph McGarrity, 1939.

Preceding the advent of the tour, there was much controversy surrounding the mere possibility of the tour, and the newspaper clippings included in McGarrity’s diary offer immense evidence of this. As a newspaper article titled “Britain Fears War” alluded to, many people were questioning in April 1939 if King George VI and Queen Elizabeth should be allowed to go on the visit at all because of the rising fears of an imminent breakout of international war (p. 15, clipping 4). There was a clear division of opinion within both the British cabinet as well as within the royal household; further, this primarily was due to the concern that if war broke out while the British royals were in the United States, the British government feared if they could return home from the tour (p. 15, clipping 4).

Despite these concerns, the tour went ahead, and the first traces of the decision for the tour to go ahead, is evident through the eyes of Joseph McGarrity in his 1939 diary. For, on May 23, 1939, McGarrity wrote “the King + Queen are to visit the President at Washington what Gall they have (p. 50). From this clear disdain, it is clear that McGarrity found the royal visit to not only inappropriate, but also inflammatory with the Irish question still looming large. With his characteristic vitriol towards Britain and the British empire, McGarrity chronicles what he considers to be the most important aspects of the royal visit in his diary.

The royal visit was inflammatory to McGarrity’s immense hatred toward the British monarchy, and his reaction to King George VI and Queen Elizabeth’s visit to the Irish exhibit at the 1939 New York World’s Fair. In the newspaper clipping, found in McGarrity’s diary, entitled “Royal Guests Visit the Irish Exhibit” King George VI and Queen Elizabeth are depicted as maintaining respectfulness and politeness while perusing the exhibit. As the “Queen gave special attention to an exhibit showing the activities for improvement of housing and hospital facilities,” and she commented that the exhibit was “very colorful and pleasant” (p. 93, clipping back). Furthermore, this was the first stop of the royal visit, and according to McGarrity the royal walk at the World’s Fair demonstrated that the visit represented “Fake freedom” and “Fake Patriots” on the part of the American government for entertaining the British royals (p. 92). McGarrity inherently thought that the United States should not entertain the British royals, as they represented a country maintaining a hold on a country searching for freedom. Evidence of this is apparent with McGarrity maintaining “gradually we have pulled the veil from the Faik [sic] Freedom that Ireland is supposed to Have and leave Her masked as still the Pawn of England (p. 92). For McGarrity believed that Roosevelt should side with the Irish, and support an independence movement that he equated with the American revolution.

. 92, “Diary, Joseph McGarrity, 1939.” Joseph McGarrity, 1939.

Further, it is clear that the Irish exhibit at the 1939 New York World’s Fair was a key part of the royal visit. As the reactions of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth are covered in intricate detail. For instance the reporter wrote, “the Queen paused briefly and asked John M. Conway…for an explanation…She made no comment, however, when he showed her the affixed text of the proclamation of the Irish Republic” (p. 93, clipping back). From the brief description of the Queen’s reaction to symbolism concerning Irish republicanism, it is clear that she was aware that the visit had potential to stir up emotions and criticism. Further, all descriptions of the king and queen on the visit to the Irish exhibit allude to a carefully staged, and self-monitored experience for the royals.

As a whole, McGarrity’s short inclusion of the 1939 royal visit offers a deeper understanding of McGarrity, as understanding what angered him hints at what he found most important. This episode in McGarrity’s diary demonstrates his deep criticism of not only Roosevelt, but also the actions and intentions of the royal family as well. For an Irish American, and Irish republican, McGarrity viewed the first visit of the royal family to the United States with deep suspicion of the intentions of the British for visiting, but also with deep fury.

——————–
Emily Poteat is a graduate assistant in Irish Studies and Falvey Memorial Library’s Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement Department, and a graduate student in the History Department.

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Green Voices of the Past: Franklin D. Roosevelt through the Eyes of Joseph McGarrity

Posted for: Emily Poteat.

From September 1938 to December 1939, Joseph McGarrity kept a number of diaries; however, this particular diary is in an old “Composition” notebook. Despite its humble appearance, this diary provides a riveting glimpse into the machinations of McGarrity concerning the onset of World War II, and McGarrity’s perceptions of the most prolific politicians of that period. Touched upon most in this particular diary, are McGarrity’s thoughts surrounding President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s visitors, and policies at the onset of World War II.

p. 20, Diary, “Diary, “Compositions” Joseph McGarrity, September 22, 1938 – November 1939.” Joseph McGarrity, 1939.

For McGarrity, Roosevelt was an obstacle standing in the way of American support for a fully united and independent Ireland. Because of this, much of McGarrity’s rhetoric concerning Roosevelt is not only skeptical, but at times McGarrity’s rhetoric becomes vitriolic. Attracting the most scorn from McGarrity was Roosevelt’s meeting with Max Aitken, 1st Baron Beaverbrook, whom McGarrity refers to as “Lord Beverbrook [sic]” (p. 20). To McGarrity, “Lord Beverbrook [sic]” is an “English official propagandist,” as he purchased quite a few American newspapers and McGarrity believed that the papers became too geared towards supporting England soon after (p. 20). Inherently, this is problematic for McGarrity, as it represented a turn for him towards a more sympathetic view of the British. In this regard, McGarrity describes Aitken’s role in the American press as one of the “tools of Americas [sic] most daingerous [sic] ‘Friend.” Because Roosevelt dined with Aitken, McGarrity viewed him as being too close and too willing to work with the British. This view is evident, as McGarrity viewed Roosevelt’s dinner with Aitken, as Roosevelt aligning the United States too closely with the United Kingdom. Inherently this was a major issue for McGarrity, as he, as an Irish republican, saw England as an imperial aggressor that was keeping Ireland from unification and independence. Most vitriolic in his assessment of Roosevelt, McGarrity on page 21 questions “will we ever get another such President as Washington who warned us for all future time aginst [sic] foreign entanglements,” and more pertinently McGarrity wondered “How can the United States prosper all the time on the auction block for England to buy” (p. 21). From this, McGarrity was not only questioning the efficacy of the United States catering to England when they were claiming to be neutral, but also was highly skeptical of Roosevelt’s integrity when it came to U.S. foreign policy. Moreover, McGarrity did not view Roosevelt as forming his policies on his own accord, instead McGarrity viewed Roosevelt as a puppet of the English government.

In equating Roosevelt with England’s war objectives, McGarrity often portrayed Roosevelt as lacking agency, and merely a tool utilized by England. Most clearly McGarrity does this by alluding to a “Roosevelt Promise,” or Roosevelt ignoring neutrality to work directly with England. With this rhetoric in mind, McGarrity on page 24 directly states “I wonder if England has a Roosevelt Promise to put America in the war on Her side?” (p. 24). In equating Roosevelt with McGarrity’s enemy, England, McGarrity does show partiality towards the Axis powers, and often times show outright support for Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, and Joseph Stalin. In doing so, McGarrity on page 24 details that “Hitler and Stalin I hope are very buisy [sic] preparing”.

p.1, Letter, “Letter, To: “To the President of the United States We Appeal” From: [Irish Race?, 1939?].” McGarrity Papers, 1939.

McGarrity’s machinations about Roosevelt, and other key figures of the World War II era are important, as they demonstrate the way that McGarrity was understanding the events that were happening in the world around him. Further, these ideas surrounding Roosevelt represent a concerted shift from the way that McGarrity perceived Roosevelt in 1936, as in McGarrity’s 1936 diary, McGarrity wrote “I thank and I pray that Roosevelt gets elected a man of great Heart and courage + Brain” (p. 47)). By further exploring these diaries, one will be able to discern when, and why, McGarrity’s perception of Roosevelt changed, and what key factors pushed McGarrity from staunch support to strong dislike.

——————–
Emily Poteat is a graduate assistant in Irish Studies and Falvey Memorial Library’s Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement Department, and a graduate student in the History Department.

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From the Archives: Black Student League on Campus

From the Archives: Black Student League on Campus

Black Student League meeting, 1972

Black Student League, 1972 yearbook

“We Black Students see our purpose as being twofold: first, we are constantly trying to education relate more to the problems that all people face in society; secondly, we try to make the educational process reciprocal by impression upon teachers and other students that we have a worthwhile viewpoint which should be acknowledged.

Specifically, we would like to see more courses dealing with the problems of the community included in the curriculum. For example, instead of just having biology as a required course, why not make community health also a required course. Also, in teaching history why not include the contributions of other peoples as required courses.

These things are of the utmost importance because they will build understanding and respect for other peoples and their problems, and will get away from the viewpoint that only the majority opinion is right.” – Ronald Rothwell ’73

Black Student League event poster, 1971

Black Student League event poster, 1971

 

Looking back at our past is a way to recognize and honor the many accomplishments and contributions of Black individuals and communities to our Villanova history, culture, and values. For Black History Month, the University Archives’ highlights the Black Student League. Since its inception in the 1960s, the Black Student League (known today as the Black Cultural Society) has been a mainstay on campus with innumerable amount work bringing to light inequality on campus and contributing new ideas of equality and inclusion for a better campus culture. The University Archives invites you to learn more about the Black Student League and the Black experience in the 1960s with The Villanovan special issue, from April 23, 1969,  called, “Black Wildcat.” The issue included several articles about identity, racism, and campus culture. Please be advised there is a content warning of the issue.

 

Learn more about the Black Student League in the Digital Library.

 

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Content Roundup – Last Week – January 2022

Read, research and review the newest available digitized content. This week: new dime novels and story paper issues, more of the literary notebooks of Annie Tuttle containing poems and lyrical verse, and a host of offerings from the James Wheeler Collection of Polar Exploration including correspondence from notable explorers.

Americana

Notebook, “Mile A Minute Composition Book” / Annie L.Tuttle.

Annie L. Tuttle papers (5 notebooks added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:684371]

Dime Novel and Popular Literature

Fiction

Buffalo Bill in the jaws of death; or, The strange sacrifice of Uncopah / by the author of “Buffalo Bill.”

New Buffalo Bill Weekly (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:596124?lookfor=series%3A%28120+OR+122+OR+123+OR+124%29]

Periodicals

Detail, p. [273], Golden Days : for Boys and Girls, v. VIII, no. 18, April 2, 1887

Golden Days (5 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:650112?lookfor=title%3Aapril]

The Illustrated record, v. V, no. 64, Saturday, August 10, 1895

Illustrated Record (2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:687559]

New York Ledger (2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:688217?lookfor=title%3Amay]

New York Weekly (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:686038]

The People’s Home Journal, v. XXV, no. 5, May, 1910

People’s Home Journal (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:683123]

Portland Transcript (3 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:687558?lookfor=title%3Amay]

Detail, p. [1], The Weekly novelette, v. VI, no. 2, Saturday, September 24, 1859

Weekly Novelette (2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:686149]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:686169]

James Wheeler Collection of Polar Exploration

Letter, To: “Dear Sir” From: John Franklin, undated.

Letter, To: “Dear Sir” From: John Franklin, undated.
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:682928]

Letter, To: Rev’d H. Wagner From: Sir John Franklin, undated.

Letter, To: Rev’d H. Wagner From: Sir John Franklin, undated.
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:682921]

Diagram, showing latitude near North Pole, signed by Robert Peary, November 1, 1909

Diagram, showing latitude near North Pole, signed by Robert Peary, November 1, 1909
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:682948]

Letter, To: Dr. O. H. Tittmann From: R.E. Peary, December 9, 1910
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:682941]

Letter, To: Dr. Tittmann From: E. H. Shackleton, September 28, 1909
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:682954]

Letter, To: Dr. F. Feith From: Knud Rasmussen, 28 November, 1929
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:682935]

Letter, To: Mr. Isaiah Bowmann From: Robert Flaherty, April 18, 1918
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:682960]

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Green Voices of the Past: Joseph McGarrity, Irish Republicanism, and Irish Organizing in the Months before World War II

Posted for: Emily Poteat.

As a person with a passion for the history of World War II, it is needless to say I was intrigued at the prospect of transcribing Joseph McGarrity’s diary from 1939. Through his distinctive scrawling handwriting, McGarrity details his hopes, his Irish-republican organizing, and his personal opinions about the happenings of the world in the immediate months preceding the Second World War.

Photograph, Joseph McGarrity, standing with gloves, n.d.

Beyond this, McGarrity’s diary is immensely riveting in nature. Within just the first few pages, one is teleported into one of the Irish-republican effort’s most prolific minds, as he charts and plans how the Irish republican cause could benefit from an alliance with the Third Reich. On page ten of the manuscript McGarrity directly states that he sought, from an alliance with Nazi Germany, “technicians…particularly chemical experts,” to “ask for submarine experts to be trained,” and most tellingly with his intentions “that sufficient war stuffs be supplied in the line of war material for a major engagement in England.” As evidenced by McGarrity’s rhetoric, McGarrity and his Irish republican compatriots were planning for a major military effort and armed engagements on mainland England in the months preceding World War II. This is significant, as from my experience with McGarrity’s personal manuscripts, this is the first time he directly alluded to his involvement in arms procurement for the sole purpose of armed warfare with England. Furthermore, McGarrity’s diary entry directly points to a major Irish-republican effort to align itself with Hitler’s Nazi Germany right before World War II.

p. 10, Diary, “Diary, Joseph McGarrity, 1939,” Joseph McGarrity, 1939.

Most pertinently, McGarrity’s diary points to an intentional effort of Irish Republicans to organize armed engagement beyond anonymous bombings in England, which McGarrity chronicles in his diary as well. The purpose of this alignment with Germany in 1939 for McGarrity, was to force England to remove its forces from Northern Ireland and to allow both Ireland and Northern Ireland to unite into a single republican nation. If this were to occur, McGarrity believed that recognition by other nations was critical to the success of a completely independent and united Ireland, as he professes on page ten “since the freedom of Ireland would mean the freedom of the seas early Recognition by German Italy + [sic] Spain and as many of the Government as Germany and Her Allies can influence should come as early a date as possible.” Clearly, McGarrity saw an alliance with Nazi Germany as a clear way to push forward the effort to unite the Ireland and Northern Ireland. Distinctively, further corroborating McGarrity’s intention is his statement on page ten, “in case war supplies must be landed in England so that an Irish Republican force can get into action there on a big scale I feel sure they would be joined by many thousands of Irish once operations would begin in England.”

Expounding on McGarrity’s idea that the Irish Republican cause would benefit through an alliance with Germany, McGarrity, throughout his diary is incredibly critical of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, his cabinet, and the British parliament. Evidence for this lies in McGarrity’s numerous newspaper clippings he includes in his diary, that often only include critical assessments of the British government or critical views surrounding Roosevelt’s intentions towards the Irish cause.

As a whole, McGarrity’s 1939 diary offers important insight into the way Irish Americans, and Irish republicans like Joseph McGarrity, sought to align themselves, as well as sought to continue the Irish republican cause in the immediate months before the Second World War.

——————–
Emily Poteat is a graduate assistant in Irish Studies and Falvey Memorial Library’s Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement Department, and a graduate student in the History Department.

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Last Modified: January 19, 2022