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Ever Wonder What the World Was Thinking?

By Merrill Stein

 

Gallup Analytics, one of Falvey’s newest polling resources, uses three entry points, Topic, Geography, and Keywords to analyze recurring daily and world polls for data sources in U.S. Dailies, World Poll, Gallup Poll Social Series, and Key Indicators.

Poll questions track a variety of economics, well-being, religion, environmental, and political data. Data can be compiled for table, chart, map, and export to MS Excel for the United States, individual states, Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) district levels, and the world. Trend, rank, and scatter plot depictions can also be visualized.

Gallup World Poll data covers more than 80 metrics from 160+ countries. Current Gallup Analytics subscription includes data coverage for the  21st century only. Subscription does not include historical Gallup Brain content. World Poll recurring questions may vary by year and country conditions.

Access to Gallup Analytics  is available via the Library’s Databases A-Z list and the Library catalog.  Select sample search results appear below.

 


Merrill Stein is Political Science Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 

 


 


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Read The New Yorker Online!

By Susan Turkel

Did you know that you can access more than 50,000 online journals, magazines, and newspapers through Villanova’s online subscriptions?

Some of these journals are very niche, such as the Journal of Crustacean Biology and the International Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics.

Others are very well known, including the Philadelphia Inquirer, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and Sports Illustrated.

We also provide the Villanova community with access to some old favorites, including The New Yorker. Founded in 1925, The New Yorker is one of the most well-known and influential magazines in the U.S. Whether you’re a fan of the magazine’s cartoons, its in-depth articles, short fiction, featured poetry, movie reviews, or famous covers, you’re in for a treat!

Every issue of The New Yorker is available in a full-color, page-flippable interface from OpinionArchives. Villanova faculty, staff, and students can access it by clicking the FindIt button in the catalog record and selecting the OpinionArchives option.

The interface provides a full-page view of the cover and instructions for navigating the site.

New Yorker cover and navigation instructions

Click Browse Issues (under the three horizontal lines / “hamburger” icon on the upper-right hand corner of the page) to view the list by year. From there, you can click the cover image to view any issue.

New Yorker covers - clickable thumbnails

To read an issue, use the arrows on the screen to turn pages. Click This Issue to see thumbnail images of each page which allow you to navigate the magazine. You can zoom in for a closer look, and you can print either the full issue or a selection of pages.

To search the archive, click the magnifying glass icon in the upper right. You may find that the Advanced Search is more helpful than the Basic Search.

For an alternate way to search New Yorker content, you can try Reader’s Guide Retrospective (covers 1940-1982) and Readers’ Guide Full Text Mega (covers 1983 to present). These databases provide indexing of authors, titles, and subject headings for the content of a variety of general interest and popular magazines. Search for New Yorker in “SO Journal Name” and put your other search terms in another search box.

 

Once you find an article of interest in Reader’s Guide, click the FindIt button to return to the OpinionArchives interface. You may need to navigate the issue using the thumbnails and Table of Contents to get to the specific article.

Take some time to enjoy flipping through this friendly interface to The New Yorker; read a story, enjoy a cartoon, find a movie recommendation. Or, dive into the archives – almost 100 years’ worth! Either way, it’s a great rabbit hole to fall into.



Susan Turkel is a Social Sciences Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library. She has a giant pile of old print New Yorkers on her bookshelf.


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Littman E-Library of Jewish Civilization Trial

By Jutta Seibert

Explore the ensemble of Jewish studies books published in the Littman Library of Jewish Civilization (LLJC) series. The books published in this series cover a range of subject areas including history, religious studies, philosophy, literature, and cultural studies including classical and modern works. Online access to LLJC is available on trial basis until Nov. 22 through the Databases A-Z list on the Library’s website.


The series was established in 1965 by Louis Littman in memory of his father with the intent to explore, explain, and perpetuate Jewish heritage. Louis Littman described his motivation for the project and the challenges involved in publishing high-quality Jewish studies books in English in a posthumously published article in the journal of Jewish Historical Studies.

Littman, Louis. “The Littman Library of Jewish Civilization.” Jewish Historical Studies 29 (1982): 311-25. http://www.jstor.org/stable/29779823.

Founder and editors of the series initially focused on publishing translations of seminal Jewish works written in Hebrew as expressed on the dust jacket of the first book in the series: “The aim of the Littman Library of Jewish Civilization is to present to the English-speaking public a selection of some of the finest products of the Jewish religious and literary genius.” The first volume published in 1965 was the poetry collection Hebrew Poems from Spain, selected and translated by David Goldstein. Most of the works published in LLJC in the last decades were written in English. Among the recently added titles are Hasidism Beyond Modernity, Cities of Splendour in the Shaping of Sephardi History, and Final Judgment and the Dead in Medieval Jewish Thought.

Today, LLJC books can be found on various online platforms, such as JSTOR, Liverpool University Press, and ACLS Humanities E-Book. The current trial gives the Villanova community access to a subset of 50 titles on the Liverpool University Press e-book platform. Part of the collection is also available in print. Contact us if you have questions or if you would like to recommend this series for the permanent collection.


Jutta Seibert is Director of Research Services & Scholarly Engagement at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 



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Trial access to Bloomsbury Fashion Central

By Jutta Seibert

Bloomsbury Fashion Central (BFC) is a platform that features a range of interdisciplinary research resources on dress and textile culture. Available through BFC are the Berg Fashion Library, the Fairchild Books Library, Bloomsbury Fashion Business Cases, and archives of fashion photography and video. Campus-wide access to BFC is available on trial basis until Oct. 23 through the Databases A-Z list on the Library’s website.

While BFC was clearly created with fashion professionals in mind, books in the Berg Fashion Library have a broad multi-disciplinary appeal and cover all aspects of dress and fashion worldwide. The Library’s collection already includes a small selection of print books from the Berg Fashion Library among them the Berg Companion to Fashion and The Dictionary of Fashion History.

Another noteworthy title in this award-winning library is a new edition of Peter McNeil’s collection of essays on fashion by a wide swath of critical thinkers among them Roland Barthes, Pierre Bourdieu, Fernand Braudel, Johan Huizinga, Georg Simmel, and Thorstein Veblen. Originally published as Fashion: Critical and Primary Sources, the new edition is called Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion. Michelle Maskiell’s “Consuming Kashmir: Shawls and Empires, 1500–2000” is one of the essays in this collection that reveals the intricate connections between fashion and daily life, politics, and economics. Also included is the multi-volume Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion which explores all aspects of dress and fashion on a global level.

Take a closer look at some of the works featured in this collection and let us know what you think. Here are a few titles to get you started:

BFC also includes lesson plans and bibliographic subject guides on a range of topics such as fashion and art, the social psychology of dress, and fashion and gender contributed by subject experts. Each object has its own doi to facilitate content sharing and integration in the online classroom. Contact us if you have questions.


Jutta Seibert is Director of Research Services & Scholarly Engagement at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 



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Trial access to the Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism

By Jutta Seibert

Students and scholars interested in the modernist era will welcome the chance to take a closer look at The Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism (REM) in the coming weeks. Trial access will be available until October 23 through the Databases A-Z list on the Library’s website.

REM distinguishes itself through global interdisciplinary coverage of its subject matter. The ideas of modernism were explored and embraced by artists, writers, and thinkers in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Well known schools and movements such as expressionism, social realism, dadaism, cubism, and Bauhaus emerged during the modernist era. Modernist thinking and ideas influenced architecture, dance, theater, film, literature, music, philosophy, and the visual arts.

The REM platform offers both keyword searching and browsing by subject, movement, and place. All articles are written by subject specialists and include recommended reading lists as well as cross-references to related resources. For example, the article about Russian Modernism proffers links to articles about representative Russian artists and works as well as to overview articles on Social Realism and Symbolism. While REM content is heavily weighted in favor of artists and movements in the visual arts and literature, there are some unexpected contributions, such as an article about Physical Culture, which traces today’s interest in physical fitness back to the modernist era.

Take the online tour to learn more about REM, and contact us if you would like to recommend REM for the permanent collection.


Jutta Seibert is Director of Research Services & Scholarly Engagement at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 



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Black Lives Matter: Resources from Falvey Library and Beyond

Collage of book covers featured in the article.

By Beaudry Allen, Laura Bang, Deborah Bishov, Sarah Wingo, and Kallie Stahl 

Black lives matter. Antiracism is a lifelong process. Over the past months, we’ve seen an outpouring of interest from our community seeking to learn more and to broaden their understanding of the historical context of our current moment. Our role as the library is to share resources to support learning, so with that in mind, we are sharing a list of books and other resources. No list of this nature could ever be comprehensive, but we hope that this list, compiled by members of the Falvey Memorial Library Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion working group, will serve as a starting point.  

 

Falvey Memorial Library E-Resources
These books and movies are available digitally in our collections and are free to all members of the Villanova University community.  

Freely Available E-books
These e-books are currently (as of September 2020) freely available on the internet. 


Podcasts

These podcasts are freely available on the internet. 


Other Freely Available Resources

These web resources are freely available to everyone. 

Public Libraries
Because of the way e-book licensing works, some e-books not available through Falvey may be available through your local public library. Current Villanova affiliates have access to the collections at the Free Library of Philadelphia and the Lower Merion Library System. If you live outside Pennsylvania, you may have access to other large library systems beyond your local public library.  The following e-books are available from the Free Library, though some have a wait list  

Additional Anti-Racist Reading Lists 


If you’re looking for a specific work or for literature on a specific topic, please feel free to get in touch with our librarians at
ref@villanova.edu 


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Missing the Book Shelves in Falvey? Give Virtual Browsing a Try!

Carl Spitzweg, Der Buchwurm,
ca. 1850, oil on canvas, 49.5×26.8 cm,
Museum Georg Schäfer.
Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

By Jutta Seibert

This is a year like no other. The Villanova community grew to meet every new challenge. When the Library building closed in March, for example, we had to rely exclusively on electronic sources. The dedicated folks at Falvey brought back access to the print collection in July with contactless pickup. However, the book stacks need to remain closed for the foreseeable future.

We know many of you miss direct access to the shelves and the ability to browse their contents at your leisure. Scholars often wax nostalgic about shelf-browsing and fondly remember serendipitous discoveries made in the stacks. They encourage their students to do the same and gently nudge them by telling them where to start.

Shelf-browsing has unique qualities that are not easily defined. What is it that drives us to reach for an unknown book? Is it its title or the fact that we are familiar with its author? Is it the color or material of its binding? Is it its size or its condition?

Every spine along the shelves contains worlds and new knowledge.

It is easy to forget that shelf-browsing has its disadvantages too: books that are missing or checked out escape our notice unless we take note of the empty space on the shelf. These “missing” books are often the most influential or “popular” titles. But the biggest drawback to shelf-browsing is the absence of electronic books, which continue to grow in popularity.

Did you know that you can browse the Library’s collection virtually? Virtual shelf-browsing is in many ways a superior alternative to in person shelf-browsing. It is one of the most overlooked search features in today’s library catalogs. It may lack some of the meditative, relaxing aspects of getting lost in the stacks, but it certainly will lead to more serendipitous discoveries than a stroll in the stacks. Virtual shelf-browsing shows the complete collection: the virtual shelf presents digital records of electronic books and print books. Print books are represented regardless of whether they are checked out.

Learn How to Browse the Shelves Virtually! It is easy enough once you get the hang of it, and maybe you will even keep doing it in post-pandemic times.

Contact us if you have questions.

 


Jutta Seibert is Director of Research Services & Scholarly Engagement at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 



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New Guide to Finding Film Reviews

By Susan Turkel

Image of movie theater by Nathan Engel via pexels.com

 

Are you taking a film studies class… or just looking for a good movie to watch on Friday night? Depending on your interest, come to (virtual) Falvey for help finding a film review or some film criticism!

The library has put together a guide to finding both reviews of movies (typically found in newspapers, magazines, and on websites), and works of film criticism, which are scholarly works on films and filmmakers that are usually found in scholarly books and journals.

Film reviews are usually published soon after a film or DVD is released. They describe the film and provide some sort of evaluation, to help potential viewers decide whether to watch the movie. Film criticism or film critique is more analytical, and may include references to film theory and other kinds of literary or cultural theory.

The Finding Film Reviews guide offers links to free websites like Rotten Tomatoes and Metacritic, which collate film reviews and provide “what to watch” lists. The guide also provides links and search tips for using library-subscribed academic resources that delve into film studies scholarship.

This guide and many others are linked from the Library’s How-to Guides list, which is linked under Research Services at the top of every page. You’ll find tips there on finding information in various formats, getting your scholarship published, annotating PDFs, using e-books, and more.

As a reminder: Falvey offers access to thousands of streaming films for your edification and viewing pleasure! Please visit the Streaming Video at Falvey guide for more information.

If you need more help finding film reviews, film critiques, or any other type of information, please contact your friendly librarian. We are always happy to help!

 


Susan Turkel is a Social Sciences Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library. 

 

 

 


 


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New Resource Available on the History of Gender Activism

By Sarah Hughes

Gender: Identity and Social Change is a new resource from Adam Matthew Digital containing both primary and secondary resources from the 19th century up to the present. As the name suggests, the collection covers the interdisciplinary area of gender history. Pivotal historical moments related to activism, which lead to equality and women’s rights are found through international primary resources from the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and Australia.

Official program, Woman Suffrage Procession, 1909-1919, © Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America

Some of the themes in the collection include women’s suffrage, feminism, employment and labor, organizations, education, legal cases, and domesticity and the family.

Speeches, pamphlets, newspaper clippings, correspondence, and diaries are just a few of the primary sources that detail the historical development gender identity, roles, and relations. Also featured is an array of visuals, including photographs, illustrations, posters, scrapbooks, and objects. Some of the secondary resources are supplemental essays from leading scholars in the field and video interviews with leading academics.

Access to the collections is available via the link above or on the Library’s Database A-Z list and its catalog.

 


Sarah Hughes is Nursing & Life Sciences Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.

 


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Commemorating the End of Slavery, Celebrating Juneteenth!

By Jutta Seibert

General Order No. 3, June 19, 1865
Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

June 19, 1865 marks the end of slavery in Texas. On this day Major General Gordon Granger of the Union Army occupied Texas on behalf of the federal government and upon arrival on Galveston Island publicly read General Order No. 3 which began with this sentence: “The people of Texas are informed that in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free.”

While slaves in the Confederate states were theoretically freed on January 1, 1863 with President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, solely those in Union-occupied areas and those who fled to the North became de facto free. For most slaves in the South slavery ended only after the Union won and even then, close to six weeks passed before the news reached the outer fringes of the nation. June 19 is commemorated as the day on which the last slaves were freed despite the fact that slavery persisted in some pockets of the country until the Thirteenth Amendment took effect on December 18, 1865.

On the first anniversary of Granger’s reading of General Order No. 3 Texan freedmen began celebrating what was then called Jubilee Day. Early festivities included political rallies besides music and food. Celebrations waxed and waned over the years but the longest-running African American holiday continues to this day. June 19 or Juneteenth evolved over time into America’s second Independence Day. In 1980 Texas, befittingly, became the first state to adopt Juneteenth as a state-wide holiday. Other states followed suite and most states now recognize Juneteenth as a state holiday or ceremonial holiday. There are efforts underway to make Juneteenth a national holiday.

Commemorate Juneteenth by exploring African American history. We recommend the following collections:


Jutta Seibert is Director of Research Services & Scholarly Engagement at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 



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Last Modified: June 17, 2020