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Celebrating Faculty Adopting Open Educational Resources (OER)

The Affordable Materials Project celebrated the work of five faculty members who adopted open educational resources (OER) in the 2020–21 academic year.  OER are free, accessible, and openly licensed textbooks.

Alexander Diaz Lopez, PhD, Assistant Professor, Mathematics & Statistics; Stephanie Katz Linkmeyer, PhD, Assistant Teaching Professor, Chemistry; Sarvesh Kulkarni, PhD, Associate Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering; Sue McFarland Metzger, Professor of the Practice, Information Systems; and Motjaba Vaezi, PhD, Assistant Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering, were motivated to adopt OER for a variety of reasons not limited to the significant cost savings for students. Faculty noted that the award inspired them to try OER.

Dr. Katz Linkmeyer appreciated the seamless integration of OER with Lab Archives, and Professor McFarland Metzger’s integrated with Blackboard. They liked that digital OER incorporated interactive features, but were also available as PDFs for offline use or in print. Professor McFarland Metzger noticed that by giving students the OER they all were on the same page with course content. One faculty member attributed improved Course and Teacher Surveys scores, in part, to the adoption of OER.

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Several faculty remarked they supplemented OER with extra notes, problems, exercises, and figures to better align with their course objectives and that this was time intensive but worthwhile. Additional support for these projects would be welcome.

Students remarked that they liked having continued access to the book in contrast to e-book rentals. They admitted that the use of OER relieved students from weighing the risks involved in waiting to see if the assigned textbook is really used as a key resource for learning and assessments. They felt that the use of OER relieved financial pressures and hoped to see more widespread adoption of OER across the curriculum.

The 2021–22 OER Faculty Adoption Grant is accepting applications.  Visit this site to apply.

A recording of the full faculty forum, including student’s remarks is available to the Villanova community and a version with only the faculty presentations, is available for open viewing.


Linda Hauck is the Business Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library and Affordable Materials Project member.

 

 


 


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Celebrate Earth Week 2021 With Campus Events

Celebrate Earth Week 2021 with the campus events below!

Pre-Earth Week Events

Sustainable Living Conversations: Students

  • Sustainable Fashion—Friday, April 9 at 1 p.m.; Led by: Sarah Wisniewski ’22 Psychology and Delaina Castillo ’21 Environmental Science.
  • Eating Vegan or Vegetarian on Campus—Wednesday, April 14 at 7 p.m.; Led by: Amelia Robinson ’21 Psychology and Jameson Parker ’21 Finance.

Sustainable Living Conversations: Faculty and Staff

  • Mastering a Vegetarian Diet—Wednesday, April 14 at 12 p.m.; Led by: Deena Weisberg, Assistant Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences, and Steven Goldsmith, Associate Professor of Geography and the Environment.
  • Explore Renewable Energy Solutions for Your Home—Friday, April 16 at 12 p.m.; Led by: Christopher Kilby, Professor of Economics, and Scott Dressler, Professor of Economics.

Earth Week Events 

Monday, April 19

  • Climate (De)Regulation in the Courts—Tune in from 4-5 p.m. to hear from Villanova University’s Charles Widger School of Law Professor Todd Aagaard on the state of regulating climate change pollutants in the United States.

Wednesday, April 21

Thursday, April 22

  • Campus Tree Tour—11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., meet under Corr Arch. Learn about all the amazing trees on campus from Villanova’s Horticulturalist Hugh Weldon. Pre-registration is required.
  • Keynote Address—Join us at 5:30 p.m. to hear from renowned climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe, PhD, an endowed Professor in Public Policy and Public Law and Co-Director of the Climate Center at Texas Tech University, on “Christians, Climate, and our Culture in the US.” Pre-registration is required.
  • Quizzo: Earth Day Edition—9-10:30 p.m.; Enjoy your weekly Quizzo with a green twist. The questions for the night won’t be the only thing centered around the Earth Day theme, so will the food and prizes.

Friday, April 23

  • Earth Day Food Truck Friday—Sustainability themed food trucks will be set up along the Campus Green area (right by the road along Falvey) and will be handing out samples to students between 8 p.m. and 10 p.m.

Saturday, April 24

  • Sustainability Market on the Green—Enjoy an evening market filled with sustainability vendors and products from 6-9 p.m. Free giveaways, along with items for sale, will fill out our first Sustainability Market on the Green.
  • Open Mic For Justice—The open mic is a space for a wide range of solo or group artistic expressions. Music, song, dramatic readings, comedy, sketches and skits, dance, and beyond are welcome. We ask that all performances somehow address an issue of social justice. Performances should not exceed five minutes. The event will take place from 7-8:50 p.m. and 9-10:50 p.m. on the green near the Riley Ellipse.

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TBT: Dorm Life

The dorm is the first home away from home for many college students and a place that you can really make your own over the course of a semester. Whether that’s decorating with posters or bringing your favorite blanket or pillow from home, it’s those little comfort items that really make it homey. Check out this throwback picture from the 1968 Belle Air looking at the “cinder block bag of potpourri” – the dorm room.


Jenna Newman is a graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication Department.


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Dig Deeper: Ma Rainey and Billie Holiday

Two films featuring revolutionary singers were released just a few months apart—Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom and The United States vs. Billie Holiday. Premiering on Netflix on Nov. 25, 2020, Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, (named after Rainey’s song of the same name), is adopted from August Wilson’s Tony-Award winning play of the same name. The film depicts tensions amongst Rainey and her band as they come together to record a new album at a Chicago music studio in 1927.

The United States vs. Billie Holiday premiered on Hulu on Feb. 26, 2021. Based on Johann Hari’s novel Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs, the film follows Holiday’s career as the Federal Department of Narcotics launches an undercover sting operation against the jazz singer.

Both films have received numerous accolades and nominations:

Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom 

  • Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role—Viola Davis as Ma Rainey (2021 Academy Award Nominee)
  • Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role—the late Chadwick Boseman as Levee Green (2021 Academy Award Nominee)
  • Best Achievement in Costume Design—Ann Roth (2021 Academy Award Nominee)
  • Best Achievement in Makeup and Hairstyling—Sergio Lopez-Rivera, Mia Neal and Jamika Wilson (2021 Academy Award Nominee) 
  • Best Achievement in Production—Production Design: Mark Ricker; Set Decoration: Karen O’Hara and Diana Stoughton (2021 Academy Award Nominee) 
  • Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture: Drama—the late Chadwick Boseman as Levee Green (2021 Golden Globe Winner, Posthumously)
  • Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture: Drama—Viola Davis as Ma Rainey (2021 Golden Globe Nominee)

The United States vs. Billie Holiday 

  • Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role—Andra Day as Billie Holiday (2021 Academy Award Nominee)
  • Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture: Drama—Andra Day as Billie Holiday (2021 Golden Globe Winner)
  • Best Original Song: Motion Picture—For song “Tigress & Tweed,” Raphael Saadiq: music/lyrics, Andra Day: music/lyrics (2021 Golden Globe Nominee) 

Rainey and Holiday were trailblazing singers: Rainey was famed “The Mother of the Blues” and Holiday had a major influence on jazz and swing genres. Dig deeper and explore the links below for additional information on the groundbreaking performers.

Ma Rainey Georgia Jazz Band pose for a studio group shot c 1924-25 with ‘Gabriel’, Albert Wynn, Dave Nelson, Ma Rainey, Ed Pollack and Thomas A Dorsey. (Photo by JP Jazz Archive/Redferns/Getty Images)

Ma Rainey 

Although records suggest that Rainey was born in Alabama in September 1882, Rainey stated she was born Gertrude Pridgett in Columbus, Georgia on April 26, 1886. “Known for her thunderous, moaning voice, sharp comic timing and compelling stage presence, Rainey was a pioneer of early blues music.”

Rainey began singing as a teenager, performing in a local Columbus stage show called “A Bunch of Blackberries.” She married fellow performer Will Rainey in 1904 and they began touring with the Rabbit’s Foot Company, billing themselves as “Ma and Pa Rainey.” After her marriage ended, Rainey established her own performance company, “Madame Gertrude Rainey and her Georgia Smart Sets.” Her band became one of the highest paid acts on tour.

Rainey wrote a third of her songs, and often sang about her bisexuality. “Angela Davis called Rainey’s 1928 song “Prove it on Me,” a precursor to the lesbian cultural movement of the 1970s.” In 1923 Rainey signed with Paramount Records and recorded nearly 100 records. She continued to tour, however by 1935 Paramount had gone bankrupt and her records were no longer distributed. She retired and worked as a theatre proprietor in Georgia until her death in 1939. She was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990.

 

Jazz singer Billie Holiday wears a large white flower in her hair for a performance in New York City. (© Bradley Smith/CORBIS)

Billie Holiday 

Holiday was born Eleanora Fagan Gough on April 7, 1915, in Philadelphia. Singing in her teens, Holiday began auditioning with pianists at jazz clubs in New York when she and her mother moved to the city in 1929. Borrowing her professional name from actress Billie Dove and her father Clarence Halliday, she “quickly became an active participant in what was then the most vibrant jazz scene in the country–as the Harlem Renaissance transitioned into the Swing Era.”

Producer John Hammond offered Holiday her first record deal and from 1935-1941 Holiday’s career skyrocketed—often collaborating with pianist Teddy Wilson and saxophonist Lester Young, who “famously christened her Lady Day.” In 1937, she joined Kansas City’s Count Basie Orchestra, whose shows were among the top billed performances of the time.

In the 1930’s, Holiday was at Café Society in Manhattan when she was introduced to the poem “Strange Fruit.” Written by Abel Meeropol, the poem details the horrific depiction of lynching in the Southern United States and in 1939 Holiday began signing the poem at her concerts. “Strange Fruit is ‘considered by scholars to be the first protest song of the Civil Rights era. The lyric was so controversial that Holiday’s record label wouldn’t record it, so she jumped over to the independent Commodore Records where she could record and sing as she pleased.'”

Holiday received multiple warnings from the Federal Bureau of Narcotics to stop singing “Strange Fruit,” though she never did. Henry Anslinger, the first commissioner of the U.S. Treasury Department’s Federal Bureau of Narcotics, exploited Holiday’s ongoing struggle with addiction to silence her. Holiday was arrested and convicted of narcotics possession in 1947 and sentenced to one year and a day in prison.

Upon release, Holiday had lost her cabaret card (no longer able to play in clubs that served alcohol), and began performing in concert halls. Still widely popular, she continued to tour and perform in the 1950’s though her substance abuse had taken its toll on her voice. She gave her final performance on May 25, 1959, in New York City. She passed away on July 17, 1959. She was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library. 

 

 


 


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Cat in the Stax: National Library Week

We’re officially halfway through National Library Week! There’s something about libraries that sticks with you throughout life, whether it’s memories of getting your first ever library card or late nights spent writing papers and studying for exams. For this week’s Cat in the Stax I’m going to reminisce on some of my favorite library memories and factors that make a great library.

My first library card was from the Mercer County Library, and I remember practicing writing my name over and over again because my mom said once I could write my own name, I could get my library card. Despite having not been there in over 10 years, I can still distinctly remember where everything is located. Every summer they would always have different events for elementary students that promoted reading and learning. One factor that makes a great library is the variety of programming and events that they have available, whether in-person or virtual!

During my undergraduate years, I spent quite a bit of time at the University of Delaware’s Morris Library. My four years there included many late night study sessions and trying to snag the best study spots between classes. Another mark of a quality library is definitely study spots and study rooms. My roommate and I would always meet up in our pre-booked study room after classes to study before heading back to our apartment!

Maybe I’m a little biased, but my favorite library right now is definitely Falvey! Beyond the extensive programming and study spots, Falvey also has an amazing group of staff and librarians that are always willing to help with papers and research projects. Plus, having Holy Grounds there to get a mid-study caffeine fix has become a deal-breaker for me as far as study spots go. Make sure to head over to Falvey sometime this week to celebrate National Library Week and let us know what you think makes a great library on social media or in the comments!


jenna newman headshotJenna Newman is a graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication Department.


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Get to Know Gale’s British Library Newspapers

Gale poster image

Please join us on Tuesday, April 13, from 12-1 p.m., for a webinar to learn more about a new Gale primary source collection available at Falvey Memorial Library: British Library Newspapers.

Enhance your understanding of regional life and culture in Britain across parts of three centuries with a trove of local newspaper coverage and first-hand accounts with British Library Newspapers. This resource provides researchers with the most comprehensive collection of national and regional newspapers of eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and early twentieth-century Britain. Taken directly from the extensive holdings of the British Library, the selected publications provide coverage of well-known historic events, cultural icons, sporting events, the arts, culture, and other national pastimes.

In this webinar, we’ll explore best practices for finding what you need in the collection, how to share it with students, and ways to incorporate it into research and syllabi.

REGISTER here to attend or receive a link to the recording after.

You can browse Falvey’s extensive Databases A-Z list here and dive deeper into British Library Newspapers as well as the countless other databases available to help you with your research needs!

For one-on-one help using Gale, we suggest that you reach out to Sarah Wingo or Jutta Seibert.

Sarah Wingo headshot black and white

 

Sarah Wingo specializes in the areas of English literature, theatre, and romance languages and literature. More information about how to book an appointment with Sarah is available here.

 

jutta seibert headshot black and white

 

Jutta Seibert specializes in the areas of history, art history, and global interdisciplinary studies. More information about how to book an appointment with Jutta is available here.

 

You can connect with one of our other expert subject librarians for help using library resources as well. A full list of Falvey librarians and their subject specializations are listed here.


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Review: Villanova Theatre’s The Scar Test Shines in Virtual Presentation

By Shawn Proctor

The Scar Test Scene

 

“Women cry, are dragged out screaming. Where do they go?”

This line of dialogue, delivered late in the play by a detainee without a name, cuts to the heart of Villanova Theatre’s The Scar Test, which streamed online March 25-April 4.

Hannah Khalil

Hannah Khalil, playwright of The Scar Test

The person provides merely one of the fragmented stories that create Hannah Khalil’s play. And, together, their narratives explore and illuminate the lives of those individuals detained at Yari’s Wood Immigration Removal Centre in the United Kingdom. The centre holds hundreds of women who are seeking asylum from their countries. It has been described as “inhumane” by detainees who receive spoiled food and report racial abuse by staff.

This virtual production, lasting an hour and recorded socially distanced and masked, renders its eight ensemble cast members even more anonymous. Their faces are obscured, except for their eyes.

From afar, it underlines that their humanity has been stripped away. They could be anyone. They could be us.

But the online format also provides a focus unavailable to theatre performed on stage. Director Claire Moyer and Director of Photography Michael Long use the camera to push the viewer to both look closer and not look away. This eye does not let the audience’s attention wander to study the set or secondary characters in the scene. And even masked, the detainees’ intimate struggles come through, as they are forced to relive and defend their reasons for fleeing their countries: the scar test.

The issue of immigration is complicated and fraught. And current Charles A. Heimbold Chair for Irish Studies Hannah Khalil treats it with complexity and nuance, largely allowing the quiet desperation of the situation permeate the scenes.

They appear. They disappear.

They have no names, and we are not told their fates. But what remains is their stories, along with this burning question: “What do we do now?”

Khalil will present a digital lecture and reading as part of the 2021 Villanova Literary Festival on Thursday, April 15, 2021, at 5 p.m. Register here.


Shawn Proctor is Communications and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library.


 


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Photo Friday: A Blessed Easter to All

Easter Poster

“God loves each of us as if there were only one of us.” – Saint Augustine

A blessed Easter to Villanovans around the world. To celebrate this joyous season, we decided to revisit the Easter exhibit from 2013, “I Am the Resurrection and the Life (John 11:25): An Easter Celebration from Special Collections.”

Visual. Intellectual. Spiritual.

The exhibit was designed by Laura Bang, ‎Distinctive Collections Librarian; she and Michael Foight, Director of Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement, mounted the exhibit; and Joanne Quinn, Director of Communications and Marketing, created posters and other graphics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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TBT: National Library Worker’s Day

National Library Worker’s Day is next Tuesday, April 6. As a way to show appreciation for those who work and have worked in Falvey, here’s a throwback picture of Librarian Rev. Louis A. Rongione, OSA, overseeing work on a library project from the 1968 Belle Air. That same year, groundbreaking ceremonies were held for library expansion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


jenna newman headshotJenna Newman is a graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication Department.

 

 

 


 


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Register for the Last Two Literary Festival Events!

 

Literary Festival poster with Hannah Khalil and Robin Coste Lewis

The 23rd annual Villanova Literary Festival resumes on Thursday, April 8! Please REGISTER for the two remaining virtual readings and talks. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event. All readings are ACS approved!

Robin Coste Lewis (Thursday, April 8, at 7 p.m.)

Register here: https://villanova.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMqdOugqD4oEtVf2K5H8upjyxgNcgpqoiyk

Coste Lewis is the poet laureate of Los Angeles. In 2015, her debut poetry collection, Voyage of the Sable Venus (Knopf), won the National Book Award in poetry–the first time a poetry debut by an African-American had ever won the prize in the National Book Foundation’s history. Lewis’ writing has appeared in various journals and anthologies such as Time MagazineThe New YorkerThe New York TimesThe Paris ReviewTransition, and Best American Poetry.

Hannah Khalil (Thursday, April 15, at 5 p.m.)

Register here: https://villanova.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJUlduyrrTkoGNAw5I3RwpJAxEU9dI3CzNyM

Palestinian-Irish writer and playwright, Hannah Khalil holds the Charles Heimbold Chair of Irish Studies for Spring 2021 at Villanova University. Her work for stage includes A Museum in Baghdad, which opened at the Royal Shakespeare Company’s Swan Theatre in 2019, Interference for The National Theatre of Scotland, The Scar Test for Soho Theatre and Scenes from 68* Years for the Arcola. She is currently under commission to write new work for Shakespeare’s Globe, Chichester Festival Theatre, The Kiln and Golden Thread San Francisco. Alongside her theatre work, Khalil has written numerous radio plays, including The Unwelcome, Last of the Pearl Fishers and The Deportation Room all for BBC Radio 4. Television work includes multiple episodes of the Channel 4 drama Hollyoaks. Khalil’s first short film, The Record, won the Tommy Vine screenplay award at the Underwire film festival, and went on to be made. It was selected at London Palestine Film Festival and Almagro Festival as well as Filmets Badalona. It was a finalist in the Tolpuddle Radial Film Festival.


Previous 2021 Literary Festival Speakers:

Brenda Shaughnessy

Shaughnessy is the author of five poetry collections, including The Octopus MuseumSo Much Synth (2016, Copper Canyon Press) and Our Andromeda (2012), which was a finalist for the Kingsley Tufts Award, The International Griffin Prize, and the PEN Open Book Award. A 2013 Guggenheim Foundation Fellow, Shaughnessy is Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing at Rutgers University-Newark.

Bryan Washington

Washington’s debut collection of short stories, Lot, was published by Riverhead in 2019. His fiction and essays have appeared in The New York TimesThe New York Times MagazineThe New YorkerBBC, The Paris ReviewTin House, and numerous other publications. Washington is also a National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 winner, and the recipient of an O. Henry Award.

His first novel, Memorial was released on Oct. 27, 2020. The New York Times called it a Notable Book of 2020 and TIME called it one of their books of the year. So did the Los Angeles TimesEntertainment Weekly and Vanity Fair.


Gina's headshotRegina Duffy is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Last Modified: April 1, 2021