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’Caturday: Welcome Athletes

Image of the the Special Olympics Pennsylvania Fall Festival banner on Villanova's campus. Good luck to all the athletes competing at the Special Olympics Pennsylvania Fall Festival today!


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Upcoming Book Talks at Falvey Library

How to Do Things with Dead People: History, Technology, and Temporality from Shakespeare to Warhol

Alice Dailey, PhD.

Please join us on Wednesday, Nov. 9 from 7:30-8:30 p.m. in Falvey Library’s Room 205 for an event titled “Alice Dailey’s How To Do Things with Dead People: History, Technology, and Temporality from Shakespeare to Warhol, A Conversation and Celebration.” You can also REGISTER HERE to join virtually on the evening of the event.

Together Alice Dailey, PhD, Professor, Department of English, Villanova University;  Peter Holland PhD, McMeel Family Professor in Shakespeare Studies, University Of Notre Dame; and Melissa Sanchez, PhD, Donald T. Regan Professor of English and Comparative Literature, University of Pennsylvania will discuss Alice Dailey’s recently published book, How to Do Things with Dead People: History, Technology, and Temporality from Shakespeare to Warhol (Cornell University Press, 2022).

How to Do Things with Dead People: History, Technology, and Temporality from Shakespeare to Warhol studies human contrivances for representing and relating to the dead. Dailey takes as her principal objects of inquiry Shakespeare’s English history plays, describing them as reproductive mechanisms by which living replicas of dead historical figures are regenerated in the present and re-killed. Considering the plays in these terms exposes their affinity with a transhistorical array of technologies for producing, reproducing, and interacting with dead things—technologies such as literary doppelgängers, photography, ventriloquist puppetry, X-ray imaging, glitch art, capital punishment machines, and cloning.

This ACS-approved event is co-sponsored by the Department of English and Falvey Library. Light refreshments will be served.


Drama and Civility: James Shirley in the Age of Charles III

Please join us for the 2022 Outstanding Faculty Research Award Lecture featuring recipient Lauren Shohet, PhD, on Tuesday, Nov. 15 at 1 p.m. in Falvey Library’s room 205.

Dr. Shohet, Professor, Department of English, will give a presentation that highlights the extensive research that led her to win the coveted Outstanding Faculty Research Award in 2022. Her talk is titled “Drama and Civility: James Shirley in the Age of Charles III.”

Lauren Shohet, PhD.

James Shirley (1596-1666) was a dramatist who lived through much drama. Working first in the opulent orbit of King Charles I and in Ireland, then in civil spaces after the king was beheaded, then in the revival of London playhouses after the Restoration of Charles II, Shirley consistently explored ways that writing, performing, and reading plays could promote inclusive, good-humored conversation across sometimes bitter social, economic, and political divides.

Following the talk there will be short Q&A and light refreshments. This ACS-approved event, co-sponsored by Falvey Library and the Office of the Provost, is free and open to the public. Be sure to join us to honor this remarkable awardee!

You can learn more about the Outstanding Faculty Research Award here: https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/provost/awards/research.html

Speaker Information:

Lauren Shohet, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of English at Villanova University. She earned a BA at Oberlin College, a BMus at Oberlin College Conservatory, an MA and PhD at Brown University.

Dr. Shohet’s teaching areas include Early-Modern poetry and drama, Milton, Shakespeare, History of Material Texts, Digital Humanities, Adaptation and Genre Studies.

Some of Dr. Shohet’s recent publications include: “Shakespeare’s Cymbeline and the Idea of the Interface.” (Routledge Companion to the Interface, ed. Paul Budra and Clifford Werier, 2022); “Mediation, Media, and Milton’s Eve” (Milton Studies 63.1, 2021); Gathering Force: Early Modern British Literature in Transition 1557-1623 (co-editor with Kristen Poole, Cambridge University Press, 2019); and Temporality, Genre, and Experience in the Age of Shakespeare: Forms of Time (ed., . Bloomsbury/Arden, 2018).

See Dr. Shohet’s Website for a full listing of her publications and other accomplishments: http://laurenshohet.com/


T.S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land”

In 1922, The Dial magazine published a strange new poem called “The Waste Land.” Join us on Wednesday, Nov. 16, from 4-5:30 p.m. in Falvey Library’s room 205 to celebrate 100 years of T.S. Eliot’s modernist masterpiece. Villanova English professors Kamran Javadizadeh, PhD, and Megan Quigley, PhD, will give the poem a dramatic reading and toast it with tea and sheet cake! Tarot readings, games of chess, and existential angst will be served.

This ACS-approved event is co-sponsored by the Department of English and Falvey Library.

 

 

 


 


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LECTURE ON “CERVANTINE BLACKNESS” FEATURING NICHOLAS JONES, PHD


Please join us on Thursday, Nov. 3 at 4 p.m. in Falvey Memorial Library’s Speakers’ Corner for talk by Nicholas Jones, PhD, Assistant Professor of Spanish, Yale University. Dr. Jones will be giving a talk entitled “Cervantine Blackness.”

In this study of Black and African-descendant figures in the works of Miguel de Cervantes, Dr. Jones argues for a more nuanced critical reckoning with the historical, literary, and cultural legacies of anti-Blackness within the Iberian peninsula and the global reaches of the Spanish empire.

Dr. Jones is a leading scholar in the study of Black history, literature, and culture in the early modern Iberian world. He is the author of Staging Habla de Negros: Radical Performances of the African Diaspora in Early Modern Spain (Penn State UP, 2019), and co-editor, along with Cassander L. Smith and Miles P. Grier of Early Modern Black Diaspora Studies: A Critical Anthology (Palgrave Macmillan 2018), and, with Chad Leahy, of Pornographic Sensibilities: Imagining Sex and the Visceral in Premodern and Early Modern Spanish Cultural Production (Routledge 2020).

This ACS-approved event is co-sponsored by the Department of Spanish, Department of Global Interdisciplinary Studies, Department of History, Department of Humanities, Villanova Latin American Studies Program, Africana Studies Program, Falvey Memorial Library, Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, and the Department of Political Science.


 


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Scholarship@Villanova Event: Alan Drew, MFA, on “The Recruit: A Novel”


Please join us on Friday, Nov. 4 from 2-3 p.m. in Falvey Memorial Library’s Room 205 for a Scholarship@Villanova event featuring Alan Drew, MFA, associate professor of English, and director of Villanova University’s Creative Writing Program. Drew will be talking about his recently published book, The Recruit: A Novel (Random House, 2022) in conversation with Jean Lutes, PhD, Professor of English, Luckow Family Endowed Chair in English Literature.

The Recruit follows Detective Benjamin Wade and forensic expert Natasha Betencourt as they try to connect a series of strange and unsettling crimes in Rancho Santa Elena, Southern California, in 1987. Ben soon discovers that a gang of youths may be responsible for the crimes and focuses in on their latest recruit, hoping that he will lead to uncovering the leader and mastermind of the operation. Ultimately, what they uncover is an extensive and powerful network of white supremacists and so much more.

The Recruit is Drew’s third book. His other works include Shadow Man (Random House, 2017) and Gardens of Water (Random House, 2008). Drew received his MFA at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop at the University of Iowa. In addition to teaching English classes and directing Villanova University’s Creative Writing Program, he is the director of the Villanova Literary Festival.

This ACS-approved event is co-sponsored by the Department of English, the Creative Writing Program, and Falvey Memorial Library. Light refreshments will be served.


 


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Photo Friday: Phillies Phanatics

Photo courtesy of Kallie Stahl.

Joanne Quinn, her daughter Tracey, and golden retriever Duffy, supporting Chase Utley.

Annie Stockmal and her Dad at the Phillies game.

Shawn Proctor, Kallie Stahl, Gina Duffy, and Annie Stockmal supporting the Phillies!

Ethan Shea repping the 2022 World Series hat.


We have some Phanatics at Falvey Library! Good luck to the Philadelphia Phillies as they open the 2022 World Series tonight against the Houston Astros.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library. Stahl is a Cleveland baseball fan, but she will be rooting for the Phillies in 2022 World Series.

 

 


 


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Resource Trial: Sanborn Digital Maps, 1867-1970 (ProQuest)

By Merrill Stein

Image courtesy of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanborn_maps

Sanborn Digital Maps, 1867-1970 (ProQuest), provide access to more than 660,000 Sanborn maps, produced over a century, charting the growth, layout and development of more than 12,000 American towns and cities. Originally produced in color, these black and white Sanborn maps are large-scale plans of a city or town, drawn at a scale of fifty feet to an inch. They were created to assist fire insurance companies as they assessed the risk associated with insuring a particular property. The maps list street blocks and building numbers including numbers in use at the time the map was made and previous numbers. A legend has also been added to assist with interpretation of the black and white maps.

Although Sanborn maps today have minimal interest for the fire insurance industry, municipal governments are Sanborn’s best customers today. Engineering and architectural concerns are also significant purchasers of corrected Sanborn maps. The maps can be useful for geography and urban planning, ancestry, history and policy studies.

For additional information and history about Sanborn maps, visit the ProQuest guide and the Library of Congress Introduction to the Sanborn Map Collection. Access the Sanborn Digital Maps, 1867-1970 (ProQuest) trial under Falvey Library’s Databases A to Z. Access the Sanborn Digital Maps, 1867-1970 (ProQuest) trial under Falvey Library’s Databases A to Z, until Nov. 4.


""Merrill Stein is Political Science Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Welcome to Falvey: Meg Piorko, PhD, Joins Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement

Headshot of Meg Piorko, Digital Scholarship Librarian.

Meg Piorko, Distinctive Collections Librarian.


Meg Piorko, PhD, recently joined Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement (DCDE) as Distinctive Collections Librarian. Falvey Library’s rare collections are organized into three categories—Special Collections, University Archives, and the Digital Library. “I am responsible for cataloging new acquisitions and materials currently in the Library’s collections and adding them to the Digital Library.”

Originally from northern Delaware, Piorko earned a BA in Art History and Studio Art from the University of North Carolina Wilmington, a MA in Art History from Georgia State University, and a PhD in History from Georgia State University. Before joining the Falvey Library staff she was the Curatorial Fellow for the Othmer Library Special Collections at the Science History Institute. “They have a huge alchemy collection of rare materials,” Piorko reflects on her post-doctorial fellowship at the Science History Institute. “I spent 80 percent of my time researching and 20 percent of my time learning library skills from James R. Voelkel, PhD, Curator of Rare Books. I acquired skills that were not taught in my PhD curriculum; like acquisitions, how to accession new materials in the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) and all of the library databases.”

Combining her librarianship and academic background, Piorko is focused on digitizing the materiality of a text. “Theoretically, I come from the standpoint of material bibliography. I mostly work on early hand-pressed texts and every copy is unique. When we replicate something it is never the same. Even on a copy machine, each individual material culture object is different from the other one. If you’ve ever seen artists copy the same print over and over…the print changes every time. So do texts when they are copied and when multiple copies are produced (even in the same edition). I’m interested in copy specific evidence of the production of a material culture object (text) and how it was used by different historical actors. For example, people writing in the margins of their text, or chopping them up and putting them with other texts and rebinding them. How knowledge travels through textual media is what I’m interested in and I hope to bring that to my current position when I’m digitizing. Ensuring I’m also capturing the materiality and the copy specific evidence within these objects.”

The broad collections at Falvey Library and the opportunity to stay near the Philadelphia area drew Piorko to Villanova University. “Philadelphia has such a rich intellectual and cultural history. The city has incredible libraries with all kind of objects to study and make available to individuals that want to know about the cultural heritage. Villanova University is an outstanding holding institution for that. I’m really excited about the collections at Falvey Library. They are really broad and the nature of donations that come to Villanova are not subject specific and seem to be driven by relationships rather than subject. Which results in all kinds of fascinating objects that span different cultures and different time periods.”

Piorko is excited to collaborate with the Villanova community. “I am looking forward to bringing special collections into the classroom and public exhibits; encouraging hands-on (to whatever extent is safe for the materials) interactions with these objects. They should not just sit in the library. These objects are living. They are not just printed and the knowledge is stagnant. People continually contribute knowledge to these objects.” Building relationships and communicating the value of these collections to the Villanova community is essential for Piorko. “Falvey’s collections can be another vehicle of knowledge. I want to connect with the community and let them know about the really incredible things that we have in the collections. That’s what drew me here, the opportunity to help connect the humanity of these objects to to what is being learned in the classroom.”

In her free time, Piorko volunteers with PAWS animal rescue in Philadelphia. She enjoys playing board games and card games and going to the moves to watch horror films. Her reading recommendation for Falvey patrons: Out There by Kate Folk. “I loved this book. I like to read futuristic sci-fi that is also social commentary.”

Piorko’s desk is located in Access Services on Falvey’s first floor (email: megan.piorko@villanova.edu). For more on Villanova University’s distinctive collections materials, please visit this webpage. Distinctive collections materials can be viewed in the Rare Book Room (Wednesday’s 9:30 a.m.11:30 p.m. and Thursday’s 2 p.m.4 p.m.) as well as other hours by appointment. Faculty interested in incorporating Falvey’s collections in the classroom can contact Piorko to discuss options for collaboration.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Photo Friday: Falling for Autumn

Image of a beautiful tree with autumn leaves on campus.

Photo courtesy of Kallie Stahl.


Hope you had a great fall break, Wildcats! Some beautiful autumn colors await your return to campus.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Join Us For The Annual Cultural Studies Food Matter Week


Join us to educate your palate and your mind during the annual Cultural Studies Food Matters Week featuring tastings and talks on food justice around the world. These ACS-approved events will take place at 4:30 p.m. in Falvey Library’s Room 205. Both events, co-sponsored by the Cultural Studies Program and Falvey Memorial Library, are free and open to the public.

Samrah Shoaib: Tuesday, Oct. 18

Samrah Shoaib will join us on Tuesday, Oct. 18, at 4:30 p.m. in Falvey Library’s room 205 to talk about Hibiscus Tea and Social Justice. Shoaib is the Program Manager of the New York Botanical Garden’s Humanities Institute and a trained community herbalist. Hibiscus Tea with traditional sweet potato pie from Sweet T’s Bakery in Redding Terminal Market will be served.

Joe Haber: Thursday, Oct. 20 

Joe Haber will join us on Thursday, Oct. 20, at 4:30 p.m. in Falvey Library’s room 205 to talk about Native American food. Haber is the owner of Tomahawks, an indigenous taco shop, whose menu is inspired by Native American cuisine. Haber’s ancestry on his mother’s side is of the Mohawk people. Haber will be serving tacos from his restaurant.


 


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TBT: A Handy Guide to Your Future

By Kallie Stahl 

Image of the book cover "How to tell fortunes by the hand."

Image courtesy of the Villanova University Digital Library.


Looking for a quick read during fall break? Celebrate spooky season and check out this handbook by A. Anderson. Published in 1898, How To Tell Fortunes by the Hand explains the rules of fortunetelling for readers. Learn more about the art of palmistry—Explore the full manual here.

Don’t miss your chance to see more mystical materials at Distinctive Collections Annual Halloween Event on Monday, Oct. 31, at 1 p.m. in front of Holy Grounds (First Floor, Falvey Library). On display will be Special Collection’s spookiest material along with a ghoulish game and treats.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Last Modified: October 13, 2022