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March of the Sixty-Ninth

This recent acquisition titled, “March of the Sixty-Ninth,” references New York’s 69th Infantry Regiment, popularly known as “The Fighting 69th” or “The Fighting Irish.” The regiment’s coat of arms at the top of the page include the names of well-known Irish military heroes including Commodore John Barry, as well as motifs of Irish heritage such as the shamrock and the golden harp. The two Irish wolfhounds on either side inspired the regimental motto, “Gentle when stroked, fierce when provoked.”

The text, possibly a poem or a song, seeks to combat anti-immigrant sentiments by demonstrating the natural bravery of the Irish soldiers and their loyalty to both their home country and the United States. The idea is reinforced by the repeating exclamation by Winfield Scott, Commanding General of the U.S. Army, “Seldom such men I’ve led; There go the boys for a FIGHTING BRIGADE!”

Around 1851 the 69th Regiment began the tradition still followed today of leading the marchers in New York City’s annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade. But the text here likely refers to a military inspection parade observed by Scott, known for his nickname “Old Fuss and Feathers” because of his attention to details and military formalities. Traditionally, military parades were not commonly held in the United States outside of war time, though in the early days of U.S. history military parades were sometimes reviewed by the President on the Fourth of July. But given the publication date noted here as “All-Hallow Eve” – October 31st, 1858 – do you think the 69th were marching in a Halloween parade instead?!

Transcription:

Comrades! the cocks in yon hamlet are crowing,
The morning star pales like our own dying lamp,
But fill, and we’ll drink “dough-a-doras” o’erflowing,
To outposts and soldiers asleep in the Camp.
Promptly at duty’s call
Forth they rushed one and all,
Must’ring in order along the Parade;
Gallant old Scott has said,
“Seldom such men I’ve led;
There go the boys for a FIGHTING BRIGADE!”

Honored by good men’s unsought approbation,
Specially thanked by the Chief of our State,
Soldiers by birthright, they’re sons of a nation
Of warriors who used but their swords in debate!
Marked ye the ranks to-day!
Straight as sun-setting ray,
Proudly they passed at INSPECTION PARADE;
Well has the veteran said –
“Seldom such men I’ve led;
There go the boys for a FIGHTING BRIGADE!”

True to the land of their birth and adoption,
Upholding the Free Flag, revering the Green,
More loyally bound to the home of their option
Than Orange or native-bred Arnolds have been. –
Impotent bigot-slaves,
Cravens and traitor-knaves,
War’s wild excitement would make ye afraid;
Scott knew ye well that day,
When he was heard to say –
“There go the boys for a FIGHTING BRIGADE!”

Comrades! away to your posts and your duty,
For Sol gilds the vane on the village church dome;
And ere he goes down, friends, affection, and beauty,
Will throng to the Batt’ry to welcome us home.
Guardians of liberty!
Soldiers we’re proud to see,
Eirinn’s allegiance ‘neath FREE FLAG arrayed!
Braver men never fought;
Truer men never sought
Liberty’s shrine, than the IRISH BRIGADE!


eBook available: Fun o’ the Forge

Our latest Project Gutenberg release, produced with the help of Distributed Proofreaders, comes from our Joseph McGarrity Collection of materials dealing with Ireland: Fun o’ the Forge, by Brian O’Higgins. Most of the stories in the collection are the author’s own, but three describe themselves as adaptations from An Seabhac‘s 1913 collection, An Baile Seo ‘Gainn-ne.

The book is a collection of short, humorous stories about Irish country life, most revolving around misunderstandings and clever tricks. The forge of the book’s title belongs to Ned M’Grane, a blacksmith who loves to tell stories and longs for better times. The stories are connected together by common characters, and most are told by Ned to the narrator and his friends. While on the surface this is a calm narrative about a simpler time, there is an undercurrent of anger, and it is easy to see how the text relates to its author’s politics.

The entire book may now be read online (or downloaded in a variety of convenient eBook formats) through Project Gutenberg.


Available for proofreading: Fun o’ the Forge

Need something to do while snowed in today? How about helping to create a new electronic edition of a long out of print book?

Our latest project is Fun o’ the Forge, a collection of humorous stories by Irish author Brian O’Higgins, taken from our Joseph McGarrity Collection.

To help turn our digitized images of the book into a full-text Project Gutenberg eBook, you can read this earlier post about how the process works, then join in at the project page.


Summer Research: Irish Nurses of 1916

Yesterday, we had a visit from an international researcher who was excited to go through our Joseph McGarrity Collection. He was looking for materials related to Irish nurses who participated in the Easter Rising of 1916.

One of the items in the collection is In Times of Peril, which contains excerpts from the diary of nurse Linda Kearns.

Cover of In Times of Peril, featuring a photo of Linda Kearns

Our copy is especially noteworthy as it belonged to Éamon de Valera (to whom the book was dedicated) and bears his signature on the title page. De Valera served as the first president of the Irish Republic (1921-1922) and the third president of the modern Republic of Ireland (1959-1973).

Signature of Eamon de Valera on title page of In Times of Peril.

An excerpt from Kearns’ diary is one of the readings featured in the fifth episode of our Mail Call podcast.

Our researcher had a very productive visit. It is always thrilling to see researchers examining primary sources and bringing new connections to light. You can view a list of published resources that have used materials from our collections in our Zotero library.


Information Wanted Of …

14 p., The Irish People, v. 1, no. 19, April 2, 1864

14 p., The Irish People, v. 1, no. 19, April 2, 1864

When digitizing newspapers rich stories are often hidden in the classified ads. In the April 2, 1864 issue of the Irish People, John M’Carthy wounded at Gettysburg and recovering at Camp Dennison seeks information on the whereabouts of his brother Denis, last seen in Buffalo, N.Y. The Irish People was published in Dublin so John was looking to connect to Denis by the fragile and tenuous network of hearsay and word-of-mouth communication. Did John ever find Denis, his long lost brother? Historical research may provide one answer.


Waterloo 200

Today, on the 200th anniversary of the epic Battle of Waterloo it is appropriate to show some of the Villanova University Special Collections holdings related to Napoleon. Most materials in Special Collection are from the Joseph McGarrity collection and include rare books and newspapers, and facsimile collections of materials as well a manuscript letter to the Emperor Napoleon himself from Herni Clarke, digitized and available in the Digital Library. McGarrity himself annotated and collected materials on Bonaparte. These and other works on the Napoleonic Wars and Revolutionary France are available for consultation in the Rare Book Room.


Summer Project: Bishops and Lepracauns

Posted for: Lisa Kruczek, Summer 2012 Digital Library Intern.

As the Summer 2012 Digital Library Intern, I have recently completed scanning a portion of the historic papers of Bishop Francis Patrick Kenrick, former Bishop of Philadelphia (1796-1863). Villanova is putting them online through a collaborative project with the Philadelphia Archdiocesan Historical Research Center, who owns the collection. Although the papers are largely in French and Latin, PAHRC has already created a finding aid for this collection, so the descriptions helped clarify the meaning of the documents. Some fascinating subjects are discussed in the correspondence of this collection, such as the Riots of 1844 and the beginning of the Civil War and how it was impacting the Catholic Church.

I was also given the opportunity to scan some books and manuscripts, most recently a book of poetry, handwritten by the author. I was able to enter all the metadata for these projects as well, which enabled me to gain more insight into this material. During my time here in the digital library, I have completed transcriptions of 19th century correspondence and created a Wikipedia article on “the Lepracaun Cartoon Monthly” from the Joseph McGarrity collection. I’ve received an education on topics such as Cataloging, Intellectual Property and Social Media, which has been an excellent supplement to my coursework. I’d like to thank Michael Foight and Laura Bang for taking the time to impart some of their vast knowledge so that I too may move on to become a professional and take part in the Digital Library Revolution!


New Exhibit – Joseph McGarrity: Man of Action; Man of Letters

Posted for: Brian J. McDonald, PhD (2012 Digital Library Intern)

Joseph McGarrity (1874-1940), at the age of 18, left his Irish hometown of Carrickmore, County Tyrone to immigrate to America. He arrived in Philadelphia with no luggage, very little money and a strong sense of Irish nationalism that would soon attract him to become an active member of the Clan-na-Gael, the leading Irish republican organization in the United States. He would, during his lifetime, rise to lead the Clan-na-Gael and become a significant figure in the struggle for Irish independence.

Despite the secretive nature of much of Joseph McGarrity’s political activity, his name surfaces in the historical record at key moments during the tumultuous years of the Irish Revolution and the foundation of the Irish Free State. Students of Irish history encounter McGarrity as a successful liquor and real estate entrepreneur who helped finance the Easter Rising in 1916; and as a colleague, confidant and correspondent of many of the leading Irish revolutionaries of the period, including Michael Collins, Padraig Pearse, Roger Casement, John Devoy and Harry Boland. He is also known as a close personal friend of Eamon de Valera, and as one of the key architects, along with Sean Russell, of what came to be known as the Sabotage or S-plan Campaign, the IRA’s 1939 bombing operation against targets on British soil.

While the political and administrative papers that tell the singular story of Joseph McGarrity’s lifelong commitment to the cause of Irish independence are scattered across many repositories, including the National Library of Ireland and New York Public Library, his personal papers held by Villanova University provide unique insight into Joseph McGarrity the man—the devoted father, friend, Catholic and poet. It is the latter, McGarrity the poet (who also maintained a lifelong interest in Irish history, culture and books), which provides the focus of Joseph McGarrity: Man of Action; Man of Letters, a new Villanova Digital Library online exhibition.

Though not a major poet, McGarrity was unquestionably committed to his verse. Despite being prodigiously busy with his many political and business responsibilities, McGarrity would often stay up late into the night working away at his poetry. In his introduction to Celtic Moods and Memories, McGarrity’s only major published collection, the poet and folklorist Padraic Colum speculates that as:

A man of moods and memories whose days were taken up with business, an Irish country boy living the strenuous life of an American city, a man of simple Catholic piety going vehemently through the world, Joseph McGarrity must have been aware of a conflict in himself.

In many ways this psychological portrait of McGarrity as a seemingly contradictory figure sets the framework for this exhibition; which, it is hoped, will suggest something of the complexity hinted at by Colum. Joseph McGarrity: Man of Action; Man of Letters presents a selection of digitized items representative of McGarrity as a literary man exhibited alongside descriptions of key details of his remarkable life, of his “going vehemently through the world.” All exhibition items are drawn from Special Collections, Villanova University Falvey Library (many of which are accessible online through Villanova University Digital Library).


Brushing up on Elizabeth Yeats

Posted for: Lisa Kruczek, Summer 2012 Digital Library Intern.

Recently I had the opportunity to scan a lovely book from the Joseph McGarrity Collection, housed at Villanova University’s Digital Library. Published in 1900, “Elementary-Brush Strokes” by Elizabeth Corbett Yeats is an explanation of the process and merits of teaching the painting of foliage to young children. Yeats uses a dabbing technique that she assures the reader will work with most types of plants. She emphasizes the importance of children working from real flower arrangements which she suggests gives a better understanding of color and form. The book includes beautiful full color plates of her examples of flowers, plants, birds and fruit, with explanations for each plate of colors chosen and technique. Included is a materials list and instructions of how to adapt the paintings included for other flowers and plants.

The introduction mentions the next book in the series, “Brush Work Studies”, but it is not in Villanova’s collection, nor have I been able to find it anywhere else. I did find a reference to “Elementary Brush Strokes” in another book printed by her publisher, George Phillip & Son, Ltd. as part of an advertisement of Educational Publications (although it looks to be the revised 1905 edition which included the addition of some photographs). Yeats was the daughter of Irish artist, John Butler Yeats and after teaching art, went on to study printing and became a successful printer. She printed many of the works of her famous brother, William Butler Yeats

.


Covering the Celt

Dust jackets offer a representation of a book’s content as well as an opportunity to provide an iconic and memorable marketing medium for a publisher. For books without illustrative matter the dust jacket is the only pictorial representation that will help create and focus the lens of the mind’s eye. Publishers and graphic designers work long and hard on the jacket design especially that most important aspect of the design: the front cover.

The newly published book, The Dream of the Celt by Nobel Prize in Literature winner Mario Vargas LLosa, recently reviewed in the Guardian, is a fictional account of the life of Irish Nationalist Sir Roger Casement who was hanged by the British government during the First World War. Several of Casement’s manuscripts are in Special Collections; as well, other materials which were collected by his friend and ally Joseph McGarrity are housed in the Joseph McGarrity Collection in Falvey Memorial Library. All of these materials have been digitized and are made available in Villanova’s Digital Library. Prominently featured on the front cover of the English language translation of the Dream, (translated by Edith Grossman, Farrar, Straus and Girous, 2012) is a photograph of Roger Casement drawn from the McGarrity Collection. Credit is appropriately given for use of the photograph on the rear flap of the dust jacket by the designer Eric Fuentecilla.

Not only does this evocative cover image help depict Casement to the reader’s imagination, but also the citation and acknowledgement act as an advertisement for scholars and researchers to the wealth of additional information available in the Joseph McGarrity Collections and to the role of Villanova University in preserving and making access available to these internationally significant Irish heritage materials. According to Brian McDonald, a Digital Library Intern currently reading The Dream, citations to Joseph McGarrity “can be found on pp. 146, 148, 317, 319, 320, 331, 332, and 334.”


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Last Modified: June 6, 2012