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Fall 2022 Mosaic Now Available

The Fall 2022 issue of Mosaic is now available in the Digital Library. For those with visual accessibility needs, an optimized, accessible PDF is also available on the same page.

In this issue, we talk with Victor “Vic” J. Maggitti Jr. ’56 VSB whose $20 million gift was the largest in Falvey Library’s history, profile our 2022 Falvey Scholars, create a poster-worthy send-off for Coach Jay Wright, and explore the pitfalls of staging Julius Caesar for modern audiences.

 


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Honoring Veterans with The Art of War

Art of War Event

Francis A. Galgano, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Geography and the Environment, and US Army Lt. Colonel (Retired) with Ken DeTreux, MA, MPA ’18, US Marine Corps Colonel (Retired)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Veterans Day, Villanova salutes our military veterans for their service and sacrifice at home and abroad.

In support of the current exhibit Art of War: Illustrated and Military Maps of the Twentieth Century, Falvey Memorial Library and the Office of Veterans and Military Service Members presented an exhibit talk and reception Nov. 9 in Falvey Library. Speakers discussed maps, their history, their use, and what the future holds for them in the military and beyond.


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Service Alert: EZBorrow Unavailable on Monday, Oct. 3

SERVICE ALERT

Due to a scheduled upgrade, EZBorrow will be unavailable Monday Oct. 3. We apologize for any inconvenience.


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1842 Day: Support Falvey Library

1842 Day has arrived, and Villanova welcomes alumni, students, faculty, staff, as well as friends, family, and supporters to join the fun by supporting Falvey Library!

The Library will be celebrating on our social channels and in-person on the first floor of Falvey, so stop by! You might even win a prize!

Located at the heart of main campus, Falvey Memorial Library is the interdisciplinary academic center of the Villanova University community. Students, faculty, and staff visit Falvey over half a million times each year. Whether to discuss research with a librarian, attend a book talk with an accomplished author, or find a quiet place to write or study, a visit to the Library is an essential part of a student’s life at Villanova.

Gifts to the Library on 1842 Day over the past six years have helped enhance and impact many areas of the Library, including e-journals, databases, books, and treasured items in Distinctive Collections, benefiting students and faculty for generations to come. Past donations were used to purchase public health materials and preservation supplies for rare materials, including a specialized vacuum to safely clean books in Special Collections and archival boxes to rehouse thousands of at-risk, rare materials.

In 2021, Falvey continued to expand diversity, equity, and inclusion materials within the collection, including adding a Jewish newspaper collection, The Jewish Exponent (1887-1990.)

“This effort utilized 1842 Day funding in an impactful way,” says Millicent Gaskell, University Librarian. “The Library represents a link from alumni’s shared past to current students. Where the University’s memories and history is preserved. And a hub of academics and research support for students to excel, both in their undergraduate careers and beyond.”

Make your gift on 1842 Day, or beat the rush and donate early!

 


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Visit the New Digital Scholarship Lab at the Open House Sept. 14

Falvey Memorial Library is proud to announce the opening of a brand new Digital Scholarship Lab on Wednesday, September 14, 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. The lab is located on the second floor of the library in Room 218A. Stop by to learn more about the Digital Scholarship Lab and our services, or visit our website at https://library.villanova.edu/digital-scholarship. Digital Scholarship Lab

Designed to support Villanova faculty, students, and staff who are working on creating digital projects and/or are experimenting with digital media, digital humanities, and data-intensive research and teaching, the Digital Scholarship Lab offers an expanded range of software covering a variety of digital methods and tasks, including but not limited to geospatial mapping, data visualization, text and data mining, and multimodal publishing.

The Digital Scholarship Lab is equipped with 4 PC workstations, 1 high-performance Mac Pro workstation, 1 large Epson flatbed scanner, 2 display monitors, 1 meeting table, and 3 Mac and 3 PC laptops that can be connected to docking stations and monitors in the Lab.

Additionally, the Digital Scholarship Lab will offer a new digital media technology loan program, where Villanova faculty, students, and staff will be able to check out DSLR cameras, 360-degree cameras, and podcasting equipment from the Digital Scholarship Lab for up to 1-week with no renewals, and can be picked up at the first floor service desk. Please see our full list of available software and our digital media technology loans for more information.

The Digital Scholarship Lab is open by reservation-only during the following days and times, except for Villanova Holidays and closures:

  • Wednesdays: 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
  • Thursdays: 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
  • Fridays: 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Specific workstations, laptops, and the Epson flatbed scanner are reservable and may only be used in the Digital Scholarship Lab. Please see our booking reservations or contact us at digitalscholarship@villanova.edu for more information. The space may be used for digital scholarship sponsored events and workshops, but may not be used for regular class meetings.


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Library 101: Falvey Acronyms You Need to Know

By Shawn Proctor

There’s so much lingo to learn at Villanova, especially for new students.

One example. If someone wants to meet you for lunch at The Oreo, Spit, or the Pit, for which one should you plan to bring along your food?

Answer: The Oreo. Despite its tasty-sounding name, the so-called Oreo is just nickname for “The Awakening” sculpture near the Connelly Center. It is so not edible.

At Falvey, we have some acronyms of our own. Don’t worry, they aren’t ones you have to memorize, since you can just stop back here anytime and get oriented to the Library’s services and resources.

RA Faire 2019

RAs pick out Falvey materials to display in the residence halls (2019).


Access Services

The friendly faces at the front desk and the hardworking people who handle borrowing and lending, equipment loans, interlibrary loan services (ILL) and EZ-Borrow collection maintenance, and course reserves so students can easily read, study, and succeed.

C&M (Communications & Marketing)

The team who handles library events, publications, signage, social media, and this very own news blog.

DCDE (Distinctive Collections & Digital Engagement)

This includes several important areas in the Library: Special Collections, University Archives, and Villanova’s Digital Library.

RSSE (Research Services & Scholarly Engagement)

Do you know your subject librarian? Have a question about research or how to navigate the resources on the Library’s website? Start here. Dedicated librarians will help you find what you need and more.


Bonus:

Two Library partners are located within the building: CASA (Center for Success and Achievement) on the second floor and IIE (Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship) on the ground floor.

CASA aims to recruit, retain, and graduate underrepresented, first generation, and Pell Eligible students through holistic support in a culturally diverse and academically excellent environment.

IIE’s Idea Lab is a gathering space for individuals from all corners of campus to collaborate on innovative, creative, and cross-curricular projects.


Shawn Proctor Head shot

 

 

Shawn Proctor, MFA, is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Library. He loves to share trivia about “The Awakening.”

 


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Photo Friday: Happy National Dog Day

 

Pals for Life Pet Therapy event from 2019.

Happy National Dog Day! If you are an incoming student, perhaps you haven’t experienced our pet therapy sessions, courtesy of Pals for Life, which happen each semester in the Library.

You don’t need a scientific study to tell you that petting dogs lower stress and blood pressure. Well, if you do, here’s that. And we just think having a day to boop a dog’s nose, rub a puppy’s belly, or just spend some time with an amazing canine, is the perfect thing to get you mentally prepared for a test or finals. Look for news of upcoming events like this on the Library home page or right here on the blog!

If you can’t wait for canine cuddles, the Office of Health Promotion offers “Where is the Love” pet therapy most Wednesdays during the semester, too!

 

 

 

 

 


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Happy Birthday, Snoopy: The World’s Most Famous Beagle!

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By Shawn Proctor

Peanuts’ most famous character, Snoopy, is turning 72 years old…or there abouts.

For the record, Snoopy was first drawn in comics by Charles M. Schulz in October 1950, according to the Charles M. Schulz Museum, but Snoopy’s inspiration came from the cartoonist’s dog Spike, first adopted in 1927. The dog’s many antics sparked Schulz’s imagination, leading to Snoopy’s many adventures as beleaguered novelist, World War II flying ace, and grocer, among many others.

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Courtesy of Peanuts.

In dog years, Snoopy is 350 years old. But you wouldn’t know it from the longevity of Peanuts and the many holiday cartoon specials still in heavy rotation.

So why August 10 as the day to celebrate Snoopy’s birthday? According to the Schulz’s Museum: “…even Snoopy can’t remember when he was born. And, of course, if you were to ask Snoopy, every day would be his birthday!”

Schulz was wise to make Snoopy a beagle, according to 50 Quick Breeds. The hound sports a tri-colored coat and is sleek, hardy, and short. “This is a curious dog which loves everyone. With a wagging tail they are gentle, sweet, calm and loving.” And generations of children and adults love Snoopy right back!

(The one knock on the breed: based on my experience, they have a distinctive and very loud yawp-bark that could be heard for miles.)

Snoopy and the many characters that populated the strip are considered apolitical by the general public. However, in a book discussing Schulz, Charlie Brown’s America: The Popular Politics of Peanuts, it was noted how the cartoon strip reflected the times and politics.

“Peanuts regularly commented on the politics and social turmoil of Cold War America,” the author Blake Scott Ball says. “From nuclear testing to the Civil Rights Movement, from the Vietnam War to the feminist revolution, Peanuts was an unlikely medium for Americans of all stripes to debate the hopes and fears of the era.”

In 2000, Schulz retired as the world’s wealthiest cartoonist and passed away soon after.

Resources:

Andrews, Paul. 50 Quick Dog Breeds: The Quick Guide to Some Popular Dog Breeds. Andrews UK Ltd., 2011.

Ball, Blake Scott. Charlie Brown’s America: The Popular Politics of Peanuts. Oxford University Press, 2021.

“Charles M. Schulz.” Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th Edition, 2021, p. 1.

“Charles M Schulz Retires.” The Christian Century, vol. 117, no. 2, 2000, p. 53.

“The Life of Charles M. Schulz.” Charles M. Schulz Museum: https://schulzmuseum.org/timeline/

 


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Shawn Proctor is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Library.


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Because of Winn-Dixie: A Lovable (Not) Berger Picard

 

Because of Winn-Dixie

Note: this cover is not a Berger Picard. (Courtesy of Good Reads.)

By Shawn Proctor

Like a slippery dog after a bath, this book completely slipped by me for two decades.

When Because of WinnDixie, Kate DeCamillo’s Newberry Award winning debut novel, was published in 2000, I wasn’t reading books often (or at all.) And my then-childless self wouldn’t have wandered into the middle-grade fiction section of the library anyway. But like the dog for whom the book is named, Because of WinnDixie came at the right time–when I was finally ready for him.

A Berger Picard

A Berger Picard (for real!) from Public Domain (By Leanam (talk) (Uploads) – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=85490418)

Ten-year-old Opal moves into a Florida town with her emotionally cloistered father, who she calls “The Preacher.” Her mom left seven years before, and Opal is very much alone. Then she meets a “big, ugly, suffering dog with a sterling sense of humor” in the back of a Winn-Dixie grocery store. Opal opens her heart to this dirty, friendly dog, and, in turn, Winn-Dixie opens the world to Opal, and she meets new friends, mends her relationship with The Preacher, and helps people along the way. It’s brief, funny, sad, and (like Winn-Dixie) very easy to love.

Now, Winn-Dixie is not a specific breed of dog in the story. Likely, he’s just a mixture of different stray dogs and grew up on the street, as evidenced by his strong fear of thunder.

In the movie, however, Winn-Dixie was cast as a group of Berger Picards (pronounced bare-ZHAY pee-CARR, according to the Bloomberg Businessweek article “Puppy Love.” There is zero chance one of these dogs ended up in a Florida store, as they are a rare breed of French herding dog that nearly became extinct after the two World Wars. Few print Library resources mention the Picardy Shepard (as they are also known), but online access to The Dog Encyclopedia indicates simply: “This breed can be stubborn.”

“Puppy Love” traces the growth in popularity of dog breeds from rarity to fad, using the Berger Picard as one example, as it was recognized by the American Kennel Club only in 2014. This arrival on the dog show scene is often met by interest in sourcing puppies and, sometimes, unscrupulous behavior from profiteering breeders. The owners in the article explained they sought out the Berger Picard especially because it is energetic and affectionate.

Energetic. Affectionate. Stubborn. That sure sounds like Winn-Dixie to me.

Resources:

  • Battan, Carrie. “PUPPY LOVE.” Bloomberg Businessweek, 4451, 2015, p. 62.
  • Merriam Garcia. The Dog Encyclopedia. Abdo Reference, 2021.

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Shawn Proctor is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Library.

 


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“of peas and bees: Bicentennial Exhibit” of Gregor Mendel Now on Display

""Visit Falvey Memorial Library’s first floor to see the new Gregor Mendel exhibit “of peas and bees: Bicentennial Exhibit” celebrating “the Father of Modern Genetics. The exhibit was curated by Michael Foight, Director of Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement Department, with text by Laura Bang, formerly of DCDE.    ""

“The name Mendel is familiar to the Villanova community as the name of a campus building, the Mendel Science Center, usually called Mendel Hall. But how many are aware of the man for whom the building is named? Gregor Mendel (1822-1884) is the acknowledged father of genetics based upon a paper he presented in 1865 and published the following year.

“He was born in the German-speaking Austrian Empire (now the Czech Republic) to a farming family. At age twenty one he joined the Augustinian Abbey of St. Thomas in Brűnn to further his education. The abbot, who was interested in heredity of plants and animals, encouraged Mendel to experiment with plant genetics in the abbey’s five-acre garden. As noted he presented his research, but it was virtually ignored until 1900.”

One case celebrates the history of the University’s Mendel Medal, named in honor of Mendel and awarded annually to an outstanding scientist. The award was established in 1928 and given each year until 1943.

From 1946 until 1968, the Mendel Medal was awarded only eight times and from 1968 until 1992 there were no awards. In 1992 the Mendel Medal award was reestablished and has been given each year to an outstanding scientist.

(These passages are excerpted from Alice Bampton’s blog, marking the 150th anniversary of the publication of Mendel’s paper, “Experiments in Plant Hybridization.”)

This year’s Mendel Medal will be awarded on Nov. 19.

Dig Deeper:

 


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Last Modified: July 20, 2022