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Falvey Scholars 2022: Addison Drone ’22 VSB

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Addison Drone ’22 VSB, 2022 Falvey Scholar (Photo by Andrew McKeough)

The Falvey Scholars Program is an annual program established by Falvey Library to recognize outstanding undergraduate research. Now in its 20th year, the program is a collective initiative of the Library and the Center for Research and Fellowships. The recipients of this award are selected from a pool of candidates nominated by Villanova faculty and reviewed by Library staff and faculty.

This year, eight students received awards, their work reflecting the breadth and depth of undergraduate research at the University as well as the support the Library, its resources and staff, provide student-scholars.

This blog is the third of seven installments, which will introduce our scholars and cover their research in their own words. Look for additional coverage of the Falvey Scholars in the fall issue of Mosaic.

Congratulations to all of our Falvey Scholars, past and present!

Scholars Summary

Addison Drone ’22 VSB

  • Project Title: “50 Years of Sports Teams in Work Teams Research: Missed Opportunities and New Directions for Studying Team Processes”
  • Faculty Mentor: Narda Quigley, PhD, Associate Professor of Management and Chair of the Department of Management and Operations, Villanova School of Business
  • Hometown: Summit, N.J.
  • Other Honors: Presidential Scholarship, Honors Program

Describe your research in your own words.
We conducted a literature review on sports teams studies over the last 50 years. We looked at what topics have been covered, what has not been covered, and how these outcomes/findings within sports samples can be applied to broader work teams.

How did the Library’s staff impact your research and academic experience?
I worked with the Library staff during both the research and within my academic career through my Competitive Effectiveness course. They made sure that I knew how to utilize the databases and helped me get started with research ideas.

How did Falvey’s resources and databases impact your research?
I utilized Falvey’s database library to conduct a thorough scan of the existing literature on the topic. Ultimately, we found over 250 applicable articles covering over 270 applicable studies.

What’s next for you?
Working postgrad at Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group, a Japanese investment bank, within New York City.

Will you continue this research direction or has it inspired you to new research interests?
While my professional career is within a finance field and not sports/management, this remains an interest that I will continue to foster as I enter my postgraduate career.


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Celebrating Juneteenth, America’s Second Independence Day!

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Last year, before the Juneteenth celebration, President Peter M. Donohue, OSA, PhD, announced Villanova University would close in observance of Juneteenth, adding June 19 as an official University holiday.

He explained, “The Juneteenth celebration not only marks an end to slavery, but it is also a day to reflect on the significant contributions of Black Americans to our country, our history and our culture.”

US President Joe Biden signed a bill in 2021 making Juneteenth a permanent national holiday as well.

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Dr. Judith Giesberg, creator of the Last Seen Project.

Two excellent opportunities for reflection and education are available in Villanova’s Slavery in the Modern World Class and the Last Seen Project, both created by Judith Giesberg, PhD, Robert M. Birmingham Chair in the Humanities, Professor, Department of History.

Last year, Dr. Giesberg shared the importance of Juneteenth in history and its relevance to the modern United States. It has been updated for this year’s holiday:

Through Juneteenth celebrations, Black communities around the U.S. began marking the end of slavery in 1865, drawing on a long tradition of using events that served both as moments of reflection, but also as opportunities to refocus for the fight ahead.

Enslaved Americans joyously greeted the end of slavery in Haiti, and their celebrations threatened American enslavers and subverted the institution at home. After slavery ended in the West Indies, white slaveowners tried to manage the celebrating that occurred among the enslaved, because they understood their disruptive potential.

On this first Juneteenth since becoming a federal holiday, I hope that Americans will read and reflect on the strength and resilience of post-emancipation Black families as told in the ‘Last Seen Project’ collection and draw from that experience the courage and the conviction to look to the racial justice work that lies ahead.

To facilitate further exploration, Falvey has collected several links for the Villanova community with information about Dr. Giesberg’s class and nationally recognized historical project:

Slavery in the Modern World Class

Last Seen Project

The Rooted Project

It is a three-year initiative that aims to explore Villanova University’s past to come to terms with histories of slavery, segregation, institutionalized racism, and gender and religious prejudice, in an effort to hold the university to its values of Veritas, Unitas, and Caritas (truth, unity, and love).

Beginning in fall 2020, a team of researchers is working to produce a history of Villanova that situates the university’s founding in fact, that recognizes the significance of diverse nineteenth- and twentieth-century people to the university’s success, and that considers the consequences of university decisions on communities of color and other marginalized groups. This new history aims to give all students, prospective students, and alumni at Villanova a sense of place and belonging.

Additional resources, written about the researchers for the Rooted Project:

To learn about Juneteenth’s history and background, we look back at an abridged version of Falvey’s 2020 Juneteenth blog, written by Jutta Seibert, Director of Research Services & Scholarly Engagement at Falvey Memorial Library:

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General Order No. 3, June 19, 1865
Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

June 19, 1865, marks the end of slavery in Texas. On this day Major General Gordon Granger of the Union Army occupied Texas on behalf of the federal government and upon arrival on Galveston Island publicly read General Order No. 3 which began with this sentence: “The people of Texas are informed that in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free.”

While slaves in the Confederate states were theoretically freed on January 1, 1863, with President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, solely those in Union-occupied areas and those who fled to the North became de facto free. For most slaves in the South slavery ended only after the Union won and, even then, close to six weeks passed before the news reached the the nation’s fringes. June 19 is commemorated as the day on which the last slaves were freed, despite the fact that slavery persisted in some pockets of the country until the Thirteenth Amendment took effect on December 18, 1865.

On the first anniversary of Granger’s reading of General Order No. 3 Texan freedmen began celebrating what was then called Jubilee Day. Early festivities included political rallies besides music and food. Celebrations waxed and waned over the years, but the longest-running African American holiday continues to this day, evolving into America’s second Independence Day: Juneteenth.

To commemorate Juneteenth by exploring African American history, we also recommend the following collections, originally published in Falvey’s 2020 Juneteenth blog:


Jutta Seibert is Director of Research Services & Scholarly Engagement and Shawn Proctor, MFA, is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library.


 


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Bloomsday Marks Ulysses’ Centennial Celebration

By Ethan Shea

"James Joyce Ulysses Books in Falvey"

On Feb. 2, 1922, James Joyce’s 40th birthday, this Irish author’s masterpiece, Ulysses, was published in its entirety for the first time. The book’s publisher, Sylvia Beach, was Joyce’s saving grace after several proprietors refused to print his text because of its critiques of Catholicism. Bloomsday is a celebration that takes place in Dublin, Ireland and around the world. It commemorates Thursday, June 16, 1904, which is the day depicted in Joyce’s novel Ulysses.

"James Joyce's statue in St, Stephen's Green, Dublin, Ireland"

James Joyce’s statue in St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin, Ireland

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of this movement-defining text, feel free to take some time to learn about the story. The best thing to do is simply kick back and read the book, but not everyone has the time to read all 265,222 words on a whim. Fascinatingly, these hundreds of thousands of words describe only one day in the life of the story’s protagonist, Leopold Bloom.

It is also worth noting that the text is based on Homer’s epic poem, The Odyssey, hence the title Ulysses, which was chosen to match the Latin name of the Greek king of Ithaca and Homeric hero, Odysseus.

James Joyce is the author of other major works such as the collection of short stories Dubliners; novels A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Finnegan’s Wake; and the play Exiles.

Falvey Memorial Library is home to many resources on Joyce, like research on his work such as James Joyce by Steven Connor. Additionally, you can visit The James Joyce Centre website to learn more about the author’s life or even take part in Ulysses Fantasy Football.

Note: This article was originally published Feb. 2, 2022. 


Dig deeper into the author James Joyce and learn more about Ulysses as well as how you can celebrate Bloomsday—whether you are in Ireland or near Philadelphia.

Links curated by Sarah Wingo, English Literature, Theatre, and Romance Languages and Literature Librarian.


Headshot of Ethan SheaEthan Shea is a first-year English Graduate Student and Graduate Assistant at Falvey Memorial Library.


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Falvey Scholars 2022: Christopher DiLullo ’22 CLAS

Christopher DiLullo ’22 CLAS, 2022 Falvey Scholar (Photo by Andrew McKeough)

The Falvey Scholars Program is an annual program established by Falvey Library to recognize outstanding undergraduate research. Now in its 20th year, the program is a collective initiative of the Library and the Center for Research and Fellowships. The recipients of this award are selected from a pool of candidates nominated by Villanova faculty and reviewed by Library staff and faculty.

This year, eight students received awards, their work reflecting the breadth and depth of undergraduate research at the University as well as the support the Library, its resources and staff, provide student-scholars.

This blog is the second of seven installments, which will introduce our scholars and cover their research in their own words. Look for additional coverage of the Falvey Scholars in the fall issue of Mosaic.

Congratulations to all of our Falvey Scholars, past and present!

Scholars Summary

Christopher DiLullo ’22 CLAS
Hometown: Farmington, Conn.
Other honors: 2022 CLAS Medallion Recipient, Department of Communication; Phi Beta Kappa; Lambda Pi Eta; and Sigma Delta Pi.

Project: “Media on Media: How Media Trade Publications View Streaming Services Compared With Legacy Media”

Faculty Mentor: Allyson Levin, PhD, Assistant Teaching Professor, Communication


Describe your research in your own words (as simply as possible):

My research was an examination of how the media industry has reacted to the evolution of the industry itself since streaming was introduced in 2007. This was performed through an analysis of the coverage of the media industry by media trade publications.

How did the Library’s staff impact your research and academic experience?

I worked with former Falvey Social Studies Librarian Deborah Bishov to develop a greater understanding of LexisNexis (now known as Nexis Uni), a resource I accessed through Falvey Library in order to collect all of the articles I used in my research.

How did Falvey’s resources and databases impact your research?

Falvey’s resources helped me immensely with the literature review portion of my research. Without Falvey’s subscriptions to various academic journals, I would not have been able to complete the comprehensive literature review that served as the foundation for my research. Furthermore, Falvey’s resource of LexisNexis is what helped me collect all of the articles included in my sample and overall population. LexisNexis made the article collection process of my research incredibly easy, and without using LexisNexis courtesy of Falvey, I would have spent countless more hours collecting each article included in my time frame individually from the trade publication websites themselves.

What’s next for you?

I have been admitted to a Master’s in Media Studies program at Syracuse University. However, I am still exploring options, and I hope to pursue a career in the media industry.

Will you continue this research direction or has it inspired you to new research interests?

I am interning at The Walt Disney Company for their Disney+ Content Programming team.

In the future, I would like to continue this research, although slightly changing the direction. I would love to analyze the evolution of the media industry through the eyes of the media-consuming public, potentially performing an analysis of content posted on social media to gauge this reaction. I would also love to analyze the programming developed by media companies since the introduction of streaming to understand how media channel programming has changed as a result of industry evolution.


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Falvey Scholars 2022: Nadjulia Constant CON and Daryl Jucar CON

Falvey Scholar Protrait

Daryl Jucar ’22 CON and Nadjulia Constant ’22 CON, 2022 Falvey Scholars (Photo by Andrew McKeough)

The Falvey Scholars Program is an annual program established by Falvey Library to recognize outstanding undergraduate research. Now in its 20th year, the program is a collective initiative of the Library, Honors Program, and the Center for Research and Fellowships. The recipients of this award are selected from a pool of candidates nominated by Villanova faculty and reviewed by Library staff and faculty.

This year, eight students received awards, their work reflecting the breadth and depth of undergraduate research at the University as well as the support the Library, its resources and staff, provide student-scholars.

This blog is the first of seven installments, which will introduce our scholars and cover their research in their own words. Look for additional coverage of the Falvey Scholars in the fall issue of Mosaic.

Congratulations to all of our Falvey Scholars, past and present!


Scholars Summary

Nadjulia Constant (NC) ’22 CON
Hometown: Orange, NJ
Other honors: Villanova University Presidential Scholarship and Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Honor Society

Daryl Jucar (DJ) ’22 CON
Hometown:
Portland, Oregon
Other honors:
Villanova University Presidential Scholarship, Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Honor Society, and 2021 Villanova Undergraduate Research Fellowship grantee


 

Project: “Minority Stress and Effects on Cardiovascular Health in African Americans”

Faculty Mentor: Theresa Capriotti, DO, MSN, RN, CRNP. Clinical Professor

Research, in brief: Nadjulia and Daryl conducted a literature review focused on how minority stress affects cardiovascular health outcomes in African Americans within the Black community. Their research adds to the growing literature showing the tangible impacts of racism on health care disparities in the Black community.

 


 

How did the Library’s staff impact your research and academic experience?

NC: While we used the online Library resources to conduct this research, whenever I visited the Library for other academic needs, the staff has always been helpful. You can tell they genuinely love lending a hand and never mind answering questions.

DJ: I took advantage of Library tools, such as the Nursing Subject Guide, meeting with the Nursing Subject Librarian Sarah Hughes, and Citation Resources. The staff has always been willing to assist me with my research and academic endeavors.

How did Falvey’s resources and databases impact your research?

Utilizing the Nursing databases CINAHL and PubMed, over 40 different scholarly articles pertaining to the project were reviewed. We found articles over-viewing the phenomenon of minority stress as it affects marginalized persons across many identities (i.e. ethnic, gender, sexual orientation); however, due to the extensive results, we narrowed down a review of the literature to the effects of minority stress as it specifically relates to African Americans in the Black community. We integrated findings and summaries from the articles we found to create an outline and subsequently the manuscript.

What’s next for you both?

NC: On Undergraduate Nursing Scholar’s Day, I presented scholarly work on The Use of Social Marketing Theory to Increase the Consumption of Vegetables Among College Students. In May, I traveled with the Global Medical Brigade to do volunteer work in Panama. After graduation, I will be working as a New Grad Nurse Resident at Children’s National Hospital in the Emergency Medicine and Trauma Center.

DJ: I will be a Nurse Resident at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital in Washington D.C. on a Medical/Surgical Intermediate Care Unit.

Will you continue this research direction or has it inspired you to new research interests?

NC: I am really interested in clean eating and I know that many Black communities do not have the same access to healthier foods as other communities. This is largely due to economic disparities and food deserts. So, this research experience has inspired me to investigate what research is out there about the contributing factors and what interventions are currently being used to combat this.

DJ: Our manuscript is slated to be published in a nursing journal this fall, so we are very excited for that. This work showed me how I can utilize nursing research to highlight persisting inequities within healthcare in a concrete manner, and I now want to pursue a career in research in the future to ensure the quality of healthcare is sufficient for all.


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Falvey Library Celebrates Pride Month

Philadelphia Pride Flag.

Happy Pride! Falvey Memorial Library is celebrating Pride Month, and we invite you to celebrate along with us.

It is in this spirit that we encourage the community to increase awareness about LGBTQIA+ related topics, needs, and challenges.

Villanova University provides an array of resources for LGBTQIA members of our community, from VU Pride to scholarship information to Safe Zone training. We invite you to explore and discover a wealth of information there.

Similarly, in honor of Pride Month, we offer a LGBTQIA+ reading list, including a wide range of novels, poetry, non-fiction, and film. They span hundreds of years and include classics along with modern works. No list of this nature could ever be comprehensive, but we hope that this list, will serve as a starting point. 

Pride Month Recommended Reading List

 

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Paris is Burning (film) Livingston, Jennie Documentary 1990 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/2502515
Stonewall Uprising Documentary 2015 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/2527630
Normal Heart, The Kramer, Larry Drama 1985 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/712495

 

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Price of Salt, The Highsmith, Patricia Fiction 1952 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1235259
Giovanni’s Room Baldwin, James Fiction 1957 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/2319883
City of Night Rechy, John Fiction 1963 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1472732
Rubyfruit Jungle Brown, Rita Mae Fiction 1973 Available via E-Z Borrow
City and the Pillar, The Vidal, Gore Fiction 1979 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/389013
Color Purple, The Walker, Alice Fiction 1982 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/56572
Boy’s Own Story, A White, Edmund Fiction 1982 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/585354
Oranges are Not the Only Fruit Winterson, Jeanette Fiction 1997 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1200903
Tipping the Velvet Waters, Sarah Fiction 1998 Available via E-Z Borrow
Hours, The Cunningham, Michael Fiction 1998 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/512834
Middlesex Eugenides, Jeffrey Fiction 2003 Available via E-Z Borrow
Under the Udala Trees Okparanta, Chinelo Fiction 2015 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1586103
Edinburgh Chee, Alexander Fiction 2016 Available via E-Z Borrow
She Of The Mountains Shraya, Vivek Fiction 2016 Available via E-Z Borrow
Long Live the Tribe of Fatherless Girls Madden, T. Kira Fiction 2019 Available via E-Z Borrow
On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous Vuong, Ocean Fiction 2019 Available via E-Z Borrow
Memorial Washington, Bryan Fiction 2020 Available via E-Z Borrow
Real Life Taylor, Brandon Fiction 2020 Available via E-Z Borrow
Vanishing Half, The Bennett, Brit Fiction 2020 Available via E-Z Borrow
Ana on the Edge Sass, AJ Fiction 2021 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/WorldcatRecord/1237346336
Simon Vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda Albertalli, Becky Fiction 2021 https://https://library.villanova.edu/Find/WorldcatRecord/1242785439
Single Man, The  Isherwood, Christopher Fiction 1962 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/56579
Maurice: A Novel FORSTER, E.M. Fiction 1971 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/545909
Perks of Being a Wallflower, The  Chbosky, Stephen Fiction 1999 Available via E-Z Borrow
Line of Beauty, The Hollinghurst, Alan. Fiction 2004 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/641947
Hero Moore, Perry Fiction 2007 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/WorldcatRecord/938163872
Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe Saenz, Benjamin Alire Fiction 2013 Available via E-Z Borrow
Call Me By Your Name Aciman, Andre Fiction 2017 Available via E-Z Borrow
Reverie La Sala, Ryan Fiction 2019 Available via E-Z Borrow
Fun Home Bechdel, Alison Graphic memoir 2006 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1212728
Princess and the Dressmaker, The Wang, Jen Graphic novel 2018 Available via E-Z Borrow

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In the Dream House : a memoir Machado, Carmen Maria Biography 2019 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1973319
Zami: A New Spelling of My Name Lorde, Audre Biomythography 1982 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/345956
Song of Achilles, The Miller, Madeline Historical fiction 2011 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1925155
Orlando: A Biography Woolf, Virginia Literature 1928 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1954950
Tales of the City Maupin, Armistead Literature 1976 Available via E-Z Borrow
And the Band Played On Shiltz, Randy Non-fiction 1987 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/633142
Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches Lorde, Audre Non-fiction 2007 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1971527
Queer History of the United States, A Bronski, Michael Non-fiction 2011 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1320996
Transgender Experience: Place, Ethnicity, and Visibility Zabus, Chantal J. and Coad, David Non-Fiction 2014 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1523865
LGBTQ America: A Theme Study of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer History Non-fiction 2016 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1631694
Trans Studies: The Challenge to Hetero/Homo Normatives Martínez-San Miguel, Yolanda (Editor), Tobias, Sarah, 1963- (Editor) Non-fiction 2016 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1615298
Unbound: Transgender Men and the Remaking of Identity Stein, Arlene Non-fiction 2018 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1940794/Description
Gay on God’s Campus: Mobilizing for LGBT Equality at Christian Colleges and Universities Coley, Jonathan S. Non-fiction 2018 https://library-villanova-edu.ezp1.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1866048
Nonbinary Gender Identities: History, Culture, Resources McNabb, Charlie, Non-fiction 2018 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1919165
Navigating Trans and Complex Gender Identities Green, Jamison; Hoskin, Rhea Ashley; Mayo, Cris; and Miller, S.J. Non-fiction 2020 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/2200122
Queer New York, A : geographies of lesbians, dykes, and queers Gieseking, Jen Jack Non-fiction 2020 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/2526892
United Queerdom: From the Legends of the Gay Liberation Front to the Queers of Tomorrow Glass, Dan Non-fiction 2020 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/2526846

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June Jordan’s Poetry for the People: A Revolutionary Blueprint Jordan, June Stories 1995 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/WorldcatRecord/878915124
Leaves of Grass Whitman, Walt Poetry 1855 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/105734
New and Selected Poems, Volume Two Oliver, Mary Poetry 2005 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/692427
Selected Poems: 1950-1995 Rich, Adrienne Poetry 1996 https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/442936
Homie: Poems Smith, Danez Poetry 2020 Available via E-Z Borrow
Amora Polesso, Natalia Borges Stories 2020 Available via E-Z Borrow

 

 


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Interactive Memorial Map Celebrates Veterans’ Service, Sacrifice

By Shawn Proctor

 

 

This Memorial Day, Falvey and the Office of Veterans and Military Service Members at Villanova University wanted to share with our Villanova community a part of our project “The Voices of Villanova’s Veterans.” “Honoring the Fallen: An Interactive Memorial Map” displays the names of Villanova veterans killed in service, along with their branch of service, location, and year of death. For those veterans reported missing in action, we have mapped the nearest location of where they were last seen.

This project will honor the life and sacrifice of Villanova veterans who died while serving their country. Reflecting extensive research and collaboration, this interactive map will remember their service. This map allows users anywhere on the globe to access this map, and creates an access point for family members, the community, historians, and anyone else interested in learning about their legacy.

This Memorial Day—and every day—Villanova honors its veterans and pay tribute to their service and sacrifice by ensuring that they are never forgotten.

 

Note: This blog originally appeared May 31, 2021.


Shawn Proctor

Shawn Proctor, MFA, is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 

 


 

 


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Celebrating, Supporting Nurses During National Nursing Week and Beyond

Sarah Hughes

By Shawn Proctor

National Nursing Week, May 6–12, celebrates and honors the sacrifices and many contributions of nurses to improving and saving lives. At Falvey Library, Sarah Hughes, Librarian for Nursing, Biology, and Health Sciences, supports the academic and research efforts of the students in the M. Louise Fitzpatrick College of Nursing as they join the proud tradition of Villanova nurses.

We sat down with Hughes to learn more about her work with nurses, before and after joining Villanova University in 2019.

Question: Your experience working in the emergency department at University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro gave you insight into the role of nurses in that clinical setting. Can you tell me more about the work and challenges of those nurses?

Sarah Hughes: At Princeton Medical Center, I worked with nurses as both a medical librarian, but also in a separate role when I worked evenings at the emergency department (ED) assisting the front desk, basically as a glorified greeter. In both roles, I saw different sides to the nursing profession.

As a librarian, I helped with information-seeking behavior, mostly many of the nurses came to the library to get access to BLS, PALS, and ACLS books for recertification. I also did searches for nurses and doctors, provided patients with consumer health information, interlibrary loan services and maintained the nursing intranet page.

Working in the ED in a non-clinical role, but observing clinical practice really helped me to fully appreciate and understand what nurses do. I observed the triage process for the ED and also helped patients and family while they waited to be seen. Inside the ED, I watched first hand as nurses worked doing a variety of life saving measures including resuscitating patients, treating children that came in with significant burns, bedside assistance, and all sorts of things that the average person will never see with their own eyes.

When the COVID-19 pandemic started, my immediate first thought was with the nurses and other ED workers because their jobs were tough to start with, but the added layer of working through a highly contagious, deadly, airborne virus day in and out was simply unthinkable. The horrors that health care providers have seen over the past years is simply incalculable. Many nurses have chosen to leave the profession due to burnout and unsafe working conditions. Others have chosen to take early retirement because they were exhausted from seeing so much sadness and death.

This is why I personally choose to continue to masking indoors at all times in public, because I don’t want nurses to continue working through this pandemic forever. To me, masking is the most responsible thing a person can do in this moment. I mask to not only protect myself, but for all the nurses and healthcare workers out there.

Q: How would you describe Villanova’s nursing students and your work with them?

SH: I’ve found all students in Villanova nursing to be incredibly dedicated and hardworking. From the undergraduates to the DNP and PhD students, the vast majority of students are serious about their studies and ask me wonderful questions every day.

I tend to be involved early on in the NUR1102 course pointing students towards Falvey Library resources like CINAHL and PubMed for finding credible, peer-reviewed information. I come back again to the undergraduates in the Research Methods class and cover more advance searching and review things like PRISMA charting and use of citation management tools like Zotero. And I’m more deeply involved with long one-on-one research consultations with students in several of the higher level courses.

Asking the right research question and framing it in such a way is highly important to retrieve appropriate search results. I spend time also getting students familiar with citation management tools like Zotero, particularly if students are doing extensive searching and need to organize their search results for publication or group projects.

Q: Why is celebrating nurses and their work during Nurses Week important?

SH: National Nurses Week is an essential celebration and acknowledgement of those in the profession. It’s important to honor the varying roles of nurses and all the ways they make a difference in the different communities they serve. Since many nurses are struggling right now with what they have endured during the pandemic, it is more important than ever that they are commended and provided with safer working conditions in hospitals and health care settings.

These nurses must be recognized for their efforts, and it is imperative that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration implement a permanent safety standard for hospital and healthcare settings to protect our vitally important nurses and healthcare workers. Nurses are highly trained and skilled workers that tend to be in short supply, so it is vital they have a safe environment.

Q: You joined Falvey Library about 6 months before the pandemic. How has your way of engaging students during this time changed? Are there takeaways or practices that you would continue in the years beyond?

SH: I got to have one fully pre-pandemic semester so I had a glimpse of what “normal” was like. The majority of my research consults were conducted virtually on Zoom, even before the pandemic so not all that much has changed. It’s often easier to demonstrate searching techniques on a Zoom meeting than in person, so the student can observe what I do when I share my screen. Or conversely, I can watch what a student is doing and then take control of the screen if they have questions or cannot locate something right away. I also find virtual instruction sessions to be more conducive to online as well, since again students can watch and mirror my actions. We are fortunate to have such technology that allows for virtual instruction and meeting online when it is not safe to be together.

Students who wish to schedule a nursing, biology, or health sciences consultation, visit Sarah Hughes’ staff page or email sarah.hughes@villanova.edu.


Shawn Proctor

Shawn Proctor is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Library.


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Virtual Event: Russia’s War on Ukraine: Historical Turning Points

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Russia’s War on Ukraine: Historical Turning Points

Monday, April 25, 6-7 p.m.

What were the turning points that led to Russia’s current war on Ukraine and its people? Join us for a discussion of the Ukrainian-Russian relationship, including: the Holodomor, WWII and its aftermath, the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Budapest Memorandum, the Russian war on Georgia, and the illegal annexation of Crimea.

Speakers:

  • Dr. Adele Lindenmeyr, Historian of Russia and the USSR, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Villanova University
  • Dr. Mike Westrate, Historian of Ukraine and the USSR, Assistant Vice Provost, Graduate Education and Research, Villanova University

Co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, Villanova University

***EVENT CHANGED TO VIRTUAL-ONLY*** 

Click here to register


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Photo Friday: Lawn Lesson

Class outdoors

On the last glorious day before Easter break, more than one Villanova class decided to bring the learning outdoors for a “lawn lesson.” It was welcome relief to months of cabin fever and a chance to bask in the early spring sun.

Enjoy the Easter holiday and the time with family, everyone!


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Last Modified: April 15, 2022