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Distinctive Summer Reading

Here are the books that top the reading piles of the Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement staff this summer. Most if not all of these titles can be found via stocked online booksellers while some are also available in digital and audio formats for interested readers. And for even more reading recommendations, here are links to the 2019, 2020, and 2021 lists.

From Beaudry Allen, Preservation and Digital Archivist:

All Boys Aren’t Blue, George M. Johnson. A series of essays about Johnson growing up as a young queer men of color.

From Michael Foight, Director Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement:

Scarlett: The Sequel to Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With the Wind / Alexandra Ripley. In this first sequel to Margaret Mitchell’s novel, Scarlett and Rhett’s relationship continues the page-turning-drama of the original.

The Roman Republic of Letters: Scholarship, Philosophy, and Politics in the Age of Cicero and Caesar / Katharina Volk. This deep dive into Roman Republican “senator scholars” checks many of my ancient world interests.

Watergate: A New History / Garrett M. Graff. A compelling and page-turning big picture revisionist read on the scandal that caused Nixon to resign.

In Pursuit of Civility: Manners and Civilization in Early Modern England / Keith Thomas. An ethnographic study showcasing the conflicting early European standards of polite behavior through a lens of voices from 1600-1789.

From Rebecca Oviedo,Distinctive Collections Archivist:

Archival Virtue: Relationship, Obligation, and the Just Archives by Scott Cline.

The Personal Librarian by Marie Benedict and Victoria Christopher Murray.


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Green Voices of the Past: Final Reflections

Posted for: Emily Alesia Poteat

The act of transcribing manuscripts can transport you back in history and allow you to rediscover voices lost or ignored in the historical record. My graduate assistantship with Villanova University’s Irish Studies Department and Falvey Library’s Distinctive Collections has done just that. Throughout my time transcribing Irish American historical manuscripts in Villanova’s collection, I was confronted with a diverse set of experiences and distant voices from unique figures of the past.

Stark and defiant voices emerged in manuscripts from figures like Joseph McGarrity, who sought to make real change in their own time. McGarrity was born on March 28, 1874, and died on September 04, 1940. It is through his distinctive scrawling penmanship, McGarrity’s voice rose from the pages, and he detailed his hopes, his organizing for the Irish republican cause, and his personal opinions about the happenings of the world on the eve of World War II. Most riveting, however, was the discovery that McGarrity directly sought to partner with Nazi Germany to find support for the Irish republican cause. As Joseph McGarrity’s 1939 diary demonstrated the reach of Irish American organizing in the twentieth century. As, the purpose of aligning with Germany was to force the United Kingdom to remove its forces from Northern Ireland, and to allow a united and independent Ireland. Brute force was seen as the best way to do this by McGarrity, as he he sought, from an alliance with Nazi Germany, “technicians…particularly chemical experts,” to “ask for submarine experts to be trained,” and most tellingly with his intentions “that sufficient war stuffs be supplied in the line of war material for a major engagement in England.” From McGarrity’s rhetoric, he and he Irish republican allies sought to plan a major military effort and armed engagements with England during the onset of World War II.

Photograph, Joseph McGarrity, standing with gloves, n.d.

Also deepening the Irish American and German connection, The Irish American Club’s connection to the Clan-na-Gael was most revelatory, as this connection was largely undiscovered. The Clan-na-Gael formed in 1867 in New York as the successor of the Fenian Brotherhood, and was a secret Irish Republican society. As the American sister organization to the Irish Republican Brotherhood, the Clan-na-Gael was dedicated to supporting the formation of an independent and democratic republic in Ireland through the use of force. With Irish republican beliefs deeply embedded into the organization, the Clan-na-Gael was active in assisting the Irish Republican Brotherhood in achieving an independent Ireland. Because of this deep support of Irish independence, the Clan-na-Gael was the single largest financial support of the Easter rising, as well as the Irish War of Independence. In the Minute Book of the Board of Officers for the Irish American Club, the way in which Irish Americans, in the Irish American Club, actively engaged in support of the German war effort came to light, and offered new insight into ways Irish Americans engaged in Irish republicanism during the early twentieth century. Through advocacy work and monetary support, the Irish American Club attempted to support the German war effort in World War I. Most distinguishing, however, was not this fact alone, it was the fact that the Irish American Club consistently referred to themselves as the Clan-na-Gael.

Advertisement, “Grosse Massen-Demonstration unter den Asupicien des Irish-American Club,” 1916.

By delving into the archive forgotten connections that largely reorient our understandings of history are possible. For instance, just by connecting Irish Americans to Germans during the world wars, these sources offer new opportunities for research into transatlantic history, as well as into understanding the reach of Irish American organizing. If we continue to ask new questions of archival sources, we can continue to diversify the historical record with underrepresented voices from the past. While these sources can not tell us everything about certain individuals, they offer a chance to preserve the voice and experiences in the historical record.

——————–
Emily Poteat is a graduate assistant in Irish Studies and Falvey Memorial Library’s Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement Department, and a graduate student in the History Department.


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Green Voices of the Past: An Introduction to 19th Century Irish American Voices from the Friendly Sons and Daughters of Saint Patrick

Posted for: Emily A. Poteat

The Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick for the Relief of Emigrants from Ireland, now known as the Friendly Sons and Daughters of St. Patrick, emerged in the immediate years before the American Revolution, 1771. Founded in Philadelphia on St. Patrick’s Day of 1771, the organization’s founding tenants were to aid immigrants from Ireland. In the present day, the organization also seeks to focus on ties between the United States and Ireland, as well as sponsors a variety of charitable scholarships, activities, as well as educational endowments.

Currently I am transcribing the minute book of the organization, which extends from 1813 to 1852. Intriguingly, the beginning of the manuscript is not handwritten, rather, it was a printed by a prominent Philadelphia printer named John Bioren, who was the co-proprietor of Mountford, Bioren and Company. Most striking in this particular manuscript, however, is the sheer number of prominent historical figures, especially founding fathers, involved in the American Revolution that were founding members of the organization. Riddled throughout the first few pages of this manuscript are the names of those who created, and facilitated, the charity and aid to Irish immigrants to the United States that landed in Philadelphia.

p. 3, “Rules Minutes &c. of the Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, 1813-1852.” Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick for the Relief of Emigrants from Ireland, 1813.

Thomas McKean is the first man listed as amongst the founding members of the organization. McKean was a founding father of the United States, and politician that was born to Irish parents in 1734. Coming to prominence during the American Revolution, McKean was the Delaware delegate to the Continental Congress, at which he signed the Continental Association, Articles of Confederation, as well as the Declaration of Independence. Beyond this, McKean is also noteworthy for his place in Pennsylvania’s history, as McKean served as the chief justice to Pennsylvania, and was the governor of Pennsylvania as well.

Also appearing in the manuscript is Thomas Barclay, an Irish American who came to international political prominence, is also amongst the founding members of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick. Barclay, initially a Philadelphian merchant, was integral to international relations for the United States in the aftermath of the American revolution. Importantly, Barclay was the first U.S. consul in France, and later George Washington appointed Barclay the U.S. consul in Morocco in 1791. This appointment came following Barclay’s success at negotiating the first treaty between the United States and Morocco in 1786.

Jared Ingersoll is also amongst those who are listed as founding members of the organization. Ingersoll, was a founding father of the United States, and was a delegate to the Continental Congress, as well as signed the United States constitution. Further, Ingersoll was important to Pennsylvania’s history, as he served as the state’s attorney general from 1791 to 1800, and then from 1811 to 1816. In addition to this, Ingersoll was the United States attorney for Pennsylvania, as well as the Philadelphia city solicitor. In further connection to his career as a lawyer, Ingersoll argued Chisholm v. Georgia, and Hylton v. United States, which were two of the first cases to be argued before the United States Supreme Court.

“Masthead image, The Society of The Friendly Sons of St. Patrick for The Relief of Emigrants from Ireland.” The Society of The Friendly Sons and Daughters of St. Patrick for The Relief of Emigrants from Ireland, published digitally 2017.

These three men are only a few of many who appear in this minute book, and represent just a few of many voices to arise from the manuscript’s pages. Pertinently to the historical record, this minute book gives a glimpse into the machinations of the elite Irish American class of the newly formed United States, as well as their efforts to support new Irish immigrants to the United States. In doing so, this manuscript provides evidence of understandings of class and societal rank in the immediate aftermath of the American Revolution as well. Furthermore, this manuscript allows a deeper understanding of Irish American organizing during the 19th century, and provides a peek into what went into maintaining a cohesive organizing effort during the time period as well.

——————–
Emily Poteat is a graduate assistant in Irish Studies and Falvey Memorial Library’s Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement Department, and a graduate student in the History Department.


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Green Voices of the Past: Two Newspaper Clippings from Joseph McGarrity’s WWII Diary

Posted for: Emily A. Poteat

Joseph McGarrity’s diary from 1939 details his hopes, his work in Irish-republican organizing, and his personal opinions about the happenings of the world in the immediate months preceding the Second World War. This diary gives an important glimpse into the mind of one of the most prolific Irish-American organizers of the period.

Riddled throughout this particular diary of McGarrity’s are numerous newspaper clippings, and through these clippings one discerns what was important, or exciting to McGarrity about the world on the eve of World War II.

First see the clipping in McGarrity’s diary on the page entitled “Front flyleaf, verso clipping over.” This clipping importantly signals that McGarrity was watching the United States’ involvement in Irish peacemaking attempts, and activities.

front flyleaf, verso clipping over, “Diary, Joseph McGarrity, 1939.” Joseph McGarrity, 1939.

SLOVAKIA
OPERATIVES OF THE SURETE NATION-
ALE GUARDED THE COLONEL FROM HIS
PARIS APARTMENT TO THE CHERBOURG
MARTIME STATION TODAY. HIS WIFE

CONTINUED ON PAGE 7, COLUMN 3

U.S. ROLE REPORTED
IN IRISH PEACE STEP;
4-WAY PACT HINTED

LONDON, APRIL 8 (U.P.). – THE
DUBLIN SUNDAY TIMES SAID TODAY
THAT NEGOTIATIONS, IN WHICH THE UNIT-
ED STATES IS PARTICIPATING, ARE IN
PROGRESS TO END THE IRISH PARTITION
PROBLEM AND MAY INVOLVE A FOUR-WAY
BRITISH-AMERICAN-NORTHER IRELAND-
EIRE AGREEMENT.
ACCORDING TO THE NEWSPAPER, THE
TREATY WOULD PROVIDE THAT IN CASE OF
A WAR IN WHICH THE UNITED STATES
WAS INVOLVED, TROOPS COULD BE LANDED
IN IRELAND IN RETURN FOR A GUARANTEE
OF IRELAND’S SAFETY.
THE VISIT OF PRIME MINISTER EAMON
DE VALERA TO THE UNITED STATES NEXT
MONTH WAS EXPECTED TO HAVE SOME
INFLUENCE ON THE NEGOTIATIONS, ACCORD-
ING TO THE NEWSPAPER. IT SAID PRESI-
DENT ROOSEVELT WAS ANXIOUS TO SEE A
FINAL SOLUTION OF THE IRISH PROBLEM
BECAUSE OF THE IMPRESSION IT WOULD
MAKE ON THE IRISH POPULATION IN THE
UNITED STATES.
“ONE REPORT IS THAT IF SUCH A SOLU-
TION COULD BE REACHED FOR A UNITED
IRELAND, MAINTAINING EXTERNAL ASSO-
CIATION WITH THE BRITISH EMPIRE,
UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES SHOULD,
BY THE TREATY, BE GIVEN CERTAIN AC-
COMODATION IN IRELAND IN WARTIME,”
THE NEWSPAPER SAID.

Next, another telling clipping, is one entitled “Dublin Bill Asks Terrorists’ Death,” and is located on “p. 3, clipping over,” of the manuscript. In this clipping the legislation created by Irish president, at the time, Éamon de Valera is featured, which called for the death penalty of persons found guilty of treason.

p. 3, clipping over, “Diary, Joseph McGarrity, 1939.” Joseph McGarrity, 1939.

DUBLIN BILL ASKS
TERRORISTS’ DEA

MEASURE BY DE VALERA WOULD
MAKE CAPITAL CRIMES OF ACTS
COVERED BY TREASON ARTICLE

EMBRACES DEEDS ABROAD

REPUBLICAN GROUPS OPEN DRIVE
ON LEGISLATION – CLOSE GUARD
SET FOR KING’S 3-DAY TOUR

WIRELESS TO THE NEW YORK TIMES
DUBLIN, FEB. 20. – THE TEXT OF
THE FIRST OF PRIME MINISTER EAMON
DE VALERA’S NEW LEGISLATIVE MEAS-
URES AGAINST EXTREMISTS, WHICH WAS
ISSUED HERE TONIGHT, PRESCRIBES THE
DEATH PENALTY FOR THOSE FOUND GUILTY
OF TREASON AS DEFINED IN ARTICLE
XXXIX OF THE IRISH CONSTITUTION.
THE BILL FOLLOWS RECENT TERRORISTIC
ACTS IN BRITAIN ASCRIBED TO THE OUT-
LAWED IRISH REPUBLICAN ARMY.
THE DEATH PENALTY IS PROVIDED NOT
ONLY FOR THOSE GUILTY OF TREASON.

WITHIN THE STATE, BUT ALSO FOR IRISH
CITIZENS OR PERSONS ORDINARILY RES-
IDENT WITHIN THE STATE WHO COMMIT
TREASON OUTSIDE ITS BORDERS.
ANOTHER SECTION OF THE BILL PRO-
VIDES THAT A PERSON INDICTED FOR
TREASON MUST BE TRIED IN THE SAME
MANNER AS A PERSON INDICTED FOR
MURDER, WHO CANNOT BE CONVICTED
ON THE UNCORROBORATED EVIDENCE OF
ONE WITNESS. THOSE WHO “ENCOUR-
AGE, HARBOR OR COMFORT” PERSONS
COMMITTING TREASON ARE TO AD-
JUDGED GUILTY OF A FELONY AND LIABLE
TO A FINE OF 500 OR PENAL SERVITUDE
NOT EXCEEDING TWENTY YEARS OR IM-
PRISONMENT NOT EXCEEDING TWO YEARS.
UNDER ANOTHER SECTION, PERSONS
WHO, KNOWING THAT TREASON IS ABOUT
TO BE COMMITTED, FAIL TO GIVE THE
INFORMATION TO THE AUTHORITIES WILL
BE ADJUDGED GUILTY OF MISPRISION OF
TREASON. THIS WILL MAKE THEM LIABLE
TO PENAL SERVITUDE UP TO FIVE YEARS
OR IMPRISONMENT NOT TO EXCEED TWO YEARS.
PRIME MINISTER DE VALERA HAS ALSO
INTRODUCED A SECOND MEASURE AGAINST
EXTREMISTS – THE OFFENSES AGAINST
THE STATE BILL – BUT THE TEXT IS NOT
AVAILABLE YET.
CERTAIN REPUBLICAN ORGANIZATIONS
ARE ALREADY WORKING UP A CAMPAIGN
AGAINST THESE BILLS ON THE GROUND
THAT THEY ARE REACTIONARY LEGISLATION
IN BRITAIN’S INTERESTS. EVEN AMONG
A SECTION OF THE GOVERNMENT’S OWN
FIANNA FAIL PARTY THERE IS AN UN-
EASY FEELING OVER THIS LEGISLATION,
BUT PRIME MINISTER DE VALERA IS CER-

TAIN THAT THE DAIL EIREANN WILL
CARRY IT THROUGH.
AS HE SIGNIFICANTLY OBSERVED IN
THE SENATE RECENTLY, HE WILL ENACT
THESE BILLS WHATEVER THE CONSE-
QUENCES MAY BE. HE FEELS STRONGLY
THAT THE GOVERNMENT MUST ACCEPT
THE IRISH REPUBLICAN ARMY’S CHAL-
LENGE TO ITS AUTHORITY OR CEASE TO
GOVERN.

Taken together, these two clippings, and the countless others laden throughout McGarrity’s 1939 diary, add a dimension to the manuscript that would otherwise be lacking if they were not included. These clippings act as a type of gauge, in a sense, to what McGarrity was paying most attention to, or even taking issue with as World War II approached. Beyond this, McGarrity’s personality peaks through from these clippings, as McGarrity wrote commentary on the pages that he featured the clippings on. In this commentary one finds the most candid iterations of McGarrity that I have encountered in his different diaries.

——————–
Emily Poteat is a graduate assistant in Irish Studies and Falvey Memorial Library’s Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement Department, and a graduate student in the History Department.


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Content Roundup – Second Week – March 2022

Photograph, Volleyball (Women), 1992

This week we present a number of new materials of note, including additional Dime Novels and Story Paper issues as well two more volumes from the Mendel Collection, and in the Villanova Digital Collection 40 miscellaneous athletics photographs and two basketball scrapbooks!

Dime Novel and Popular Literature

Fiction

Front cover, The murder at Linden Fells, or, The mystery of the cadillac needle / edited by Chickering Carter

Nick Carter Stories (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:627425?lookfor=series%3A[58+TO+62]#]

Front cover, Buffalo Bill’s iron bracelets; or, Dauntless Dell’s daring / by the author of “Buffalo Bill.”

New Buffalo Bill Weekly (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:596124?lookfor=series%3A(155+OR+163+OR+166+OR+167)#]

Periodicals

Golden Era (3 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:689499?lookfor=title%3A(march+OR+april)#]

Portland Transcript (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Collection/vudl:700409]

Weekly Novelette (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:687791?lookfor=title%3Anovember]

Masthead, The New York Ledger, v. XXIII, no. 21, Saturday, July 20, 1867

New York Ledger (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:688217?lookfor=title%3Ajuly]

New York Weekly (2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:699039]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:699051]

Mendel Collection

Front cover, Verhandlungen des naturforschenden Vereines in Brünn, III Band, 1864

Naturforschenden Vereines in Brünn (2 v. added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:693282]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:692362]

Villanova Digital Collection

Photograph, Karate Club, 1989

Miscellaneous Athletics Images (40 photographs added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:700410]

Photograph, Swimming (Women), 1990

Athletics

Scrapbook, Villanova Basketball, 1933-1946
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:695437]

p. [8], Scrapbook, Villanova Basketball, 1946-1951

Scrapbook, Villanova Basketball, 1946-1951
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:698201]


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Content Roundup – First weeks – February 2022

Recently added to the digital library, on offer are more story paper issues, more dime novels, and materials of note including 7 manuscript notebooks of the American popular author Annie Tuttle, 5 notebooks of the poetry and diary entries from James Roger, items from the “Remember the Maine” collection, and photographs from the University Archives collections documenting student and university activities!

Americana

Notebook, “Songs Freedom’s Emblem” / Annie L.Tuttle

Annie L. Tuttle papers (7 notebooks):
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Collection/vudl:684371?recordID=vudl%3A688554]

Historical Sketch From the Destruction of the “Maine” to the Battle of Manila : a short history in memory of the lost heros of the “Maine” / by Otto Volckmer

Remember the Maine Collection (12 items added):
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:684698]

Dime Novel and Popular Literature

Fiction

Nick Carter and Keno M’Call, or, The fate of a stool pigeon / edited by Chickering Carter.

Nick Carter Stories (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:627425?lookfor=series%3A%5B30+TO+34%5D]

Old Broadbrim (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Collection/vudl:287323?recordID=vudl%3A694970]

Sweet love’s atonement : a novel / by Mrs. E.D.E.N. Southworth.

Sweet love’s atonement : a novel / by Mrs. E.D.E.N. Southworth
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:693673]

Periodicals

Golden Era (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:689499?lookfor=title%3Afebruary]

New York Ledger (5 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:688217?lookfor=title%3Ajune]

Street and Smith’s New York Weekly : a journal of useful knowledge, romance, amusement, & c. , v. 49, no. 21, March 17, 1894

New York Weekly (2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:690769]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:690781]

Weekly Novelette (5 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:687791?lookfor=title%3Aoctober]

Villanova Digital Collection

University Functions

Photograph, Black Cultural Society Award, 1981

Photograph, Black Cultural Society Award, 1981
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:656426]

Photograph, Black Cultural Society, 1983-1984
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:656324]

Photograph, Black Cultural Society, 1983-1984
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:656330]

Photograph, Villanova Band, 1940s

Villanova Band (12 photos added):
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649898?type=AllFields&filter%5B%5D=topic_facet%3A%22Villanova+Band%22]

Photograph, Villanova Singers, 1992-1993

Villanova Singers (2 photos added):
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:649898?type=AllFields&filter%5B%5D=topic_facet%3A%22Villanova+Singers%22]

World

[1] p., Diary, James Roger, April 1, 1900 – Novermber 30, 1901

James Roger Personal Papers (5 notebooks added):
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Collection/vudl:691783?recordID=vudl%3A692024]


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Green Voices of the Past: Joseph McGarrity and the 1939 British Royal Visit to the United States

Posted for: Emily Poteat.

Beginning on June 07, 1939 King George VI, and his wife Queen Elizabeth embarked on the first royal visit to the United States that would endure until June 12, 1939. Joseph McGarrity’s 1939 diary offers intriguing insight into the visit through the lens of an American Irish Republican.

p. 93 clipping unfolded back, “Diary, Joseph McGarrity, 1939.” Joseph McGarrity, 1939.

Preceding the advent of the tour, there was much controversy surrounding the mere possibility of the tour, and the newspaper clippings included in McGarrity’s diary offer immense evidence of this. As a newspaper article titled “Britain Fears War” alluded to, many people were questioning in April 1939 if King George VI and Queen Elizabeth should be allowed to go on the visit at all because of the rising fears of an imminent breakout of international war (p. 15, clipping 4). There was a clear division of opinion within both the British cabinet as well as within the royal household; further, this primarily was due to the concern that if war broke out while the British royals were in the United States, the British government feared if they could return home from the tour (p. 15, clipping 4).

Despite these concerns, the tour went ahead, and the first traces of the decision for the tour to go ahead, is evident through the eyes of Joseph McGarrity in his 1939 diary. For, on May 23, 1939, McGarrity wrote “the King + Queen are to visit the President at Washington what Gall they have (p. 50). From this clear disdain, it is clear that McGarrity found the royal visit to not only inappropriate, but also inflammatory with the Irish question still looming large. With his characteristic vitriol towards Britain and the British empire, McGarrity chronicles what he considers to be the most important aspects of the royal visit in his diary.

The royal visit was inflammatory to McGarrity’s immense hatred toward the British monarchy, and his reaction to King George VI and Queen Elizabeth’s visit to the Irish exhibit at the 1939 New York World’s Fair. In the newspaper clipping, found in McGarrity’s diary, entitled “Royal Guests Visit the Irish Exhibit” King George VI and Queen Elizabeth are depicted as maintaining respectfulness and politeness while perusing the exhibit. As the “Queen gave special attention to an exhibit showing the activities for improvement of housing and hospital facilities,” and she commented that the exhibit was “very colorful and pleasant” (p. 93, clipping back). Furthermore, this was the first stop of the royal visit, and according to McGarrity the royal walk at the World’s Fair demonstrated that the visit represented “Fake freedom” and “Fake Patriots” on the part of the American government for entertaining the British royals (p. 92). McGarrity inherently thought that the United States should not entertain the British royals, as they represented a country maintaining a hold on a country searching for freedom. Evidence of this is apparent with McGarrity maintaining “gradually we have pulled the veil from the Faik [sic] Freedom that Ireland is supposed to Have and leave Her masked as still the Pawn of England (p. 92). For McGarrity believed that Roosevelt should side with the Irish, and support an independence movement that he equated with the American revolution.

. 92, “Diary, Joseph McGarrity, 1939.” Joseph McGarrity, 1939.

Further, it is clear that the Irish exhibit at the 1939 New York World’s Fair was a key part of the royal visit. As the reactions of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth are covered in intricate detail. For instance the reporter wrote, “the Queen paused briefly and asked John M. Conway…for an explanation…She made no comment, however, when he showed her the affixed text of the proclamation of the Irish Republic” (p. 93, clipping back). From the brief description of the Queen’s reaction to symbolism concerning Irish republicanism, it is clear that she was aware that the visit had potential to stir up emotions and criticism. Further, all descriptions of the king and queen on the visit to the Irish exhibit allude to a carefully staged, and self-monitored experience for the royals.

As a whole, McGarrity’s short inclusion of the 1939 royal visit offers a deeper understanding of McGarrity, as understanding what angered him hints at what he found most important. This episode in McGarrity’s diary demonstrates his deep criticism of not only Roosevelt, but also the actions and intentions of the royal family as well. For an Irish American, and Irish republican, McGarrity viewed the first visit of the royal family to the United States with deep suspicion of the intentions of the British for visiting, but also with deep fury.

——————–
Emily Poteat is a graduate assistant in Irish Studies and Falvey Memorial Library’s Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement Department, and a graduate student in the History Department.


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Green Voices of the Past: Franklin D. Roosevelt through the Eyes of Joseph McGarrity

Posted for: Emily Poteat.

From September 1938 to December 1939, Joseph McGarrity kept a number of diaries; however, this particular diary is in an old “Composition” notebook. Despite its humble appearance, this diary provides a riveting glimpse into the machinations of McGarrity concerning the onset of World War II, and McGarrity’s perceptions of the most prolific politicians of that period. Touched upon most in this particular diary, are McGarrity’s thoughts surrounding President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s visitors, and policies at the onset of World War II.

p. 20, Diary, “Diary, “Compositions” Joseph McGarrity, September 22, 1938 – November 1939.” Joseph McGarrity, 1939.

For McGarrity, Roosevelt was an obstacle standing in the way of American support for a fully united and independent Ireland. Because of this, much of McGarrity’s rhetoric concerning Roosevelt is not only skeptical, but at times McGarrity’s rhetoric becomes vitriolic. Attracting the most scorn from McGarrity was Roosevelt’s meeting with Max Aitken, 1st Baron Beaverbrook, whom McGarrity refers to as “Lord Beverbrook [sic]” (p. 20). To McGarrity, “Lord Beverbrook [sic]” is an “English official propagandist,” as he purchased quite a few American newspapers and McGarrity believed that the papers became too geared towards supporting England soon after (p. 20). Inherently, this is problematic for McGarrity, as it represented a turn for him towards a more sympathetic view of the British. In this regard, McGarrity describes Aitken’s role in the American press as one of the “tools of Americas [sic] most daingerous [sic] ‘Friend.” Because Roosevelt dined with Aitken, McGarrity viewed him as being too close and too willing to work with the British. This view is evident, as McGarrity viewed Roosevelt’s dinner with Aitken, as Roosevelt aligning the United States too closely with the United Kingdom. Inherently this was a major issue for McGarrity, as he, as an Irish republican, saw England as an imperial aggressor that was keeping Ireland from unification and independence. Most vitriolic in his assessment of Roosevelt, McGarrity on page 21 questions “will we ever get another such President as Washington who warned us for all future time aginst [sic] foreign entanglements,” and more pertinently McGarrity wondered “How can the United States prosper all the time on the auction block for England to buy” (p. 21). From this, McGarrity was not only questioning the efficacy of the United States catering to England when they were claiming to be neutral, but also was highly skeptical of Roosevelt’s integrity when it came to U.S. foreign policy. Moreover, McGarrity did not view Roosevelt as forming his policies on his own accord, instead McGarrity viewed Roosevelt as a puppet of the English government.

In equating Roosevelt with England’s war objectives, McGarrity often portrayed Roosevelt as lacking agency, and merely a tool utilized by England. Most clearly McGarrity does this by alluding to a “Roosevelt Promise,” or Roosevelt ignoring neutrality to work directly with England. With this rhetoric in mind, McGarrity on page 24 directly states “I wonder if England has a Roosevelt Promise to put America in the war on Her side?” (p. 24). In equating Roosevelt with McGarrity’s enemy, England, McGarrity does show partiality towards the Axis powers, and often times show outright support for Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, and Joseph Stalin. In doing so, McGarrity on page 24 details that “Hitler and Stalin I hope are very buisy [sic] preparing”.

p.1, Letter, “Letter, To: “To the President of the United States We Appeal” From: [Irish Race?, 1939?].” McGarrity Papers, 1939.

McGarrity’s machinations about Roosevelt, and other key figures of the World War II era are important, as they demonstrate the way that McGarrity was understanding the events that were happening in the world around him. Further, these ideas surrounding Roosevelt represent a concerted shift from the way that McGarrity perceived Roosevelt in 1936, as in McGarrity’s 1936 diary, McGarrity wrote “I thank and I pray that Roosevelt gets elected a man of great Heart and courage + Brain” (p. 47)). By further exploring these diaries, one will be able to discern when, and why, McGarrity’s perception of Roosevelt changed, and what key factors pushed McGarrity from staunch support to strong dislike.

——————–
Emily Poteat is a graduate assistant in Irish Studies and Falvey Memorial Library’s Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement Department, and a graduate student in the History Department.


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Content Roundup – Last Week – January 2022

Read, research and review the newest available digitized content. This week: new dime novels and story paper issues, more of the literary notebooks of Annie Tuttle containing poems and lyrical verse, and a host of offerings from the James Wheeler Collection of Polar Exploration including correspondence from notable explorers.

Americana

Notebook, “Mile A Minute Composition Book” / Annie L.Tuttle.

Annie L. Tuttle papers (5 notebooks added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:684371]

Dime Novel and Popular Literature

Fiction

Buffalo Bill in the jaws of death; or, The strange sacrifice of Uncopah / by the author of “Buffalo Bill.”

New Buffalo Bill Weekly (4 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:596124?lookfor=series%3A%28120+OR+122+OR+123+OR+124%29]

Periodicals

Detail, p. [273], Golden Days : for Boys and Girls, v. VIII, no. 18, April 2, 1887

Golden Days (5 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:650112?lookfor=title%3Aapril]

The Illustrated record, v. V, no. 64, Saturday, August 10, 1895

Illustrated Record (2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:687559]

New York Ledger (2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:688217?lookfor=title%3Amay]

New York Weekly (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:686038]

The People’s Home Journal, v. XXV, no. 5, May, 1910

People’s Home Journal (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:683123]

Portland Transcript (3 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:687558?lookfor=title%3Amay]

Detail, p. [1], The Weekly novelette, v. VI, no. 2, Saturday, September 24, 1859

Weekly Novelette (2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:686149]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:686169]

James Wheeler Collection of Polar Exploration

Letter, To: “Dear Sir” From: John Franklin, undated.

Letter, To: “Dear Sir” From: John Franklin, undated.
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:682928]

Letter, To: Rev’d H. Wagner From: Sir John Franklin, undated.

Letter, To: Rev’d H. Wagner From: Sir John Franklin, undated.
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:682921]

Diagram, showing latitude near North Pole, signed by Robert Peary, November 1, 1909

Diagram, showing latitude near North Pole, signed by Robert Peary, November 1, 1909
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:682948]

Letter, To: Dr. O. H. Tittmann From: R.E. Peary, December 9, 1910
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:682941]

Letter, To: Dr. Tittmann From: E. H. Shackleton, September 28, 1909
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:682954]

Letter, To: Dr. F. Feith From: Knud Rasmussen, 28 November, 1929
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:682935]

Letter, To: Mr. Isaiah Bowmann From: Robert Flaherty, April 18, 1918
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:682960]


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Green Voices of the Past: Joseph McGarrity, Irish Republicanism, and Irish Organizing in the Months before World War II

Posted for: Emily Poteat.

As a person with a passion for the history of World War II, it is needless to say I was intrigued at the prospect of transcribing Joseph McGarrity’s diary from 1939. Through his distinctive scrawling handwriting, McGarrity details his hopes, his Irish-republican organizing, and his personal opinions about the happenings of the world in the immediate months preceding the Second World War.

Photograph, Joseph McGarrity, standing with gloves, n.d.

Beyond this, McGarrity’s diary is immensely riveting in nature. Within just the first few pages, one is teleported into one of the Irish-republican effort’s most prolific minds, as he charts and plans how the Irish republican cause could benefit from an alliance with the Third Reich. On page ten of the manuscript McGarrity directly states that he sought, from an alliance with Nazi Germany, “technicians…particularly chemical experts,” to “ask for submarine experts to be trained,” and most tellingly with his intentions “that sufficient war stuffs be supplied in the line of war material for a major engagement in England.” As evidenced by McGarrity’s rhetoric, McGarrity and his Irish republican compatriots were planning for a major military effort and armed engagements on mainland England in the months preceding World War II. This is significant, as from my experience with McGarrity’s personal manuscripts, this is the first time he directly alluded to his involvement in arms procurement for the sole purpose of armed warfare with England. Furthermore, McGarrity’s diary entry directly points to a major Irish-republican effort to align itself with Hitler’s Nazi Germany right before World War II.

p. 10, Diary, “Diary, Joseph McGarrity, 1939,” Joseph McGarrity, 1939.

Most pertinently, McGarrity’s diary points to an intentional effort of Irish Republicans to organize armed engagement beyond anonymous bombings in England, which McGarrity chronicles in his diary as well. The purpose of this alignment with Germany in 1939 for McGarrity, was to force England to remove its forces from Northern Ireland and to allow both Ireland and Northern Ireland to unite into a single republican nation. If this were to occur, McGarrity believed that recognition by other nations was critical to the success of a completely independent and united Ireland, as he professes on page ten “since the freedom of Ireland would mean the freedom of the seas early Recognition by German Italy + [sic] Spain and as many of the Government as Germany and Her Allies can influence should come as early a date as possible.” Clearly, McGarrity saw an alliance with Nazi Germany as a clear way to push forward the effort to unite the Ireland and Northern Ireland. Distinctively, further corroborating McGarrity’s intention is his statement on page ten, “in case war supplies must be landed in England so that an Irish Republican force can get into action there on a big scale I feel sure they would be joined by many thousands of Irish once operations would begin in England.”

Expounding on McGarrity’s idea that the Irish Republican cause would benefit through an alliance with Germany, McGarrity, throughout his diary is incredibly critical of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, his cabinet, and the British parliament. Evidence for this lies in McGarrity’s numerous newspaper clippings he includes in his diary, that often only include critical assessments of the British government or critical views surrounding Roosevelt’s intentions towards the Irish cause.

As a whole, McGarrity’s 1939 diary offers important insight into the way Irish Americans, and Irish republicans like Joseph McGarrity, sought to align themselves, as well as sought to continue the Irish republican cause in the immediate months before the Second World War.

——————–
Emily Poteat is a graduate assistant in Irish Studies and Falvey Memorial Library’s Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement Department, and a graduate student in the History Department.


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Last Modified: January 19, 2022