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Nursing students & social media / Hunting for drugs to combat Zika

Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, text messaging….so many ways to stay in touch and share information with friends.  However, nursing students need to be aware of the ethical and legal ramifications surrounding the use of social media during their clinical experience.  Patient confidentiality is only one of several important factors to consider.  The ANA Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements (2015 e-book ed. available through Falvey Library) specifically addresses the issue of social media use.  Court cases have ensued!

Here’s an article on the topic you may wish to share with your students:

Westrick, S. J. (2016). Nursing students’ use of electronic and social mMedia: Law, ethics, and e-professionalism. Nursing Education Perspectives, (1), 16-22. doi:10.5480/14-1358

Click to access.

Fighting the Zika Virus

Read a recent article in Nature Medicine reporting on the hunt for antivirals to combat the Zika virus:

Kincaid, E. (2016). A second look: Efforts to repurpose old drugs against Zika cast a wide net. Nature Medicine, 22, 822-825. doi:10.1038/nm0816-824

Click to access.

Here’s a research article, also from Nature Medicine, on investigators’ discovery that niclosamide, a medication commonly used to treat tapeworm, has shown promise in preventing the replication of the Zika virus in the fetal brain.

Research questions?  Contact Barbara


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Zika Virus News & Data You Can Reuse

Recent articles on the Zika virus

zika_womanBrasil, P., Pereira, J. P.,Jr, Raja Gabaglia, C., Damasceno, L., Wakimoto, M., Ribeiro Nogueira, R. M., . . . Nielsen-Saines, K. (2016, March 4). Zika virus infection in pregnant women in Rio de Janeiro – preliminary report. New England Journal of Medicine, doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1602412 [doi]
http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=http://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa1602412

Marrs, C., Olson, G., Saade, G., Hankins, G., Wen, T., Patel, J., & Weaver, S. (2016).
Zika virus and pregnancy: A review of the literature and clinical considerations.
American Journal of Perinatology, doi:10.1055/s-0036-1580089 [doi]
https://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0036-1580089

Other recent articles listed in RefWorks format.
http://tinyurl.com/zikaarticles

Click the Find it button to check for full text. Click the double helix icon to the right of the title to read the PubMed abstract.
Image credit: http://www.paho.org/

Data you can use and reuse

Data want to be free, and as members of the Villanova University community, you
have access to entire series of health-related data via the ICPSR database.

icpsr2

Most of these data sets are available in SPSS, SAS, STATA and other data formats. Check them out!

Health and Medical Care Archive (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation)
http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/HMCA/index.jsp

AHRQ MCC Research Network Data Archive
http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/AHRQMCC/

National Addiction & HIV Data Archive Program (Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, NIH)
http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NAHDAP/

Integrated Fertility Survey Series (Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health
& Human Development,
Population Studies Center)
http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/IFSS/

National Archive on Computerized Data on Aging (National Institute on Aging, NIH)
http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NACDA/index.jsp

Genomic Data and Biomarkers (Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health
& Human Development)
http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/content/DSDR/genomic.html
Image credit: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu

Questions? Comments? Contact Barbara


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Zika Virus Information

Video from the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)
Zika, a New Threat. What Is It (in Spanish with English subtitles)
https://youtu.be/M8mWDIPKW28

 

Excerpt from Zika virus spreads across Americas as concerns mount over birth defects. (2015). BMJ, 315, h6983.
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.h6983

Zika’s rapid geographic spread would be causing less concern to public health authorities were it not for worrying evidence that the disease is less benign than initially thought. Hundreds of cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome have sprung up in the wake of Zika infection, but it is an explosion of microcephaly among infants born to infected women that has caused Brazil to declare Zika a “public health emergency of national importance.”

 

Basic info on Zika

According to PAHO, “Zika fever is a mosquito-borne viral disease caused by Zika virus (ZIKV), consisting of mild fever, rash (mostly maculo-papular), headaches…and non-purulent conjunctivitis, occurring about three to twelve days after the mosquito vector bite. One out of four people may develop symptoms, but in those who are affected the disease is usually mild with symptoms that can last between two and seven days. Its clinical manifestation is often similar to dengue, also a mosquito-borne illness.”
http://www.paho.org/hq/index.php?option=com_topics&view=article&id=427&Itemid=41484&lang=en

There is currently no vaccine or specific treatment for Zika virus infection. Therefore, treatment for everyone, including pregnant women, is directed at alleviating symptoms.
http://www.paho.org/hq/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=11552&Itemid=41672&lang=en

Factsheet from the World Health Organization (WHO)
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/zika/en/

How does Zika virus affect pregnant women and fetuses?

Fetuses exposed in utero to the Zika virus are at risk for microcephaly, a condition where a baby’s head is much smaller than expected. Babies with microcephaly can suffer from various problems, such as developmental delay, intellectual disability, hearing loss, and vision problems.

More about microcephaly
http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/birthdefects/microcephaly.html

Travel Alert (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

The CDC recommends special precautions for pregnant women and women trying to become pregnant. These women should consider postponing visits to countries currently affected by Zika virus transmission. Included are the countries of Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Martinique, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Suriname, Venezuela, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.
http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2016/s0315-zika-virus-travel.html

CDC Zika Website
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/

Journal articles available on the topic of the Zika virus outbreak (Click Find it to check for full text availability.)
http://tinyurl.com/zikavirus

Barbara Quintiliano, Nursing/Life Sciences Librarian
(610-519-5207)
More Nursing blog features


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Last Modified: January 27, 2016