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Photo Friday: Villanova Winters Through the Years

By Ethan Shea

"Campus Snow Scene: Alumni Hall"

Photograph of a snowy Alumni Hall (c. 1899 – 1903)

"Campus Snow Scene"

Campus snow scene (c. 1920s)

"Photograph Campus Alumni Hall Winter Scene circa 1920s"

Alumni Hall in the winter (c. 1920s)

"Campus View Snow Scene - Dougherty Hall"

Photograph of a snow-clad Dougherty Hall (1960)

"Campus Snow Scene with view of St. Thomas of Villanova Church and St. Rita's Hall"

Campus snow scene with view of St. Thomas of Villanova Church and St. Ritas Hall (c. 1970s)

If warm weather is preventing you from getting into the holiday spirit, Falvey Memorial Library is here to help! Our Digital Library curates countless collections, including the photographs above, creating windows to the past. These images date back to the 19th century and allow us to reminisce on times when our campus was covered in the snow we all (okay, maybe not everyone) know and love. Whether you’re looking forward to winter weather or hoping for continued warmth, here at Falvey, we hope you enjoy the holidays and have a relaxing winter break!


Headshot of Ethan SheaEthan Shea is a first-year English Graduate Student and Graduate Assistant at Falvey Memorial Library.


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Falvey Library Staff Shares Reading Recommendations for Winter Break

Happy Holidays, Wildcats! Looking for some reading recommendations for the semester recess? The Falvey Memorial Library staff shares a few suggestions below.

Roberta Pierce, Access & Collections Coordinator:

Image of the book cover of "The Invited."

Image courtesy of Amazon.

Darren Poley, Associate Director of Research Services:

Image of the book cover of "The Tiger's Wife."

Image courtesy of Amazon.

Image of the book cover "No One Is Talking About This."

Image courtesy of Amazon.

Michael Foight, Director of  Distinctive Collections and Digital Engagement:

Image of the book cover of "The Library."

Image courtesy of Amazon.

Meg Schwoerer-Leister, Access and Collections Coordinator:

Image of the book cover of "Notes From A Young Black Chef."

Sarah Wingo, Librarian for English Literature, Theatre, & Romance Languages:

  • My recommendation is for Harry Potter fans, who love the world but maybe wish there was better more inclusive representation in the Harry Potter world. The Simon Snow book series (currently three books Wayward Son, Carry On, and Any Way the Wind Blows), by Rainbow Rowell are pretty literally Harry Potter fan fiction. Characters have different names and not everything is the same, but it’s not that these books are like Harry Potter, they are directly commenting on and engaging with Harry Potter. Rowell is herself a prolific award-winning author, and I’ve really enjoyed this series. The audiobooks are excellent if that is more your speed. Link to series: https://bit.ly/3pw3LPI
Image of the book cover of "Carry On."

Image courtesy of Amazon.

Deborah Bishov, Social Sciences & Instructional Design Librarian:

  •  My reading recommendation is The Hidden Palace (2021), long awaited sequel to The Golem and the Jinni (2013), both by Helene Wecker. They’re magical realist fantasy that immerse you completely in a richly detailed world where mystical beings end up in turn of last century New York City and face otherworldly obstacles and human dilemmas.
Image of the book cover of "The Hidden Place."

Image courtesy of Amazon.

Shawn Proctor, Communication & Marketing Program Manager:

  • Aristole and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz. This is a unique and memorable novel about friendship and self-discovery. A book that both reads quickly and lingers in your memory for a long time. Bonus: the sequel book just came out.
  • Enola Holmes: The Case of the Missing Marquess by Nancy Springer. A tightly written mystery by a master puzzle maker and author. It feels a part of the time in which it is set and refreshingly modern, using Sherlock Holmes as inspiration and foil to Enola’s ingenuity and pluck. If you’ve been wanting to see what the Netflix movie’s buzz is about, this is the best place to start.
Image of the book cover of "Enola Holmes."

Image courtesy of Amazon.

Ethan Shea, Communication & Marketing Graduate Assistant:

  • The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde. I’ve heard endless praise about The Picture of Dorian Gray, so this winter, I’m finally taking the plunge and checking this novel off my to-read list. The story follows a young and beautiful Dorian Gray as he sells his soul to ensure he will never age or lose his beauty. Gray continues to live a worry-free but sinful life while the consequences of his actions become visible in his portrait.
  • The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller. I hope to read Madeline Miller’s The Song of Achilles over winter break, a fresh take on the story of the relationship between Achilles and Patroclus. A couple of my friends have recommended Miller’s books to me, and this particular text aligns with my interest in Greco-Roman mythology. 
  • Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe. In anticipation of a class on the African novel I’ll be taking next semester, I’m excited to read Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart.  I’ve heard Achebe’s depiction of colonialism and masterful use of language is incredibly moving to say the least, so I can’t wait to read this classic novel.
Image of the book cover of "Things Fall Apart."

Image courtesy of Amazon.

Joanne Quinn, Director of Communication & Marketing:

  • At Christmas time, not only do I like to eat cookies, I like to read about them, too. That’s why I’m excited to see several delicious looking new cookie cookbooks on the horizon, including one by legendary baker Rose Levy Beranbaum. When Rose titles a book with a food item and then the word Bible after it, you know The Cookie Bible will be a must-read. The pandemic has affected its delivery date, but you can pre-order it on Amazon.
  • Also on my cookie-cooking radar is Sweet Talk Cookies, by Hayley Callaway. This one teaches you all the tools to ice/stencil and uber-customize cookies to feature any art that you wish–including an amazing turkey from a peace sign cookie cutter–which of course, every Villanovan should own.
  • And finally, It’s Not Just Cookies, by Tiffany and John Chen tells the story of two college sweethearts and entrepreneurs who began a multi-million dollar cookie business, Tiff’s Treats, in an off-campus apartment at the University of Texas, Austin. Sound like they’re two smart cookies, for sure.
Image of the book cover of "Sweet Talk Cookies."

Image courtesy of Amazon.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library. While you won’t be able to read it during the semester recess, Stahl recommends Dolly Parton and James Patterson’s book Run, Rose, Run (available March 7, 2022.) Parton is also releasing a new album of the same name in conjunction with the novel. Dolly Parton, Songteller: My Life in Lyrics is available to read over the holidays.



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Falvey Memorial Library: Winter Break Service Hours

Image of a holly plant in front of Falvey Memorial Library.

Image courtesy of Joanne Quinn, Director of Communication & Marketing.


Falvey Library service hours for winter break are listed below. Happy Holidays, Nova Nation!

Winter Break Service Hours

  • Saturday 12/18: Closed (24/7 access available)
  • Sunday 12/19: Closed (24/7 access available)
  • Monday 12/20: 9 a.m.—5 p.m. (book stacks close at 4:30 p.m., 24/7 access available)
  • Tuesday 12/21: 9 a.m.—5 p.m. (book stacks close at 4:30 p.m., 24/7 access available)
  • Wednesday 12/22: 9 a.m.—5 p.m. (book stacks close at 4:30 p.m., 24/7 access unavailable after 4:30 p.m.)

24/7 access is unavailable from 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday 12/22 until 6 a.m. on Wednesday 1/5. The Library building will be fully locked and closed during this time period.

  • Wednesday 1/5: 9 a.m.—5 p.m. (book stacks close at 4:30 p.m., 24/7 access available)
  • Thursday 1/6: 9 a.m.—5 p.m. (book stacks close at 4:30 p.m., 24/7 access available)
  • Friday 1/7: 9 a.m.—5 p.m. (book stacks close at 4:30 p.m., 24/7 access available)
  • Saturday 1/8: 12 p.m.—5 p.m. (book stacks close at 4:30 p.m., 24/7 access available)
  • Sunday 1/9: 12 p.m.—8 p.m. (book stacks close at 7:30 p.m., 24/7 access available)

Regular semester hours resume on Monday 1/10, 8 a.m.—12 a.m.

Masks must be worn on all floors and spaces of the building, regardless of vaccination status. Electronic collections (articles, e-books and more!) are accessible through the Library’s website 24/7.



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Falvey Staff Holiday Traditions and Memories

Gingerbread House

 

By Regina Duffy

There weren’t many things to celebrate in 2020; however, one thing that we can certainly celebrate is that the holiday season has officially arrived. Despite difficult times, we can take some comfort in sharing some safe and festive holiday traditions and even re-living memories of holidays past.

Like most people, I have some things that I simply must do to commemorate this time of year. Beyond admiring the colorful light displays in my neighborhood and taking my kids to visit Santa at Arasapha Farms, I have a couple days that are dedicated to wrapping presents. It’s just me, a large peppermint mocha latte, and some Christmas classics playing in the background as I tackle a giant pile of presents on the living room floor. No interruptions.

While I can’t say that the wrapping job I do is a great, the process is fun and makes me feel so accomplished.

Are you still looking for some seasonal inspiration? I asked the Falvey Library staff to share some holiday traditions they celebrate as well as their favorite memories.

Sarah Wingo, English Literature, Theatre, and Romance Languages and Literature Librarian: “We don’t have a lot of super specific Christmas traditions, just cozy fires in the fireplace and decorating the Christmas tree. My birthday is December 6, and growing up we’d always decorate gingerbread houses at my birthday parties, the gingerbread my mom and I would bake and assemble ahead of time. This always felt like the start of the holiday season.”

Demian Katz, Director of Library Technology: “It’s kind of ridiculous, but one of my favorite holiday traditions is cleaning out my personal inbox. I maintain a website as a hobby, and I receive a lot of email throughout the year from people with feedback and suggestions, but I never have time to act on them until the holiday break. Every year, I frantically catch up on all those accumulated messages, vow that I will do a better job of keeping up with communication, and then fail completely until the next holiday break.”

Susan Turkel, Social Sciences Librarian: “[I remember the] Christmas break during my first year in college. While I was home, I had all four wisdom teeth removed! So, I spent a few days over the holiday home recovering – watching TV, eating soft food, ice pack held up to my face.” (This is a tough way to spend a holiday break!)

Linda Hauck, Business Librarian: “Every year my kids have performed in Swarthmore Ballet Theatre’s Nutcracker which ran for two weekends in December. Parents were asked to volunteer to set up the theatre, apply makeup to the youngest dancers, and bake and serve fancy cookies at intermission. I’ve been baking Christmas cookies for the occasion for something like 12 years. I’ve had a lot of fun baking cookies to correspond to my daughter’s and son’s roles, including snowflakes, spice cookies, Christmas trees, linzer hearts, and springerle ginger nutcrackers. This year the performance has gone virtual. My daughter is off to college and son opted not to perform, which is just as well because while he still takes class, we don’t have the room in our home for him to dance full out on video. I’ll still be baking cookies to share with the dancers. Some of the other bakers and I will individually package them, and we are planning an outdoor drive by pick up. Sweet memories.”

My heartfelt thanks to everyone who took time to share with us. On behalf of everyone at Falvey Memorial Library, we wish you a happy, healthy, and safe holiday season, however you decide to celebrate this year.

Do you have any special traditions or memories? Drop your comments below to share some of your own holiday magic.


Gina's headshotRegina Duffy is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library. 

 

 


 


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January Intersession Service Hours

By Kallie Stahl

January Intersession Service Hours

Monday, Jan. 6–Friday, Jan. 10: 9 a.m.–5 p.m.
Entrance doors and book stacks close at 4:30 p.m.

Saturday, Jan. 11 and Sunday, Jan. 12: 12 p.m.–5 p.m.
Entrance doors and book stacks close at 4:30 p.m.

Spring semester hours begin Monday, Jan. 13: 8 a.m.–12 a.m.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.  View the complete January intersession schedule here


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Last Modified: January 6, 2020