Skip Navigation
Falvey Memorial Library
Advanced
You are exploring: Home > Blogs

Join Us for the Remaining Lineup of Spring Events

Happy April, Wildcats! The end of the semester is quickly approaching. Be sure to check out one (or a few) of the remaining events at Falvey Memorial Library. All events are ACS-approved and open to the Villanova University community. The lineup of events are listed below.


2022 Villanova University Literary Festival: Tiphanie Yanique

  • Thursday, April 21, at 7 p.m. in Falvey Library’s Speakers’ Corner.
  • Livestream link.
  • Tiphanie Yanique is a novelist, poet, essayist, and short story writer. She is the author of the poetry collection, Wife, which won the 2016 Bocas Prize in Caribbean poetry and the United Kingdom’s 2016 Forward/Felix Dennis Prize for a First Collection. Tiphanie is also the author of the novel, Land of Love and Drowning, which won the 2014   Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Award from the Center for Fiction, the Phillis Wheatley Award for Pan-African Literature, and the American Academy of Arts   and Letters Rosenthal Family Foundation Award, and was listed by NPR as one of the Best Books of 2014. Land of Love and Drowning was also a finalist for the Orion Award in Environmental Literature and the Hurston-Wright Legacy Award. She is a tenured associate professor at Emory University.
  • For more information on Yanique, please visit her website.
  • This event is co-sponsored by the English Department, the Creative Writing Program, Global Interdisciplinary Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies, the Center for Irish Studies, and Falvey Library.

Polar Voyaging and the Humanities

  • Tuesday, April 19, at 4 p.m.
  • Virtual lecture on Zoom. Register here.
  • Lecture by Hester Blum, PhD, Professor of English at Penn State.
  • In the summer of 2019 Blum was the lone humanities scholar on a scientific expedition tracking climate change in the Northwest Passage. Drawn from her experience on the Arctic icebreaker (and on an Antarctic expedition), as well as her research on nineteenth-century polar expeditions, Blum’s talk offers a meditation on ice as a measure for visualizing, writing about, mourning, and mediating the state of the climate in an age of ecological and institutional crisis.
  • This event is offered in support of Falvey Memorial Library’s current exhibit “That Fairyland of Ice”: Polar Exploration in Mind and Memoryand is included alongside Earth Week events.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, the Office of Sustainability, the Department of Geography and the Environment, the Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest, and the Department of English.

2022 Falvey Forum Workshop Series: Capturing the Web: Introduction to Web Archiving

  • Wednesday, April 20, at 12 p.m.
  • Virtual workshop on Zoom. Register here.
  • Workshop led by Beaudry Rae Allen, Preservation and Digital Archivist.
  • Web archiving is the process of gathering up data that has been recorded on the World Wide Web, storing it, ensuring the data is preserved in an archive, and making the collected data available for future research. Get a foundational overview of web archiving in this workshop and learn ways to leverage the Wayback Machine and other web preservation tools in your scholarship and teaching.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Library and the Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest.

 


“The Politics of the Irish Harp Symbol from Henry VIII to Brexit” Lecture and Harp Performance with Mary Louise O’Donnell

  • Wednesday, April 20, at 4 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner.
  • Mary Louise O’Donnell, PhD, will discuss the origin of the Irish harp symbol and its history and significance in Irish political iconography through the centuries.
  • Dr. O’Donnell is a harpist, musicologist, and Fulbright scholar 2019/2020. She holds a doctorate from the University of Limerick and is a former Irish Research Council postgraduate scholar and postdoctoral fellow. Her first book Ireland’s Harp: the Shaping of Irish Identity c.1770 to 1880 was published by UCD Press in 2014. She has also published widely on topics relating to Irish cultural history, semiotics, and performance studies. Some of her most recent research can be found in Musicians and their Audiences: New Approaches to a Timeless Division (Ashgate, 2016) and Thomas Moore and Romantic Inspiration (Routledge, 2017). Dr. O’Donnell has performed extensively throughout Ireland, Europe, Africa, and Asia as a soloist and with various ensembles; she has also appeared on BBC, RTÉ, CNN, and NHK (Japan). Working alongside her sister, Dr. O’Donnell recently recorded an album which includes compositions for pedal harp, portable Irish harp, and voice to harp accompaniment by the nineteenth-century Irish composer Charles Egan.
  • This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Irish Studies and Falvey Library.

2022 Falvey Forum Workshop Series: Bringing Historical Maps into GIS

  • Wednesday, April 27, at 12 p.m.
  • Virtual workshop on Zoom. Register here.
  • Workshop led by Erica Hayes, Digital Scholarship Librarian.
  • Georeferencing is the process of connecting images (e.g., scanned historical maps, aerial and satellite photographs) to their geographic locations, so that they can be used as spatial layers in GIS software. Using tools like Map Warper and ArcGIS Online, this workshop will provide participants with the steps to align geographic coordinates to a scanned historical map and display them online to examine how locations have changed over time.
  • Falvey Scholars will give short presentations on the content and findings of the research involved in the writing of the thesis or in the creation of the project report.

 


Russia’s War on Ukraine: Historical Turning Points

  • Monday, April 25, from 6-7 p.m.
  • Virtual lecture on Zoom. Register here.
  • A conversation about the ongoing war in Ukraine.
  • Dr. Adele Lindenmeyr, Historian of Russia and the USSR, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Villanova University, and Dr. Mike Westrate, Historian of Ukraine and the USSR, Assistant Vice Provost, Graduate Education and Research, Villanova University, will discuss the turning points that led to Russia’s invasion.
  • What were the historical turning points that led to Russia’s current war on Ukraine and its people? Join us for a discussion of the Ukrainian-Russian relationship, including: the Holodomor, WWII and its aftermath, the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Budapest Memorandum, the Russian war on Georgia, and the illegal annexation of Crimea.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Library and the Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest.

2021-2022 Alfred F. Mannella and Rose T. Lauria-Mannella Endowed Distinguished Speaker Series Lecture featuring Poet Maria Famà

  • Thursday, April 28, at 2:30 p.m.
  • Virtual lecture on Zoom. Register here.
  • Lecture by Poet Maria Famà.
  • Famà’s talk is titled, “Mining an Italian Heritage for Poems.” As a poet of Sicilian descent, she mines the richness of the oral culture that has been passed down by her family of storytellers. Famà writes her poems to preserve family tales, personalities, sufferings, joys, and wisdom for future generations.  In her presentation, she will give examples of her poems from her various books and explain how they came into being.
  • For more information on Famà, please visit her website.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Library, the Italian Studies Program, the Department of English, and the Creative Writing Program.

Falvey Library’s Semi-Annual Stress Busting Open House: Make Finals a Grand Slamphoto of the Philadelphia Phillies stadium

  • Friday, April 29 (Reading Day) from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. or until supplies last on the Old Falvey patio.
  • Stop by for some major (league) fun and treats to make these finals a grand slam!
  • Pals for Life therapy animals will be there to help you during the 7th inning stretch of the semester.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Library, the Office of Health Promotion, and POWER.

 

 


2022 Falvey Scholars Awards Presentation and Reception Ceremony

  • Friday, April 22, at 10 a.m.
  • Virtual lecture on Zoom. Register here.
  • The 2022 Falvey Scholar award winners: Nadjulia Constant, Daryl Jucar, Christopher DiLullo, Addison Drone, Nicole Garcia, Alec Henderson, Mai Khuc, and Erica Mallon.
  • Falvey Scholars is an annual program that recognizes outstanding undergraduate research by senior students at Villanova University.
  • Falvey Scholars will give short presentations on the content and findings of the research involved in the writing of the thesis or in the creation of the project report.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Library and the Center for Research and Fellowships.

CONCEPT Virtual Recognition CeremonyConcept poster

  • Friday, April 22, at 1 p.m.
  • Virtual lecture on Zoom. Register here.
  • Join us as we celebrate the official launch of the 2022 issue of CONCEPT, the interdisciplinary journal of graduate students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
  • The ceremony will recognize this year’s Graduate Research Prize for top paper, along with all of the student authors and editors, faculty editors, and peer reviewers.
  • CONCEPT accepts submissions from Villanova graduate students in all fields of the arts and sciences and is an opportunity for them to share their scholarship and research.
  • This event is co-sponsored by Falvey Library and the Office of Graduate Studies in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
  • Visit the CONCEPT website to learn more about the journal and to browse past volumes.

Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.


Like

Join us for Mindfulness Mondays this Fall

Mindfulness Mondays posterThis fall, we invite the Villanova community to join us for a taste of mindfulness meditation on Mondays from 1:00- 1:30 p.m. This virtual series will begin with the first meditation on Monday, Aug. 23 and run on Monday afternoons throughout the semester.

Mindfulness Mondays will offer a comfortable space where you are guided and encouraged to stop and focus on the “here and now.” Mindfulness is proven to reduce stress and enhance well being, which can be beneficial to all faculty, staff, and students.

Sessions will take place each week via Zoom. Please follow this link to join each week:

https://villanova.zoom.us/j/98337578849

Mindfulness Mondays are presented by Campus Ministry and co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library. Registration is not required. All are welcome to attend these ACS-approved events!

Please join us!

 


Dig Deeper

To learn more about the practice and benefits of mindfulness meditation, we invite you to read some of the following e-books which are part of Falvey Library’s collection:

These e-books are available to any student, faculty, or staff with a valid Villanova email address.

Please also check out these helpful resources being offered by Campus Ministry:


headshot picture of regina duffy

Regina Duffy is a Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 

 


 


Like

Register for the Last Two Literary Festival Events!

 

Literary Festival poster with Hannah Khalil and Robin Coste Lewis

The 23rd annual Villanova Literary Festival resumes on Thursday, April 8! Please REGISTER for the two remaining virtual readings and talks. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event. All readings are ACS approved!

Robin Coste Lewis (Thursday, April 8, at 7 p.m.)

Register here: https://villanova.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMqdOugqD4oEtVf2K5H8upjyxgNcgpqoiyk

Coste Lewis is the poet laureate of Los Angeles. In 2015, her debut poetry collection, Voyage of the Sable Venus (Knopf), won the National Book Award in poetry–the first time a poetry debut by an African-American had ever won the prize in the National Book Foundation’s history. Lewis’ writing has appeared in various journals and anthologies such as Time MagazineThe New YorkerThe New York TimesThe Paris ReviewTransition, and Best American Poetry.

Hannah Khalil (Thursday, April 15, at 5 p.m.)

Register here: https://villanova.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJUlduyrrTkoGNAw5I3RwpJAxEU9dI3CzNyM

Palestinian-Irish writer and playwright, Hannah Khalil holds the Charles Heimbold Chair of Irish Studies for Spring 2021 at Villanova University. Her work for stage includes A Museum in Baghdad, which opened at the Royal Shakespeare Company’s Swan Theatre in 2019, Interference for The National Theatre of Scotland, The Scar Test for Soho Theatre and Scenes from 68* Years for the Arcola. She is currently under commission to write new work for Shakespeare’s Globe, Chichester Festival Theatre, The Kiln and Golden Thread San Francisco. Alongside her theatre work, Khalil has written numerous radio plays, including The Unwelcome, Last of the Pearl Fishers and The Deportation Room all for BBC Radio 4. Television work includes multiple episodes of the Channel 4 drama Hollyoaks. Khalil’s first short film, The Record, won the Tommy Vine screenplay award at the Underwire film festival, and went on to be made. It was selected at London Palestine Film Festival and Almagro Festival as well as Filmets Badalona. It was a finalist in the Tolpuddle Radial Film Festival.


Previous 2021 Literary Festival Speakers:

Brenda Shaughnessy

Shaughnessy is the author of five poetry collections, including The Octopus MuseumSo Much Synth (2016, Copper Canyon Press) and Our Andromeda (2012), which was a finalist for the Kingsley Tufts Award, The International Griffin Prize, and the PEN Open Book Award. A 2013 Guggenheim Foundation Fellow, Shaughnessy is Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing at Rutgers University-Newark.

Bryan Washington

Washington’s debut collection of short stories, Lot, was published by Riverhead in 2019. His fiction and essays have appeared in The New York TimesThe New York Times MagazineThe New YorkerBBC, The Paris ReviewTin House, and numerous other publications. Washington is also a National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 winner, and the recipient of an O. Henry Award.

His first novel, Memorial was released on Oct. 27, 2020. The New York Times called it a Notable Book of 2020 and TIME called it one of their books of the year. So did the Los Angeles TimesEntertainment Weekly and Vanity Fair.


Gina's headshotRegina Duffy is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


Like

Senior Students and Faculty Mentors: Learn more about the Falvey Scholars Program!

Front of the Library with filter
Are you a senior student working on a research project utilizing Falvey Library’s resources? Or are you a faculty mentor to a senior student or group of students who are working on a research project? Please read on to learn about the Falvey Scholars Program!

The Falvey Scholars award is an annual program established by Falvey Memorial Library and the Center for Research and Fellowships (CRF) to recognize exceptional undergraduate research by senior-level students at Villanova.

To be considered for the Falvey Scholars award, the process is two-fold. First, faculty mentors are invited to nominate individual or group projects of senior students who have completed exemplary (and publicly presentable) scholarship or research. Then, students who are nominated by faculty mentors must also formally apply to be considered for the award.

In applying for the award, students are asked to share information about their overall research process, provide a detailed abstract of their project, as well as a comprehensive bibliography. The awards traditionally have an emphasis on work that has required substantial use of library resources. Students who are applying are asked to include information about library resources and services utilized including librarian assistance, databases, journals, books, Interlibrary Loan, etc. Students may also discuss how the library building aided in their research—from late night study sessions to a welcoming place to meet with professors, co-researchers and scholars.

A committee consisting of representatives from Falvey Memorial Library and CRF typically meets in mid-April to review nominations and applications and to select award winners. 5-7 students are annually granted Falvey Scholars awards.

Towards the end of the spring semester, Falvey Scholars award winners are recognized at a virtual presentation and reception ceremony event. This event includes presentations by each of the award recipients on their winning project and overall research process. Presentations highlight the use of Library resources.

In addition to being honored at the awards presentation event, Falvey Scholars will be interviewed and featured individually in our Library blog during the week leading up to Commencement and will be included in the Library’s newsletter, Mosaic. Digital copies of the winning papers are also maintained in the Digital Library.

Falvey Scholars is one of the keynote events of the annual Villanova Spring Research Exposition, or EXPO Week. EXPO is week-long series of events that celebrates the scholarly achievements of Villanova’s researchers—undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty. The Expo showcases a year’s worth of undergraduate research and student accomplishment in innovation and creativity as well as research done by our graduate students and faculty.

View the 2020 Falvey Scholars Awards virtual booklet here.


2021 Falvey Scholars Deadlines

Faculty: You can nominate students until Saturday, April 3 at 11:59 pm. Once nominated, students will be asked to apply in order to be considered for the award. Faculty mentors who plan to nominate should encourage students to apply. Please consider nominating a student who exemplifies the awards criteria.

Seniors: If you haven’t been nominated yet, ask your faculty mentor to nominate you for the award by Saturday, April 3 at 11:59 pm. Once nominated by your faculty mentor, you will be asked to formally apply for the award by Friday, April 9 at 11:59 pm.

Nomination/application forms as well as additional information about Falvey Scholars can be found here.

If you have questions, please contact: libraryevents@villanova.edu


gina duffy headshot

 

 

Regina Duffy is a Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library.


 

 


Like

Join us at the “Irish Pipeline: Irish Athletics at Villanova” event on March 4th!

Irish Pipeline Event poster

The Villanova University Community is cordially invited to join us on Thursday, March 4, from 4:00-5:00 p.m. for an ACS-approved virtual talk titled, “The Irish Pipeline: Irish Athletics at Villanova.”

Zoom join link:

https://villanova.zoom.us/j/93468089921

Additional Events from the Center for Irish Studies and Falvey Memorial Library:

Falvey Memorial Library’s Irish Studies Resources

Please see the Irish Studies Research Guide that has been carefully curated and maintained by Jutta Seibert, subject specialist for history, art history, and global interdisciplinary studies and the Director of Research Services and Scholarly Engagement, Falvey Memorial Library. The guide that Jutta compiled includes books/book chapters, academic journals, newspapers/magazines, primary resources, encyclopedias, handbooks, companions, and biographical information related to Irish Studies. You can also find handy information on citation tools!

 


headshot picture of regina duffy

 

 

Regina Duffy is a Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library.


 


Like

Foto Friday: Just the Beginning

We’re continuing our lineup of virtual events for the spring semester, and we can’t wait to have you join us! Three exciting event series kicked off this week: the 2021 Villanova University Literary Festival, Falvey Fridays, and Researcher’s Toolbox.

Check out some screenshots below and see how you can join these exciting ACS-approved events!

The 2021 Villanova University Literary Festival kicked off with Brenda Shaughnessy on Thursday, Feb. 11. Shaughnessy read multiple poems to an engaged audience comprised of 98 Villanovans. Next up on the Literary Festival Lineup is Bryan Washington on Thursday, Feb. 25, at 7 p.m. Register here.

Falvey Fridays evite

 

Sarah Wipperman, Scholarly Communications Librarian, led the first of six Falvey Friday workshops today at 11 a.m. Wipperman discussed the basics of copyright and how to reuse content responsibly. Drawn from our popular brown bag lunch sessions, each Falvey Friday workshop will provide new and exciting information on research methods, tools, and pedagogies for researchers of all levels. During the next workshop, Erica Hayes, Digital Scholarship Librarian, will discuss “Bringing Historical Maps into GIS” on Friday, Feb. 26, at 11 a.m. Register here. View more information on all six Falvey Friday sessions here

Researchers Toolbox Workshop with Jutta Seibert

 

Jutta Seibert, Director of Research Services and Scholarly Engagement, led a workshop session entitled “Newspapers and Magazines” today at 3 p.m. as part of the Research’s Toolbox event series. The workshop took a look at the discovery of national and international news publications covering daily news, as well as texts aimed at specific interest groups. Seibert guided audience members in locating a cited source, determining the availability of news sources in the local collection, and citing news sources. Seibert will led another session focusing on newspapers and magazines on Wednesday, March 24, at 4 p.m. Register here.

For a detailed listing of upcoming events, visit the Falvey Memorial Library events page.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library. 

 

 


 


Like

Join us for the Spring 2021 Digital Seeds Lectures

This spring Falvey Memorial Library’s Digital Scholarship Program will be offering two lectures in its Digital Seeds Speaker Series. Check out the details below and be sure to REGISTER in advance! Once registered, you will be sent a link to the event.

Julia Lewandoski headshot

“Mapping Indigenous Landowners in 19th-Century Los Angeles: Historicizing GIS and the Public Land Survey System“

Julia Lewandoski, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of History, California State University San Marcos

Thursday, February 18, 4:00-5:00 pm

REGISTER HERE

After the 1848 U.S. conquest of Mexican California, the federal government negotiated, but declined to ratify treaties with Indigenous peoples in California. Tongva, Tataviam, and Chumash peoples around Los Angeles turned to property ownership to keep communities intact and in important places for decades, generating local property maps of their lands.

This project uses ArcGIS to locate, layer, and analyze property maps of Indigenous land in southern California. These local property maps show theJulia Lewandoski Digital map persistent existence of important Indigenous places. They also challenge understandings of the Public Land Survey System (PLSS) as a visual project that replaced Indigenous geographies with rationalized settler space. Indigenous properties and landscapes are clearly visible on historic maps, and in the patterns of the present-day PLSS. Their presence raises questions for GIS practitioners about the tensions between social and mathematical frameworks for locating peoples and places.

Julia Lewandoski is a historian of early North America and is an Assistant Professor at California State University, San Marcos. Previously, she was a Postdoctoral Fellow in History and the Digital Humanities at the University of Southern California. She received her PhD in History with a designated emphasis in Science and Technology Studies from the University of California, Berkeley in August 2019. Her dissertation was awarded the 2019 prize by the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic (SHEAR). Her current book project explores how small Indigenous nations across North America exploited imperial transitions to defend land as property in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. She is also at work on a digital companion to the book project, using GIS to examine how Indigenous property has been mapped and measured. Website: https://www.julialewandoski.com/

This event is ACS- approved and is co-sponsored by Villanova’s Department of History, the Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest, and Falvey Memorial Library.

 

Ted Underwood headshot

“Libraries of Babel: An Expansive Future for the Humanities”

Ted Underwood, Professor in the School of Information Sciences and Department of English, University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign

Thursday, March 11, 4:00-5:00pm

REGISTER HERE

The last twelve months have not been kind to optimists. It may sound especially implausible to predict a bright future for the humanities right now, since enrollment and hiring are down in many disciplines. But, as paradoxical as it sounds, we are living in an age of unprecedented opportunity for the study of culture and history. Some of the opportunities are well publicized: for instance, digital libraries have opened up fundamental new research questions for literary scholars. I’ll give examples of that work, but the broader point of this talk is to propose that we’re living through a digital transformation that will matter for everyone, not just for academic researchers. In making it possible to explore culture as a latent space—a space of possibility—machine learning facilitates a kind of creative play that is akin to rigorous self-understanding. This is good news for the humanities, although our disciplinary institutions are admittedly struggling to seize the opportunity.

Ted Underwood is a professor in the School of Information Sciences at University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and holds an appointment with the Department of English in the College ofTed Underwood's book, Horizons Liberal Arts and Sciences. After writing two books that describe eighteenth- and nineteenth-century literature using familiar critical methods, he turned to new research opportunities created by large digital libraries. Since that time, his research has explored literary patterns that become visible across long timelines, when we consider hundreds or thousands of books at once. He recently used machine learning, for instance, to trace the consolidation of detective fiction and science fiction as distinct genres, and to describe the shifting assumptions about gender revealed in literary characterization from 1780 to the present. He has authored three books about literary history, Distant Horizons (The University of Chicago Press Books, 2019), Why Literary Periods Mattered: Historical Contrast and the Prestige of English Studies(Stanford University Press, 2013), and The Work of the Sun: Literature, Science and Political Economy 1760-1860 (New York: Palgrave, 2005). Website: https://tedunderwood.com/

This event is ACS- approved and is sponsored by Villanova University’s Falvey Memorial Library.

 

If you are interested in learning more about Falvey Memorial  Library’s spring events line-up, please see our events page for an up-to-date listing: https://library.villanova.edu/events

 


Like

Announcing the 2021 Literary Festival Lineup!

 

The 23rd annual Villanova Literary Festival begins Thursday, Feb. 11! Please REGISTER for these exciting virtual readings and talks. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event. All readings are ACS approved!


Brenda Shaughnessy

Thursday, Feb. 11, at 7 p.m.

Register here: https://villanova.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJckcOygpj8sHNT6qZlLZfHmmo4Gyqqasv1l

Shaughnessy is the author of five poetry collections, including The Octopus MuseumSo Much Synth (2016, Copper Canyon Press) and Our Andromeda (2012), which was a finalist for the Kingsley Tufts Award, The International Griffin Prize, and the PEN Open Book Award. A 2013 Guggenheim Foundation Fellow, Shaughnessy is Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing at Rutgers University-Newark.


Bryan Washington

Thursday, Feb. 25, at 7 p.m.

Register here: https://villanova.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIpc-ytpjouEt34Ydb1FaJEQOJRj6X27XBU

Washington’s debut collection of short stories, Lot was published by Riverhead in 2019. His fiction and essays have appeared in The New York TimesThe New York Times MagazineThe New YorkerBBC, The Paris ReviewTin House, and numerous other publications. Washington is also a National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 winner, and the recipient of an O. Henry Award.

His first novel, Memorial was released on Oct. 27, 2020. The New York Times called it a Notable Book of 2020 and TIME called it one of their books of the year. So did the Los Angeles TimesEntertainment Weekly and Vanity Fair.


Robin Coste Lewis

Thursday, April 8, at 7 p.m.

Register here: https://villanova.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMqdOugqD4oEtVf2K5H8upjyxgNcgpqoiyk

Coste Lewis is the poet laureate of Los Angeles. In 2015, her debut poetry collection, Voyage of the Sable Venus (Knopf), won the National Book Award in poetry–the first time a poetry debut by an African-American had ever won the prize in the National Book Foundation’s history. Lewis’ writing has appeared in various journals and anthologies such as Time MagazineThe New YorkerThe New York TimesThe Paris ReviewTransition, and Best American Poetry.


Hanna Khalil

Thursday, April 15, at 5 p.m.

Register here: https://villanova.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJUlduyrrTkoGNAw5I3RwpJAxEU9dI3CzNyM

Palestinian-Irish writer and playwright, Hannah Kahlil holds the Charles Heimbold Chair of Irish Studies for Spring 2021 at Villanova University. Her work for stage includes A Museum in Baghdad, which opened at the Royal Shakespeare Company’s Swan Theatre in 2019, Interference for The National Theatre of Scotland, The Scar Test for Soho Theatre and Scenes from 68* Years for the Arcola. She is currently under commission to write new work for Shakespeare’s Globe, Chichester Festival Theatre, The Kiln and Golden Thread San Francisco. Alongside her theatre work, Khalil has written numerous radio plays, including The Unwelcome, Last of the Pearl Fishers and The Deportation Room all for BBC Radio 4. Television work includes multiple episodes of the Channel 4 drama Hollyoaks. Khalil’s first short film, The Record, won the Tommy Vine screenplay award at the Underwire film festival, and went on to be made. It was selected at London Palestine Film Festival and Almagro Festival as well as Filmets Badalona. It was a finalist in the Tolpuddle Radial Film Festival.

 


headshot picture of regina duffy

 

Regina Duffy is a Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library.

 


 


Like

Cat in the Stax: Connecting Virtually

College is all about meeting and connecting with new people from all over the country that normally you wouldn’t get an opportunity to interact with if you stayed in your small town. Unfortunately, the last year has made it really difficult to form and maintain those relationships. Below are some ways to stay safe, mask up, but still connect with friends, new and old.

Virtual Study Sessions
This was one idea my undergraduate roommate had as a way for us to spend time together despite the fact we were both super busy in grad school and hundreds of miles apart. We pick a time that works well for both of us, find our own, safe study space, then hop in a Zoom room to study at the same time. Our fields couldn’t be more different, but the important part is being able to spend time together, like we used to when we had study sessions back at Delaware. 

Attending NEW Events
Walking into a room full of people you don’t know to hear a speaker on a topic you’re unfamiliar with can be super intimidating. However, with Zoom events, you can feel free to leave your camera off and no one will even know you’re there! And who knows? Maybe you’ll find a new topic you enjoy learning more about or see the name of someone you have a class with also at the event and make a new connection!

To view a list of upcoming events hosted by Falvey click here. To check out the latest Villanova Theatre production, Songs for a New World, click here

Fresh Air
Going for walks, masked up, around Villanova’s beautiful campus is another way to connect with new and old friends while still staying safe. Swing by the library to pick-up some books, grab some food, loop around campus, and then go your separate ways back to your building or house. Being outdoors is a safer way to connect and is a great way to take a break from studying (if you don’t believe me, read any of my stress reliever blogs from last semester). 

What new ways have you been able to connect with people this past year that you’ve never thought of before?

 


Jenna Newman is a graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication Department.


Like
1 People Like This Post

Caturday: Mindfulness Mondays this Spring

This spring, we invite the Villanova community to join us for a taste of mindfulness meditation on Mondays from 1:00- 1:30 pm. This virtual series will begin with the first meditation on Monday, Jan. 25 and run on Monday afternoons throughout the semester.

Mindfulness Mondays will offer a comfortable space where you are guided and encouraged to stop and focus on the “here and now.” Mindfulness is proven to reduce stress and enhance well being, which can be beneficial to all faculty, staff, and students.

Sessions will take place each week via Zoom. Please follow this link to join each week:

https://villanova.zoom.us/j/98337578849

Mindfulness Mondays are presented by Campus Ministry and co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library. Registration is not required. All are welcome to attend these ACS-approved events!

Please join us!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dig Deeper

To learn more about the practice and benefits of mindfulness meditation, we invite you to read some of the following e-books which are part of Falvey Library’s collection:

These e-books are available to any student, faculty, or staff with a valid Villanova email address.

Please also check out these helpful resources being offered by Campus Ministry:

 


headshot picture of regina duffy

 

Regina Duffy is a Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library.

 


 


Like
1 People Like This Post

Next Page »

 


Last Modified: January 23, 2021