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Peek at the Week: November 1

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Did You Know?

In lieu of a word of the week this week, I’ll be sharing some fun bird facts in honor of our bird-focused events this Thursday! 

Did you know? In the 1800s the snowy egret’s wispy plumes were literally worth their weight in gold. 

Did you know? Spotted sandpipers constantly bob their tails; people call them teeter-peeps and tip-tails. 

Did you know? The red-bellied woodpecker’s tongue reaches out 2 inches for insects, but seeds are half of their diet. 

All of these bird facts came from the game Wingspan, which is a MUST HAVE for any table-top game lovers out there. 


This Week at Falvey  

Monday, Nov. 1

Mindfulness Mondays / 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. / ZOOM / https://villanova.zoom.us/j/98337578849 

Wednesday, Nov. 3  

Fall 2021 Falvey Forum Workshop Series – Policy Map: Selecting, Mapping and Downloading 21st Century Policy Data / 12:30–1:30 p.m. / ZOOM / Register Here 

The Interfaith Human Library: Where Books Talk and We All Learn About Life in a Multi-Faith World / 4-5:30 p.m. / Speakers’ Corner / Register Here  

Thursday, Nov. 4

“A Bird, Came Down the Walk”: A Creative Writing Workshop Celebrating Birds as Familiar and Unfamiliar Presences Through Poetry / 4-5 p.m. / DeLeon Room (SAC 300) 

Birds of North America: A Reading and Artist’s Talk / 6-7:30 p.m. / Room 205 

Friday, Nov. 5

Villanova Gaming Society Meeting / 2:30-4:30 p.m. / Speakers’ Corner / Free & Open to the Public 


This Week in History 

November 4, 1922 – Entrance to King Tut’s tomb is discovered 

British archaeologist Howard Carter and his workmen discover a step leading to the tomb of King Tutankhamen in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt. 

When Carter first arrived in Egypt in 1891, most of the ancient Egyptian tombs had been discovered, though King Tutankhamen, who had died when he was 18, was still unaccounted for. The most splendid architectural find inside the newly discovered tomb was a stone sarcophagus containing three coffins nested within each other. Inside the final coffin, which was made of solid gold, was the mummy of the boy-king Tutankhamen, preserved for more than 3,000 years. Most of these treasures are now housed in the Cairo Museum. 

History.com Editors. (2010, March 04). Entrance to King Tut’s tomb discovered. Retrieved from https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/entrance-to-king-tuts-tomb-discovered

Want to read more about Carter’s journey? Read this book from Falvey’s collection! 


""Jenna Renaud is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library.


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Peek at the Week: October 4

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Word of the Week: Friluftsliv (pronounced free-loofts-liv) 

The expression literally translates as “open-air living” and was popularized in the 1850s by the Norwegian playwright and poet, Henrik Ibsen, who used the term to describe the value of spending time in remote locations for spiritual and physical well being. 

Today, the phrase is used more broadly by Swedes, Norwegians, and Danes to explain anything from lunchtime runs, to commuting by bike, to getting away for a weekend in the woods. 


This Week at Falvey  

Monday, Oct. 4

Mindfulness Mondays / 1– 1:30 p.m. / ZOOM / https://villanova.zoom.us/j/98337578849 

Tuesday, Oct. 5

Midterms Stress Buster Pop-Up / 12-2 p.m. / Old Falvey Patio

Wednesday, Oct. 6

Fall 2021 Falvey Forum Workshop Series: Citation Management Using Zotero / 12:30-1:30 p.m. / ZOOM / Register Here 

Friday, Oct. 8

Villanova Gaming Society Meeting / 2:30-4:30 p.m. / Speakers’ Corner / Free & Open to the Public 


This Week in History 

Oct. 4, 1957 – Sputnik launched 

The Soviet Union inaugurates the “Space Age” with its launch of Sputnik, the world’s first artificial satellite. The spacecraft, named Sputnik after the Russian word for “satellite,” was launched at 10:29 p.m. Moscow time from the Tyuratam launch base in the Kazakh Republic. 

The first U.S. satellite, Explorer, was launched on January 31, 1958. By then, the Soviets had already achieved another ideological victory when they launched a dog into orbit aboard Sputnik 2. The Soviet space program went on to achieve a series of other space firsts in the late 1950s and early 1960s: first man in space, first woman, first three men, first space walk, first spacecraft to impact the moon, first to orbit the moon, first to impact Venus, and first craft to soft-land on the moon. 


""Jenna Renaud is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library.


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Last Modified: October 4, 2021