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Summer Reading Stacks

I’m Daniella Snyder, a second-year graduate student at Villanova University, and your ‘Cat in Falvey Library’s Stacks. I’ll be posting about academics– from research to study habits and everything in between– and how the Falvey Library can play a large role in your success here on campus!

 

Welcome back to campus, Wildcats!

How was your summer? More importantly, did you read any good books? Which book did you pack in your beach bag and bring home covered in sand and salt water stains? Which book kept you turning pages for hours during a lazy day at home? Was there a book you started but left unfinished when you packed up to return to school?

Thankfully, National Read A Book Day is Friday, Sept. 6, and Falvey Library wants you to spend the day reading for fun. Yes, read for run. Get outside, and pick up a new book, a favorite book, or a book you didn’t finish. Make sure to stop in the library and pick up a button at the Circulation Desk to show your support for the holiday.

I’ll be picking Whisper Network by Chandler Baker back up. I started the novel at the tail end of my summer, and it’s been sitting on my nightstand ever since. For National Read A Book Day, I’m going to bring the book with me to work and spend my lunch break outside, ignoring my phone and academic responsibilities for just a little bit. It’s an engrossing read, set in a modern-day corporate office after the suspicious suicide of the company’s CEO. Every page has enough thrill and intrigue to keep me guessing.

In thinking about National Read A Book Day, I asked some of Falvey’s staff to reflect on their favorite summer reads:

 

Nate Haeberle-Gosweiler, Communication and Marketing Graduate Assistant, recalls The Stack: On Software and Sovereignty by Benjamin Bratton: “This book was more than just interesting. It was a book that made me change my feelings about the world.”

Shawn Proctor, Communication and Marketing Program Manager, picked a throwback: The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton: “I watched the movie as a kid, but never read the book. It’s cool to read it now, knowing that my kids have read it before me. It’s also really incredible that a book without featured characters that are similar to us is still to relatable.”

Annabelle Humiston, Falvey Library Student Worker, loved Nick Bilton’s American Kingpin: The Epic Hunt for the Criminal Mastermind Behind the Silk Road: “I’m a huge fan of crime thrillers and this one really kept you on your toes. I want to work in forensics psychology after graduation, so it was both informative and entertaining.”

The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin made Chris Hallberg, Library Technology Developer, catch the book bug this summer. “The book was such an unbelievably gripping work of science fiction that I couldn’t put it down, and I went on to read twelve books this summer,” Hallberg says.

After watching the Chernobyl HBO miniseries and listening to the podcast about the show, Kallie Stahl, Communication and Marketing Specialist, picked up Midnight in Chernobyl: The Untold Story of the World’s Greatest Nuclear Disaster by Adam Higginbotham. “After watching the miniseries, I realized I didn’t know a lot about Chernobyl,” Stahl admits. “This book was a great resource for the event itself, because it really delves into history.”

Joanne Quinn, Director of Communications and Marketing, has been talking about Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup by John Carreyrou for months.”Not only was it intriguing and the author told a good story, it was also fascinating to learns the intricacies of the relationship between entrepreneurs and venture capitalists.”

Tara Westover’s Educated really inspired Regina Duffy, Communication and Marketing Program Manager. She says, “Her success story was moving. She grew up in the mountains, uneducated, and with little guidance, achieved her dreams.”

Allie Reczek, Falvey Library Student Worker, is going to finish Hannibal by Thomas Harris. “I only got about 100 pages into the book this summer, but I really want to finish it. I liked it because I read The Silence of the Lambs and then I watched the movies. I wanted to continue the series,” she says.

 

 

 


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Reading Toni: Explore Morrison’s Body of Work

Toni Morrison book collage

“Love is or it ain’t. Thin love ain’t love at all.”

—Toni Morrison (1931-2019)

 

Toni Morrison, Pulitzer Prize, Nobel Prize, and American Book Award winner, passed away today at the age of 88. On the eve of a new biopic about Morrison, Kallie Stahl looked back on the library’s collection of her work. In honor of her life and incredible contribution to American letters, we are re-running a portion of the blog, originally featured in June.

Whether you’re familiar with Morrison’s narratives, looking to re-experience her storytelling before the film, or new to the author’s work, Falvey Memorial Library has a number of Morrison’s novels for you to explore:

    • The Bluest Eye (1972) The story of eleven-year-old Pecola Breedlover—a black girl in an America whose love for its blond, blue-eyed children can devastate all others–who prays for her eyes to turn blue: so that she will be beautiful, so that people will look at her, so that her world will be different.
    • Sula (1973) Two girls who grow up to become women. Two friends who become something worse than enemies.
    • Song of Solomon (1977) With this brilliantly imagined novel, Morrison transfigures the coming-of-age story as audaciously as Saul Bellow or Gabriel García Márquez. As she follows Milkman from his rustbelt city to the place of his family’s origins, Morrison introduces an entire cast of strivers and seeresses, liars, and assassins…inhabitants of a fully realized black world.
    • Tar Baby (1981) The place is a Caribbean island. In their mansion overlooking the sea, the cultivated millionaire Valerian Street, now retired, and his pretty, younger wife, Margaret, go through rituals of living, as if in a trance.
    • Beloved (1987) Set in rural Ohio several years after the Civil War, this profoundly affecting chronicle of slavery and its aftermath is considered to be Toni Morrison’s greatest novel and the most spellbinding reading experience of the decade.
    • Jazz (1992) This passionate, profound story of love and obsession moves back and forth in time, as a narrative is assembled from the emotions, hopes, fears, and deep realities of Black urban life.
    • Paradise (1997) In prose that soars with the rhythms, grandeur, and tragic arc of an epic poem, Morrison challenges our most fiercely held beliefs as she weaves folklore and history, memory and myth into an unforgettable meditation on race, religion, gender, and a far-off past that is ever present. 
    • Love (2003) A Faulknerian symphony of passion and hatred, power and perversity, color and class that spans three generations of black women in a fading beach town.
    • A Mercy (2008) Reveals what lies beneath the surface of slavery. But at its heart, it is the ambivalent, disturbing story of a mother and a daughter—a mother who casts off her daughter in order to save her, and a daughter who may never exorcise that abandonment.
    • Home (2012) The story of a Korean war veteran on a quest to save his younger sister. Frank Money is an angry, broken veteran of the Korean War who, after traumatic experiences on the front lines, finds himself back in racist America with more than just physical scars. He is shocked out of his crippling apathy by the need to rescue his medically abused younger sister and take her back to the small Georgia town they come from that he’s hated all his life.
    • God Help the Child (2015) A tale about the way the sufferings of childhood can shape, and misshape, the life of the adult. At the center: a young woman who calls herself Bride, whose stunning blue-black skin is only one element of her beauty, her boldness and confidence, her success in life, but which caused her light-skinned mother to deny her even the simplest forms of love.

Kallie Stahl, MA ’17 CLAS, is communication and marketing specialist at Falvey Memorial Library. Her favorite Toni Morrison novel is The Bluest Eye.


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Reading Toni: Explore Morrison’s Body of Work Before New Biopic “The Pieces I Am” Premieres in Theaters

Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures.

Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am, a new biographical film about the Nobel Prize-winning author premiers in select theaters Friday, June 21. Whether you’re familiar with Morrison’s narratives, looking to re-experience her storytelling before the film, or new to the author’s work, Falvey Memorial Library has a number of Morrison’s novels for you to explore:

    • The Bluest Eye (1972) The story of eleven-year-old Pecola Breedlover—a black girl in an America whose love for its blond, blue-eyed children can devastate all others–who prays for her eyes to turn blue: so that she will be beautiful, so that people will look at her, so that her world will be different.
    • Sula (1973) Two girls who grow up to become women. Two friends who become something worse than enemies.
    • Song of Solomon (1977) With this brilliantly imagined novel, Morrison transfigures the coming-of-age story as audaciously as Saul Bellow or Gabriel García Márquez. As she follows Milkman from his rustbelt city to the place of his family’s origins, Morrison introduces an entire cast of strivers and seeresses, liars, and assassins…inhabitants of a fully realized black world.
    • Tar Baby (1981) The place is a Caribbean island. In their mansion overlooking the sea, the cultivated millionaire Valerian Street, now retired, and his pretty, younger wife, Margaret, go through rituals of living, as if in a trance.
    • Beloved (1987) Set in rural Ohio several years after the Civil War, this profoundly affecting chronicle of slavery and its aftermath is considered to be Toni Morrison’s greatest novel and the most spellbinding reading experience of the decade.
    • Jazz (1992) This passionate, profound story of love and obsession moves back and forth in time, as a narrative is assembled from the emotions, hopes, fears, and deep realities of Black urban life.
    • Paradise (1997) In prose that soars with the rhythms, grandeur, and tragic arc of an epic poem, Morrison challenges our most fiercely held beliefs as she weaves folklore and history, memory and myth into an unforgettable meditation on race, religion, gender, and a far-off past that is ever present. 
    • Love (2003) A Faulknerian symphony of passion and hatred, power and perversity, color and class that spans three generations of black women in a fading beach town.
    • A Mercy (2008) Reveals what lies beneath the surface of slavery. But at its heart, it is the ambivalent, disturbing story of a mother and a daughter—a mother who casts off her daughter in order to save her, and a daughter who may never exorcise that abandonment.
    • Home (2012) The story of a Korean war veteran on a quest to save his younger sister. Frank Money is an angry, broken veteran of the Korean War who, after traumatic experiences on the front lines, finds himself back in racist America with more than just physical scars. He is shocked out of his crippling apathy by the need to rescue his medically abused younger sister and take her back to the small Georgia town they come from that he’s hated all his life.
    • God Help the Child (2015) A tale about the way the sufferings of childhood can shape, and misshape, the life of the adult. At the center: a young woman who calls herself Bride, whose stunning blue-black skin is only one element of her beauty, her boldness and confidence, her success in life, but which caused her light-skinned mother to deny her even the simplest forms of love.

Kallie Stahl, MA ’17 CLAS, is communication and marketing specialist at Falvey Memorial Library. Her favorite Toni Morrison novel is The Bluest Eye.


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Last Modified: June 20, 2019