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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (11/9)

EIGHT-THIRTY-GRAPHIC2

Here’s your daily dose of library-oriented speed-reads to start your day!

SAVE THE DATE…

Reception for James & Kathryn Murphy. Thursday, November 12 at 4:30 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner. Please join us as we celebrate James and Kathryn Murphy’s planned donation of 300 signed, first-edition Irish poetry books to the Library.

The event marks the unique contributions the Murphys have made to Irish studies and also Villanova’s long standing connection with leading Irish writers, such as Seamus Heaney, Derek Mahon, Paul Muldoon and Ciaran Carson. Award-winning poet and former Heimbold Chair, Moya Cannon, will present readings.


Did you know—elipses

All University publications, both print and online, adhere to AP style. To be consistent with University publications, Falvey’s online and print publications also adhere to AP style (see FML Style Guidelines).

AP Style evolved so as to fit the maximum amount of words in a space. That goal is the reason for the following:

Ellipses—“In general, treat an ellipsis as a three-letter word, con- structed with three periods and two spaces, as shown here” ( … ).


 

how to be detectiveNEW MEDIA NEWS

Looking for a job that doesn’t pay, but that rewards you in other ways? Consider proofreading this vintage book as part of the Distributed Proofreaders project.  You could learn How to Be a Detective while you’re on the job! Find out more on the Blue Electrode blog today!

 

 

 

 


PHILADELPHIA: WORLD HERITAGE CITY

Did you hear the news before the weekend? Philadelphia has been designated a “World Heritage City,” the first in the United States, and will now be a city categorized with the likes of Paris, Jerusalem, and Prague. What an honor! As reported on Philly.com, the title is more than just a gold star, as it offers the potential of increased reputation and tourism.

philadelphia


QUOTE OF THE DAY

Today in 1934, astronomer Carl Sagan was born. Last month we ran a quote celebrating Neil deGrasse Tyson’s birthday (October 5) and mentioned his praised airtime as the host of Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey. But did you know Carl Sagan was his predecessor as host of Cosmos: A Personal Voyage – a majorly influential piece of scientific documentary? Both deGrasse Tyson and Sagan share similar vocations as science popularizers and while Sagan has since passed, his contributions toward bringing space to the public eye live on.

carl sagan

“For small creatures such as we the vastness is bearable only through love.” – Carl Sagan


HAVE A GREAT DAY!

If you have ideas for inclusion in The 8:30 or to Library News in general, you’re invited to send them to joanne.quinn@villanova.edu.


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Booktober Break! Patti Smith: Take the M Train

booktober logo smFall is the season when we all begin to move indoors and even pastimes get a little more ambitious – things like binge watching Game of Thrones, knitting Christmas stockings for the dog and tackling fat serious novels by Authors You Should Read come to mind. 

This fall is loaded with releases of buzzy books from authors Salman Rushdie, Elena Ferrante, John Irving and a host of celebrity authors. Fall break just may afford you time to get through one, or at least at procure it for your night table to enjoy over semester break. Some library staff have perused the fall lists and have picked their favorites. For a Booktober special, we’ll bring you their thoughts each day this week.

M TrainThis isn’t the first time Patti Smith has published a book. She wrote the award-winning memoir Just Kids in 2010. Just Kids was a book about her childhood, about remembering, whereas her new book, M Train, portrays her solitary thoughts about the present-day as stations, as if they were visual tableaus of her life. The “train” stations seem to be places of meditation as well as places where Smith stopped while traveling through life.

M Train was published last week and precedes the HarperCollins 40th anniversary publication of Patti Smith Collected Lyrics, a 320-page book filled with new songs, new artwork and an updated introduction that comes out October 27.

Her book tour started on October 6 in New York City and will be coming through Philadelphia on November 6.

Will you be waiting for the M Train?

 

Additional reading:

Patti Smith Reveals Her Solitary Soul in the M Train, NPR, October 7, text & audio

Patti Smith’s ‘M Train’ is a Literary Ride Through Stations of Mourning, Observer, October 9


LuisaCywinski_headshot thumbnailBy Luisa Cywinski, editorial coordinator on the Communication & Service Promotion team and team leader, Access Services.


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'Caturday: Wildcats at War

Vietnam Rev Robert J Walsh VU Pres 1969 photo

Rev. Robert J. Welsh, OSA, STD

The Vietnam War started in 1955 and ended 20 years later in 1975. In the midst of the War, Villanova students and faculty here in the States were not idle. Many issues of The Villanovan contained reports of their activity and responses to the War. Below are two images from the Oct. 8 and Oct. 15, 1969 issues of The Villanovan that highlight the campus response to the moratorium to end the war.

Rev. Robert J. Welsh, OSA, STD, was University president from 1967-1971 and wrote “We must work and pray that the way to a just and lasting peace may soon be found.”

As noted on the Villanova Digital Library search page, issues of The Villanovan “are fully searchable from the Library Catalog and are in PDF format for easy reading, printing and downloading. Search the fulltext in the … Digital Library search box or in the library Search tab.”

Vietnam Rev Robert J Walsh VU Pres 1969

vietnam moratorium events Oct 15 1969

 

LuisaCywinski_headshot thumbnail‘Caturday blog by Luisa Cywinski, editorial coordinator on the Communication & Service Promotion team and team leader of the Access Services team.


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'Caturday: "Library Corner" of the 40's and 50's

There was a time when Wildcat book lovers and library patrons could read about new book titles and library events in the “Library Corner” section of the Villanovan. The excerpts below are from 1949 and 1950 when library news shared a page with articles about the school radio station and the Physics club. We know that ‘Cats still read books and articles, our circulation statistics tell us that, but these days they read about new resources, books, and events on the Library’s news blog online.

(If you’re interested in book reviews, check out the “Book-tober” feature in The Eight Thirty daily blog this month. Our first review was posted on Oct. 2.)

Library Corner Oct 11 1949

 

Library Corner Oct 10 1950

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Images courtesy of the Villanova University Digital Library.

LuisaCywinski_headshot thumbnail‘Caturday blog post by Luisa Cywinski, editorial coordinator on the Communication & Service Promotion team and team leader of the Access Services team.


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Philadelphia Researching Tips

Even though Philadelphia is only 13 miles away, navigating the city may seem like another world in some sense. With world class institutions, museums, and parks, coupled with a rich history running throughout the city, it is no wonder people can feel overwhelmed when visiting Philadelphia. Luckily Falvey has access to many resources to help navigate and research any topic on Philadelphia. Whether the resource is in print or online, the Library can help resolve any confusion when it comes to researching the City of Brotherly Love.

Books

Falvey has a vast collection of books on Philadelphia; where that collection is located in the Library depends on your subject of research. Start with “Philadelphia” in the subject line to narrow your results.

 

subject

Use the facets on the right to filter the results down to your area of interest:

refine

 

In this example, the results are filtered down into books about Philadelphia politics. The picture below displays that books on this subject can be found in the F 158 call number section of the library.

final

 

Online Resources

Jutta Seibert, History Librarian and Academic Integration Team Leader, suggests the following free resources readily available online:

Historical Images of Philadelphia – 20,000 historical images of the city dating back to 1841 courtesy of the Free Library.

Library Company of Philadelphia – The Library Company was founded in 1731 by Benjamin Franklin and remains to this day an independent cultural institution. Its rare books, manuscripts, broadsides, ephemera, prints, photographs, and works of art are worth a visit to its Locust Street location. The Library Company currently hosts “Fashioning Philadelphia – the Style of the City, 1720-1940.” Selected exhibits such as the “Black Founders: The Free Black Community in the Early Republic” are available online.

Digital Maps of Philadelphia – Digital access to city maps ranging from 1834 to 1962 courtesy of the Free Library.

 

This is a short, starting point for researching tips on Philadelphia. Remember to always contact your subject librarian for a more in depth search.


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'Caturday: Following Thomas

VillanuevaDeLosInfantes_CampoDeMontiel00

This beautiful Spanish plaza can be found in Villanueva de los Infantes, which is near the village in which St. Thomas of Villanova was raised.

According to the Villanova University website, the “University is named for a Spanish Augustinian, Thomas García (1486-1555), the son of a miller who was born in Fuenllana, a village near Villanova de los Infantes, Castile, Spain. Thomas studied at the University of Alcalá where he received his master’s degree in 1509, and the insignia marking him as a doctor shortly thereafter. In 1512, he became a professor of philosophy at the University of Alcalá where his lectures were received enthusiastically for their clarity and conviction. In addition, Thomas was praised by his students and colleagues for always being friendly and helpful.”

I like to think Falvey’s subject librarians emulate St. Thomas as they assist faculty, staff, students and visitors with their research needs.

On a lighter and only slightly related note, you might want to check out this cool summer book for kids featuring Thomas the Cat (or Tomas el Gato). It’s written in both English and Spanish!

thomas the cat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘Caturday post by Luisa Cywinski, editorial coordinator on the Communication & Service Promotion team and team leader of the Access Services team.

Photo of Plaza Major used with permission from Carlos Barraquete and the Asociacion de Amigos del Campo de Montiel, whose website is a Tribute to Campo de Montiel.


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Spotlight on Subject Librarians—Today’s Subject: Philosophy

Spotlight

Think of them as research accelerators,

…………………resource locators,

…………..idea developers,

…….database navigators,

personal coaches …

… we call them “subject librarians.”RS9332_2014-01-29 14.34.20-5-scr

Today’s subject librarian—Philosophy Librarian Nikolaus Fogle

What’s new this year?

NF—Well, the Philosophy program is about to welcome six new graduate students, who I’ll get to meet in August. And of course the philosophy collection is constantly growing. We’ve recently acquired the online version of the Loeb Classical Library, which is great for people doing ancient philosophy. We’re getting more resources online generally, including Oxford Handbooks and a Bloomsbury e-book collection in political thought.

What are the challenges for philosophy students who want to use the Library? 

NF—People often just don’t know where to start. Depending on the project, they might need to use any number of different research tools. And once they figure out where to go, students don’t always know the right sorts of questions to ask themselves in order to use them effectively. A related problem, too, is waiting too long to ask for help.

What resources does the Library offer to help philosophy students overcome those challenges? 

NF—We try to make navigation as easy as possible. The subject and topic guides on the website are pretty helpful, but librarians are also here in person to provide guidance whenever it’s needed. In addition to individual research consultations, we also do in-class orientations and workshops on research skills, tools and techniques throughout the year.

What do you wish philosophy students knew about you, about the Library? 

NF—I guess I just want them to know that the Library is here to provide them with help, and with resources. There’s practically nothing you might need that we won’t be able to get a hold of for you. And it’s not just materials—we’re here to provide you with the knowledge and know-how to enable you to move through the research process as effectively as possible.

What do you like best about being a librarian? 

NF—I love getting to help people, and finding out what they’re working on. I really enjoy collaborating with my colleagues in the Library and elsewhere on campus. And I love that I get to be a philosophy nerd in a really big way.

What do you like best about working with Villanova students? 

NF—Villanova students have such a wide range of interests, and so much enthusiasm. The humanities curriculum here is really great. I like that I never know what the next question is going to be. I also like seeing people’s interests coalesce as they decide on a paper topic, or a major, or a dissertation.


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Alice's Adventures and Mock Turtle Soup

Alice's Adventures in WonderlandSince this is a library food blog, I like to find recipes that will connect to a book or to reading in general. So this month, to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, I decided to read this childhood favorite again in the hopes of finding culinary inspiration.

The story begins with Alice half-dozing outside on a hot summer day as her older sister reads a book with “no pictures or conversations in it.” As her mind wanders, she enters another world where animals talk, playing card soldiers double as croquet arches, and a Queen randomly orders executions for trivial infractions. But it’s the Mock Turtle who gets my attention. He goes to school, sings, dances and plays games. We learn of the sad Mock Turtle’s schooling in chapter 9 and he performs the Lobster Quadrille in chapter 10. Both chapters are filled with songs, puns and word play.

I’m not sure if it was the Queen’s mention of Mock Turtle Soup or if it was the Turtle Soup song that inspired me to make soup. And there was no doubt in my mind that it would be the mock version of turtle soup. The ingredients would be easier to find and cheaper than using real turtle. That, combined with the happy childhood memories of finding cute little turtles near Fern Hill Lake, prevented me from considering turtle meat.

mock turtleIn the earliest publication of Alice’s Adventures, the Mock Turtle was beautifully illustrated by Sir John Tenniel, who showed the character with a calf’s head and hoofs instead of flippers on his hind legs. He may have been inspired to draw the Mock Turtle this way because of the transition to “dull reality” as Alice’s sister thought of how “the lowing of the cattle in the distance would take the place of the Mock Turtle’s heavy sobs.”

Instead of making the traditional Victorian mock turtle soup, which calls for calf’s head and heels, I adapted a Louisianan recipe from the In a While, Crocodile cook book that had a little more kick to it. In addition to ground beef, I added ground veal, as a nod to the traditional calf ingredient.

¾ lb. ground sirloin

¾ lb. ground veal

6 stalks celery, chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 cup chopped onion

3/4 cup butter

15 oz. tomato puree

30 oz. chicken broth

30 oz. beef broth

1/2 cup flour mixed with 1 cup water

1/2 cup Worcestershire sauce

1 cup ketchup

1 teaspoon hot sauce (more if you like it hotter)

2 bay leaves

1-1/2 teaspoons dried thyme leaves

Salt and pepper to taste

1/2 cup lemon juice

1/4 cup minced flat-leaf parsley

6 hard-boiled eggs, chopped

6 slices lemon, for garnish

1 cup sherry (or to taste)

Mock turtle saute stepSaute the meat, celery, garlic, and onion in butter until meat is brown and veggies are translucent. Add to the slow cooker (6 quart or larger).

Add tomato puree, chicken broth, beef broth, flour mixture, Worcestershire sauce, ketchup, hot sauce, bay leaves, thyme, salt, and pepper to the slow cooker. Stir.

Cook on low heat for 3 ½ hours.

Add lemon juice, parsley, and eggs. Stir well and cook for another 30 minutes. If desired, skim and discard fat from top of soup.

IMG_8535Immediately before serving, remove bay leaves, add sherry to taste, and garnish individual bowls with lemon slices. Enjoy with buttered bread.

 

 

 

If you’re looking for a historically accurate mock turtle soup recipe, try the one copied below, from Martha Lloyd’s Household Book. (Martha was a close friend of Jane Austen.)

Mrs. Fowle’s Mock Turtle Soup:

Take a large calf’s head. Scald off the hair. Boil it until the horn is tender, then cut it into slices about the size of your finger, with as little lean as possible. Have ready three pints of good mutton or veal broth, put in it half a pint of Madeira wine, half a teaspoonful of thyme, pepper, a large onion, and the peel of a lemon chop’t very small. A ¼ of a pint of oysters chop’t very small, and their liquor; a little salt, the juice of two large onions, some sweet herbs, and the brains chop’t. Stand all these together for about an hour, and send it up to the table with the forcemeat balls made small and the yolks of hard eggs.

“The Mock Turtle sighed deeply, and began, in a voice sometimes choked with sobs, to sing this:—

‘Beautiful Soup, so rich and green,

Waiting in a hot tureen!

Who for such dainties would not stoop?

Soup of the evening, beautiful Soup!

Soup of the evening, beautiful Soup!

Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!

Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!

Soo—oop of the e—e—evening,

Beautiful, beautiful Soup!

 

‘Beautiful Soup! Who cares for fish,

Game, or any other dish?

Who would not give all else for two

Pennyworth only of beautiful Soup?

Pennyworth only of beautiful Soup?

Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!

Beau—ootiful Soo—oop!

Soo—oop of the e—e—evening,

Beautiful, beauti—FUL SOUP!’”


Food blog by Luisa Cywinski, editorial coordinator on the Communication & Service Promotion team, and team leader, Access Services team.

Mock Turtle Soup recipe adapted from In a While, Crocodile: New Orleans Slow Cooker Recipes by Patrice Keller Kononchek and Lauren Malone Keller, © 2014 by Patrice Keller Kononchek and Lauren Malone Keller, used by permission of the publisher, Pelican Publishing Company, Inc.


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Harper Lee’s Second Book and its Publication Bring Controversy

Go Set a Watchman - cover

Imagine having a book you’ve written published for the first time. How surprised would you be if your book became a bestseller, won a Pulitzer Prize, and was even made into a motion picture starring a major actor? Would you publish another book and risk disappointing your audience? Or would you choose to leave your readers wanting more?

That book, of course, is Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird. When it was released 55 years ago, one critic compared Lee’s skill to that of Mark Twain, and described her as “an artist of rare talent and control. This first novel is an achievement of unusual magnitude” (Canfield).

The recent announcement that Harper Lee’s second book to be published, Go Set a Watchman, would be released today captured the imaginations of Mockingbird’s fans and of the literary world. Watchman, however, is not a new book. In fact, Lee wrote it decades ago, before writing Mockingbird. That Lee waited so many years before publishing Watchman has raised questions about her decision, including controversy about whether she herself made this decision.

The first controversy

Harper Lee, now 88, suffered a stroke in 2007 and lives in an assisted-living facility (Trachtenberg). Her sister, Alice Lee (now deceased), in a 2011 interview, described Harper as “mostly blind and deaf” following her stroke (Berman). Alice Lee, an attorney, who had “long represented her sister and whom friends describe as Ms. Lee’s ‘protector,’ died Nov. 17 [2014].” Less than three months after Alice Lee’s death comes the announcement from HarperCollins Publishers that Go Set a Watchman would be published on July 14, 2015.

Lee has not spoken to anyone except her agent and her attorney about Watchman, its discovery or its publication. Harper publisher Jonathan Burnham insists that Lee is “very much engaged in the process,” although he bases his assessment on reports from Lee’s agent. Lee, Burnham adds, will not give interviews or other publicity when Watchman is released (Berman).

That Lee’s agent and her attorney, who appear to have everything to gain financially from this situation, have been the only ones communicating with the author Harper Leehas prompted an investigation. The Alabama Securities Commission investigated and “concluded that Ms. Lee appeared to understand what was occurring while approving the publication of ‘Go Set a Watchman’” (Stevens).

Despite the Commission’s findings, Lee’s fans have remained skeptical over the circumstances of Watchman’s discovery. These lingering doubts may have motivated Lee’s attorney, Tonja Carter, to publish an explanation in Monday’s Wall Street Journal (Carter).

The second controversy

Although Watchmen includes characters from Mockingbird, such as Scout and Atticus, the novel is set twenty years into the future, into the civil-rights movement. Fans of Mockingbird may be shocked to discover changes in Atticus. He served as Mockingbird’s “moral conscience: kind, wise, honorable, an avatar of integrity” (Kakutani).

In Watchmen, Scout, 26 and known as Jean Louise, has been living in New York City. She visits her hometown, Maycomb, Ala., to discover that Atticus now holds “abhorrent views on race and segregation” (Kakutani). Readers may wonder why Lee wrote this book as “a distressing narrative filled with characters spouting hate speech.” Ultimately, as Mockingbird “suggested that we should have compassion for outsiders like Boo and Tom Robinson,” Watchman “asks us to have understanding for a bigot named Atticus” (Kakutani).

Works Cited

Berman, Russell. “How Harper Lee’s Long-Lost Sequel Was
……..Found.” theatlantic.com. Feb 4, 2015.

Canfield, Francis X., “To Kill a Mockingbird,” Critic, 1960

Carter, Tonja B. “How I found the Harper Lee Manuscript.” Wall
……..Street Journal
, Eastern edition ed. Jul 13 2015. ProQuest.
……..Web. 13 July 2015.

Kakutani, Michiko. “Review: Harper Lee’s ‘Go Set a Watchman’
……..Gives Atticus Finch a Dark Side.” http://nyti.ms/1ULlBZv

Stevens, Laura, and Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg. “Business News: No
……..Fraud found Is Discovered in Harper Lee Case.” Wall Street
……..Journal
, Eastern edition ed.Mar 13 2015. ProQuest. Web. 13
……..July 2015.

Trachtenberg, Jeffrey A., and Laura Stevens. “Harper Lee
……..Bombshell: How News of Book Unfolded.” Wall Street
……..Journal
, Eastern edition ed. Feb 07 2015. ProQuest. Web. 13
……..July 2015.


To Dig Deeper, explore the following links, prepared by Sarah Wingo, team leader: Humanities II and also subject librarian for English, literature and theatre:

One of the big issues that has sprung up around GSAW beyond the controversy over its publication is the difference in the character of Atticus Finch and concerns that it may “tarnish” his legacy.

Here is another point from yesterday

You can read the first chapter or listen to Reese Witherspoon read it

NPR piece from yesterday

NPR piece from Feb

NPR piece from 2014 indicating that if Lee is being taken advantage of with this publication it may not be the first time


SarahDig Deeper links selected by Sarah Wingo, team leader- Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre. Article by Gerald Dierkes, senior copy-editor for the Communication and Service Promotion team and a liaison to the Department of Theater. 


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Foto Friday: A Summer Beauty

Lily Pad

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management


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Last Modified: July 10, 2015