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Peek at the Week: March 28

By Jenna Renaud

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Word of the Week: Offensive efficiency 

Villanova is in the Final Four, so we’re back with more basketball terminology this week. Offensive efficiency is the number of points scored per 100 offensive possessions. Currently, according to the popular KenPom Ratings, Villanova has a top-10 offense, despite relying heavily on defense in this past weekend’s win against Houston.  

Fingers crossed for another big win this Saturday against the Kansas Jayhawks! If we secure the win, I will be back again next week with more basketball vocabulary as we move into the finals. 


This Week at Falvey  

NOW–Wednesday, Jun. 15th  

“That Fairyland of Ice”: Polar Exploration in Mind and Memory Exhibit | Falvey First Floor & Virtual | Free & Open to the Public 

Monday, March 28th   

2021 Outstanding Faculty Research Award Lecture Featuring Christopher Kilby, PhD, and Samantha K. Chapman, PhD | 1–3 p.m. | Room 205 | Free & Open to the Public | Find more info here 

Tuesday, March 29th   

2022 Literary Festival Schedule: Camille Dungy | 7–8:30 p.m. | Speakers’ Corner | Free & Open to the Public | Find more info here 

Wednesday, March 30th   

2022 Falvey Forum Workshop Series: Photo Management with Tropy for Archival Research | 12–1 p.m. | Virtual | Register Here 

Thursday, March 31st   

Spring 2022 Digital Seeds Lecture: David R. Ambaras, PhD, and Kate McDonald, PhD on “Bodies and Structures 2.0: Scalar and the Practice of Digital Spatial History | 4 p.m. | Virtual | Register Here 

Friday, April 1st   

Villanova Gaming Society Meeting | 2:30–4:30 p.m. | Speakers’ Corner | Free & Open to the Public 


This Week in History 

March 31st, 1889 – Eiffel Tower opens  

For this week’s “This Week in History” we’re traveling across the Atlantic Ocean over to Europe, specifically, Paris, France. On March 31st, 1889, the Eiffel Tower is dedicated in Paris. Gustave Eiffel, the tower’s designer, French Prime Minister Pierre Tirard, various other dignitaries, and over 200 construction workers were in attendance.  

The Eiffel Tower is 984 feet tall and boasts an iron framework supported on four masonry piers, from which rise four columns that unite to create a single vertical tower. There are observation decks on each of the three levels.  

Despite now being regarded as an architectural masterpiece, the project was originally met with some resistance, in part due to concerns it would be structurally unsound. At the time, it was the largest man-made structure in the world, a title it held until the New York Crysler building was completed in 1930.  

Read more from History.com. 


Jenna Renaud is a Graduate Assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a Graduate Student in the Communication Department.

 


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Join Falvey Memorial Library for the 2022 Digital Seeds Speaker Series

Join Falvey Memorial Library for the 2022 Digital Seeds Speaker Series. The speaker series provides opportunities for Villanova faculty, staff, and students to learn more about digital scholarship and research at the intersection of social science, humanities computing, and data science. For more on digital scholarship at Falvey Memorial Library click here.

These ACS-approved events, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest, are free and open to the public.

Promotional poster featuring Matthew Bui, PhD, for the Digital Seeds speaker series.

Matthew Bui, PhD, on “Toward Urban Data Justice: Auditing the Racial Politics of Data”

Thursday, March 24 at 4:00 p.m. via Zoom 

What is the role of (open and big) data in enacting, facilitating, and/or limiting racial justice within an increasingly datafied society? This talk explores the relationship between marginalized communities of color and data, foregrounding questions about power, inequality, and justice.

First, Bui will briefly touch on a study that proposes a typology of community-based engagements with, and disengagements from, data for racial justice: namely, data use, re-use, and refusal. Building on this work and considering the politics of data re-use and refusal to keep powerful actors accountable, Bui will discuss in detail a second longer-term project exploring questions of algorithmic accountability and the predatory nature of data-driven systems: specifically, a study that aims to audit and examine online targeted ads as racially discriminatory by nature.

In all, this work theorizes and conceptualizes “urban data justice” as a community-engaged vision and reparative praxis in response to what Bui and his team are conceptualizing as “algorithmic discrimination”. In all, he asks: how do we tell stories with—and about—data? Who benefits from dominant narratives? How can we subvert unequal power relations within—and of—data? What new methods, frameworks, and language do we need for these endeavors?

REGISTER HERE

Speaker Biography:

Matthew Bui (he/him), PhD, is a postdoctoral researcher and incoming assistant professor (starting Fall 2022) at the University of Michigan School of Information. He also holds faculty affiliations with the UCLA Center for Critical Internet Inquiry and NYU Center for Critical Race and Digital Studies. Bui’s research examines the potential for, and barriers to, urban data justice, foregrounding the racial politics of data-driven technologies, policy, and platforms. He is currently leading a study about racial discrimination and targeted ads and launching a new project that explores how entrepreneurs of color navigate algorithmic bias. His research has received recognition and support from the Annenberg Foundation, Benton Foundation, Democracy F¬¬und, and Kauffman Foundation; and the International Association for Media and Communication Research (IAMCR) and Research Conference on Communications, Information and Internet Policy (TPRC).

Previously, Bui was a Provost’s Postdoctoral Fellow at the NYU Alliance for Public Interest Tech and received his PhD from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Southern California. He also holds graduate certification in geographic information science, an MSc in Media and Communication Research from the London School of Economics, and a bachelor’s degree in Communication from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

 

Promotional poster featuring David Ambaras, PhD, and Kate McDonald, PhD, for the Digital Seeds speaker series.David R. Ambaras, PhD, and Kate McDonald, PhD on “Bodies and Structures 2.0: Scalar and the Practice of Digital Spatial History” 

Thursday, March 31 at 4:00 p.m. via Zoom 

The fundamental intervention of spatial humanistic scholarship is the notion that space is multi-vocal — that places are made up of layers of meaning and history; that layers of place produce distinct geographic footprints and sets of spatial relationships; and that one’s social-historical positionality or “body” shapes how one encounters particular spatial “structures.” Launched in 2021, Bodies and Structures 2.0 examines the dynamics of place- and space-making in modern East Asia. In this presentation, we will discuss how we developed Bodies and Structures 2.0’s unique combination of individually-authored modules and collectively-curated conceptual maps and visualizations and how we used the open-source Scalar platform to build our multivocal project.

REGISTER HERE

Speakers’ Biographies: 

Kate McDonald, PhD, is Associate Professor of Modern Japanese History at the University of California, Santa Barbara and co-director of the Bodies and Structures: Deep-Mapping Modern East Asian History project. She is the author of Placing Empire: Travel and the Social Imagination in Imperial Japan (California, 2017) and currently serves as the Associate Editor for Japan at the Journal of Asian Studies.

David Ambaras, PhD, is a Professor of History at North Carolina State University. His research explores the social history of modern Japan and its empire, particularly through a focus on transgression and marginality. He is the author of Japan’s Imperial Underworlds: Intimate Encounters at the Borders of Empire (Cambridge University Press, 2018); Bad Youth: Juvenile Delinquency and the Politics of Everyday Life in Modern Japan (University of California Press, 2006); and articles and book chapters on class formation, urban space, wartime mobilization, and ethnic intermarriage. He is the co-director of the digital project Bodies and Structures: Deep-mapping Modern East Asian History. Ambaras holds a PhD from Princeton University, and degrees from the University of Tokyo, the Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales (Paris), and Columbia University. He is recipient of fellowships from the National Humanities Center and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Feel free to reach out to Erica Hayes, Digital Scholarship Librarian, with any questions you might have!


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Announcing the 2020 Digital Seeds Lecture Featuring Whitney Trettien, PhD

2020 Digital Seeds poster

 

By Regina Duffy

The Villanova Community is cordially invited to the 2020 Digital Seeds Lecture featuring Whitney Trettien, PhD, Assistant Professor of English, University of Pennsylvania. Trettien’s talk, “Experimental Publishing, Then and Now,” will take place virtually on Thursday, November 5 from 4:00-5:00 pm via Zoom.

Please REGISTER HERE. Once registered, you will be sent a link to the Zoom meeting.

When we consider the role of the (digital) humanities today, we do so from within a fragmented field where the center no longer holds. This moment of creative destruction presents an opportunity to shift into a new register — one defined not by minute clefts between theories or methods but by a renewed commitment to how we compose and share our work. Specifically, how we publish — how we use media to make public the stories we spin about texts and their past lives. Drawing on her own experiments in creative/critical publishing (including most recently with the Manifold platform), as well as the deep history of writing with scissors and paste, Trettien will chart the politics, praxis, and urgency of digital publishing today.

To learn more about Whitney Trettien’s research, please visit her website at: http://whitneyannetrettien.com/

This talk is part of Falvey Memorial Library’s Digital Seeds series. For more information about Falvey Library’s support of Digital Scholarship, please contact Erica Hayes, Digital Scholarship Librarian at erica.hayes@villanova.edu. Please also visit Falvey Memorial Library’s Digital Scholarship Program webpage to learn how the Library supports faculty, students, and staff interested in applying digital methods and tools to their research and teaching.

This ACS approved event, which is sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, is free and open to the public.

 


headshot picture of regina duffy  Regina Duffy is a Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library. 


 


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Register for Digital Research Methods & Scholarly Publishing Demo & Discussion Workshops!

By Regina Duffy

Picture of student at computer

Interested in digital scholarship and scholarly communication? Join us this fall semester as Falvey Memorial Library offers several opportunities for you to learn more about digital tools, pedagogy, scholarly publishing, copyright, and more!

Throughout the semester, Falvey’s Digital Scholarship Program will host community conversations on digital scholarship tools as well as research and publishing topics. These informal virtual meetups are designed to facilitate collaborative learning and connection across all disciplines and departments at Villanova University.

Each meeting will begin with a 20-30 minute introduction to a digital scholarship or scholarly communication tool or reading (check out the list below), with the rest of the hour dedicated to informal chatting and related discussions.

All Villanova community members are welcome to attend, regardless of their prior experience with digital scholarship or scholarly communication! Feel free to stop by to join the conversation and meet other faculty members, students, and Villanova staff who share an interest in digital research methods, digital humanities, scholarly publishing, and the unique challenges we all are facing in our current remote environment. Workshops are sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library, are ACS-approved, and will be hosted by either Erica Hayes, Digital Scholarship Librarian, or Sarah Wipperman, Scholarly Communication Librarian.


Fall 2020 Digital Research Methods & Scholarly Publishing Demo & Discussion Workshops:

Choosing Creative Commons Licenses: Friday, Sept. 4, 11 a.m.–12 p.m.
Sarah Wipperman, Scholarly Communication Librarian, will discuss copyright licensing and how to share your work on your own terms.
PLEASE REGISTER HEREOnce registered, you will be sent a link to this Zoom meeting.

Map Warper and Story Map JS: Friday, Sept. 18, 11 a.m.–12 p.m.
Erica Hayes, Digital Scholarship Librarian, will provide a demo of Map Warper and Story Map JS and lead a discussion on how to bring historical maps into GIS in order to tell your own geographic story.
PLEASE REGISTER HEREOnce registered, you will be sent a link to this Zoom meeting.

SPARC Author Addendum: Friday, Oct. 2, 11 a.m.–12 p.m.
Sarah Wipperman, Scholarly Communication Librarian, will discuss retaining more rights when you publish your scholarly research.
PLEASE REGISTER HERE. Once registered, you will be sent a link to this Zoom meeting.

Voyant Tools: Friday, Oct. 16, 11 a.m.–12 p.m.
Erica Hayes, Digital Scholarship Librarian, will discuss Voyant Tools, a web-based text analysis and visualization tool.
PLEASE REGISTER HERE. Once registered, you will be sent a link to this Zoom meeting.

AntConc: Friday, Oct. 30, 11 a.m.–12 p.m.
Erica Hayes, Digital Scholarship Librarian, will speak on analyzing a collection of texts with AntConc’s concordance tool.
PLEASE REGISTER HERE. Once registered, you will be sent a link to this Zoom meeting.

CRediT: Friday, Nov. 6, 11 a.m.–12 p.m.
Sarah Wipperman, Scholarly Communication Librarian, will talk about how to credit collaborators with various roles on your scholarly projects.
PLEASE REGISTER HERE. Once registered, you will be sent a link to this Zoom meeting.

Hypothes.is: Friday, Nov. 20, 11 a.m.–12 p.m.
Erica Hayes, Digital Scholarship Librarian, will give a demo of Hypothes.is and lead a discussion on annotating online readings, collaboratively.
PLEASE REGISTER HERE. Once registered, you will be sent a link to this Zoom meeting.


Please be sure to register for the events you are interested in. Once you register, you will receive the appropriate Zoom link(s) so that you can attend the events.


 

headshot picture of regina duffy

Regina Duffy is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Save The Date: Digital Seeds Fall 2019 Events featuring Julia Flanders of Northeastern University

Falvey Memorial Library is very pleased to announce our Digital Seeds speaker for Fall 2019, Julia Flanders of Northeastern University.

When You Think All You Have Is a Hammer, You’re Not Looking Closely Enough at Your Tools: Emerging Research Tactics for Humanities Scholarship

October 31, 2019, 4:00-5:30pm, Falvey 205

The Women Writers Project — a digital research collection focused on early modern women’s writing in English — was designed at a time when digital methods were in their infancy, and has evolved with the field of digital humanities. What kinds of research does such a collection make possible, now that digital methods are maturing and are taking root in humanities departments? What debates animate the ongoing development of collections like this one? How do the politics of digital tools manifest in these research spaces? This presentation will examine the Women Writers Project and the social and technical systems that support it, and also discuss the starting points and design agendas for institutions and scholars seeking to establish new digital scholarship programs. Light refreshments will be provided. Free and open to the public.

Exploring Digital Humanities Pedagogy Workshop

November 1, 2019, 12:00-1:30pm, Falvey 205

This workshop will explore tools and strategies for digital humanities pedagogy that meet three challenging criteria: Do they offer genuinely illuminating engagement? Are they within our capacities as busy scholars and teachers? Can our institution support us in using them? We’ll discuss and experiment with some concrete examples, and share challenges and experiences. Open to Villanova faculty and graduate students. To sign up for this workshop, please visit https://forms.gle/uhRTCtS4SLmeURig9.

Julia Flanders is a Professor of the Practice in the Department of English and the Director of the Digital Scholarship Group in the Northeastern University Library. She also directs the Women Writers Project and serves as editor in chief of Digital Humanities Quarterly, an open-access, peer-reviewed online journal of digital humanities. She has served as chair of the TEI Consortium and as President of the Association for Computers and the Humanities. Her research interests focus on data modeling, textual scholarship, humanities data curation, and the politics of digital scholarly work.


Kallie Stahl ’17 MA is Communication and Marketing Specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.

 


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Last Modified: October 2, 2019