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Flip or Flick: The Outsiders

Sunset in a field

Photo by Darwis Alwan from Pexels.


Nature’s first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf’s a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing gold can stay.

-Robert Frost, “Nothing Gold Can Stay”


By Allie Reczek

The Outsiders novel, written by S.E. Hinton in 1967, follows the life of Ponyboy Curtis (yes, his real name) and the “greasers” as they battle the “Socs” (short for socials), in this coming-of-age tale. The greasers, known for their greasy, long hair and low-class, scum reputation and the Socs, the upper-class kids from the good side of town, are always at war with each other. The social and economic differences that exist between these two groups cause constant tension and rivalry in town, ultimately leading to the accidental death of a Soc at the hands of a 16-year-old greaser named Johnny. This accident sends Ponyboy and Johnny on a journey that takes a toll on the rest of the greasers and results in more death and destruction than any young person should experience.

From the first few pages of this novel, readers root for Ponyboy and the rest of the greasers, understanding that just because you are from a lower social class does not mean that you have less to offer society. Readers learn the importance of family and that the people who have your back no matter what are the ones worth staying beside.

The Outsiders movie adaptation was released in 1983, directed by Francis Ford Coppola and starred C. Thomas Howell, Matt Dillion, and Ralph Macchio. Coppola does a remarkable job at keeping to the storyline and plot of the novel, where almost nothing was left out or changed. This film brings this seemingly simple story of a young boy and his life to reality, where viewers can truly empathize with the greasers, and understand the relationship and love between these boys.

So… Flip or Flick?

While both versions of this story are captivating and gut-wrenching, I would have to choose Flick. The movie adds another layer of connection to the charactersThe Outsiders movie cover and their journey through life, where viewers get a visual glimpse into the lives of Ponyboy, Sodapop, Darry, Dally, Johnny, Two-Bit, and Steve. Because Coppola maintains the integrity and structure of the storyline, I did not feel that anything important was missing in the film and it only further enhanced the plot. While Ponyboy and the greasers may be the Outsiders in their world, this story is one that I feel everyone can relate to in some way. There comes a point in all our lives where we feel as if we don’t fit in or belong. The Outsiders proves that sometimes it is OK to be on the outside; it proves that as long as you have people who love you and are there for you through thick and thin, nothing else matters. Finally, we are reminded to stay optimistic and appreciate life, even when it may seem like nothing good will last. Even when dawn goes down to day, we ought to remember that the gold does in fact stay.

“Stay Gold, Ponyboy.”

 

 


Allie Reczek headshot

 

 

Allie Reczek ’22 CLAS is a current senior at Villanova, majoring in Psychology with minors in Communications and Sociology. She works in Falvey Library as a Marketing and Communications Assistant.


 


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Flip or Flick: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Jekyll and hyde movie poster

Photo courtesy of IMDB

By Allie Reczek

When we think of Halloween stories and the terrifying characters associated with them, we tend to think of witches, zombies, vampires, or even the horrid Frankenstein’s monster. However, the story of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is not like these frightening stories at all. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, written by Robert Louis Stevenson, is a Gothic novella published in 1886. The main character, Dr. Henry Jekyll, is known as a brilliant scientist, currently questioning the internal psyche of man. He is incredibly handsome and widely respected by all who know him.

During one of Jekyll’s experiments to understand the good and bad inside of us all, he develops a potion to transform humans into their evil counterparts. Taking it himself, Jekyll becomes Mr. Hyde—gruesome to look at and dangerous to the core. He commits murder while in the body of Hyde, but eventually transforms back to the good Jekyll after consuming another potion. After repeated voluntary transformations, Jekyll becomes unable to control when he becomes Hyde, even without taking his experimental concoction. Knowing that soon he will be Hyde forever and people will be after him for his crimes, Jekyll decides that there is nothing else he can do but take his own life. 

There are several movies based off of this novella, however the 1931 version directed by Rouben Mamoulian and starring Fredric March is widely considered to be the best adaptation. Despite its 90% rating on Rotten Tomatoes, this movie takes a different approach to this story. Many of the supporting characters in the movie are not included in the novella and vice versa. In the movie, Jekyll is about to marry his fiancée, Muriel Carew, but after unsuccessful attempts to stay as Jekyll, he decides that he has to let her go. When he is Hyde, he murders dance hall girl, Ivy Pearson, after she rejects him and fears his horrifying appearance. Unlike in the novella, instead of Jekyll ending his own life and leaving a suicide note, he is shot and killed while he is Hyde. Although this was a movie made in the 30s, I was surprised at how realistic the transformation from Jekyll to Hyde appeared. Even without the movie magic of 21st century films, this adaptation did a great job at maintaining an engaging storyline that I am sure terrified audiences when first released. 

So… Flip or Flick? 

Flip! While the movie should not be overlooked, I think the book did a better job at explaining this horror story. This novella explores the idea of good and evil, allowing readers to question if we can ever overpower the evil inside us all or if it is only a matter of time before it takes over. Through its classic 19th century European stylistic writing and thought-provoking ending, this book is a perfect fit for anyone looking for a psychological thriller this Halloween season. This story reminds us that it is not witches, zombies, or vampires that are scary, but rather it is what is inside of us that is truly the scariest thing of all. 

 


Allie Reczek headshot

 

Allie Reczek ’22 CLAS is a current senior at Villanova, majoring in Psychology with minors in Communications and Sociology. She works in Falvey Library as a Marketing and Communications Assistant.


 

 


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Flip or Flick: A Clockwork Orange (CW)

original book cover of "A Clockwork Orange"


***Content Warning: Please be advised that this post discusses aspects of A Clockwork Orange, a book and feature film that contain strong elements of sexual assault, torture, and other forms of violence.***


By Allie Reczek

Hello all readers! It is I, Your humble narrator, back with another Flip or Flick, and today I am discussing A Clockwork Orange. Written by Anthony Burgess in 1962, this book is famous for its ingenious and masterful use of language. Spoken in a confusing, mind-twisting slang invented by the main character, Alex, this novel challenges the concept of horrorshow (good) and evil.

In this dystopian universe, a 15 year old boy with a dark and devious mind and a passion for classical music, along with his droogs (friends), wreak havoc on their neighborhood, robbing and assaulting innocent people. After one fatal night and an attack gone wrong, Alex ends up in staja (state jail), staring down a 14 year sentence. A new inmate reformation treatment allows Alex to return to society earlier than expected, however it is not without its dire consequences on his mental stability and outlook on life. Burgess so cleverly makes readers root for the villain and empathize with him, despite knowing full well the destruction and terror Alex causes. This novel challenges the idea of what it means to be “healed” and leaves readers questioning, “What is the cost of salvation?”

The title itself, A Clockwork Orange, does not make much sense at first. However, if one is to look up the translations of Alex’s invented vocabulary, a ‘Clockwork Orange’ is a “mechanically-responsive person”. Through his treatment in prison, Alex becomes a clockwork orange, arguably becoming worse off than he was before. Despite knowing that Alex is a horrid person and a danger to society, one cannot help but feel remorse for him when he is “cured”.

The movie version of A Clockwork Orange, released in 1971, and directed by Stanley Kubrick, brings Anthony Burgess’ masterpiece to life. Viewers can truly witness the dystopian lifestyle of the characters and just how frightening and zammechat (remarkable) this story is. In regard to using the movie as an aid in the overall understanding of the plot, I would say it does a great job in staying true to the storyline of the novel. Because the book can be hard to follow at times, the movie allows for a visual element to enhance and clarify what exactly was happening, despite how graphic it may be. However, from an enjoyment perspective, I enjoyed the novel more. I believe there is a sense of bliss to ignorance and there are certain scenes from this movie that I would rather have left unclear. Just from the first 10 minutes of the movie, I was horrified and quite frightened at what I was witnessing. Despite my opinion, I think cinephiles would better understand and appreciate the context in which the brutality and overwhelming nature of this film is presented.

So, Flip or Flick?

Flip! If you are sensitive to explicit content and prefer to leave some images to the imagination.

Flick! If you want to add a visual component to further enhance the message behind this story. However, it is important you are able to separate the gore from the overall takeaway of A Clockwork Orange and not be bothered by some disturbing content.

Falvey Library owns a DVD copy of A Clockwork Orange as well as several copies and interpretations of the book.  View the full list here.


Allie Reczek headshot

 

Allie Reczek ’22 CLAS is a current senior at Villanova, majoring in Psychology with minors in Communications and Sociology. She works in Falvey Library as a Marketing and Communications Assistant.

 


 


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Cat in the Stax: From the Pages to the Screen

With winter seeming never-ending and spring still feeling like a far-off dream, it’s time to make a new list of movies and TV shows to watch. Below is a list of five books that have been adapted into TV series or movies for 2021. Many of these books are in Falvey’s collection. If you’re like me, you’ll need to read the book before you watch the movie!

Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Platform: Netflix

Release Date: OUT NOW – Feb 1, 2021

 

The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Platform: Netflix

Release Date: OUT NOW – Jan 22, 2021

 

The Dig by John Preston

Platform: Netflix

Release Date: OUT NOW – Jan 15, 2021

 

Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs by Johann Hari

Movie Title: The United States vs. Billie Holiday

Platform: Hulu

Release Date: Feb 26, 2021

 

Cherry by Nico Walker

Platform: Apple TV+

Release Date: Mar 12, 2021


Jenna Newman is a graduate assistant in Falvey Memorial Library and a graduate student in the Communication Department.


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Flick or Flip: The Handmaid’s Tale

By Allie Reczek

Flick or Flip logo

Welcome to Falvey’s Flick or Flip? My name is Allie Reczek, and I am a sophomore undergrad and student worker in the Library. For this blog, I will pick a book that has been turned into a movie, and argue which I thought was better.

This week on Falvey Flick or Flip, I will be discussing The Handmaid’s Tale, written in 1985 by Margaret Atwood. The novel is set in a future dystopian society in which societal roles consist of patriarchal men and subservient women. Offred, the main character, sets out to escape the confines of this life and be reunited with her family. The Republic of Gilead, which is the name of the totalitarian state that takes over after the fall of the United States government, limits the role of many women to “handmaids” who are forced to bear children for barren women and their husbands. Offred is defiant of the new role she has been forced into and works with other handmaids to secretly destroy this toxic government. Throughout the novel, Atwood pushes the boundaries of the human mind, highlighting gender stereotypes and the dangers of technology, leaving readers wondering if we are not that far away from reaching this hypothetical future. 

Rather than a movie adaptation, The Handmaid’s Tale was converted into a TV series on Hulu in 2017. In the first two seasons, the show follows the same storyline, with some changes that take a modern-day approach to this 1980s novel, like the inclusion of an interracial couple and highlighting the fear of expressing same-sex relationships in Gilead. 

While very well-directed and produced, I feel that after the first season I was not as invested in the series as I was reading the book. For anyone who can keep up with a TV series, I highly suggest this show. However, unlike a movie that tells a whole story in less than two hours, I grew bored of the plot line as more episodes were released.

Ultimately, regardless of the format in which you unfold this tale, The Handmaid’s Tale is a story that should not be overlooked. 

So, Flick or Flip?

FLIP


Picture of Allie Reczek

Hi! My name is Allie Reczek, and I am a sophomore Psychology Major. I work as a Marketing and Communication Assistant in Falvey. Hope you enjoy this blog! Which flips or flicks should I debate in the future? Message @villanovalibrary on Instagram or tweet us @FalveyLibrary!


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Last Modified: February 14, 2020