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It’s Women’s History Month! Read, Watch, Learn

In 1987, the U.S. Congress declared March to be National Women’s History Month. Coordinated by the National Women’s History Alliance, this annual celebration seeks to recognize “the diverse and significant historical accomplishments of women.”

This year’s theme is Valiant Women of the Vote: Refusing to be Silenced in recognition of the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment to the Constitution, which gave women the right to vote.

Want to read about women’s suffrage? Historian Susan Ware recommends these five books:

1. The Myth of Seneca Falls by Lisa Tetrault (e-book or print book at Falvey)

2. The Concise History of Woman Suffrage by Mari Jo Buhle & Paul Buhle (order via Interlibrary Loan)

3. All Bound Up Together: The Woman Question in African American Public Culture, 1830-1900 by Martha S. Jones (e-book or print book at Falvey)

4. The Woman’s Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote by Elaine Weiss (order via Interlibrary Loan)

5. The Right to Vote: The Contested History of Democracy in the United States by Alexander Keyssar (e-book or print book at Falvey)

 


Are you doing research on a gender-related topic? Falvey has you covered! We have everything you need: journals, books, search engines for finding resources, and databases containing primary source materials to answer all of your gender and women’s studies questions! Visit the our Subject Guide on Gender & Women’s Studies, and be sure to check out these resources:

We subscribe to all of the top journals in the field, including:

Great interdisciplinary databases to help you find journal articles, books, news, and more:

GenderWatch

GenderWatch includes indexing, abstracts, and full text of scholarly journals, magazines, newspapers, newsletters, books, conference proceedings, dissertations, and reports in many disciplines on topics relevant to gender studies. This database is particularly strong in its coverage of dissertations and non-mainstream magazines and newspapers.

Gender Studies Database

Gender Studies Database provides indexing and abstracts for academic and professional journals, conference papers, books, book chapters, government reports, discussion and working papers, theses & dissertations and other sources. GSD combines Women’s Studies International and Men’s Studies databases with the coverage of sexual diversity issues, and is very strong in its coverage of health sciences journals as well as other academic journals.

 

Primary sources and historical documents:

Source: Digital Transgender Archive

Digital Transgender Archive (Free to all users)

This resource provides “an online hub for digitized historical materials, born-digital materials, and information on archival holdings throughout the world” related to transgender history. The project is based at the College of Holy Cross in Worcester, Mass., and is searchable and browsable by map, institution, collection, topic, and genre. The contents of the collection focus on materials created before 2000.

 

Source: Adam Matthew Digital

Gender: Identity and Social Change

This database provides access to primary sources documenting the changing representations and lived experiences of gender roles and relations from the nineteenth century to the present. Offers sources for the study of women’s suffrage, the feminist movement, the men’s movement, employment, education, the body, the family, and government and politics. Falvey licenses this resource from Adam Matthew Digital.

The Gerritsen Collection of Aletta H. Jacobs

The Gerritsen Collection features digital copies of more than 4000 books and pamphlets and complete runs of more than 200 periodicals related to women’s history in general and the movement for women’s rights in particular. It includes materials addressing both the pro-feminist and anti-feminist case, as well as other materials that provide an objective look at the condition of women in a given time of place. Its coverage is international, and extends from the middle of the 15th century to the middle of the 20th century. Each of the books, pamphlets, and periodical titles has its own listing in Falvey’s library catalog.

 

E-Book Collections:

Duke Gender Studies e-book Collection

The Duke Gender Studies e-book collection includes “essential titles and field-defining scholarship in queer theory, gay and lesbian studies, transgender studies, feminist theory, and women’s studies.” This collection is comprised of more than 500 titles published between 1990 and the present. Each book is fully downloadable and printable (chapter by chapter), and is accessible by an unlimited number of VU community members at once.

Perdita Manuscripts

Offers digital copies of writings by early modern women (1500-1700). The name of the collection, derived from the Latin word for “lost,” alludes to the ephemeral nature of women’s writings which were rarely published and widely shared. Genres represented in the collection range from poetry and religious writings to letters, recipes, and account books. Includes manuscript descriptions with partial transcriptions and detailed annotations where available. The collection is part of the Perdita Project. The manuscripts are held by libraries and archives in the US and UK. Includes pdf files for all manuscripts. Licensed from Adam Matthew Digital.

 

Film and Video:

Academic Video Online

Academic Video Online, or AVON, offers more than 70,000 films and documentary TV episodes from distributors including PBS, the BBC, Bullfrog Films, Ro*Co Films, California Newsreel, and many others. Most films include searchable full text transcripts. Here are some subcollections focused on women’s history:

Women’s and Gender Studies Video Online

– Women’s History Month: Celebrating Artists Who are Women

Films on Women’s Suffrage

 

Data and statistics:

Source: WomanStats Project

WomanStats Project (Free to all users)

The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world with qualitative and quantitative information on over 260 indicators of women’s status in 174 countries. To view the data, you first need to create a free account.

 Women, Peace and Security Index (Free to all users)

Measures women’s well-being in 167 countries around the world. It examines three dimensions of women’s lives: inclusion (political, social, economic); justice (formal laws and informal discrimination); and security (at the family, community, and societal levels). A score between 0 (worst possible) and 1 (best possible) is generated for each country, ultimately determining their rank. Begun in 2017/18, the index was created by the Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security in partnership with the Peace Research Institute Oslo.

Statista

Statista is a user-friendly data portal offering tables, graphs, reports, and more on over 80,000 topics from more than 18,000 sources. Women- and gender-related data points covered include information on health, employment and career, consumer behavior, women’s portrayal in media, political behavior, demographics, and public opinion.

For help with your research in Gender and Women’s Studies, please contact the GWS Librarian Jutta Seibert.


Susan Turkel, MA, MLS is a Social Sciences Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Black History in Documentary Films

February is over, but at Falvey, Black history is always part of our collections. One way to learn about facets of this vital component of American history is through documentary films. Read on to learn about some library-subscribed streaming video platforms, and to get some great film recommendations!

Falvey offers Villanova’s students, staff, and faculty access to thousands of documentaries via our streaming subscriptions. Most of our documentaries come to us via Academic Video Online (also known as AVON). AVON offers more than 70,000 films and documentary TV episodes from distributors including PBS, the BBC, Bullfrog Films, Ro*Co Films, California Newsreel, and many others. Most films include searchable full text transcripts. Browse the Film Platform and Black Studies subcollections to get a sampling of AVON’s contents.

Academic Video Online (ProQuest) – Images from the Black Studies film collection

We also license a changing set of documentaries and feature films on the Kanopy platform. You can think of these films as long-term rentals, selected on the basis of faculty requests. Once campus-wide access is purchased, the film remains available via the library catalog for up to three years. Click here to view the films currently available to the Villanova community via Kanopy.

Here are ten documentaries currently screening via AVON and Kanopy that relate to the history of Black Americans. Click the image to access the film.

Banished: A History of African American Expulsion (2007)

 

Black and Blue (1987)
On the history of race and policing in Philadelphia

 

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution (2016)

 

I Am Not Your Negro (2016)

 

John Lewis: Good Trouble (2020)

 

Let the Fire Burn: Tragedy in Philadelphia (2013)

 

Olympic Pride – American Prejudice (2016)
On the other 17 Black athletes who participated in
the 1936 Berlin Olympics… beyond Jesse Owens.

 

The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow (2002; 4 episodes)

 

T’Ain’t Nobody’s Bizness: Queer Blues Divas of the 1920s (2013)

 

Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People (2014)

Enjoy exploring these great films!


Susan Turkel is a Social Sciences Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.


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A TROVE OF NEWLY ADDED EBOOKS FOR THE HUMANITIES

By Darren G. Poley

During this time of necessary remoteness, it has been fortuitous that the Villanova University community can access so many e-books via the Library. In fact, Falvey’s online collection has well over a million e-books that are available to students and faculty alike.

Many publishers today produce e-books alongside their print offerings, but what about slightly older books which were previously only sold as physical items? Some academic publishers are working to remedy the situation by making available electronic versions of books still in high demand that were published in the last forty years, and in some cases even longer ago.

A couple of prominent examples are Oxford University Press and Taylor & Francis. Some more specialized ones are the Wiley Online Library and the Loeb Classical Library Online by Harvard University Press.

Bloomsbury, in addition to being a notable independent publisher since the 1980s, over the last decade has been acquiring other UK book publishers well-respected in the humanities. It now aggregates books from Bloomsbury Academic, I. B. Tauris, Bristol Classical Press, and Continuum International, which includes books by T&T Clark, Burns & Oates, and Cassell.

Recently Falvey Memorial Library has gained access to several e-book collections, and although each individual e-book will be added to the Library’s catalog of holdings, below is a list of the newly acquired Bloomsbury Collections, which can be browsed or searched using keywords.
 

If you want to browse or search across collections by subject and keyword, you can do that, too. Just be sure to limit your results to e-books for which we have access. Otherwise, you will get records for e-books to which we do not have access. Note: Bloomsbury also has an interdisciplinary Open Access Collection.

 

Some e-book platforms aggregate content from a variety of publishers, such as the EBSCO eBook Collection and JSTOR. There are even a few very good open access online aggregators for books no longer in copyright; Hathi Trust Digital Library, Internet Archive, and even our own Distinctive Collections: Digital Library.

 


Darren G. Poley is Associate Director of Research Services and Scholarly Engagement, and Theology, Humanities & Classical Studies Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library. 

 

 



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Presidents Day Resources from Falvey, and Beyond

By Merrill Stein

Happy Presidents Day!

Today we celebrate George Washington’s 289th birthday, which has come to be known as Presidents Day due to its positioning between Washington’s and Abraham Lincoln’s birthdays. To celebrate the history of this important American office, visit these resources, many of which are provided by Falvey Memorial Library, and learn more about the 46 Presidents of the United States, from Washington to Joe Biden!

Seal of the President of the United StatesFrom U.S. National Archives and Records Administration:

National Constitution Center

Featured Presidents’ Day Information from govinfo.gov

From UC Santa Barbara:

American presidency project  – Documents related to the study of the American Presidency, including public papers, annual messages to Congress, inaugural addresses, radio addresses, acceptance speeches, presidential candidates debates, party platforms, elections data, and an audio/video archive.

Selected resources at Falvey:

America: History and Life (EBSCO)

American History Collection (Rotunda – University of Virginia Press)  – authoritative print editions of the papers of major figures of the early republic
American History, 1493-1945 (Adam Matthew Digital)

HeinOnline – visit the U.S. Presidential Library and U.S. Presidential Impeachment Library resources (HeinOnline is available courtesy of the Charles Widger School of Law)

Roper Center for Public Opinion Research (iPOLL)  –  Elections and Presidents Collection


Merrill Stein is Political Science Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.


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Ten Resources to Explore for Black History Month

By Susan Turkel

February is Black History Month, and Villanova kicked off its observance last week with the MLK Keynote Address by Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor on Wednesday and the Freedom School day of learning on Thursday.

Celebrate Black history anytime by visiting these online resources made available to you by Falvey Memorial Library!


1. African American Studies Center (Oxford University Press)

The African American Studies Center is a comprehensive collection of scholarship focusing on the individuals and events that have shaped African American history and culture. It includes more than 15,000 biographical entries, and thousands of encyclopedia articles and images. You’ll also find more than 500 primary source items, such as speeches, letters, legal documents, and poems.


2. Civil Rights and Social Justice collection (HeinOnline)

The Civil Rights and Social Justice collection brings together a variety of legal materials related to civil rights broadly defined, including protection from discrimination based on race, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, ethnicity, religion, age, and ability.

CRSJ includes full text access to legislative histories, hearings and prints, Supreme Court briefs, government reports, law review articles, and publications from the Commission on Civil Rights.


3. Black Drama, Third Edition (Alexander Street Press)

Playbill for “Don’t Bother Me, I Can’t Cope”
by Vinnette Carroll and Micki Grant

Black Drama contains more than 1700 full text works by playwrights from North America, English-speaking Africa, the Caribbean, and other African diaspora countries. These plays were written between 1850 through the present.

Black Drama contextualizes these plays by providing detailed information about productions, theaters, production companies, as well as ephemera such as playbills and posters.

Many of the works are rare, hard-to-find, or out of print. This unique database includes a large number of previously unpublished plays by writers such as Langston Hughes, Derek Walcott, Alice Childress, Amiri Baraka, Zora Neale Hurston, and many others.


4. Oxford Bibliographies on African American Studies

The Oxford Bibliographies are a set of peer-reviewed, annotated bibliographies with expert commentary on scholarship in a wide variety of disciplines. They’re a great place to start any research project!

Each bibliography entry includes a “FindIt” link, to help you access the recommended book or article via Falvey’s collections.

The African American Studies series includes bibliographies on a wide variety of topics; examples include Political Resistance, African American Doctors, the Fisk Jubilee Singers, Ida B. Wells, and Pan-Africanism.


5. Black Historical Newspapers (ProQuest) & African American Newspapers (Accessible Archives)

Newspapers are essential primary source documents, presenting commentary on political, social, and economic events as well as photographs, cartoons, and advertisements.

There have been newspapers published by and for African American in the U.S. since the early 19th century. For more information on using newspapers and magazines as primary source documents, see this guide.

Falvey offers two majors sources for finding these useful materials:

  • African American Newspapers covering the 19th century (including Philadelphia’s Christian Reporter, Douglass’s Monthly, Freedom’s Journal, and the Weekly Advocate)
  • Black Historical Newspapers covering the 20th century (including the Philadelphia Tribune, Chicago Defender, Baltimore African-American, New York Amsterdam News, and many more).

6. Ethnic Newswatch (ProQuest)

Ethnic Newswatch is a news database that provides a direct window into non-mainstream perspectives.

Use Ethnic Newswatch to find newspapers and magazines published by ethnic, cultural, and community presses, mostly in the United States.

This resource contains current content as well as material going back to the 1950s, and includes publications from African American, Hispanic, Arab/Middle Eastern, Jewish, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Indigenous communities.


7. Academic Video Online (Alexander Street Press)

Looking for something to watch? Academic Video Online offers more than 70,000 films and television episodes on a huge variety of topics.

The Black Studies in Video channel offers award-winning documentaries such as John Lewis: Good Trouble and Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People, and TV series such as Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates Jr. and American Experience: Eyes on the Prize.

Each film can be streamed online, and comes with a searchable transcript and the ability to create and save film clips.


8. Slavery, Abolition, and Social Justice (Adam Matthew)

Slavery, Abolition, and Social Justice is an archival collection of scanned manuscripts, court documents, pamphlets, books, paintings, maps, and some secondary sources on many topics relating to slavery and abolition. It covers the period from 1490 to 2007.


9. African American Communities (Adam Matthew)

African American Communities is a multimedia collection of oral histories, correspondence, newspapers, pamphlets, images and official records that provides insights into a variety of African American experiences in the 20th century.

This resource draws its source materials from archives in Atlanta, Chicago, New York, and towns and cities in North Carolina. Explore 360 views of objects, read letters and articles, watch videos, and listen to oral history interviews on a variety of topics.


10. Research Guides

Falvey Librarians have created curated research guides to help you get started with your research. Each guide provides recommendations for encyclopedias and other reference works, primary source materials, and databases for locating relevant journal articles.

Check out any of the following:

 

Stay tuned for more blog posts throughout the month featuring documentaries, books, and more, all with a focus on Black history!


Susan Turkel, MA, MLS, is a Social Sciences Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.

 


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Find Credible Health Information on UpToDate Medicine Resource

By Sarah Hughes

As we enter the winter season during a pandemic, it is more important than ever to remain healthy. While a wealth of health information may be available when conducting a quick search on the web, much of the content is not always credible. Instead, consider using some of the trustworthy resources available at Falvey Memorial Library.UpToDate Logo

UpToDate is an evidence-based medicine resource used by medical providers to retrieve the most current information on health topics.

While the content is primary geared towards students and faculty at the College of Nursing, it does have features that can be helpful for those seeking basic health-related information. A nice feature of this resource is that it contains some specific content geared towards patients, not medical providers. These specific entries are written in more plain terms and is easy to read and understand.

Access UpToDate through Databases A to Z on the Falvey Memorial Library homepage. Be sure to register with your valid Villanova email account.

Once you have an account set, you can search for specific information, like in the example below, information on flu treatment.

Click the Patient tab to retrieve content written for patients. While this is no replacement for a telemedicine visit to your doctor, it can be helpful to see the recommended guidelines written by healthcare providers.

Stay safe and healthy this winter!


 Sarah Hughes is Nursing & Life Sciences Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.


 


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Focus on Falvey Resources: Guidestar Pro

Guidestar Pro is a very useful database for students hoping to work in the voluntary sector, taking a course incorporating a nonprofit/public policy consulting project, or studying nonprofit organizations. It offers a search engine for US third sector organizations built on the Internal Revenue Service’s financial form 990, the Exempt Organization Master File with cumulative information and Publication 78 of organizations eligible for tax exempt donations. These official sources are enhanced with verified self-reported data and Guidestar’s “Seal of Transparency.” Giving hands with coins

You can use Guidstar to find nonprofits leaders by name, role, compensation level, location, and organization cause.  People searches can be used to effectively boast your networking activities.

The organizations search is most useful for learning about potential employers, understanding the nonprofit environment of a given locale, or researching nonprofits. Searches by the National Taxonomy of Exempt Entities (NTEE) or cause category, by location (state, MSA, city, county, zip code), by IRS subsection type, number of employees, and financial benchmarks, such as revenue, expenses, and assets are all supported. The keyword search can be used to find organizations with very specific interests that may not neatly fit into a cause category.

The level of detail and currency of information provided for each nonprofit varies, but they generally cover mission, personnel, programs, outcomes, financials, compensation, and operations. When available trends are presented. Links to annual reports and the 990 are provided. The data is easily downloadable to Excel.

In addition to this powerful organization database, Guidestar Pro’s Blog is a collection of best practice articles on everything related to running and growing a successful nonprofit. Want tips on volunteer recognition? Wondering what key performance indicators a nonprofits should be measuring?  Looking for advice on recruiting diverse boards? All of these topics and many more are covered.

Of course, you can simply use Guidestar Pro to verify your favorite charities!


Linda Hauck, MLS, MBA, is the Business Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Resource Highlight: Presidential Race Tracker 2020

Screenshot of National Journal Daily, Race Tracker 2020 logo.

By Merrill Stein

Visit the National Journal (Daily), a political resource today, Election Day, and in the future. Covering politics and public policy, Falvey Memorial Library’s subscription includes a Washington daybook, House, Senate, and State hotline briefings, webinars, select research briefs, and event listings.

The National Journal (Daily) also offers at least two more resources of note for this year’s election. One is the Race Tracker 2020, which “contains data, insights, and visualizations for active national, congressional, and gubernatorial races plus historical data from recent years.” Two is the Almanac (Almanac of American Politics in print), featuring profiles of political leaders and basic demographics for the part of the country they represent.

Access this periodical resource by searching National Journal Daily in Journal Finder on the Library homepage, via the links above and in the Library catalog.


Merrill Stein is Political Science Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


 


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Ever Wonder What the World Was Thinking?

By Merrill Stein

 

Gallup Analytics, one of Falvey’s newest polling resources, uses three entry points, Topic, Geography, and Keywords to analyze recurring daily and world polls for data sources in U.S. Dailies, World Poll, Gallup Poll Social Series, and Key Indicators.

Poll questions track a variety of economics, well-being, religion, environmental, and political data. Data can be compiled for table, chart, map, and export to MS Excel for the United States, individual states, Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) district levels, and the world. Trend, rank, and scatter plot depictions can also be visualized.

Gallup World Poll data covers more than 80 metrics from 160+ countries. Current Gallup Analytics subscription includes data coverage for the  21st century only. Subscription does not include historical Gallup Brain content. World Poll recurring questions may vary by year and country conditions.

Access to Gallup Analytics  is available via the Library’s Databases A-Z list and the Library catalog.  Select sample search results appear below.

 


Merrill Stein is Political Science Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 

 


 


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Read The New Yorker Online!

By Susan Turkel

Did you know that you can access more than 50,000 online journals, magazines, and newspapers through Villanova’s online subscriptions?

Some of these journals are very niche, such as the Journal of Crustacean Biology and the International Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics.

Others are very well known, including the Philadelphia Inquirer, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and Sports Illustrated.

We also provide the Villanova community with access to some old favorites, including The New Yorker. Founded in 1925, The New Yorker is one of the most well-known and influential magazines in the U.S. Whether you’re a fan of the magazine’s cartoons, its in-depth articles, short fiction, featured poetry, movie reviews, or famous covers, you’re in for a treat!

Every issue of The New Yorker is available in a full-color, page-flippable interface from OpinionArchives. Villanova faculty, staff, and students can access it by clicking the FindIt button in the catalog record and selecting the OpinionArchives option.

The interface provides a full-page view of the cover and instructions for navigating the site.

New Yorker cover and navigation instructions

Click Browse Issues (under the three horizontal lines / “hamburger” icon on the upper-right hand corner of the page) to view the list by year. From there, you can click the cover image to view any issue.

New Yorker covers - clickable thumbnails

To read an issue, use the arrows on the screen to turn pages. Click This Issue to see thumbnail images of each page which allow you to navigate the magazine. You can zoom in for a closer look, and you can print either the full issue or a selection of pages.

To search the archive, click the magnifying glass icon in the upper right. You may find that the Advanced Search is more helpful than the Basic Search.

For an alternate way to search New Yorker content, you can try Reader’s Guide Retrospective (covers 1940-1982) and Readers’ Guide Full Text Mega (covers 1983 to present). These databases provide indexing of authors, titles, and subject headings for the content of a variety of general interest and popular magazines. Search for New Yorker in “SO Journal Name” and put your other search terms in another search box.

 

Once you find an article of interest in Reader’s Guide, click the FindIt button to return to the OpinionArchives interface. You may need to navigate the issue using the thumbnails and Table of Contents to get to the specific article.

Take some time to enjoy flipping through this friendly interface to The New Yorker; read a story, enjoy a cartoon, find a movie recommendation. Or, dive into the archives – almost 100 years’ worth! Either way, it’s a great rabbit hole to fall into.



Susan Turkel is a Social Sciences Librarian at Falvey Memorial Library. She has a giant pile of old print New Yorkers on her bookshelf.


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Last Modified: October 15, 2020