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2016—2017 Penn Humanities Forum on Translation

2016-17 Penn Humanities Forum on Translation

Topic Director: Bethany Wiggin
Associate Professor of German
Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities

https://www.phf.upenn.edu/annual-topics/translation

Translation. Rendition. Revision. Rip Off. Where does one end and the next begin—and who draws the lines?  Was rock and roll a brilliant translation of rhythm and blues or an act of cultural and racial theft? Is translation inevitably an impertinence, a breach of faith with the original? Is it perfidious to relocate Dante’s Virgil to Belfast, Romeo and Juliet to Verona Beach? Or is the translation an original in its own right?  For that matter, what text or artifact is not, one way or another, a translation? Isn’t all culture, even language itself, predicated on translation?

Across languages, media, disciplines, places, and times, translation moves. It can bridge previously unpassable stretches, providing first steps toward discovering or recovering a language and its culture. Indeed, with the new tools of the computer age we can translate faster and bridge farther than ever before. Key to the establishment of a Lenape curriculum, for example, has been the creation of translation dictionaries facilitated by powerful technologies of machine translation.

Perhaps, then, translation provides the getaway car, allowing us to swerve past obsolete linguistic, cultural, artistic, and disciplinary divides. Maybe, as Bruno Latour suggests, the work of translation can help us to avoid the modern error of dividing the world into human culture vs nonhuman nature.  Seen in this way, translation provides a basis for some of the most exciting experiments in contemporary research: the environmental humanities, the medical humanities, the digital humanities. It directs our particular attention to the concept of anthropocene, the post-holocene geologic epoch proposed by Nobel laureate Paul Crutzen to capture the profound mutual entanglement of human and nonhuman on a planet under ever-increasing stress.

As it moves, translation crosses lines of difference, sometimes blurring distinctions of race and ethnicity, class and religion, gender and sexuality. Translation can be a mode of passing. But translation can move otherwise, too; practices of queer translation may seek to accentuate and explore difference rather than efface it. Translation may be deployed as a feminist strategy, a subaltern strategy, a critical legal strategy.

Translation may simply fail inspection as a vehicle for safe passage. Beginning at the source, it steers toward the target, yet along the way its itinerary can change both origin and endpoint. A translation can corrupt, contaminate, or monstrously hybridize, as in translations of sacred or spiritual texts. Some faiths proscribe the translation of holy texts entirely. Martin Luther’s translation of the bible was so monstrous to his Catholic critics that it was for them the book of a seven-headed devil—that devil being, of course, Luther, the translator, himself.

There have been seminal historical moments, including that of the European Renaissance, when the work of translators provided vital springs of cultural renewal. For some cultural historians, this affinity between translation and renaissance is fundamental; it is through translation that newness enters the world.  From their perspective, the situation in contemporary America, where barely three percent of books published each year have been translated from outside English, may well be indicative of cultural retreat and decline. But other scholars have wondered whether translation itself is not part of the current cultural predicament. Where we do find many translated books, they can seem to diminish cultural variety, spreading a literary monoculture exemplified by the kind of “global” or “world” novel that is now featured in the bookshops of international airports.

These disputes over the meaning and value of translation are baked into the word itself, which arrives in English via a Latin rendering of the Greek word metaphorein. What we call translation is already a translation of metaphor, that most notoriously untranslatable of rhetorical figures, so often enlisted as evidence of what, in translation, must be lost. Etymologically, translation is a term at war with itself, always threatening to dissolve into paradox.

But this is just what makes it so a rich topic for our explorations. If translation is a metaphor, we take it as an apt figure for the work of the humanities today, for the scene of uncertain but productive struggle among our many fields and disciplines and modes of apprehension. We invite you to participate in a series of conversations across languages, cultures, historical periods, and systems of knowledge as we devote the year 2016-17 to the challenge of Translation.

April, 2015
Bethany Wiggin, Topic Director
James English, Director, Penn Humanities Forum


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Dig Deeper: Christians in the Contemporary Middle East Conference

Nova Conference: Middle East

Villanova University will host a conference on Dec. 5-6 titled Christians in the Contemporary Middle East: Religious Minorities and the Struggle for Secular Nationalism and Citizenship. With such wonderful speakers attending as Retired General Anthony Charles Zinni (USMC) and Ussama Makdisi of Rice University, the conference promises some elucidating conversation.

For a conference on such a particular subject, the presentations will cover a diverse range of topics. Attendees will hear such intriguing talks as “Christian Contributions to Art, Culture and Literature in the Arab-Islamic World” and “The Impact of the Shia-Sunni Political Struggle and Future Strategies for Christians and Other Minorities in the Middle East.”

Specialized lectures such as these sometimes require a little bit of background information, and some students may be wondering the relevance of these topics to their lives or academic development. I had similar questions and concerns and brought them up with Assistant Director of Academic Integration and Theology Librarian Darren Poley.

Screen Shot 2016-12-01 at 2.20.58 PM

(Cover of illustrated edition of Universal Declaration of Human Rights from website below)

 

“Religious liberty is not just an American or even an exclusively Western concept,” he began. “Freedom to practice one’s faith or belief system is an intrinsically human desire.”

Poley recommends taking a look at the UN’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights if you’re interested in why the Villanova University should be concerned about the Middle East. It’s available here, and Poley reminds you, “especially since we live in an increasingly interconnected and globalized society: no one can afford to ignore any lack of respect for people, property, social justice or the integrity of creation anywhere in the world.”

Dig Deeper by investing these associations, centers and initiatives for social justice:

“It surprises most students to learn that the Middle East and North African were predominantly Christian lands for the centuries between the official toleration of Christianity in the Roman Empire in the 4th century and the rise of Islam in the 7th century,” Poley continued.

Cartouche

(Villanova University’s Arabic Cartouche)

It’s important for Villanova students to think about the decline of pluralistic spaces in the Middle East because so many of these early Christian societies remain today, albeit under different leadership and sometimes different names.

“Nestorian Christians in the Middle East established themselves in the 5th century and continue as the Assyrian Church of the East.” Poley highlighted, and “there are many different Eastern Orthodox churches often along ethnic or national lines that are affiliated with the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, a Turkish citizen who resides in Istanbul.”

Patriarchate Banner

(Banner for the Ecumenical Patriarchate – website below)

In addition, there are Catholics outside of the Latin Rite tradition. The Maronites of Lebanon, the Chaldeans of Iraq, and the Melkites from Syria, Jordan and Israel represent the largest groups of such.

Poley said, “There are also small groups of Christians in the Middle East with doctrinal differences from either the Catholic of the Eastern Orthodox churches, which are collectively called the Oriental Orthodox churches; the three major ones being the Syrian, Armenian, and Coptic (Egyptian).”

Despite the complexity of their histories, you may find statistics and information on the individuals and groups of Christians who continue to “live, work, worship, and coexist alongside Muslims and Jews in Middle Eastern countries,” according to Poley, at these websites:

An encyclopedia of knowledge on the topic, Poley provided me with an exhaustive list of thinkers, theologians and writers who have promoted religious diversity in the Middle East. I’ve included just a few of those thinkers below so that you may familiarize yourself with them before the conference:

  • Saint Pope John Paul II
  • Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI
  • Eastern Orthodox Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I
  • Catholic Patriarch Emeritus of Jerusalem Michel Sabbah
  • Latin Patriarchal Vicar for Jerusalem and Palestine William Shomali
  • Melkite Archbishop George Wadih Bakouni
  • Antiochian Orthodox Bishop George Khodr
  • Coptic Orthodox Bishop Barnibas El Soryany
  • Armenian Bishop of Damascus Armash Nalbandian
  • Father Kail C. Ellis, OSA, Villanova University.

Yes, that’s the abridged list. In case you were wondering if you should visit a subject librarian before collecting research for your next term paper: yes, you should. Poley, and indeed all of our subject librarians, work tirelessly to keep up-to-date on current events, research, and research methodologies.

Darren Poley resize

(This is what Darren Poley looks like, in case you go looking for him.)

They also keep tabs on the library collection and can direct you to books and journals available either here at the Falvey or through the library’s databases. I asked Poley: what library resources are available for students to learn about the prospects of and strategies for promoting piece in the Middle East?

He suggested looking at the Theology & Religious Studies and Cultural Studies subject guides and reading one, some, or all of the following:

For some students, including me, starting to read up on Middle Eastern Christianity would be difficult without some background on Middle Eastern geopolitics. I submitted the same question to Poley about library resources for looking at the geopolitical landscape of the Middle East. He suggested starting with the Political Science Subject Guide and the History Subject Guide, but also directed me to these books:

Mary Queen of Peace

(Mary Queen of Peace)

Speaking of the UN’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Poley said, “So in the middle of the 20th century, perhaps the bloodiest in history so far in terms of wars and other violence, people of good will came together to publically declare among other tenets that freedom of conscience and religion is a basic human right.” Described as “timely and riveting” by the university’s poster, this conference may be an excellent opportunity for the Villanova community to validate these tenets.


Website photo 2

Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant on the Communications and Marketing Team at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.

 


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Before you vote on Tuesday, check this out! Lots of good information on candidates.

BallotReady resize

Would you like to have a sample ballot before you vote? Are you still uncertain about some candidates or what referendums might be on your ballot?

Janice Bially Mattern, Social Sciences and Data Services librarian, provided this fascinating, informative (and addictive) website < https://www.ballotready.org/> for BallotReady.

“Every candidate and referendum, explained.” “Know what you are voting for by researching every name and issue on the ballot with BallotReady.” (website) “We founded BallotReady because we believe that no one should have to guess or leave blanks on their ballot. … [BallotReady] was founded as the movement to create a more informed democracy.” (email)

To get started with BallotReady, type in your home (voting) address and click “Get Started.” A list of offices which will be on your ballot appears, beginning with President of the United States and moving down in order of rank, ending with whatever referendums are on your local ballot. Click on the office you are interested in; for example, I selected President of the United States and four candidates – Democratic, Republican, Libertarian and Green – appeared, each in a box with a small photograph and a brief biography. At the top of the page are places you click to bring up a candidate’s stance (numerous topics here-education, economy, etc.), endorsements (publications, organizations), and news (articles with sources and publication dates). After reading available information, select “Add to my ballot” for the candidate you choose. After creating an account you can either print or email your list of chosen candidates and how you want to vote on any referendums. I found the explanation of the referendum (retirement age for judges) on my ballot very helpful because the language used is misleading.

Unfortunately, BallotReady does not work for all states. It is currently available for Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, Nevada, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Virginia.

For information about Social Sciences or Data Services, contact Janice Bially Mattern, room 229, 610-519-5391.

 


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It’s Open Access Week! Here’s how to find great OA journals to publish with

It’s Open Access Week, a global event organized to promote free online access to scholarship.  Research funders are increasingly mandating that underlying research data and articles for sponsored research are made available via open access.  Some universities have adopted open access policies encouraging or requiring faculty to deposit their scholarship in open access archives.  Many scholars are motivated to publish in open access forums for a range of moral (open access advances science and innovations) and self- interested reasons (open access results increases readership and impact via citations).

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Falvey Memorial Library supports faculty interested in publishing in open access journals via the SOAR fund and provides assistance with identifying reputable open access journals.  Your liaison librarian is able to guide you through these sources designed for finding high quality open access journals.


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The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) is an international organization dedicated to advancing open access and best practices in scholarly publishing.  It maintains a browseable and searchable list of open access peer reviewed journals.  The DOAJ doesn’t include so called hybrid open access journals that are subscription based but make individual articles open access in exchange for significant article processing charges.  Only true, sometimes called “gold”, open access journals with creative commons licenses, allowing authors to retain copyright and users to read, copy, download and reuse without significant restrictions are included.


Cabell’s Directory of Publishing Opportunities is a bespoke database for academic authors seeking just the right journal outlet for their scholarship.  The Falvey Library subscription includes the education, nursing, business and psychology modules.  Authors can use check offs and slides to find journals by topic, acceptance rates, time to review, time to publication, review type, impact factor and of course by gold open access.


SCOPUS

SCOPUS, Elsevier’s multidisciplinary search engine, provides multiple pathways for finding open access journals.  From the Source tool you can browse journals by subject and limit to open access or you can do keyword searches in journal titles and limit to open access.  To find cross disciplinary open access journals, searching Scopus on the article level and scanning the results to see which journals in the results list are labeled “open access” is another effective approach.  Scopus also provides journal level metrics and tools for comparing custom build lists of journals.


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Similarly, Web of Science, the Thomson competitor to Elsevier’s SCOPUS, has an open access check off on the article search results screen.  The Impact Factor, perhaps the gold standard for journal metrics, is only provided for titles included in the Journal Citation Report.


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Checking Beall’s List of “potential, possible or probably predatory publishers” is a must for any to do list for finding and evaluating open access journals.  In short, Beall’s list is a curated, vetted list of where NOT to publish.  Jeffrey Beall, a librarian passionate about integrity in scholarly communication, conceived of and maintains the list.   Beall’s criteria for inclusion in the list is inspired by theCommittee on Publishers Ethics’ (COPE) Code of Conduct for Journal Publishersand the Principles of Transparency and Best Practices in Scholarly Publishing.  To apply similar criteria to a journal that is a promising candidate for publication try the Think Check Submit website.


Whether or not you choose to publish in an open access journal depends on many factors including whether the journal will reach your intended audience, handles the publication process in a timely businesslike manner, the availability of funding for article processing fees, and not least, tenure and promotion committee attitudes.  If you’d like a sounding board and assistance identifying reputable open access journals your liaison librarian is here to help.


Linda Hauck resize 2Article by Linda Hauck, MS, MBA, business librarian and team coordinator for the Business Research team.


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Awaken your mind & fill your soul by celebrating the Humanities on Friday afternoon!

HUM_PROG

 

Studying the Humanities at Villanova will fill your life with meaning and purpose; it’ll awaken your mind and fill your soul.  But did you also know that a degree in the Humanities — we’re talking Theology, Philosophy, Humanities, English, History, and Language — is coveted by our nation’s top employers? The skills you cultivate by studying the humanities – critical thinking and analysis, communication, writing, presenting, etc. – are sought after by our nation’s premier employers.

At this fun and informative event, you’ll learn about Villanova’s degree programs in the Humanities; talk to wonderful students, faculty, and staff in those disciplines; eat great food; laugh and smile; and learn many new things! Join us on Friday, October 21, from 1 to 4 PM, for an afternoon of excellent conversation and fun! Learn more about the Humanities and how earning a degree can help you build a meaningful, fulfilling life.


Nik-Fogle-crNikolaus Fogle, PhD. is the Philosophy librarian and Philosophy, Theology and Humanities team coordinator. Don’t miss his presentation on “The Library of the Future” at 3:30 during the Humanities Day presentations.

 


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Call: 2017 Westminster Institute for Advances Studies-International Research Fellowships in Critical Digital & Social Media Studies

Call: 2017 Westminster Institute for Advances Studies-International Research Fellowships in Critical Digital & Social Media Studies

https://www.westminster.ac.uk/news/2016/call-for-applications-wias-international-research-fellowships-in-critical-digital-and-social-media-studies-2017

http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AUN132/westminster-institute-for-advanced-studies-international-research-fellowships-in-critical-digital-and-social-media-studies-2017-call-for-applications/

The Westminster Institute for Advanced Studies (WIAS) www.westminster.ac.uk/wias is an academic space for independent critical thinking beyond borders. It is located at the University of Westminster in the heart of London. Prof Christian Fuchs is its Director. The WIAS’ research focus is critical digital and social media studies.

The Westminster Institute for Advanced Studies has an open call for international resarch fellows who during a 3 month stay in 2017 conduct critical studies of digital and social media’s role in society.

The WIAS aims to contribute to bringing about a paradigm shift from big data analytics to critical digital and social media research methods and theories. Digital and social media research at WIAS uses and develops critical theories, is profoundly theoretical, and discusses the political relevance and implications of the studied topics.

The WIAS’ Critical Digital and Social Media Studies Fellowship Programme is aimed at current and future research leaders, who engage in independent critical thinking. It enables them to undertake independent and collaborative research on original topics in a stimulating academic environment in London.

Funded scholarships are only awarded as a result of open calls. Priority will be given to well-defined projects. The regular scholarship duration is 3 months (start between 9 January and 1 May 2017). Later start dates are not possible.

Application deadline: Friday October 28, 2016

More information, details and application:

https://www.westminster.ac.uk/news/2016/call-for-applications-wias-international-research-fellowships-in-critical-digital-and-social-media-studies-2017


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Want to Know More About the Olympics? Here is the Place to Start

Rio 2016 jpgIf you read Merrill Stein’s recent blog, “Next Best Thing to Being There! Great Links to the Games of the XXXI Olympiad, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil,” or have been watching or reading the news about the summer Olympics and have questions, Falvey’s collection can provide answers. This “Dig Deeper” features only part of our collection of books about the Olympics. And don’t forget, our very knowledgeable reference librarians (Ask a Librarian) are here to help you find materials. Or you may visit their offices on the second floor of Falvey.

Dig Deeper:

History of the Ancient Games:

The Ancient Olympic Games” (1984)

The Ancient Olympic Games” (1966)

The Ancient Olympics” (2004)

The Story of the Olympic Games, 776 B.C.” (1973)

 

Women and the Olympic Games:

Grace and Glory:  A Century of Women in the Olympics” (1996)

Their Day in the Sun:  Women of the 1932 Olympics” (1996)

When the Girls Came Out to Play:  The Birth of American Sportswear” (2006)

Women’s Sport and Spectacle:  Gendered Television Coverage and the Olympic Games” (1998)

 

Other aspects of the Games:

The First Modern Olympics” (1976)

Global Olympics: Historical and Sociological Studies of the Modern Games ” (2005)

100 Greatest Moments in Olympic History” (1995)

All That Glitters Is Not Gold:  The Olympic Game” (1972)

Historical Dictionary of the Modern Olympic Movement” (1996)

 

 


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Check Out the Works of Alvin Toffler, Futurist, in Falvey

Alvin Toffler Photo by Vern Evans/Creative Commons

Alvin Toffler
Photo by Vern Evans/Creative Commons

Alvin Toffler, a futurist and author of ten books, but most famous for Future Shock, died on June 27 at age 87. The son of Polish immigrants living in Brooklyn, N.Y., he knew that he wanted to be a writer when he was only seven years old. He graduated from New York University as an English major and held various jobs including several years with Fortune magazine before becoming a freelance writer.

Toffler wrote his first book, Future Shock (1970), after five years of research. Future Shock sold millions of copies, was translated into numerous languages, made its author famous, and is still in print.

Farhad Manoo says, “It is fitting that his death occurred in a period of weeks characterized by one example of madness after another … It would be facile to attribute any one of these events to future shock. Yet … it seems clear that his diagnosis [in Future Shock] has largely panned out, with local and global crises arising daily from our collective inability to deal with ever-faster change.”

Dig Deeper:

Farhad Manjoo. “Why We Need to Pick Up Alvin Toffler’s Torch.” New York Times, July 7, 2016.

Obituary

Toffler Biography

 

Books by Alvin Toffler:

Adaptive Corporation resizeThe Adaptive Corporation (1985)

 

 

Creating a New Civilization resizeCreating a New Civilization:  The Politics of the Third Wave (1995)

 

 

Culture Consumers resizeThe Culture Consumers:  A Study of Art and Affluence in America (1964)

 

 

Future shock resizeFuture Shock (1970)

 

 

Learning for Tomorrow resizeLearning for Tomorrow:  The Role of the Future in Education (1974)

 

 

Power Shift resizePowershift:  Knowledge, Wealth, and Violence at the Edge of the 21st Century (1990)

 

 

Third Wave resizeThe Third Wave (1980)

 


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Call for abstracts: The science of evolution and the evolution of the sciences

Call for abstracts: The science of evolution and the evolution of the sciences

We invite submissions for papers to be presented at a two-day conference on The science of evolution and the evolution of the sciences, which will be held in Leuven, Belgium on the 12th and 13th October 2016.

Submissions should take the form of a 500-word abstract. Submissions on any aspect of the evolution of scientific theories are welcome, but contributions with a clear link to digital humanities are especially encouraged.

Aims and scope of the conference:

One of the longstanding debates in history and philosophy of science concerns how the sciences develop. Thomas Kuhn famously emphasized the role of scientific revolutions and so-called paradigm shifts. Other philosophers, including Karl Popper and David Hull, have offered a Darwinian account of the process of science. In their view, scientists create conjectures about the way the world works, and these conjectures undergo a process of selection as they are tested against the world. This is analogized with biological evolution: mutation and recombination creates novelty in the biological world, which then undergoes natural selection, driving adaptive evolution. In this conference, we will reexamine these ideas using new tools from cultural evolutionary theory and the digital humanities.

This conference explores recent attempts to move beyond mere qualitative theorizing about scientific cultures and their evolution and centers on the the question of the extent to which we can make quantitative predictions, extract quantitative data, or build quantitative models of and about scientific evolution over time. In addition to numerical models of cultural evolution drawn from the evolutionary sciences, quantitative data are also being extracted in the digital humanities. Cultural products like academic journal articles can be algorithmically mined in order to understand this body of work in a new light, offering data to help test hypothesis about scientific changes. By bringing together researchers with a common interest but with different disciplinary backgrounds and toolboxes, we hope to inspire cross-fertilization and new collaborations.

Questions addressed at this conference include:

*  What novel predictions do Darwinian accounts of science offer?

*  How can we test these predictions?

*  Can new work in the digital humanities, such as the automated mining and analysis of the scientific literature, shed light on Darwinian accounts of science?

*  Do formal evolutionary models or (quantitative) textual analyses permit a systematic approach to empirical issues in the realism-instrumentalism debate?

Keynote speakers:

Charles Pence (Louisiana State University)

Kimmo Eriksson (Mälardalen University and Stockholm University)

Mia Ridge (British Library)

Simon DeDeo (Indiana University & the Santa Fe Institute)

Abstracts must be received no later than June 7. Inquiries and abstracts should be directed to the conference organizers, Andreas De Block and Grant Ramsey, at the following addresses:

Andreas.deblock@hiw.kuleuven.be and grant@theramseylab.org

The conference receives financial support from the Institute of Philosophy (KU Leuven) and the FWO (Flemish Research Council).

_______________________

Grant Ramsey

www.theramseylab.org

grant@theramseylab.org

+1 574.344.0284


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CFP: Libraries and Archives in the Anthropocene: A Colloquium at NYU

Call for Proposals

Libraries and Archives in the Anthropocene: A Colloquium
May 13-14, 2017
New York University

As stewards of a culture’s collective knowledge, libraries and archives are facing the realities of cataclysmic environmental change with a dawning awareness of its unique implications for their missions and activities. Some professionals in these fields are focusing new energies on the need for environmentally sustainable practices in their institutions. Some are prioritizing the role of libraries and archives in supporting climate change communication and influencing government policy and public awareness. Others foresee an inevitable unraveling of systems and ponder the role of libraries and archives in a world much different from the one we take for granted. Climate disruption, peak oil, toxic waste, deforestation, soil salinity and agricultural crisis, depletion of groundwater and other natural resources, loss of biodiversity, mass migration, sea level rise, and extreme weather events are all problems that indirectly threaten to overwhelm civilization’s knowledge infrastructures, and present information institutions with unprecedented challenges.

This colloquium will serve as a space to explore these challenges and establish directions for future efforts and investigations. We invite proposals from academics, librarians, archivists, activists, and others.

Some suggested topics and questions:

  • How can information institutions operate more sustainably?
  • How can information institutions better serve the needs of policy discussions and public awareness in the area of climate change and other threats to the environment?
  • How can information institutions support skillsets and technologies that are relevant following systemic unraveling?
  • What will information work look like without the infrastructures we take for granted?
  • How does information literacy instruction intersect with ecoliteracy?
  • How can information professionals support radical environmental activism?
  • What are the implications of climate change for disaster preparedness?
  • What role do information workers have in addressing issues of environmental justice?
  • What are the implications of climate change for preservation practices?
  • Should we question the wisdom of preserving access to the technological cultural legacy that has led to the crisis?
  • Is there a new responsibility to document, as a mode of bearing witness, the historical event of society’s confrontation with the systemic threat of climate change, peak oil, and other environmental problems?
  • Given the ideological foundations of libraries and archives in Enlightenment thought, and given that Enlightenment civilization may be leading to its own environmental endpoint, are these ideological foundations called into question? And with what consequences?

Formats:
Lightning talk (5 minutes)
Paper (20 minutes)

Proposals are due August 1, 2016.
Notifications of acceptance will be sent by September 16, 2016.
Submit your proposal here: http://goo.gl/forms/rz7uN1mBNM

Planning committee:

 


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Last Modified: April 12, 2016