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Advent Poetry Calendar – Day 15 – “Gaudete”

ADVENT-DAY-15 resize

“Gaudete” is the Latin word for “rejoice.” Gaudete is theme of the third Sunday of Advent. This poem was submitted by Alice Bampton, a member of the Communications and Marketing Dept. in Falvey.

Gaudete by Brad Reynolds, S.J.

Because Christmas is almost here

Because dancing fits so well with music

Because inside baby clothes are miracles.

Gaudete

Because some people love you

Because of chocolate

Because pain does not last forever

Because Santa Claus is coming.

Gaudete

Because of laughter

Because there really are angels

Because your fingers fit your hands

Because forgiveness is yours for the asking

Because of children

Because of parents.

Gaudete

Because the blind see.

And the lame walk.

Gaudete

Because lepers are clean

And the deaf hear.

Gaudete

Because of Christmas

Because of Jesus

You rejoice.

 

 


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Dig Deeper: Christians in the Contemporary Middle East Conference

Nova Conference: Middle East

Villanova University will host a conference on Dec. 5-6 titled Christians in the Contemporary Middle East: Religious Minorities and the Struggle for Secular Nationalism and Citizenship. With such wonderful speakers attending as Retired General Anthony Charles Zinni (USMC) and Ussama Makdisi of Rice University, the conference promises some elucidating conversation.

For a conference on such a particular subject, the presentations will cover a diverse range of topics. Attendees will hear such intriguing talks as “Christian Contributions to Art, Culture and Literature in the Arab-Islamic World” and “The Impact of the Shia-Sunni Political Struggle and Future Strategies for Christians and Other Minorities in the Middle East.”

Specialized lectures such as these sometimes require a little bit of background information, and some students may be wondering the relevance of these topics to their lives or academic development. I had similar questions and concerns and brought them up with Assistant Director of Academic Integration and Theology Librarian Darren Poley.

Screen Shot 2016-12-01 at 2.20.58 PM

(Cover of illustrated edition of Universal Declaration of Human Rights from website below)

 

“Religious liberty is not just an American or even an exclusively Western concept,” he began. “Freedom to practice one’s faith or belief system is an intrinsically human desire.”

Poley recommends taking a look at the UN’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights if you’re interested in why the Villanova University should be concerned about the Middle East. It’s available here, and Poley reminds you, “especially since we live in an increasingly interconnected and globalized society: no one can afford to ignore any lack of respect for people, property, social justice or the integrity of creation anywhere in the world.”

Dig Deeper by investing these associations, centers and initiatives for social justice:

“It surprises most students to learn that the Middle East and North African were predominantly Christian lands for the centuries between the official toleration of Christianity in the Roman Empire in the 4th century and the rise of Islam in the 7th century,” Poley continued.

Cartouche

(Villanova University’s Arabic Cartouche)

It’s important for Villanova students to think about the decline of pluralistic spaces in the Middle East because so many of these early Christian societies remain today, albeit under different leadership and sometimes different names.

“Nestorian Christians in the Middle East established themselves in the 5th century and continue as the Assyrian Church of the East.” Poley highlighted, and “there are many different Eastern Orthodox churches often along ethnic or national lines that are affiliated with the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, a Turkish citizen who resides in Istanbul.”

Patriarchate Banner

(Banner for the Ecumenical Patriarchate – website below)

In addition, there are Catholics outside of the Latin Rite tradition. The Maronites of Lebanon, the Chaldeans of Iraq, and the Melkites from Syria, Jordan and Israel represent the largest groups of such.

Poley said, “There are also small groups of Christians in the Middle East with doctrinal differences from either the Catholic of the Eastern Orthodox churches, which are collectively called the Oriental Orthodox churches; the three major ones being the Syrian, Armenian, and Coptic (Egyptian).”

Despite the complexity of their histories, you may find statistics and information on the individuals and groups of Christians who continue to “live, work, worship, and coexist alongside Muslims and Jews in Middle Eastern countries,” according to Poley, at these websites:

An encyclopedia of knowledge on the topic, Poley provided me with an exhaustive list of thinkers, theologians and writers who have promoted religious diversity in the Middle East. I’ve included just a few of those thinkers below so that you may familiarize yourself with them before the conference:

  • Saint Pope John Paul II
  • Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI
  • Eastern Orthodox Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I
  • Catholic Patriarch Emeritus of Jerusalem Michel Sabbah
  • Latin Patriarchal Vicar for Jerusalem and Palestine William Shomali
  • Melkite Archbishop George Wadih Bakouni
  • Antiochian Orthodox Bishop George Khodr
  • Coptic Orthodox Bishop Barnibas El Soryany
  • Armenian Bishop of Damascus Armash Nalbandian
  • Father Kail C. Ellis, OSA, Villanova University.

Yes, that’s the abridged list. In case you were wondering if you should visit a subject librarian before collecting research for your next term paper: yes, you should. Poley, and indeed all of our subject librarians, work tirelessly to keep up-to-date on current events, research, and research methodologies.

Darren Poley resize

(This is what Darren Poley looks like, in case you go looking for him.)

They also keep tabs on the library collection and can direct you to books and journals available either here at the Falvey or through the library’s databases. I asked Poley: what library resources are available for students to learn about the prospects of and strategies for promoting piece in the Middle East?

He suggested looking at the Theology & Religious Studies and Cultural Studies subject guides and reading one, some, or all of the following:

For some students, including me, starting to read up on Middle Eastern Christianity would be difficult without some background on Middle Eastern geopolitics. I submitted the same question to Poley about library resources for looking at the geopolitical landscape of the Middle East. He suggested starting with the Political Science Subject Guide and the History Subject Guide, but also directed me to these books:

Mary Queen of Peace

(Mary Queen of Peace)

Speaking of the UN’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Poley said, “So in the middle of the 20th century, perhaps the bloodiest in history so far in terms of wars and other violence, people of good will came together to publically declare among other tenets that freedom of conscience and religion is a basic human right.” Described as “timely and riveting” by the university’s poster, this conference may be an excellent opportunity for the Villanova community to validate these tenets.


Website photo 2

Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant on the Communications and Marketing Team at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.

 


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Dig Deeper: Kerbel talks Election

On Thursday, Nov. 17, Political Science Department Chair Matthew R. Kerbel will visit the Falvey Memorial Library to give a talk about moving forward after this year’s turbulent presidential election. His background in studying the effects of media on American politics make him eminently qualified to be dissecting this year’s contest between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

Kerbel on 6ABC

Kerbel appearing on a local media station (courtesy of 6abc.com)

In 1999, Kerbel wrote, “We are prompted to think about the political system as the journalist tells us about it, as a place filled with people of dubious character bent on image manipulation at all costs. It becomes a challenge for us to sort our political information in the news from messages about the political system conveyed along with the facts–to learn about politics without acquiring an attitude.”

Written almost two decades ago, these words contain an even more powerful truth in today’s world. From his “Remote & Controlled: Media Politics in a Cynical Age,” this insight demonstrates Kerbel’s keen eye for the nuances of contemporary political discourse, a discourse which has shifted dramatically during Kerbel’s 30-year career.

Of course, Kerbel’s expertise on American Politics, the Presidency, and the media go back before the 1990s. Early in his career, he published on the presidency of Gerald Ford. In this piece he argued that a president’s news exposure varies with the political climate. He continued his research throughout the ’90s, even scoring coverage by Villanova’s own newspaper, the Villanovan in 1992:

Kerbel Villanovan

Based on the research discussed in this article, Kerbel published his “Edited for Television: CNN, ABC, and the 1992 Presidential Campaign.” He followed this book up with a number of books throughout the ’90s and early 2000s; he’s credited on all of the following:

These resources, available through the Falvey Memorial Library, will give you an excellent glimpse into Kerbel’s background as a scholar. He also maintains a blog called “Wolves and Sheep,” where he discusses current political issues in relatively short posts.

Whether you’ve been feeling confused and scared, or vindicated and elated by this year’s election, Kerbel’s talk, today at 1pm in Speakers’ Corner, will be the right place to find some answers about moving forward.


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2016 Election Retrospective: What Happened—And What Happens Now?

PRES KERBEL2

2016 US Presidential Election Series Lecture: Dr. Matthew R. Kerbel presents “2016 Election Retrospective: What Happened—And What Happens Now?”


When:

Thursday, November 17th, 2016, at 1:00 PM

Where:

Speakers’ Corner

Event Description:

Please join us on Thursday, November 17 at 1:00 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner of Falvey Memorial Library for a talk about the 2016 United States presidential election. Matthew R. Kerbel, PhD, Professor and Chair, Department of Political Science, will analyze the election results (presidential, congressional and state) and talk about the implications for politics and policy-making during the first months of the upcoming presidential term. He will also touch on President Obama’s legacy. His talk is titled, “2016 Election Retrospective: What Happened—And What Happens Now?”

Dr. Kerbel is a well-known expert on political communication – the use of traditional media such as radio, television and newspapers, and new media such as social media, blogs and web sites. Kerbel has been a television and radio writer for the Public Broadcasting Service. He is often interviewed about political communication and serves as an expert source for the Constitution Center.

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of Political Science, is free and open to the public.

Dig Deeper:  Selected Books by Dr. Kerbel in Falvey’s Collection

Beyond Persuasion: Organizational Efficiency and Presidential Power (1991).

Choosing a President: The Electoral College and Beyond (2002).

Edited for Television: CNN, ABC, and American Presidential Elections (1998).

The Elections of 2000 (2001). 

Get This Party Started: How Progressives Can Fight Back and Win (2006).

If It Bleeds, It Leads: An Anatomy of Television News (2000)

iPolitics: Citizens, Elections, and Governing in the New Media Age (2012).

Party On!: Political Parties from Hamilton and Jefferson to Today’s Networked Age (with John Kenneth White) (2012).

 


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Before you vote on Tuesday, check this out! Lots of good information on candidates.

BallotReady resize

Would you like to have a sample ballot before you vote? Are you still uncertain about some candidates or what referendums might be on your ballot?

Janice Bially Mattern, Social Sciences and Data Services librarian, provided this fascinating, informative (and addictive) website < https://www.ballotready.org/> for BallotReady.

“Every candidate and referendum, explained.” “Know what you are voting for by researching every name and issue on the ballot with BallotReady.” (website) “We founded BallotReady because we believe that no one should have to guess or leave blanks on their ballot. … [BallotReady] was founded as the movement to create a more informed democracy.” (email)

To get started with BallotReady, type in your home (voting) address and click “Get Started.” A list of offices which will be on your ballot appears, beginning with President of the United States and moving down in order of rank, ending with whatever referendums are on your local ballot. Click on the office you are interested in; for example, I selected President of the United States and four candidates – Democratic, Republican, Libertarian and Green – appeared, each in a box with a small photograph and a brief biography. At the top of the page are places you click to bring up a candidate’s stance (numerous topics here-education, economy, etc.), endorsements (publications, organizations), and news (articles with sources and publication dates). After reading available information, select “Add to my ballot” for the candidate you choose. After creating an account you can either print or email your list of chosen candidates and how you want to vote on any referendums. I found the explanation of the referendum (retirement age for judges) on my ballot very helpful because the language used is misleading.

Unfortunately, BallotReady does not work for all states. It is currently available for Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, Nevada, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Virginia.

For information about Social Sciences or Data Services, contact Janice Bially Mattern, room 229, 610-519-5391.

 


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Dig Deeper: John R. Johannes, Ph.D., Kicks Off Presidential Election Lecture Series

You walk into your first day of class for the semester, sit down with your Holy Grounds cup of joe, and curiously await the arrival of your professor. An energetic gentleman walks in with an enthusiastic smile and tells you that you’ll be graded on a debate later this semester, claiming that it will be fun to become an expert. If he also says that you will be guided through the material by a professor cum coach and makes it clear that the responsibility for learning is yours, then, chances are, you’ve walked into Professor John R. Johannes’ survey course on American Politics.

This pedagogical ethos makes him the perfect candidate to give the premiere talk (at 1pm on Wednesday, Oct. 26) of the Falvey Memorial Library’s US Presidential Election Lecture Series. You may be thinking that you’ve heard all there is to know about the stakes of the current election. You may be thinking, “Yeah, yeah, I get it. I have to get out and vote.” Not so fast, according to Johannes’ recent book Thinking About Political Reform: How to Fix, or not Fix, American Government Politicsthere are two sides to the eligible voter participation debate.

"Thinking about Political Reform."

The cover of Johannes’
“Thinking about Political Reform.”

Johannes writes in his book that “members of a democratic society who work, pay taxes, serve in the military, help their neighbors, and so on have, as fundamental to the notion of a political community, both a right and responsibility to vote… on the other hand, many citizens recoil from compulsion, doubt the efficacy of incentives, and worry about abuse.” Passages like these in Thinking About Political Reform demonstrate Johannes’ acumen for seeing and articulating both sides of a political debate.

Johannes’ attention to such detail was developed over an academic and professional career that started with graduating summa cum laude from Marquette University in 1966. After receiving his Ph.D. from Harvard in the early ’70s, Johannes began teaching at Marquette where he stayed until 1995. During his time at Marquette, he served as department chair of the Political Science Department and as the Dean of Arts & Sciences. He also received a number of grants to author and publish his own pieces, many of which dealing with the US Congress.

In 1995, Johannes joined us here at Villanova as our Vice President for Academic Affairs. Since then he has also taught classes in the Political Science Department. He served as a member in the Philadelphia Economy League Task Force on the Knowledge Industry from 2000-2002. Then he worked with and served as chair for the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, where he still serves as commissioner.

Dr. Johannes

Dr. Johannes poses for a photo.

A blog post like the present piece hardly leaves room to mention his time spent as an editorial board member for the American Journal of Political Science and the Legislative Studies Quarterly, his experience with several political science associations, or his summers spent as a visiting professor at Harvard. A full list of Johannes’ achievements, accomplishments and honors can be found on his webpage.

The point of telling you all of this is to show the qualifications of a man who has dedicated his life to teaching political science and has dedicated a large portion of his career to improving the Villanova University community. On Wednesday, Oct. 26 at 1 pm, Johannes will continue his dedication by giving us Wildcats the chance to learn a thing or two about the direction of our country, focusing specifically on Congressional elections. We’ll see you at 1 pm in Speakers’ Corner.


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Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant on the Communications and Marketing Team at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.

 


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Is Hillary Rodham Clinton the First Female Presidential Candidate?

Image courtesy of nbcnews.com

Image courtesy of nbcnews.com

Today, Oct. 26, is Hillary Rodham Clinton’s sixty ninth birthday. Clinton served as a U.S. Senator from 2001-2009; she was the first lady, married to President Bill Clinton, from 1993-2001. She first ran for president in 2008, but lost the nomination to Barack Obama. Now the 2016 Democratic candidate for president, she has attracted attention for numerous reasons including the fact that she is a female running for the office that has always been held by a male. But is she the first female to run for the office of president of the United States? In recent times two women have been nominated for vice president:  Sarah Palin as the Republican candidate in 2008 and Geraldine Ferraro as the Democratic candidate in 1984. But what about presidential candidates?

Detail of Mathew Brady photograph

Detail of Mathew Brady photo

In 1872 Victoria Claflin Woodhull (1838-1927) ran for president as the candidate for the Equal Rights Party. She is the first woman to run for the office. Her opposing candidates were Ulysses S. Grant, Republican candidate and former Civil War Union general, and Horace Greeley, Democratic candidate. Although she obviously lost the race, she did found her own newspaper, she fought for women’s rights and she owned a Wall Street investment firm – all impressive accomplishments for a woman in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Belva Ann Bennett Lockwood (1830-1917), a lawyer, ran for president twice (1884 and 1888) as the Equal Rights Party candidate. In 1884 she ran against Grover Cleveland, Democrat, and James G. Blaine, Republican. In 1888 she ran against Cleveland (Democrat) and Benjamin Harrison (Republican). Lockwood was the first woman lawyer to practice before the Supreme Court; she drafted the law which was passed by Congress enabling women to do so.

US Senate photo

US Senate photo

Margaret Chase Smith (1897-1995) is the first woman nominated for president by a major political party; she was a Republican candidate in 1964, but removed her name from the ballot after the first round of voting. Smith served in the House of Representatives for four terms beginning in 1940. She became a senator in 1948 and served there for four terms.

 

 

Image from Library of Congress

Image from Library of Congress

Shirley Anita Chisholm (1924-2005), the first African American woman to run for president, actively campaigning nationwide as a Democratic candidate. At the 1972 Democratic National Convention she received more than 150 delegate votes. Chisholm is the first African American woman to serve in Congress; she served from 1969 until 1968.

 

 

US Congress photograph

US Congress photograph

The same year-1972- as Chisholm ran for president, Patsy Takemoto Mink (1927-2002) ran as an anti-war candidate in the Oregon Democratic presidential primary election. Mink, a Japanese American lawyer from Hawaii, served in Congress 1965-1977 and 1990-2002.

 

 

Ellen McCormack resizeEllen McCormack (1926-2011) ran for president twice, 1976 and 1980, as an anti-abortion candidate for the Democratic party. McCormack was the first female candidate to qualify for federal campaign matching funds (which she mostly used to fund anti-abortion television commercials).

 

 Johnson resizeSonia Johnson (b.1936), an English professor and a Mormon (Church of Latter Day Saints), organized “Mormons for ERA (Equal Rights Amendment)” with other women after the Mormon Church opposed the passage of the ERA. Congress had passed the ERA and sent it to state legislatures for their ratifications. The church then excommunicated her. In 1984 two political parties, the U.S. Citizens Party and the Peace and Freedom Party, nominated Johnson, making her the first third-party candidate to qualify for matching funds, but she found it difficult to get on the primary election ballots in most states and her campaign failed.

US Congress portrait

US Congress portrait

Four years later in 1988, Patricia S. Schroeder (b.1940), a Democrat and lawyer, began her campaign for the presidency. She soon dropped out of the race before the primary elections because she was unable to raise sufficient funds.  Schroeder was a Congress woman; she ultimately served for twenty four years.

 

 

NWHM photograph

NWHM photograph

Lenora Fulani (b.1950), an African American born in Chester, Pa., ran for president twice, in 1988 and 1992, as the candidate of the New Alliance Party. She and the New Alliance Party were interested in ending our two-party system. In 1998 Fulani became “the first woman and the first African American to appear on the ballot in all fifty states and the District of Columbia.” Although the number of votes she received was small they were, nevertheless, the most votes received by a female presidential candidate in a general election. In 1992 Fulani ran again; this was the year that Bill Clinton won the presidential election.

 

US Senate photograph

US Senate photograph

Elizabeth Hanford Dole (b. 1936), with a MA in education and a law degree, was president of the American Red Cross from 1991-January 1999; she resigned to run for the Republican presidential nomination, but dropped out in October 1999. Dole campaigned for her husband, Robert Dole, during his campaign for the vice presidency in 1976 and his two attempts at the presidency, 1979 and 1987. Elizabeth Hanford Dole served three terms as the first female senator from North Carolina, 2002-2009.

 

Braun resizeCarol Moseley Braun (b. 1947) is a lawyer who worked in the Chicago offices of the Justice Department. She is the first African American woman to be elected (1992) to the U.S. Senate from Illinois. There she was the first woman member of the Senate Finance Committee and the Judiciary Committee.  Before becoming a Senator she had served in the Illinois House of Representatives. President Bill Clinton appointed her as ambassador to New Zealand, Samoa and the Cook Islands; this role ended when George W. Bush became president in 2001.  In September 2003 she announced that she was running for president, but had difficulty raising campaign funds and dropped out of the race in January 2004.

US govt. photograph

US govt. photograph

Michele Bachmann (b.1956) made a brief run for the presidency in 2012. A lawyer, she is a conservative activist and a founder of the Tea Party Caucus in Congress in 2010. Bachmann was elected to the Minnesota state senate in 2000; in 2006 she was elected to the U.S. Congress and became a prominent critic of President Obama. Bachmann is the first Republican Congresswoman for Minnesota. She announced her presidential candidacy in 2011, but her campaign failed to achieve the nomination. Her term in Congress ended in January 2015.

CNN photograph

CNN photograph

Carly Fiorina (b. 1954) is a business woman, best known for her role as the CEO of Hewlett-Packard, where in 1999 she became the first woman to head a Fortune 50 business. She was forced to resign from HP and then served in a variety of government positions. As a Republican Fiorina ran for the U.S. Senate in 2010, but lost to the Democratic candidate, Barbara Boxer. In May 2015 she announced that she would run for the 2016 presidential nomination. However, as we know, she lost.

This brings us to the current candidate for the presidency, Hillary Rodham Clinton. Clinton, a lawyer like many of the previous candidates, ran for president in 2008 and lost the nomination to Barack Obama. She is running again as the Democratic candidate; her Republican opponent is Donald Trump.

There have also been women vice presidential candidates. In addition to Sarah Palin and Geraldine Ferraro, Frances “Sissy” Farenthold, Toni Nathan and Winona LaDuke also ran for that office, but they are another story.

 

Dig Deeper:

First but not the Last:  Women Who Ran for President.” National Women’s History Museum online exhibit.

Women Presidential and Vice Presidential Candidates:  A Selected List.” Rutgers University CAWP Presidential Watch.

The Women Who Ran for President.” Jo Freeman.

 

Dig Deeper (Individuals):

Victoria Claflin Woodhull (Falvey has many more books on Woodhull than these few listed here.)

Selected Writings of Victoria Woodhull:  Suffrage, Free Love, and Eugenics. (2010). Victoria C. Woodhull.

Free Woman:  The Life and Times of Victoria Woodhull. (1976). Marion Meade.

Notorious Victoria:  The Life of Victoria Woodhull, Uncensored. (1998). Mary Gabriel.

 

Margaret Chase Smith

Margaret Chase Smith:  Model Public Servant. (1998). Marlene Boyd Vallin.

No Place for a Woman:  A Life of Senator Margaret Chase Smith. (2000). Janann Sherman.

Politics of Conscience:  A Biography of Margaret Chase Smith. (1995). Patricia Ward Wallace.

 

Shirley Anita Chisholm

African-American Orators:  A Bio-Critical Sourcebook. (1996).

The Columbia Documentary History of American Women Since 1941. (2003)

 

Patsy Takemoto Mink

Distinguished Asian Americans:  A Biographical Dictionary. (1999).

 

Lenora Fulani

African-American Orators:  A Bio-Critical Sourcebook. (1996)

 

Elizabeth Hanford Dole

Elizabeth Hanford Dole:  Speaking from the Heart. (2004). Molly Meijer Wertheimer.

 

For help finding information about the other candidates, please contact our reference librarians: Merrill Stein resize 2Merrill.Stein – political science subject librarian or

 

 

 

CORRECTION: Merrill Stein is no longer the political science subject librarian.

 

Janice Headshot   Janice Bially Mattern – political science and data services librarian

Or

Jutta resize

 

Jutta Seibert, team leader – Academic Integration.


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Call: 2017 Westminster Institute for Advances Studies-International Research Fellowships in Critical Digital & Social Media Studies

Call: 2017 Westminster Institute for Advances Studies-International Research Fellowships in Critical Digital & Social Media Studies

https://www.westminster.ac.uk/news/2016/call-for-applications-wias-international-research-fellowships-in-critical-digital-and-social-media-studies-2017

http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AUN132/westminster-institute-for-advanced-studies-international-research-fellowships-in-critical-digital-and-social-media-studies-2017-call-for-applications/

The Westminster Institute for Advanced Studies (WIAS) www.westminster.ac.uk/wias is an academic space for independent critical thinking beyond borders. It is located at the University of Westminster in the heart of London. Prof Christian Fuchs is its Director. The WIAS’ research focus is critical digital and social media studies.

The Westminster Institute for Advanced Studies has an open call for international resarch fellows who during a 3 month stay in 2017 conduct critical studies of digital and social media’s role in society.

The WIAS aims to contribute to bringing about a paradigm shift from big data analytics to critical digital and social media research methods and theories. Digital and social media research at WIAS uses and develops critical theories, is profoundly theoretical, and discusses the political relevance and implications of the studied topics.

The WIAS’ Critical Digital and Social Media Studies Fellowship Programme is aimed at current and future research leaders, who engage in independent critical thinking. It enables them to undertake independent and collaborative research on original topics in a stimulating academic environment in London.

Funded scholarships are only awarded as a result of open calls. Priority will be given to well-defined projects. The regular scholarship duration is 3 months (start between 9 January and 1 May 2017). Later start dates are not possible.

Application deadline: Friday October 28, 2016

More information, details and application:

https://www.westminster.ac.uk/news/2016/call-for-applications-wias-international-research-fellowships-in-critical-digital-and-social-media-studies-2017


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Remembering 9/11 on Campus

Sunday, Sept. 11, is the fifteenth anniversary of 9/11/2001, the morning Islamic extremists hijacked four American airplanes. Two airplanes flew into the towers of the World Trade Center in New York City, one crashed into the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., and the fourth crashed in a field near Shanksville in western Pennsylvania.

Villanova University lost fifteen alumni that day; they are commemorated in a stained glass window in Corr Hall Chapel. The window, installed in November 2006, was designed by the Rev. Richard G. Cannuli, OSA, ’73, an artist, professor and curator and director of the University Art Gallery. Vetrate Artistiche Toscane, a stained glass studio in Siena, Italy, created the window from Father Cannuli’s design.

On the left of the window is a panel depicting the Blessed Virgin Mary in prayer. The right panel shows the twin towers of the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and fields, the sites where the four planes crashed. At the bottom of this panel is list of the fifteen Villanovans who perished that day, fourteen in the World Trade Center and a flight attendant on United Airlines flight 175.

DSC_0016 resize

Full window

 

Right panel with Twin Towers, Pentagon, Pa. field and panel with alumni names

Right panel with Twin Towers, Pentagon, Pa. field and panel with alumni names

 

List of alumni who perished on 9/11

List of alumni who perished on 9/11

 

In addition to the permanent commemoration in Corr Chapel, Falvey Memorial Library has installed a small commemoration at the circulation desk.

Falvey's Commemoration

Falvey’s Commemoration

Villanova has not forgotten 9/11.

 

Photographs by Alice Bampton, Communications and Marketing Dept.

 


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Want to Know More About the Olympics? Here is the Place to Start

Rio 2016 jpgIf you read Merrill Stein’s recent blog, “Next Best Thing to Being There! Great Links to the Games of the XXXI Olympiad, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil,” or have been watching or reading the news about the summer Olympics and have questions, Falvey’s collection can provide answers. This “Dig Deeper” features only part of our collection of books about the Olympics. And don’t forget, our very knowledgeable reference librarians (Ask a Librarian) are here to help you find materials. Or you may visit their offices on the second floor of Falvey.

Dig Deeper:

History of the Ancient Games:

The Ancient Olympic Games” (1984)

The Ancient Olympic Games” (1966)

The Ancient Olympics” (2004)

The Story of the Olympic Games, 776 B.C.” (1973)

 

Women and the Olympic Games:

Grace and Glory:  A Century of Women in the Olympics” (1996)

Their Day in the Sun:  Women of the 1932 Olympics” (1996)

When the Girls Came Out to Play:  The Birth of American Sportswear” (2006)

Women’s Sport and Spectacle:  Gendered Television Coverage and the Olympic Games” (1998)

 

Other aspects of the Games:

The First Modern Olympics” (1976)

Global Olympics: Historical and Sociological Studies of the Modern Games ” (2005)

100 Greatest Moments in Olympic History” (1995)

All That Glitters Is Not Gold:  The Olympic Game” (1972)

Historical Dictionary of the Modern Olympic Movement” (1996)

 

 


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Last Modified: August 15, 2016