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St. Paddy’s Day from the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick

On March 17, 1814, the Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick met to celebrate the anniversary of St. Patrick in Philadelphia. The United States was in the middle of war with England that would last for nearly another year. The following is a transcription, and notes, from that gathering.

From Rules Minutes &c. of the Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, 1813-1852, p. 20-22.

A portion of the transcribed text is from the digitized copy from The Society of The Friendly Sons of St. Patrick for The Relief of Emigrants from Ireland collection found in Falvey’s Digital Library.

 

20

This being the anniversary of St. Patrick, [2] the Society, [3] agreeably to former arrangement dined together at the Mansion House Hotel in Market Street, and were honored with the company of the officers of the St. Andrew’s, [4] St. George’s, [5] the Welsh and the German [6] Societies, and of the Right Reverend

21.

Bishop White, [7] the Reverend Doctors Blackwell [8] and Abercrombie [9] and other respectable citizens. After Dinner the following toasts were given from the Chair.

1. The Immortal Memory of St. Patrick.
2. The Land of our Fathers.
3. The United States: __ the country of our Adoption.
4. The Memory of George Washington.
May it ever be, as it always has been, held in grateful remembrance by the
Hibernian Society. [10]
5. The Memory of General Montgomery, [11] and the nation of Hibernia, [12] who spilt
their blood for the achievement of the Independence of America.
6. The President [13] and constituted authorities of the Union.
7. The Governor [14] and Commonwealth of Pennsylva
8. The Militia, Army and Navy of the United States.
May their joint and separate exertions in defense of this country meet their best
reward — the approbation of that country.

22.

9th The Union of the States
May each return of our anniversary find that Union drawn more close and more strongly cemented by mutual for bearance, material good will and mutual interests.
10th The Commerce, the Agriculture and the Manufacturer of the United States.
As they naturally depend upon each other, may no unreasonable jealousies deprive them of mutual assistance.
11. The Ocean
May it be the great high was for all Nations – Usurped by none.
12. The American Non descripts: Best described by Commodores Bainbridge, [15] and Decatur: [16] the Captains Hull [17] and Jones, [18] their brave officers and crews.
13. A speedy Peace, [19] upon such terms as the United States ought to grant, and the Enemy ought to accept.
14. Social Intercourse.
May the spirit of a party never rise so high as to destroy private friendships, prevent the reunion of good men, or endanger the Liberties and Happiness of our common Country.

23.

15. The benevolence Societies of St. Andrews, St. George, the Welsh and the German.
16. The Education of Youth: __ the only certain mode of securing to the commonwealth “Virtue, Liberty and Independence”.
17. The fair daughter of Columbia. [20]

____________________________________

[1] “History.” Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick For the Relief of Emigrants From Ireland. 15 Sep. 2017. <http://www.friendlysons.com/history/>
[2] “… Known as the “Apostle of Ireland”, he is the primary patron saint of Ireland” Saint Patrick. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Patrick>
[3] “History.” Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick For the Relief of Emigrants from Ireland. 15 Sep. 2017. <http://www.friendlysons.com/history/>
[4] “About Us.” The St. Andrew’s Society of Philadelphia. 15 Sep. 2017. <http://98.129.112.200/about-us/>
[5] “… being citizens of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, having associated for the purpose of establishing in Philadelphia, a society for the advice and assistance of Englishmen” St. George Society of Philadelphia. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._George_Society_of_Philadelphia>
[6] “Our History.” The German Society of Pennsylvania. 15 Sep. 2017. <http://www.germansociety.org/our-history/>
[7] White, William, 1748-1836. ; William White (bishop of Pennsylvania). Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_White_(bishop_of_Pennsylvania)>
[8]Blackwell, Robert, 1748-1831. ; “Blackwell Rev. Robert, D. D. 50 Pine” Paxton, John A. The Philadelphia Directory and Register for 1813… Philadelphia : B. & T. Kite, 1813. Internet Archive. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://archive.org/stream/philadelphiadire1813phil#page/55/mode/2up/search/blackwell>
[9]Abercrombie, James, 1758-1841. ; “Abercrombie James, D. D. assistant minister of Christ & St. Peter’s churches Sec. 162 S. Fourth” Paxton, John A. The Philadelphia Directory and Register for 1813… Philadelphia : B. & T. Kite, 1813. Internet Archive. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://archive.org/stream/philadelphiadire1813phil#page/25/mode/2up/search/Abercrombie>
[10] “is an Irish Catholic fraternal organisation. Members must be Catholic and either born in Ireland or of Irish descent. Its largest membership is now in the United States” Ancient Order of Hibernians. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Order_of_Hibernians>
[11] Montgomery, Richard, 1738-1775. ; “a major general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, and he is most famous for leading the failed 1775 invasion of Canada” Richard Montgomery. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Montgomery>
[12] “is the Classical Latin name for the island of Ireland. ” Hibernia. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hibernia>
[13] Madison, James, 1751-1836. ; “Presidents: James Madison.” The White House. Whitehouse.gov. Washington, D.C. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://www.whitehouse.gov/1600/presidents/jamesmadison>
[14] Snyder, Simon, 1759-1819. ; “the third Governor of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, serving three terms from 1808 to 1817.” Simon Snyder. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_Snyder>.
[15] Bainbridge, William, 1774-1833. ; William Bainbridge. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Bainbridge>
[16] Decatur, Stephen, 1779-1820. ; Stephen Decatur. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Decatur>
[17] Hull, Isaac, 1773-1843. ; Isaac Hull. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Hull>
[18] Jones, Jacob, 1768-1850. ; Jacob Jones. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Jones>
[19] “The War of 1812 lasted from June 1812-February 1815, a span of two years and eight months.” “War of 1812 — FAQs” Civil War Trust. ©2017 Civil War Trust. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://www.civilwar.org/learn/articles/war-of-1812-faqs>
[20] “… is a historical name used by both Europeans and Americans to describe the Americas, the New World, and often, more specifically, the United States of America. ” Columbia (name). Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbia_(name)>

 


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WWI Irish POW in Germany: Attempted Escape

The Arthur Evanson Glanville, papers, 1916-1918, a recent addition to the Villanova Digital Library, comprise of wartime letters, written to family members before and during Glanville’s captivity, photo postcards of him as a R. D. F. Officer along sketches like Glanville’s drawing his trench dug out rendered shortly before his capture.

A portion of transcribed text below is from the digitized copy  of Arthur Evanson Glanville’s recollections, a WWI Irish POW, an officer in the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, captured by the Germans in France, May, 1918, and held as a prisoner of war for 7 months.

Glanville described the attempt of a POW’s escape from the camp in Rastatt.

POW escapeGlanville's Diary: 1918

******

[p. 50]

day as at night the <insertion: noise> would have attracted too much attention. There was great excitement the night of the escape. There were many willing helpers in the scheme. Their duties were many [158]<insertion: allotted.> Some watched the sentries & reported when they were at the far end of their beats. Others kept a sharp look out for the approach of anyone in the building, while yet others prepared the ropes (from bed-clothes) which were to lower the elopers from the windows to the ground – a distance of 18 feet. The escape took place simultaneously from <insertion: the> two windows. Within one minute from the executive word “go!” from those watching the sentries, both officers were on the road and out of sight – all under the eyes of the sentries in the full glare of the electric-arc lamps of the camp! Further arrangements in the camp were the means by which the escape of these officers was not noticed for 10 days. Every night dummies were placed in the beds.

[p. 51]

But [159] This was simple enough, but was nothing compared to the lucky scheme by th [160] which the missing officers were not remarked [161] on the two daily parades. The day previous to the escape the Roll <insertion: of prisoners> in the German office had been take and “lost” by an accomplice. The result was that a new one was made from the officers on parade next day & the escape was not noticed.  It was <insertion so> a simple a scheme which [162] <insertion: that> we thought <insertion: it> would not have worked. After 10 days the Germans evidently checked the roll with some other record and found their mistake. There was great consternation. It added to their dismay to know it was their own fault. Doubtless they managed to hide their mistake from their superiors, but that did not prevent them from having their revenge on us. All sorts of restrictions were put upon us and life became more unbearable than ever. This was the worst thing they could have done, for it only made others keen to escape. In fact inspite [163] of all the extra precautions,

____________

[158] Author’s strike out.
[159] Author’s strike out.
[160] Author’s strike out.
[161] Best guess.
[162] Author’s strike out.
[163] in spite

 

 


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Toasts from the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick

On March 17, 1814 in Philadelphia, the Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick met to celebrate the anniversary of St. Patrick. The United States was in the middle of war a with England that would last for nearly another year. The following is a transcription, with notes, from Rules Minutes &c. of the Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, 1813-1852, p. 20-23.

A portion of the transcribed text from the digitized copy comes from The Society of The Friendly Sons of St. Patrick for The Relief of Emigrants from Ireland collection found in Falvey’s Digital Library.

Rules Minutes &c. of the Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, 1813-1832.

[p.] 20

This being the anniversary of St. Patrick, [2] the Society, [3] agreeably to former arrangement dined together at the Mansion House Hotel in Market Street, and were honored with the company of the officers of the St. Andrew’s, [4] St. George’s, [5] the Welsh and the German [6] Societies, and of the Right Reverend

[p.] 21.

Bishop White, [7] the Reverend Doctors Blackwell [8] and Abercrombie [9] and other respectable citizens. After Dinner the following toasts were given from the Chair.

1.    The Immortal Memory of St. Patrick.
2.    The Land of our Fathers.
3.    The United States: __ the country of our Adoption.
4.    The Memory of George Washington.
May it ever be, as it always has been, held in grateful remembrance by the Hibernian Society. [10]
5.    The Memory of General Montgomery, [11] and the nation of Hibernia, [12] who spilt their blood for the achievement of the Independence of America.
6.    The President [13] and constituted authorities of the Union.
7.    The Governor [14] and Commonwealth of Pennsylva
8.    The Militia, Army and Navy of the United States.
May their joint and separate exertions in defense of this country meet their best reward — the approbation of that country.

[p.] 22.

9th    The Union of the States
May each return of our anniversary find that Union drawn more close and more strongly cemented by mutual for bearance, material good will and mutual interests.
10th    The Commerce, the Agriculture and the Manufacturer of the United States.
As they naturally depend upon each other, may no unreasonable jealousies deprive them of mutual assistance.
11.    The Ocean
May it be the great high was for all Nations – Usurped by none.
12.    The American Non descripts: Best described by Commodores Bainbridge, [15] and Decatur: [16] the Captains Hull [17] and Jones, [18] their brave officers and crews.
13.    A speedy Peace, [19] upon such terms as the United States ought to grant, and the Enemy ought to accept.
14.   Social Intercourse.
May the spirit of a party never rise so high as to destroy private friendships, prevent the reunion of good men, or endanger the Liberties and Happiness of our common Country.

[p.] 23.

15.    The benevolence Societies of St. Andrews, St. George, the Welsh and the German.
16.    The Education of Youth: __ the only certain mode of securing to the commonwealth “Virtue, Liberty and Independence”.
17.    The fair daughter of Columbia. [20]

———————————-

[1] “History.” Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick For the Relief of Emigrants From Ireland. 15 Sep. 2017. <http://www.friendlysons.com/history/>
[2] “… Known as the “Apostle of Ireland”, he is the primary patron saint of Ireland” Saint Patrick. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Patrick>
[3] “History.” Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick For the Relief of Emigrants from Ireland. 15 Sep. 2017. <http://www.friendlysons.com/history/>
[4] “About Us.” The St. Andrew’s Society of Philadelphia. 15 Sep. 2017. <http://98.129.112.200/about-us/>
[5] “… being citizens of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, having associated for the purpose of establishing in Philadelphia, a society for the advice and assistance of Englishmen” St. George Society of Philadelphia. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._George_Society_of_Philadelphia>
[6] “Our History.” The German Society of Pennsylvania. 15 Sep. 2017. <http://www.germansociety.org/our-history/>
[7] White, William, 1748-1836. ; William White (bishop of Pennsylvania). Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_White_(bishop_of_Pennsylvania)>
[8]  Blackwell, Robert, 1748-1831. ; “Blackwell Rev. Robert, D. D. 50 Pine” Paxton, John A. The Philadelphia Directory and Register for 1813… Philadelphia : B. & T. Kite, 1813. Internet Archive. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://archive.org/stream/philadelphiadire1813phil#page/55/mode/2up/search/blackwell>
[9]  Abercrombie, James, 1758-1841. ; “Abercrombie James, D. D. assistant minister of Christ & St. Peter’s churches Sec. 162 S. Fourth” Paxton, John A. The Philadelphia Directory and Register for 1813… Philadelphia : B. & T. Kite, 1813. Internet Archive. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://archive.org/stream/philadelphiadire1813phil#page/25/mode/2up/search/Abercrombie>
[10] “is an Irish Catholic fraternal organisation. Members must be Catholic and either born in Ireland or of Irish descent. Its largest membership is now in the United States” Ancient Order of Hibernians. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Order_of_Hibernians>
[11] Montgomery, Richard, 1738-1775. ; “a major general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, and he is most famous for leading the failed 1775 invasion of Canada” Richard Montgomery. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Montgomery>
[12] “is the Classical Latin name for the island of Ireland. ” Hibernia. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hibernia>
[13] Madison, James, 1751-1836. ; “Presidents: James Madison.” The White House. Whitehouse.gov. Washington, D.C. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://www.whitehouse.gov/1600/presidents/jamesmadison>
[14] Snyder, Simon, 1759-1819. ; “the third Governor of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, serving three terms from 1808 to 1817.” Simon Snyder. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_Snyder.
[15] Bainbridge, William, 1774-1833. ; William Bainbridge. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Bainbridge>
[16] Decatur, Stephen, 1779-1820. ; Stephen Decatur. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Decatur>
[17] Hull, Isaac, 1773-1843. ; Isaac Hull. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Hull>
[18] Jones, Jacob, 1768-1850. ; Jacob Jones. Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Jones>
[19] “The War of 1812 lasted from June 1812-February 1815, a span of two years and eight months.” “War of 1812 — FAQs” Civil War Trust. ©2017 Civil War Trust. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://www.civilwar.org/learn/articles/war-of-1812-faqs>
[20] “… is a historical name used by both Europeans and Americans to describe the Americas, the New World, and often, more specifically, the United States of America. ” Columbia (name). Wikipedia. 15 Sep. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbia_(name)>

 


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College Costs at Villanova: 1918

Celebrating 175 Years of Augustinian Catholic Education 1842-2017

Catalogue of Villanova College, 1918-19.

Catalogue of Villanova College, 1918-19.

Villanova Digital Library includes a selection of Villanova College’s academic catalogues published from 1871-1918. The earliest volumes published rarely changed in format and information provided which included a “Catalogue of Students,” listing students’ names their hometowns and states, and the annual Commencement ceremony and list of graduates. An interesting tidbit: the 70 students, listed in the 1870-71 catalogue, were mostly from Pennsylvania followed by Massachusetts and included Ireland, Cuba and Spain.

From the Seventy-fifth catalogue of Villanova College: Villanova, Delaware County, Pa.: conducted by the Augustinian fathers for the academic year 1918-1919, p. 16-17.

Transcribed text from the digitized copy found in the University Catalogues of the Villanova Digital Collection.

EXPENSES

*****

The expenses at Villanova vary in amount according to the course which the student pursues and the accommodations which he enjoys. The scholastic year is divided into two terms of approximately four and a half months each. The rates given below are per term.

Ordinary Expenses

Board, bed and bedding.              $112.50
Tuition, Engineering Courses.         75.00
Tuition, all other courses.                50.00
Laboratory fee
(Chemistry and Biology).               5.00
*Private room.                               30.00
Private room, with bath.                   75.00
Laundry.                                        5.00
Physician’s fee.                             2.50
Gymnasium fee.                           2.50

Extra Expenses

Music, Piano, per term.             $ 30.00
Music, Violin, per term.                30.00
Use of typewriter, per course.        7.00
Certified Credits for admission
to another college                         2.00
———

*A few rooms are sufficiently large for two students. The charge will be not be reduced on that account.

In addition to the above, a deposit of fifteen dollars ($15.00) is required of every student at the beginning of each scholastic year to cover injury to property, breakage, etc. Any balance remaining at the end of the year will be refunded on application or credited to the student’s account for the next year. Every student is held personally responsible for property entrusted to his care or assigned for his use.


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Exhibit: “Wildcats Past & Present: Moments from the History of Sports at Villanova.”

Special Collections and University Archives, at Falvey Memorial Library, join in the celebration of Villanova University’s 175 anniversary, (1842-2017), with a collaboration of materials to present the exhibit, “Wildcats Past & Present: Moments from the History of Sports at Villanova,” featuring assorted and unique items representative of the varied sports played at Villanova College, and later Villanova University. The exhibit, located on the 1st floor of the Library, launched at the beginning of September, 2017, and will run through to the end of the fall semester.

The items that form the “Wildcats Past & Present” exhibit, such as sport programs, basketballs, baseball, photographs, newspaper clippings as well as championship memorabilia are from University Archives’ collection along with books and scrapbooks from Special Collections.

Curated by Susan Ottignon (Collections Librarian) with assistance from Laura Bang and Michael Foight. Graphics by Joanne Quinn.  Based on a legacy exhibit curated by Teri Ann Pirone.

The digital exhibit is now live and can be viewed here.


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George Washington fêted by the Friendly Sons’ Society, January 1, 1782.

From Rules Minutes &c. of the Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, 1843, 1771-1793, p. 41-43.

A portion of the transcribed text from the digitized copy from The Society of The Friendly Sons of St. Patrick for The Relief of Emigrants from Ireland collection found in Falvey’s Digital Library.

Here is General George Washington’s transcribed response to the Society’s invitation and awarding him the Society’s gold medal as written down in the Rules Minutes book.

[1] ”Sir

I accept with singular pleasure, the Ensign of so worthy a Fraternity as that of the Son of St. Patrick in this City. A Society distinguished for the firm adherence of its members to the glorious cause in which we are embark’d. —

Give me leave to assure you, Sir, that I shall never cast my eyes upon the Badge with which I am Honoured but with a grateful remembrance of the polite & affectionate manner in which it was presented. I am with Respect & Esteem
Sir
Your mo. Obt Servant
(Signd) Geo. Washington

To George Campbell Esqr.
President of the Society of the
Friendly Sons of St. Patrick
in the City of Philadelphia”

————–
[1] On the page, quotation marks [“] placed at the beginning of each line. The marks represent transcribed remarks by Washington. For the current transcription, the quotation marks are displayed only by the initial and final quotation marks.


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“The Latest Official News: Surrender of Lee and his whole Army to General Grant”

Surrender of Lee National Defender, v. IX, no. 36, Tuesday, April 11, 1865National Defender, v. IX, no. 36, Tuesday, April 11, 1865, Whole Number: 448, p. [3], col. 5.

Transcribed text from the digitized copy in the Historical Society of Montgomery County Collection.


The Latest Official News !
______

A Great and Bloodless Victory
______

Surrender of Lee and his whole Army to General Grant.
______

The not unexpected but not the less welcome news of the surrender of Lee and his whole army to General Grant was telegraphed to Philadelphia on Sunday evening shortly after 9 o’clock. The joyful news reached Norristown yesterday morning at an early hour. The fall of Petersburg and Richmond did not afford as much joy as the news of the surrender of Lee and his Army. The news being confirmed by official dispatches, with the wings of the wind the good tidings aroused the whole population, bells commenced ringing, cannon were fired every demonstration of joy was made. We have the more reason to rejoice at this last, great bloodless victory, because it is regarded at the harbinger of peace to our bleeding country. May it bring true peace and Union, a union of hearts and a union of hands, a union of brotherly love. We have not the space to give the details of the movements of our armies which resulted so gloriously. Below we give the terms proposed by Grant and accepted by Lee by which the lives of thousands of brave men were saved from a useless sacrifice :

Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865.–Gen. R. E. Lee, Commanding Confederate States : In accordance with the substance of my letter to you of the 8th inst., I propose to receive the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia on the following terms, to wit: Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplicate : one copy to be given to an officer designated by me, the other to be retained by such officer or officers as you may designate : the officers to give their individual paroles not to take up arms against the Government of the United States, until properly exchanged; and each company or regiment commander, sign a like parole for the men of their commands. The arms’ artillery and public property to be packed and stacked and turned over to the officers appointed by me to receive them. This will not embrace the side arms of the officers, nor their private horses or baggage. This done, by each officer and man will be allowed to return to their homes, not be disturbed by United States authority, so long as they observe their parole and the laws in force where they may reside.

Very respectfully,
U. S. Grant
Lieutenant General.

Headquarters, Army, Northern Virginia. April 9th 1865.–Lieut. Gen. U. S., Commanding U. S. A.: General–I have received your letter of this, date, containing terms of surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, as proposed by you. As they are substantially the same as those expressed in your letter of the 8th inst., they are accepted. I will proceed to designate the proper officers to carry the stipulations into effect.

Very respectfully your obedient servant,  R.E. Lee, General.


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The Female Federal Scout: Pauline Cushman

Female Federal Scout National Defender, v. VIII, no. 42, Tuesday, May 31, 1864, Whole Number 404, p.[3], col. 5.National Defender, v. VIII, no. 42, Tuesday, May 31, 1864, Whole Number: 404, p. [3], col. 5.

The transcribed portion of text is from the digitized copy in the Montgomery Historical Society of Montgomery County Collection.


The Female Federal Scout

Tarilling [1] Adventure of Miss Major Pauline Cushman–Her Performance As A Spy–A Narrow Escape from a Disagreeable Death.

[From Detroit Tribune.]

Among the women of America who have made themselves famous since the opening of the rebellion, few have suffered more, or rendered more service to the Federal cause than Miss Major Pauline Cushman, the female scout and spy.

At the commencement of hostilities she resided in Cleveland, Ohio, and quite well-known as a clever actress. From Cleveland she went to Louisville, where she had an engagement in Wood’s Theatre. Here, by her intimacy with certain rebel officers, she incured [2] the suspicion of being a rebel, and was arrested by the Federal authorities. She indignantly denied that she was a rebel, although born at the South, and having a brother in a rebel Mississippi regiment. . . . .

________________________

[1] Probable printer’s error. “Thrilling”
[2] incurred

Further Readings on Pauline Cushman:

“The Perils of Pauline.” Winkler, H. Donald. Stealing Secrets: How a Few Daring Women Deceived Generals, Impacted Battles, and Altered the Course of the Civil War. Naperville, Ill.: Cumberland House, 2010: 111-134.  Falvey Main. E628 .W57 2010

Sarmiento, Ferdinand L. Life of Pauline Cushman, the Celebrated Union Spy and Scout… Philadelphia : J. E. Potter, 1865. Internet Archive. 25 March 2017. <https://archive.org/stream/lifeofpaulinecus00sarm#page/n7/mode/2up>

“Pauline Cushman: The Spy of Cumberland.” Blog. Posted by: Rebecca Beatrice Brooks. Posted Date: January 3, 2013. Civil Wag Saga. Copyright 2016. 25 March 2017. <http://civilwarsaga.com/pauline-cushman-the-spy-of-cumberland/>

“Pauline Cushman Biography.” The Biography.com. Biography.com Editors. Last Updated: April 20, 2016. © 2017 A&E Television Networks. 25 March 2017. <http://www.biography.com/people/pauline-cushman>

“Pauline Cushman.” Presidio of San Francisco National Park. National Park Service. U. S. Department of the Interior. 25 March 2017. <https://www.nps.gov/people/pauline-cushman.htm>

“Pauline Cushman (1833–1893): Mathew Brady Studio.” Collections: Leaders. CivilWar@Smithsonian. Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. 25 March 2017. <http://www.civilwar.si.edu/leaders_cushman.html>

Betts, Vicki, “Women Soldiers, Spies, and Vivandieres: Articles from Civil War Newspapers” (2016). Special Topics. Paper 28. 25 March 2017. <http://scholarworks.uttyler.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1004&context=cw_newstopics>

Suggested Subjects for books in Falvey:
Women spies — Confederate States of America — Biography.
United States — History — Civil War, 1861-1865 — Participation, Female.

 


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Not Your Typical River Crossing

Wire-Rope Walker

National Defender, v. VI, no. 2, Tuesday, August 27, 1861, Whole Number: 262, p.[2], col. 4.

Annotated and transcribed text from the digitized copy in the Historical Society of Montgomery County Collection.


The Wire-Rope Performance At Fairmount.

The thousand of curious citizens who visited Fairmount [1] on the last Wednesday afternoon, for the purposes of witnessing the feat of walking a rope stretched across the river Schuylkill, [2] at an elevation of one hundred feet from the surface of the water, were doomed to disappointment. Every preparation appeared to have been made for the performance, but it was finally discovered that the riggers had not fulfilled their part of the contract, and the crowd returned home without having their curiosity gratified. Yesterday afternoon a large number of people again visited the spot and waited patiently until nearly six o’clock, when Mr. John Deiner the performer was enthusiastically cheered.

He was dressed in a flesh-colored suit, fitting him closely, and carried a balancing pole, about twenty feet in length. He started off slowly, and after proceeding a few steps sat down while the side ropes were being properly adjusted. — After some little delay he again took his position, and walked half way across [3] . . . our rope dancers celebrated. He then passed on to the western side of the river and, after reaching a point about one hundred feet from the derrick, [4] retreated backwards to the centre. He here again went through sundry evolutions, and then continued his journey to the eastern side. The performance was highly successful, and seemed to afford great pleasure to the numerous spectators.

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[1] “The park grew out of the Lemon Hill estate of Henry Pratt, whose land was originally owned by Robert Morris, signer of the Declaration of Independence. Purchased by the city in 1844, the estate was dedicated to the public by city council’s ordinance on September 15, 1855.” Fairmount Park. Wikipedia. 10 March 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairmount_Park#Growth>
[2] “The Schuylkill River got its name, meaning “hidden river,” from Dutch settlers who discovered its mouth sequestered behind the Delaware River’s League Island. ” “Along the Schuylkill River” Schuylkill River National & State Heritage Area. Pottstown, PA. 10 March 2017. <https://www.schuylkillriver.org/Along_the_Schuylkill.aspx>
[3] A crease in the newspaper page obscured the text.
[4] “a type of crane (= machine with a part like a long arm) used for moving heavy things esp. on ships” derrick n. Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press. 10 March 2017. <http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/derrick>

 

 


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Statistics on Steamboat Disasters in 1860

Western Steamboat Disasters_7_10_1860

National Defender, v. IV, no. 49, Tuesday, July 10, 1860, Whole Number: 214, p. [2] col. 5.

Transcribed text from the digitized copy in the Historical Society of Montgomery County Collection.


WESTERN STEAMBOAT DISASTERS.

The disasters upon our Western waters during the first six months of 1860 are summed up by the Louisville Courier, under date on July 2, 1860:
Steamboats sank and damaged by ice 5
Steamboats snagged and sunk, 47
Steamboats run into bank, 6
Steamboat collisions, 7
Steamboats burned, 20
Steamboats sunk on Falls, 2
Steamboats sunk by storms, 20
Steamboat explosions, 6
Machinery broken, 10
Collisions with bridges, 2
    Total Steamboats, 125
Coalboats lost, 127
Flatboats and barges, 23
Number of lives lost, 136
Estimated aggregate loss, $2,732,500
     The above recapitulation includes several minor accidents, chiefly by snags.

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Last Modified: March 10, 2017

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