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Philadelphia Researching Tips

Even though Philadelphia is only 13 miles away, navigating the city may seem like another world in some sense. With world class institutions, museums, and parks, coupled with a rich history running throughout the city, it is no wonder people can feel overwhelmed when visiting Philadelphia. Luckily Falvey has access to many resources to help navigate and research any topic on Philadelphia. Whether the resource is in print or online, the Library can help resolve any confusion when it comes to researching the City of Brotherly Love.

Books

Falvey has a vast collection of books on Philadelphia; where that collection is located in the Library depends on your subject of research. Start with “Philadelphia” in the subject line to narrow your results.

 

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Use the facets on the right to filter the results down to your area of interest:

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In this example, the results are filtered down into books about Philadelphia politics. The picture below displays that books on this subject can be found in the F 158 call number section of the library.

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Online Resources

Jutta Seibert, History Librarian and Academic Integration Team Leader, suggests the following free resources readily available online:

Historical Images of Philadelphia – 20,000 historical images of the city dating back to 1841 courtesy of the Free Library.

Library Company of Philadelphia – The Library Company was founded in 1731 by Benjamin Franklin and remains to this day an independent cultural institution. Its rare books, manuscripts, broadsides, ephemera, prints, photographs, and works of art are worth a visit to its Locust Street location. The Library Company currently hosts “Fashioning Philadelphia – the Style of the City, 1720-1940.” Selected exhibits such as the “Black Founders: The Free Black Community in the Early Republic” are available online.

Digital Maps of Philadelphia – Digital access to city maps ranging from 1834 to 1962 courtesy of the Free Library.

 

This is a short, starting point for researching tips on Philadelphia. Remember to always contact your subject librarian for a more in depth search.


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Philly Geek Awards Nominates Familiar Faces

The annual Philadelphia Geek Awards are coming up, and you might recognize one of the groups being nominated this year. Dirty Diamonds Comics has been nominated for 2015 best comic, and back in the fall semester Dirty Diamonds headlined a graphic novel event in the Library. Villanova community members learned from co-founders, Claire Folkman and Kelly Phillips, about the logistics of making a comic book, navigating the publishing world, and what it means to be a woman comic creator.

Dirty Diamonds is an all-female creation, which directly leads to the type of content they want to create. The goal of these comics is to give a platform for other women comic creators, which is exactly what they have done. Their first published book, Comics, smashed a Kickstarter goal of $8,000. This is a collection of work collected from 32 women from 6 different countries discussing their love of comics. 

The Philadelphia Geek Awards is an annual celebration of all things geek culture and is hosted by Geekadelphia and the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University. Originally established in 2011, the categories for the awards this year are:

Web Project of the Year…………..Scientist of the Year

Visual Artist of the Year…………..IRL Project of the Year

Streaming Media of the Year……..Game of the Year

Feature Length Indie Film of the YearStory of the Year

Startup of the Year………………….Event of the Year

Social Media Project of the Year….Comic Creator of the Year

Dirty Diamonds is up for Comic Creator of the Year. Other nominees in this category include local comic creator Ian Sampson and the people behind Locust Moon Comics. The awards will be held on August 15; find out more information at phillygeekawards.com. Learn more about Dirty Diamonds at dirtydiamonds.net. Feel free to satisfy that geek craving by reading some of Falvey’s graphic novel collection.


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Life as the Sister of the Liberty Bell

This post was originally posted on December 10, 2009.

A recently digitized title from the Villanova Digital Collection, The Liberty Bell’s Sister by the Rev. Louis A. Rongione, OSA, provides a history and overview of the companion to the Liberty Bell that once rested in Falvey Memorial Library and now resides in the Augustinian Heritage Room of the Saint Thomas of Villanova Monastery.

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The history of the bell started on October 16, 1751 when the Pennsylvania Assembly voted that a bell weighing 2000 pounds costing between 100 and 150 pounds (sources disagree on the specific cost – ed.) should be purchased from Whitechapel Bell Foundry in  London and then be provided for use in the new State House that was later called Independence Hall.

That historic bell cracked upon its first testing. It was felt by that same governing body that because of the need to recast twice after cracking, and the bells poor tone quality, a replacement should be purchased.

A bell of the same weight and cost was then ordered.

In the summer of 1754 the Liberty Bell’s sister arrived in Philadelphia.

On August 13, 1754, however, the Pennsylvania Assembly voted not to replace but to keep both bells as the populace who once found the Liberty Bells’ tone annoying had grown accustomed to it.

The original bell was hung in Independence Hall and the Sister Bell was hung on a special cupola in front of her, attached to the State House Clock, to toll the hours. She performed this task from 1754 to 1830, except for a brief period of time during the Revolutionary War.

Both bells rang for special occasions. One such occasion was the reading of the Declaration of Independence, July 8, 1776.

The Sister Bell is no stranger to political intrigue. On September 14, 1777 British forces were threatening invasion and then occupied Philadelphia. The bells were smuggled to secret location in Allentown to prevent the enemy from melting them down and using them for ammunition.

The British left Philadelphia June 27, 1778 and the sisters were returned to their home.

In 1830 the City of Philadelphia kept the original bell and sold the Sister Bell and Stretch Clock to Reverend Michael Hurley, O.S.A., Pastor of Saint Augustine’s Church, 4th and Vine Streets, Philadelphia.

On May 8th 1844 St. Augustine’s Church was burned to the ground by members of the Native American Party. The clock, library, paintings were totally destroyed and the bell cracked into pieces in the fire. Her fragments were gathered and given to Joseph Bernhard of Philadelphia for recasting.

In 1847 the Sister Bell was recast but she was greatly reduced in size. She was sent to Villanova College founded in 1842 by the same Augustinian Fathers who served St. Augustine’s Church.

From 1847- 1917 the Sister Bell hung in a locust tree and was used to call the students to class, chapel and their meals. In 1917 she was sent to Jamaica Long Island and was used in the steeple of St. Nicholas of Tolentine Augustinian Church, but on September 20, 1942 she returned home to Villanova for the inauguration of the Centennial year 1942-1943.

Currently the Sister Bell has found a home in the Augustinian Heritage Room. She may be seen by appointment by calling the Rev. Martin L. Smith, OSA: 610-864-1590.

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See more at: https://blog.library.villanova.edu/digitallibrary/2009/12/10/life-as-the-sister-of-the-liberty-bell/#sthash.veyLsTWz.dpuf


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FAQ's at the Desk

 

INFODESKTO

The following are some of the most frequently asked questions we hear at the front desk. Hopefully, these answers will clarify any uncertainty you may have with the Library. Leave a comment below for any question we might have missed.

Q. Can I use the group study room for a phone interview?

A.The group study rooms (GSRs) are only for what the name suggests: group studying. Because there is a two-person minimum for GSRs, two people must be present with their Wildcards to check out a GSR. These rooms may be used for a maximum of two hours. For individual rooms set up for phone interviews, students can go to the Career Center in Garey Hall.

Q. Where is room 415?

A. Room 415 is a new classroom on the library’s 4th floor. When you enter the building, turn right and take the stairwell to the 4th floor. When you exit the stairwell on the 4th floor, turn right. Room 415 replaced University Archives, which was subsequently moved to the ground floor.

Q. Do you have the textbook for my class?

A. The Library does not purchase textbooks for current courses unless specifically ordered by faculty or a librarian deems a book as important to the collection. Cost and space are the main reasons the Library does not buy the assigned textbook for every class. Sometimes, though, a professor puts their personal copy on reserve, but students would not be allowed to take this book out of the Library.

Q. The Library does not have the book I am looking for; is there anything else I can do?

A. You have a couple of options for books that we do not own or that are currently checked out:

  • – Check E-ZBorrow
  • – Check Interlibrary Loan
  • – Check Rosemont College’s library- Considered our “sister” school, Rosemont allows Villanova students to use its library as if they were students there.
  • – Villanova belongs to a group called TCLC which grants students the privilege to borrow books from members in the group. Click here for more information.

Q. I have a $103 fine on my account for an overdue book. Do I have to pay the entire amount?

A. The book you have borrowed is so overdue that our library system assumes that the book is lost. Overdue fines have stopped accruing at $3 and a $100 lost-item-replacement fee has been assessed. If you return the book, the $100 fee is waived, but you still have to pay the $3 overdue fine.

Q. How does the print quota work?

A. Full time students are allotted $60 towards printing while part time students get $20. This allotment is for the entire year, resetting in the summer. If you are running low, students can go to the Wildcard Office to add more funds. After this allotment is depleted, print jobs will automatically start to draw from the Novabucks on your Wildcard.

Q. How many books can I check out, and how long can I have them for?

A. The number of books and length of time you have them for are all dependent on your status; luckily this handy chart breaks it down.


FAQs at the Desk by Raamaan McBride, writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team and specialist on the Access Services team.


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Distractions From Finals

As finals come into full swing, the Library can provide you with many places to study but also many opportunities to procrastinate. Take a break from that mountain of schoolwork. Sure you should be studying right now, but let’s not kid ourselves; this is what really happens when you open the textbook:

 

Here are some more productive ways to put off studying for finals as long as possible. Enjoy your break:

Movies/TV Shows

Falvey has a vast array of movies and TV shows that are free to check out, from new hits such as Gravity to classics like Casablanca. Rewatching the entire series of The Wire seems like a perfect excuse to stop studying. I am sure your professor will award you extra points when you explain the importance of the Battle of Gettysburg by comparing it to policing strategies in Baltimore.

 

 

Discover your family tree

Be honest: what sounds more interesting, studying for economics or finding out your ancestors were Vikings? Lucky for you the Library subscribes to Ancestry.com, which encompasses a vast collection of genealogical data which traces the history of millions of individuals going in some cases as far back as 1300.”

 

 

 

Learn a new language

What if your history professor throws a curveball and writes the final in Italian? Good thing Falvey has an enormous amount of resources dedicated to help you learn foreign languages. Among the languages with guides are Spanish, Italian, French and German. Worst case scenario you can order that hard-to-pronounce pasta dish from Bertucci’s like a champ.

 

 

Audio Books

Around finals time many students have the feeling of too much to do and not enough time. How does your professor reasonably believe all this work can be completed unless you forgo exercise, eating and sleeping? Enter Falvey and its collection of over 2000 audio books. Having trouble finding the time to finish Pride and Prejudice? Just pick up the audio book from the Library and you will be multitasking your way to an “A” in no time.

 

 

However you study for finals, just remember to stay calm and collected. You made it to the last week of the semester, your sanity and your lack of sleep will eventually recover. Good luck and have a great break!

 


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Quick Hits: Halloween

This Halloween, as you indulge in the typical horror film, candy eating and apple bobbing, try to think about all of the scary things that surround you daily. You might not even realize how terrifying the Villanova experience actually is, so the following are some of the top scary moments at Villanova that we all experience year-round:

1. Losing Your Wildcard

The two phases you go through when you lose your Wildcard are extreme shock/frustration and depression when you realize the replacement card costs $30.

 

 

2. Falvey West

I am pretty sure I see this guy every time I go into the Falvey West Stacks

 

 

3. Scary Tunnel

It is scary enough walking underneath a train line, but the fear is compounded by the sound of a million crickets chirping and the flickering lights.

 

I feel like every time I make it to the other side I just escaped from the cave in The Descent.

 

4. Running out of points before the end of the semester

Cue the frantic call to Mom detailing how you are on the verge of death from starvation.

 

5. Tolentine Hall

Frankly, the entire building deserves to be on this list, with the seemingly endless hallways and the 19th century Gothic look. Even the chairs in the basement are meant to scare you

 

6. Squirrels

The squirrels around campus are vicious and bold. I would not be surprised if I saw this on campus this Halloween:

 

7. Amtrak Trains

The exact expression on people’s faces when they first experience the Amtrak train careening down the tracks:

 

 

8. Getting around on campus at night and just missing the shuttle

The campus is especially eerie at night, and your only escape from loneliness and despair is slowly pulling away from you:

 

 

9. Losing a library book

 


No, we will not steal your soul like in the movie Mortal Kombat, but it is still a scary experience. To avoid this, remember to check your library account online and renew your material.

Browse our collection for Halloween inspired movies and books. Have a fun and safe Halloween.

(Gifs provided by Reactiongifs.com and Giphy.com.)

Quick Hits by Raamaan McBride, writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team and specialist on the Access Services Team.

 


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Temporary Internet Service Provider Outage Affects Distance Library Users

There appears to be a network outage in the Philadelphia area on one of the routers utilized by the University’s internet service provider (ISP). UNIT is working with them to resolve the routing problem.

In the meantime, using the University’s Virtual Private Network (VPN) appears to be an acceptable short term work around  for faculty and staff. Here are instructions on how to install/use it.

http://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/unit/MobileComputing/gateway0.html

Students who live outside of the Philadelphia area may contact us directly for research assistance at either 610-519-4270 or at ref@villanova.edu. Our online chat may also be available from the homepage. Look for the green “Ask a Librarian: Live Chat” button in the lower right hand corner of the screen.

We apologize for any inconvenience this network outage may cause our users and colleagues.

 


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Blog round-up: ten quick hits from across campus

TEN QUICK HITS2

The first article in this series concentrated on content update from Falvey’s reference blogs. From here on out, this blog content roundup will feature ten quick hits from across campus, including highlights from blogs of the library.

1. Find out if that “perfect idea” of yours has some merit.

2. This student played tic-tac-toe against a Supreme Court Justice over the summer break.

3. Wonder if there were any werewolf sightings?

4. Alert to all political science, French major, and study abroad aficionados.

5. The one interview question (directive?) you should be prepared to answer.

6. Pretty cool to be a part of this.

7. At least one new student is enjoying their time here.

8 The Department of Public Administration has two new professors, one who loves to cook beef wellington and the other can weld!

9. The English Department hosted a happy hour at the Library!

10. Speaking of happy hours, Villanova Theatre shows us how to make cocktails as classy as the cast from Fallen Angels.

 


Blog roundup by Raamaan McBride, writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team and specialist on the Access Services Team.


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Browse (and bookmark) our array of academic blogs

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Locate the blogs by clicking “Blogs” at the left of the homepage menu.

There are many ways to stay up to date with news from the Library, from following us with social media to talking with a librarian one on one. Arguably, the easiest and most in depth method is reading the multitude of blogs the Library manages. The library news blog is the best place for general news and events; this blog is maintained by the Communication and Service Promotion team. The following are the research related blogs different departments curate:

Blue Electrode: Sparking between Silicon and Paper is all about Digital Library news. Michael Foight is in charge of this blog which features recent content updates, such as new e-books added to the Digital Library and the completion of a podcast. Business Reference, on the other hand, is the premier destination for business information maintained by Linda Hauck.

Merrill Stein and Jutta Seibert contribute to the History & Political Science blog, which is gearing up a for a massive World War I exhibit; please follow this for more information in the future. Nursing keeps you up to date with all news in the nursing world. A recent blog post revealed which county in Pennsylvania is the healthiest. The Social Sciences blog offers updates on new videos and books that were recently ordered, among other things. Kristyna Carroll, the communications liaison librarian, contributes to this blog the most.

Falvey’s Technology Team created the Library Technology Development blog to keep patrons in the know about recent updates to Vufind and other library related software. The Philosophy blog is mainly geared towards graduate students in that program but welcomes all readers. Content is usually generated from the Department of Philosophy with occasional stories from the liaison librarian, Nik Fogle. Golden Electrode: the Aurelius Digital Humanities Initiative Blog was created by Laura Bang to cover all things related to Digital Humanities.

Whatever your area of interest, the Library has you covered in a multitude of outlets: blogs, social media, events, and, in the near future, podcasts.


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And the winner of our Literary Bracketology contest is…

It was an intense battle last month but Gandalf proved to be too much for the rest of the competition.  This year’s battle proved to be extremely popular with over 300 submissions online and in paper. Thanks to everyone who voted and participated in the contest!

imgresShishav Parajuli was the lucky winner this year out of over 150 entries. As winner of the annual Bracketology showdown, he was awarded a book of his choice from the field of 64.  Shishav, a graduate student majoring in Political Science, decided on the book Invitation to a Beheading by Vladimir Nabokov. (If you’ll recall, Nabokov’s character Lolita lost in the second round!) See you next spring for more literary madness! Hope you play along!


Article by Raamaan McBride, writer on the Communication and Service Promotion team and specialist on the Access Services Team.


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Last Modified: May 22, 2014

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