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Sharks, Sharks and More Sharks – Falvey Has Information

  • Posted by: Robin Bowles
  • Posted Date: July 25, 2017
  • Filed Under: Library News

photograph of shark

As part of Falvey’s observation of Shark Week, Robin Bowles, Nursing and Life Sciences librarian, prepared this “Dig Deeper” about shark resources available in Falvey.

Dig Deeper:

Great White Sharks: The Biology of Carcharodon Carcharias. Let’s get going with the most famous of the sharks, the Great White. This book covers everything you might wish to know about these masterful hunters of the sea.

The Devil’s Teeth: A True Story of Obsession and Survival Among America’s Great White Sharks. Summer reading, but maybe not for the beach? Join journalist Susan Casey on her journey to Southeast Farallon Island off the coast of California to a shark enclave like no other.

Shark Trouble: True Stories About Sharks and the Sea. Best-selling author, master storyteller and shark fanatic Peter Benchley, author of Jaws and The Deep turns his hand to non-fiction for tales of sharks, humans and where they collide in this thrilling collection of shark tales.

Web of Science.” Ready to start searching the journal literature for more scholarly shark articles? Start with “Web of Science,” our best search engine for life sciences literature. Don’t forget to use the biological class name Chondrichthyes, which includes all sharks, skates and rays, to begin your dive into the shark literature.

Have a favorite shark species? Here’s some of the scientific names for the most popular sharks:

Great white shark – Carcharodon carcharias

Tiger shark – Galeocerdo cuvier

Great hammerhead shark – Sphyrna mokarran

Shortfin mako shark – Isurus oxyrinchus

 And my personal favorite

Lemon shark – Negaprion brevirostris

 Robin’s Complete List of Interesting Shark Reading at Falvey. Even more shark books for the truly obsessive.


Headshot of Robin BowlesRobin Bowles, Nursing and Life Sciences librarian, is in room 220. Telephone: 610-519-8129. Email: Robin.Bowles@villanova.edu

 

 

 

Photograph of Alfred FryAlfred Fry, Science and Engineering librarian, is also available for research help. Office” room 224, telephone: 610-519-4283, email: Alfred.Fry@villanova.edu

 

 

 

Robin Bowles’ and Alfred Fry’s photographs courtesy of Falvey Memorial Library. Shark photograph from pixabay.com.


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Internet Explorer isn’t just clunky and slow; it’s now also a danger to your computer!

 

 

The US Department of Homeland Security’s United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team has released a major warning suggesting people stop using the popular Internet Explorer web browser until further notice. Security flaws in the browser allow malicious programs to be installed on a computer without the user’s knowledge simply by opening an email or visiting an infected website. While a fix from Microsoft is expected shortly, this may be the perfect time to upgrade to a safer, more modern browser.

For more about the security problem, check out the following news coverage:

Washington Post: “Internet Explorer bug offers yet another reason to upgrade from Windows XP

USA Today:Homeland Security: Don’t use IE due to bug

National Public Radio: “U.S. Tells Users To Stop Using Internet Explorer For Now

As alternatives, the Library recommends the Mozilla Firefox browser, which is available for free download for all operating systems at http://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/new/

The widely popular Google Chrome browser is also free for all systems athttps://www.google.com/intl/en/chrome/browser/

Apple’s Safari browser is free to the public for Windows and Apple Computers from https://www.apple.com/safari/

These three have no known major security flaws and work well with the library’s resources.


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‘Twas the Week Before Finals: S.O.S. Robin’s Signs of Spring

Procrastination

Have you heard of the Pomodoro technique? It’s a time management technique developed by university student Francesco Cirillo back in the ’80s. The basics are simple:

  • Set a timer for 25 minutes.
  • Work solidly for those 25 minutes.
  • Ignore all distractions—email, your cat, birds chirping, roommates, giant lizard people—until the timer goes off.
  • Set your timer for 5 minutes, get up from your chair and take a break: get a cup of coffee, pet the cat, read Falvey’s blog, check Facebook, etc.
  • When the timer goes off, set it for 25 minutes again and get back to work.
  • Every 2 hours (or 4 work blocks) take a big break of at least 20 minutes off to take a walk, eat a meal, or save the world from lizard people.

This technique takes me from Queen of Procrastination to a work-doing machine.

If you’re into apps, there is a huge variety of Pomodoro timer apps.

On Android we liked Concentrato Pomodoro Timer, Clockwork Tomato and Pomodoro Tasks.

On iOS we liked DropTime, Pomodoro List and Po-Pomodoro.

Forgetfulness

From re-memorizing the vocabulary from the start of the semester to nailing down those last few dozen facts, studying for finals requires some hard-core memorization. The tried and true standby, flashcards, has morphed into a huge variety of study apps for your smartphone or tablet. The three we liked the best were—

Studyblue
has a huge pre-made library of flashcards or make your own and share them with your classmates. Schedule your study time and StudyBlue sends you a text message when it’s time to study from your smartphone, tablet, or computer.

Evernote Peek
lets you create and study flashcards on your iPad with a twist. Use a magnetic cover to read the question and then Peek to see if your answer was correct.

Anki
is opensource flashcards specifically with scientific or mathematical markup. On your computer, their website,  or on a mobile device, make cards with pictures, video, anything you like.

PANIC!!!

First, take a deep breath.

Okay.

Whatever it is that’s freaking you out right now, chances are good we have something that will help …

at the Library!

The Library isn’t just all heavy books you need for papers; it’s also study guides, helpful videos, thought provoking reading and above all …

helpful people.

The Library is staffed until midnight Sundays-Thursdays and, starting Monday April 28, until 3 a.m. every day except Saturday until finals are over.

See our webpage for detailed hours.

You can also send us your questions from the comfort of … well, anywhere!

You can email, call, text, or chat us (graphics) your questions to be answered by our helpful array of subject specialist librarians.

Senioritis

Seniors, we all know how it is. The weather warms, the last few things on your to-do list are falling away and so is your motivation. Here are a few things you may want to do with your last weeks on campus:

– Remember your past … and your library books:

Now’s a great time to check in on your favorite professors and staff here at Villanova one last time.

Get letters of recommendation, secure contacts for the future,

and remember to return any outstanding library books! Having books on your account can prevent you from getting your diploma on graduation day, so stop in and make sure your account is clear with us.

– Look to your future:

On Monday, May 19 it will seem like a whole new world. Be sure you know what direction you’re heading by stopping by the Career Center to meet with one of their professional career counselors or peer career assistants who can help you with your resume or show you the GoNova Jobs listings or help you take advantage of any of their other resources.

While you’re at it, look to your future as a Villanova alumni by stopping by the Library to apply for your alumni access card which lets you keep on borrowing library materials and ensures continued access to our electronic resources from within the building.

– Take care of yourself!

With all the excitement you’ll be tempted to skip sleep and meals to try to squeeze as much as possible into these last few weeks. Use common sense, however; regular sleep and meals help you keep these important memories for a lifetime and also make sure you won’t be mistaken for a raccoon in your graduation photos with Grandma.

 by Robin Bowles, research librarian on the Academic Integration Team and a liaison librarian to the Villanova University Biology Department.


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Plagiarism: Strategies in Research and Writing

Learning Commons LOGO-WEB2 smallWhat do Jane Goodall, Martin Luther King Jr., Vladimir Putin, Stephen Harper, George Harrison, J.K. Rowling, Maureen Dowd, and Joe Biden all have in common?

All of the above, as well as countless others, have been accused of plagiarizing their sources.

While we tend to think of plagiarism as some secret process done in the dark of night to cover for shoddy work, it is possible to engage in plagiarism simply by trying to incorporate information from sources you did not fully read or understand. Without a good grasp of your source and your topic, it can become all too easy to plagiarize your source without intending to be dishonest.

With this in mind we welcome Steven Schultz from the Writing Center with a few words about how to effectively use and attribute sources in your next paper.

Start by embracing the research process. Locate sources early and incorporate them into the very first draft of a paper. This approach produces better writing than shoehorning a couple quotes into the final version and gives you time to understand each source and its relationship to your topic. Sure, some sources—numbers, data, and statistics—may appear straightforward enough, but complex thinkers such as St. Augustine, Friedrich Nietzsche and Adrienne Rich probably won’t be. Also, use sources for more than just garden-variety support by including some whose perspective on your topic diverges from your own. Critical debate enriches a paper.

Writers use three techniques to integrate outside sources: summary, paraphrase, and direct quotation. An effective writer chooses among them like a painter chooses among paintbrushes with bristles ranging from broad to fine: each technique conveys a different level of detail. A summary offers the broadest overview of a source by restating a main idea, thesis statement, or a lengthy passage. Think of summary as the view from an airplane cruising at 30,000 feet: big features are enhanced but small ones may be invisible. Summary is effective technique for condensing long sources such as a research study or a book chapter.

Quotation is the opposite of summary: it preserves the original writer’s exact words and reproduces all the original detail. Quote when rephrasing an idea would lessen its impact or when including the original writer’s words enhances your credibility. We quote Ernest Hemingway, not paraphrase him.

Paraphrasing someone else’s idea means being able to explain it in your own words, not just restate it. If a writer includes an idea from an outside source by changing a few though not all of the words from the original but still provides a citation, is that an acceptable paraphrase? Not so much. Faulty paraphrases like this are called “patchwriting,” a term used to describe writing that attempts to paraphrase a source but fails because it either 1) retains most of its wording from the original source or 2) replaces select key terms with synonyms but otherwise reproduces the source’s syntax. Both are problems and usually happen when a writer doesn’t fully comprehend the material she or he is attempting to paraphrase. In fact, done well, paraphrasing is a great way to draw attention to a particular facet of an idea or offer a new interpretation of it.

Lastly, vary how you use these techniques. Not only will it make your writing style more engaging, but by adapting your technique to each source’s purpose, you’ll demonstrate to your audience that you’ve thought about each source’s unique relationship to your argument and therefore be more persuasive.

Are you having problems working with your sources? If so it is time to contact the Writing Center and make an appointment to work with one of their phenomenal tutors. Appointments can be made by phone at 610-519-4604 or in person at the Writing Center in the Learning Commons on Falvey’s 2nd floor. Act fast though because appointment slots fill quickly.

Robin Bowles is a research librarian on the Academic Integration Team and a liaison librarian to the Villanova University School of Nursing.

 


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BioDigital Human

  • Posted by: Robin Bowles
  • Posted Date: March 12, 2012
  • Filed Under: Library News

BioDigital Human is the latest in interactive, detailed maps of the human body available on the Internet. This free web tool centers around a static model of a human figure beginning with just a skeleton visible which can be rotated and scaled to view from any angle. You can control the visibility of not just the many top level systems (skeletal, digestive, nervous, cardiovascular, and many others) but also the individual components of those systems down to the individual muscles, organs, and nerves on the right and left sides.

Each piece can be highlighted, has a label of its full name with an audio pronunciation and an information window with links to related conditions from Medline Plus and further anatomical information from Wikipedia. A search box allows you to search for a structure by name so if you don’t remember where the pronator quadratus muscle is it quickly gives you the choice of left or right before making the muscle visible and zooming to its location.

The viewer also provides tools like “dissection mode” which allows you to remove structures one at a time, delving into the body from the outside in, an “x-ray” view that shows all structures transparently allowing you to see through them to what lies beneath, and isolation view that temporarily singles out a structure you have highlighted without losing your other visible structures.

Using these tools you can easily create your own personalized views with the exact choice of structures visible and angle of view. You can even “bookmark” these views for later and view bookmarks others have made public as well as take snapshots of interesting views that can be saved to your computer for later.

Today the BioDigital Human tool is in a free Beta testing mode and free for anyone to use. You can find it at http://www.biodigitalhuman.com using either the Firefox or Chrome web browser.

MORE NEWS: Falvey Membership to Hindawi Benefits Villanova Scholarly Community


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Last Modified: March 12, 2012

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