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Weekend Recs: Holocaust Remembrance

Happy Friday, Wildcats! Falvey Library is delivering you another semester of Weekend Recs, a blog dedicated to filling you in on what to read, listen to, and watch over the weekend. Annie, a graduate assistant from the Communication department, scours the internet, peruses the news, and digs through book stacks to find new, relevant, and thought-provoking content that will challenge you and prepare you for the upcoming week. 

Today, Jan. 27, is International Holocaust Remembrance Day, a day dedicated to remembering the appalling human rights atrocities of the Nazis and genocide against Jewish people during World War II. With Jewish hate, Holocaust denial, and antisemitic conspiracy theories gaining a recent (and celebrity) upsurgence, it is important to remember the Holocaust as a very, very real and horrifying historical event that still has impacts to this day. In dedication to Holocaust Remembrance Day, this weekend’s recs will help bring this topic into focus.

If you have 8 minutes…and get depressed by the horrific realities of the Holocaust, read this article from the New York Times. Although the Holocaust is never a light-hearted topic, this article profiles the actions of Adolfo Kaminsky, a forger who was able to save thousands of Jewish people living in France during World War II.

If you have 10 minutes…and want to learn more about antisemitism, read this article. It provides working definitions and examples of antisemitism and Holocaust denial and distortion.

If you have 12 minutes…and want to learn about some of the non-Jewish targets of the Holocaust and Nazi regime, read this article from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM). Groups such as Romani people, gay people, disabled people, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and Slavic people, among others, were all targeted and persecuted to varying degrees. A late Ukrainian family friend of mine was actually a survivor of a Nazi work camp as a teenager before coming to the U.S.

If you have 14 minutes…and need to brush up on your Holocaust history (thank you, American education system), watch this Crash Course video. It recaps the details of what is widely considered to be the worst and most horrific genocide and human rights crisis in human history.

Photo by Ann Buht

If you have 15 minutes…and want to learn about the Roma Holocaust, read this article from USHMM. Romani people were horribly impacted by the Nazi regime and subject to racial genocide.

Bonus: check out this blog from the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust explaining the debates surrounding commemorating the Roma Holocaust and how it has largely remained unrecognized.

If you have 30 minutes…and want to hear first-person accounts of the Holocaust, check out USHMM’s “Meet Holocaust Survivors” profiles. This page features dozens of profiles of Holocaust survivors and their stories of survival, loss, grief, horror, and hope.

If you have 2 hours and 7 minutes…and are a movie person (or a fan of Jessica Chastain), watch The Zookeeper’s Wife, a based-on-a-true-story film about a Polish woman who hid hundreds of Jewish people fleeing from the Nazis in her family’s zoo during World War II.

Bonus: check out this list of film recs from the Jewish Heritage Center of Western Canada for more.

If you have 6 hours…and want to read something that is both an autobiographical account of Holocaust survival and a practical self-help book, read Man’s Search for Meaning: An Introduction to Logotherapy by Viktor E. Frankl, available at Falvey. This book provides a powerful lesson in finding meaning in your life and, on a personal note, is also one of my mom’s favorite books of all time.

If you have 10 hours…and want to read arguably the most iconic Holocaust autobiography, read The Diary of a Young Girl: The Definitive Edition by Anne Frank, available at Falvey.

Bonus: if you’re more of a movie person, watch The Diary of Anne Frank film, available online in 4-parts through Falvey.


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Library. 


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Peek at the Week: January 23

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

In Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Ron Weasley, speculating what Hermione Granger would do, said, “When in doubt, go to the library.”

Happy Monday, Wildcats! The beginning of the semester is typically one of the lightest and least stressful times in the lives of college students, aside from, of course, the breaks. This low-stress point is the perfect opportunity to develop some helpful habits, whether it be for self-care, studying, social interaction, or anything else that helps you thrive.

We, at Falvey, would like to throw our hat in the ring. Not sure how the library can help you? Check out this guide to our services and resources. Whether you need help finding sources for or fleshing out a paper (reach out to one of our amazing subject librarians), getting materials you need for class (check out this Affordable Materials Project guide to saving money), or even just a good place to study, getting in the habit of using Falvey’s resources is a habit that will help you thrive. So, this semester, when you’re in doubt, come to the library. It might just save you a whole lot of time and stress.

THIS WEEK AT FALVEY

Monday, January 23

Mindfulness Monday | 1-1:30 p.m. | Virtual | Free & Open to Villanova Students, Faculty, and Staff

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Tuesday, January 24

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Wednesday, January 25

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Thursday, January 26

“From Having a Dream to Becoming a NASA Leader” | 4-6 p.m. | Connelly Center Cinema | Free & Open to Villanova Community

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Friday, January 27

De-carbonizing Villanova: A Townhall on Fossil Fuel Divestment | 1-2:30 p.m. | Connelly Center Cinema | Zoom Option Available | Free & Open to Villanova Students, Faculty, and Staff

Sunday, January 29

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 3-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

HOLIDAYS THIS WEEK

Tomorrow, Jan. 24, is Belly Laugh Day. Whether its prompted by a funny TikTok, a friend, or even yourself, bring some laughter into your day. After all, laughter is the best medicine.

Photo by Clay Banks on Unsplash

National Compliment Day is also tomorrow. If you’re feeling up to it, spread some positivity and compliment some of the people in your life. It could be a heartfelt compliment to someone you love or simply telling a stranger you think their shoes are cool. You never know what the simplest things could mean to someone.

Saturday, Jan. 28, is National Lego Day. If you’re feeling creative and need a hands-on activity to do, even while binge-watching a show or listening to a podcast, find yourself a fun Lego set to build. Don’t have any Lego? You can still celebrate this (admittedly consumerist) holiday by watching a film in the Lego Cinematic Universe. (The Lego Batman Movie is always a great choice).

This Sunday, Jan. 29 is National Puzzle Day. Give your brain a fun challenge and solve a puzzle, whether it’s an actual puzzle, a Rubik’s Cube, or even a game of Sudoku. As a novice puzzle enjoyer myself, I will be breaking out one of the puzzles I got for Christmas and, as always, playing Killer Sudoku on my phone.


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Library. 


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Weekend Recs: Film Awards Season

Happy Friday, Wildcats! Falvey Library is delivering you another semester of Weekend Recs, a blog dedicated to filling you in on what to read, listen to, and watch over the weekend. Annie, a graduate assistant from the Communication department, scours the internet, peruses the news, and digs through book stacks to find new, relevant, and thought-provoking content that will challenge you and prepare you for the upcoming week. 

As we embark into the new year, film awards season is upon us in full swing, a time of the year where the “best” movies and all the talented people who made them happen are publicly recognized. By now, several of the major award shows have aired, but one of the most highly anticipated and prolific award looms ahead, the Oscars. This weekend’s recs will help you get caught up on some of this year’s winners and upcoming nominees.

If you have 5 minutes…and think awards season is a bit over-hyped or kooky, read the first part of this New York Times opinion piece. It’s a short yet interesting read on how the Oscars are, in the author Frank Bruni’s own words, “insanity.”

If you have 7 minutes…and want to scroll through a list of the Golden Globe awardees this year, check out this Vanity Fair article. (I’m personally elated that Angela Bassett was recognized for her emotional role in Black Panther: Wakanda Forever, but as an MCU fan, I am a bit biased).

If you have 15 minutes…and are more interested in the celebrity fashion, check out this Elle slideshow of some of the looks from the 2023 Critics Choice Awards. My personal favorite looks came from Janelle Monáe, Jenny Slate, Kate Hudson, and Angela Bassett.

If you have 20 minutes…and are an avid IMDB-appreciator, check out this collection of the IMDB staff’s favorite films and series of 2022. It has some more underrated additions that will likely get overlooked for awards.

If you have 2 hours and 19 minutes…and are into endearingly and comedically corny sci-fi action adventure films (or just into Michelle Yeoh), watch Everything Everywhere All at Once. This movie is practically the darling of this award season (and, as I argue, rightfully so).

If you have 5 hours…and are a diehard fan of shows like The Office, Parks and Rec, and Brooklyn Nine Nine, watch the first season of Abbott Elementary. The show’s second season and its lead Quinta Brunson and supporting Tyler James Williams (yes, Chris) won Golden Globes and Critics Choice awards for this Philadelphia-set sitcom about the highs and lows of being an elementary school teacher, including incompetent administrators, crippling under-funding, and awkward yet well-meaning coworkers.

Bonus: if you were ever a fan of Shameless, check out Jeremy Allen White (yes, Lip Gallagher), who picked up the Male Actor in a Comedy or Musical award, in The Bear, a raunchy dramedy series set in Chicago.


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Library. 


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Peek at the Week: January 16

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

In The Alchemist, Paul Coelho wrote, “And, when you want something, all the universe conspires in helping you to achieve it.”

Welcome back, Wildcats! I hope your Winter Break was just what you needed to start this semester off with optimism and  excitement. Perhaps it’s your second semester as a Wildcat, like me, or perhaps it’s your last. Either way, make it a semester to remember. While positive affirmations and manifestations might not completely change what’s out of our control, they might break down some of the mental blocks we didn’t know we created for ourselves.

THIS WEEK AT FALVEY

Tuesday, January 17

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Wednesday, January 18

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Textbooks and Tacos | 5-6 p.m. | Room 205 | Free & Open to Villanova Community | Refreshments Served

Thursday, January 19

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Sunday, January 22

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

HOLIDAYS THIS WEEK

As many of you know, today, Jan. 16, is Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a day commemorating the iconic Civil Rights activist and remembering the courage of those who fought for the civil rights of millions of Americans. (Check out our latest Weekend Recs for some awesome MLK Day recs if you haven’t already). Here are some other holidays coming up this week:

This Thursday, Jan. 19, is National Popcorn Day, a day for enjoying this buttery, salty treat. Celebrate by popping some popcorn (without burning it, or your room/housemates will suffer with the smell) or by swinging by the store. If you’re looking for something to do off-campus, this could be the perfect excuse to see a movie.

Friday, Jan. 20, is National Coffee Break Day. Feeling like Winter Break was a little too short? Take a break from studying, work, or whatever is preoccupying your brain and have a cup of your preferred coffee. (Although I’m a diehard iced coffee person, this weather has me considering switching to hot). And, if you’re doing work in Falvey, you can swing by Holy Grounds for some convenient caffeine.

For all the Sriracha and Tabasco lovers, National Hot Sauce Day is this Sunday, Jan. 22. If you’re in the mood for some spicy food, celebrate the holiday by accompanying a meal with your go-to hot sauce.

Sunday is also the first day of Chinese New Year. This year is the year of the Water Rabbit. For anyone celebrating, I wish you a good and happy new year!


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Library. 


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Weekend Recs: Revisiting Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Happy Friday, Wildcats! Falvey Library is delivering you another semester of Weekend Recs, a blog dedicated to filling you in on what to read, listen to, and watch over the weekend. Annie, a graduate assistant from the Communication department, scours the internet, peruses the news, and digs through book stacks to find new, relevant, and thought-provoking content that will challenge you and prepare you for the upcoming week. 

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is without a doubt the most remembered and revered Civil Rights activist in the United States. From his rise to prominence with his activism and work with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) to his horrific assassination, and with an entire day dedicated to his life, his modern acclaim is unsurprising.

Consequently, as Civil rights and racial justice have progressed (although the progress is sometimes very meager and disappointing), the radical nature of Dr. King has largely been replaced with a liberalized image, a man seeking moderate change. Yet, in the 1950s and 60s, Dr. King was anything but a liberal or moderate figure, he was directly challenging the U.S. government, a government that very much needed to be challenged. Many of the choices he made were not just moral, but strategic and trailblazing. In honor of MLK Day this upcoming Monday, this weekend’s recs will hopefully shine a slightly different light on Martin Luther King Jr. and his philosophy, politics, and activism.

If you have 12 minutes…and want to focus less on the past and more on the future, read this article in Counter Punch. Meyer, Jeffers, and Ragland place an emphasis on learning from organizers and activists of the past to combat racial hate and violence today, and they push back against the modern oppositional dichotomization of Malcolm X and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

If you have 13 minutes…and need to brush up on your Civil Rights history, watch this Crash Course video on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the SCLC.

If you have 17 minutes…and want to read one of his most famous works, read “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” available at Falvey. This open letter was written by Dr. King after he was arrested during the nonviolent Birmingham protest campaign in 1963 and offers his guiding beliefs, arguments, and principles.

If you have 20 minutes…and only plan to read one thing from this list, read “MLK Now” by Brandon Terry, available online through Falvey. This piece is truly a standout work that revisits and offers a reconsideration of Dr. King and his work in today’s age and what we can and should learn from him.

If you have 26 minutes…and want to hear from Dr. King himself, watch this NBC interview with Dr. King. This interview really sheds light on Dr. King’s perspective on his Civil Rights work and where he saw the movement heading 11 months before his assassination.

If you have 30 minutes…and are interested in learning about King’s dedication to strategic nonviolence, read Karuna Mantena’s essay, “Showdown for Nonviolence: The Theory and Practice of Nonviolent Politics” by Karuna Mantena, available (in the 4th chapter of To Shape a New World) at Falvey.

If you have 2 hours and 8 minutes…and still haven’t seen it, watch Ava DuVernay’s Selma, available in Falvey’s DVD Collection. Although the film’s sole focus is not on Dr. King, it shows his efforts to get the Civil Rights Act of 1964 passed and puts his courage and the violence with which he and other Civil Rights activists were met into perspective.

If you have 11 hours…and want to read essays exploring Dr. King and his work from a variety of different perspectives, read Shelby and Terry’s To Shape a New World: Essays on the Political Philosophy of Martin Luther King, Jr, available in Falvey. This book has some great essays that look at King through diverse and interesting lenses.


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Library.


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Peek at the Week: December 19

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

In The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, Gandalf said, “The world is not in your books and maps, it’s out there.”

Happy Monday, Wildcats, the final Monday of the semester! With finals ending tomorrow, the semester is quickly coming to a close, and Winter Break is almost upon us.

For Winter Break, I leave you with this: Take a break from all the textbooks, notes, and academic pressures (and maybe even a brief hiatus from social media, if you’re feeling particularly drained), and enjoy the world. I wish you an enjoyable and fulfilling break. See you next semester!

THIS WEEK AT FALVEY

See you back next semester for some more awesome events at Falvey! 

HOLIDAYS THIS WEEK

Tomorrow, Dec. 20, is Games Day. Falling on the last day of finals, Games Day is a great opportunity to decompress with some friends or family. (After the past week, I think we all could use some decompression). Whether you’re into video games, card games, or board games, awaken your inner child and play a game. I know I’ll be challenging my parents to a (sometimes heated) game of Scrabble.

As some of you may know, this Wednesday, Dec 21, is the Winter Solstice, marking both the shortest day (of daylight) in the entire year and the first official day of winter. Fittingly, Wednesday is also Humbug Day, a day for any resident Grinches and Christmas detesters. It is also a day for anyone to express their negative feelings and stress about Christmas and the December holiday season. If this fits you, Dec. 21st is your day to shine.

National Christmas Movie Marathon Day is this Friday, Dec. 23. What a better way to gear up for Christmas with a festive movie marathon? Celebrate by watching some of your favorite Christmas films, whether they’re classics, like How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, or nontraditional picks, such as Die Hard and Black Christmas. If you’re having trouble picking, check out our latest Weekend Recs post on Christmas specials for some inspiration.

Christmas Eve shares its Dec. 24th spot with another festive holiday, National Eggnog Day. If you’re a fan of this creamy winter beverage, celebrate the day by grabbing yourself a (spiked, if you’re over the age of 21) glass and toast to a joyous and hopefully stress-free holiday season. Although the best eggnog is usually homemade, there are some solid store-bought options to try out if you’re not much of a mixologist.

 


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Library.


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Weekend Recs: Christmas Specials

Happy Friday, Wildcats! Falvey Library is delivering you another semester of Weekend Recs, a blog dedicated to filling you in on what to read, listen to, and watch over the weekend. Annie, a graduate assistant from the Communication department, scours the internet, peruses the news, and digs through book stacks to find new, relevant, and thought-provoking content that will challenge you and prepare you for the upcoming week. 

Christmas is a little over a week away, and this means that Christmas specials will begin (if they already haven’t) filling the airtime of most cable channels and streaming recommendation lists. In the spirit of the season, or simply as a way to bring some merriness into the bleak week of finals, this weekend’s recs will share some Christmas specials for festive enthusiasts and Grinches alike.

If you have 4 minutes and 18 seconds…and need some (violent) humor in your day, watch this SNL “A Christmas Carol” sketch. If you’re a fan of old SNL, you’ll be happy to know it features prior cast members, Steve Martin and Martin Short.

If you have 22 minutes…and need some Michael Scott cringe (or hilarity), watch “Christmas Party” from The Office‘s 2nd season, available in Falvey’s DVD Collection. Although The Office has quite a few Christmas episodes, “Christmas Party” was the first and, arguably, one of the best.

If you have another 22 minutes…and look forward to another Belcher family Christmas each year, watch the most recent Bob’s Burgers holiday special, “The Plight Before Christmas.”

If you have 51 minutes…and are a fan of the family-friendly classics, watch The Year Without a Santa Claus. If you have cable, you will likely have ample opportunities to catch this old-timey Christmas special, and it is, in my opinion, one of the bests. (I mean, the Snow Miser and Heat Miser songs earn their iconic status).

If you have 1 hour and 28 minutes…and have a chaotic family that keeps the holidays interesting, watch Four Christmases. An ode to children of divorce and emotionally immature parental figures, this Reese Witherspoon/Vince Vaughn comedy might just make you feel a bit better (or at the very least, validated) about your Christmas-time family antics and woes.

If you have 1 hour and 45 minutes…and want to watch a slightly newer “classic,” check out the ultimate Jim Carey holiday film, Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas, available in Falvey’s DVD Collection. In all honesty, this is my favorite Christmas movie of all time, so I might be a bit biased when I say it is worth a watch, but…it’s worth a watch.

Photo by Samira Rahi on Unsplash

Bonus: this recommendation practically goes without saying, but watch Elf this holiday season, also available in Falvey’s DVD Collection.

If you have 2 hours and 7 minutes…and are tired of re-watching old Christmas films, watch Spirited. Released over Thanksgiving, this film updates Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol with a comedic twist. Plus, as a bonus, it stars Ryan Reynolds and Will Ferrell.

Bonus: For all the MCU fans, Iron Man 3 and Hawkeye are both set around Christmas time and are perfect for those who want something only tangentially related to the holidays.


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Library.


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Peek at the Week: December 12

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

In The Dark Knight, Harvey Dent said, “The night is darkest just before the dawn, and I promise you, the dawn is coming.”

Happy Last Day of Classes, Wildcats! As the final day of classes, today foreshadows the impending wave of finals, a week full of late nights, term papers, cram study sessions, stress, exams, and caffeine, lots of caffeine. In my experience, finals week is a collective experience of equal parts togetherness and misery (unless you’re the Hermione Granger type, I suppose). We’re all in this together, but we all wish it was over.

Today also marks a little over a week until winter break, a whole month where you’re not required to sit through another lecture or work through another lab. So, Wildcats, the dawn is coming. Good luck!

THIS WEEK AT FALVEY

Monday, December 12

Mindfulness Monday | 1-1:30 p.m. | Virtual | Free & Open to Villanova Students, Faculty, and Staff

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Tuesday, December 13

Stress-Less Healthy Happy Hour with Pals for Life | 11 a.m.-1 p.m. | Room 205 | Free

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Fall 2022 Film & Philosophy Series: François Truffaut’s Day for Night (La nuit américaine) (1973) | 5:30 p.m. | Room 415 | Free & Open to Villanova Community | Refreshments Served

Wednesday, December 14

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Thursday, December 15

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Sunday, December 18

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 3-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

HOLIDAYS THIS WEEK

Photo by Katie Azi on Unsplash

Today, Dec. 12, is Gingerbread House Day. Although this is a December tradition that I have never partaken in, gingerbread houses make festive (and delicious) decor for the holiday season. If you have the time, the space, and most importantly, the patience, decorate your very own gingerbread house for the holidays. Or, if you’re not the decorating type, visit Peddler’s Village for their Gingerbread Competition and Display. The displays features some truly amazing gingerbread house designs, and there’s also plenty of places to eat delicious food and to get some last-minute holiday shopping done.

If you’re looking for something sweet that’s perfect for the cold winter weather, tomorrow, Dec. 13, is National Cocoa Day. With the cold weather settling in, tomorrow is the perfect day for a nice piping cup of hot cocoa to stay warm and satisfy your sweet tooth. Celebrate with a cup of your favorite hot chocolate, whether it’s home-made or from a coffee-shop. Although I am typically a Dunkin’ loyalist, Starbucks’ hot chocolate is amazing.

Not quite satisfied with hot chocolate? International Tea Day is this Thursday, Dec. 15, a perfect way to survive finals season. Whether you need to push through a study session with some black tea, wake up refreshed with some green tea, or de-stress with chamomile after a grueling exam, celebrate with a nice cup of tea.

Friday, Dec. 16, is National Ugly Sweater Day, a holiday tradition equal parts endearing, ridiculous, and comfortable. You can celebrate the occasion by wearing an ugly holiday sweater. If you don’t have one, thrift stores and Walmart are both great places to go. And, if you’re really in the spirit, you could host an ugly holiday sweater party with your friends.

Sunday, Dec. 18, marks the beginning of Hanukkah. For any Jewish readers, I hope your week is full of light, family, delicious oil-fried foods, and gelt (the monetary kind or the chocolate kind).

 


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Library.


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Weekend Recs: 2022 FIFA World Cup

Happy Friday, Wildcats! Falvey Library is delivering you another semester of Weekend Recs, a blog dedicated to filling you in on what to read, listen to, and watch over the weekend. Annie, a graduate assistant from the Communication department, scours the internet, peruses the news, and digs through book stacks to find new, relevant, and thought-provoking content that will challenge you and prepare you for the upcoming week. 

With games having started Nov. 20, Qatar is currently hosting the 2022 FIFA World Cup, where 32 of the best national soccer (or football) teams compete tournament-style for the title of champion and global recognition. (Typically, the tournament is held during the summer, but due to the extremely high temperatures it would reach in Qatar, the decision was made to hold it now, when the weather is more favorable to play). Today, with only 8 teams remaining (Argentina, Brazil, Croatia, England, France, Morocco, Netherlands, and Portugal), the Quarter-finals begin.

Unlike the U.S. Women’s Team, which currently holds the world record for national team with the most FIFA Women’s World Cup wins (with a whopping 4 wins, including the 2 most recent), the U.S. Men’s Team has never taken home the title. Last Saturday, the U.S. Men’s Team got knocked out by the Netherlands in the Round of 16, so if you were (somewhat naively) dreaming of rooting for the U.S., you’ll have to choose another team.

Still, even with the U.S. team not progressing to the Quarter-finals, watching the World Cup is truly a fun and worthwhile experience (though, as a former soccer kid, I might be a bit biased), especially if you have passionate company. This weekend’s recs will give you some of the background and highlights of the tournament so far and what to expect in the coming weeks, leading up to the ultimate game on Dec. 18.

If you have 3 minutes and 22 seconds…and need the perfect game-day song, listen to “Waka Waka (This Time for Africa)” by Shakira. This song is not only an absolute bop, it was also the official song of the 2010 FIFA World Cup.

If you have 5 minutes…and want to find out which teams will be going head-to-head, check out the current bracket, courtesy of the New York Times. Today’s games will be Croatia v. Brazil at 10:00 a.m. and Netherlands v. Argentina at 2 p.m.

Bonus: if you’re not sure how to pronounce the name of the host country, Qatar, check out this article. (Spoiler: you’re definitely not the only one, as it is somewhat difficult for English-speakers with no experience speaking Semitic languages).

If you have 10 minutes…and want live updates, check out the 2022 FIFA page on the New York Times.

If you have 15 minutes…and are looking for a rundown on all the teams that made it to the tournament and which “groups” they were/are in, read this article from the New York Times.

If you have another 15 minutes…and don’t know about the human rights abuse controversy Qatar found itself in, read this NPR article. In preparing to host the World Cup, namely building stadiums and other important infrastructure, Qatar has exploited migrant workers and, although the numbers are disputed, directly lead to the deaths of (at least) 3 people.

If you have 38 minutes…and want to see all the goals scored during the Group Stage, watch this highlight reel from Fox Soccer. Many of the comments and sports commentators, cite Richarlison’s (Brazil) goal at 28:00 as being the most impressive, but I personally also liked Cho Gue-sung’s (South Korea) header at 34:50.

Bonus: if you want to see an interactive model of 3 of the most impressive goals, including Richarlison’s, as they happened, check out this New York Times article.

If you have 1 hour and 30 minutes…and want to see the action for yourself, tune into a game. For those who have cable, all World Cup matches will be broadcast on Fox Sports in English and Telemundo in Spanish. For those without cable, check out this article to find out how you can stream games.

If you have 8 hours…and want to learn about the U.S.’s history with soccer (and why it’s not as big as American football or basketball), read Gregory G. Reck and Bruce Allen Dick’s American Soccer: History, Culture, Class.

 


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Library.


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Peek at the Week: December 5

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

In Life of Pi, Pi said, “Above all: Don’t lose hope.”

Happy Last Week of Classes, Wildcats! In one week’s time, classes will be over, and finals will have officially begun. I don’t know about you, but I’ve definitely been struggling with burnout. Last week, my message was to push through, a difficult yet rewarding feat. The message still stands.

Another equally challenging feat is remaining hopeful. It’s easy to feel like you’re swinging at nothing, truly stabbing in the dark. But staying hopeful will pay off in the long run. So, Wildcats, don’t lose hope. In a little under three weeks, it will pay off.

THIS WEEK AT FALVEY

Monday, December 5

Mindfulness Monday | 1-1:30 p.m. | Virtual | Free & Open to Villanova Students, Faculty, and Staff

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Company & Industry Competitive Intelligence | 5-6 p.m. | Room 206 | Free & Open to Villanova Students | Pizza Served | Register Here

Tuesday, December 6

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Wednesday, December 7

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Thursday, December 8

Falvey Library’s Semi-Annual Stress-Busting Open House: Donut Worry About Finals | 12-2 p.m. | Falvey Library First Floor | Free & Open to the Public | Donuts Served and Activities Available

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

Sunday, December 11

The Learners’ Studio/Center for Speaking and Presentation | 4-9 p.m. | Room 301 | Free

HOLIDAYS THIS WEEK

Not sure what to wear today? Well, today, Dec. 5, is National Blue Jeans Day. Whether your go-to brand is American Eagle, Old Navy, Target, or the G.O.A.T., Levis and whether you prefer wide leg, skinny, relaxed, or bootcut, celebrate by throwing on your favorite pair of blue jeans. After all, they go with nearly everything.

Tuesday, Dec. 6, is Walt Disney Day. Although Walt Disney himself is probably not worth revering, Disney movies still hold a special place in many of our hearts. Celebrate the hardworking animators and production teams by watching some of your favorite Disney movies (or something from their now extended portfolio, which includes Pixar, Marvel, and Lucasfilm content). In Falvey’s DVD Collection, we have quite a few Disney movies, including The Lion King and (live action) Alice in Wonderland, and extended Disney-owned content, such as Up, WALL-E, Brave, Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope, and Black Panther. 

For anyone that needs some end-of-the-semester chocolate therapy, Thursday, Dec. 8, is National Brownie Day. If you’re in the mood to celebrate, treat yourself to some chocolatey goodness. And if that doesn’t satisfy your sweet tooth, swing by Falvey between 12 and 2 p.m. for some donuts (free of charge) and stress-relieving activities at our Semi-Annual Stress-Busting Open House for finals season.

Sunday, Dec. 11, is National App Day. Although Gen Z gets a lot of flack for our supposed over-reliance on our phones, I honestly don’t know many people that don’t appreciate (at least a little) the power smart devices give us. You can celebrate today by using and appreciating your favorite apps (and not feeling guilty for it).


Annie Stockmal is a graduate student in the Communication Department and graduate assistant in Falvey Library.


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Last Modified: December 5, 2022