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Recent DVD Arrivals

The library has received many DVDs across the social sciences recently.  Ease into the new semester with some new documentaries or movies.  As always, see a few highlights below, or browse the full list.

SoLa: Louisiana Water Stories
Documentary Film (2010)
Investigates how the exploitation of Southern Louisiana’s abundant natural resources compromised the resiliency of its ecology and culture, thus multiplying the effects of the BP oil spill and Hurricane Katrina.

Waiting for “Superman”
Documentary Film (2011)
Provides an engaging and inspiring look at public education in the United States. [This documentary] has helped launch a movement to achieve a real and lasting change through the compelling stories of five unforgettable students such as Emily, a Silicon Valley eighth-grader who is afraid of being labeled as unfit for college, and Francisco, a Bronx first-grader whose mom will do anything to give him a shot at a better life.

Biutiful
Academy Award Nominee (2010)
Uxbal is a man on the wrong side of the law who struggles to provide for his children on the dangerous streets of Barcelona. As fate encircles him, Uxbal learns to accept the realities of life, whether bright, bad, or biutiful.

 

Not Just a Game
Documentary (2010)
We’ve been told again and again that sports and politics don’t mix. In this documentary, Dave Zirin, sports editor of The Nation magazine, takes viewers on a tour of the good, the bad, and the ugly of American sports culture — showing how sports have helped both to stabilize and to disrupt the political status quo throughout history. Explores how American sports, at their worst, have reinforced repressive political ideas and institutions by glamorizing things like militarism, racism, sexism, and homophobia, as well as looking at a history of rebel athletes who dared to fight for social justice beyond the field of play.

Beginners
Feature Film (2011)
Golden Globe® nominee Ewan McGregor (Star Wars I, II, III), Academy Award® nominee Christopher Plummer (Inside Man), and Mélanie Laurent (Inglourious Basterds) star in Beginners, an uplifting comedy about how funny and transformative life can be. When graphic designer Oliver (McGregor) meets free-spirited Anna (Laurent) shortly after his father (Plummer) has passed away, Oliver realizes just how much of a beginner he is when it comes to long-lasting romantic love. Memories of his father, who, following the death of his wife of 45 years, came out of the closet at age 75 to live a full, energized, and wonderfully tumultuous gay life, encourage Oliver to open himself up to the potential of a true relationship. Inspired by writer/director Mike Mills’ own father. (Amazon.com product description)

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ICPSR Undergraduate Summer Internship

The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), the world’s largest archive of digital social science data, is now accepting applications for its annual summer internship program. ICPSR is a unit within the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. ICPSR’s data are the foundation for thousands of research articles, reports, and books. Findings from these data are put to use by scholars, policy analysts, policy makers, the media, and the public.

Interns spend ten weeks from June 4 – August 10, 2012, at ICPSR (Ann Arbor, Michigan), during which they will:

  • Work in small groups and with faculty mentors to complete research projects resulting in conference-ready posters
  • Gain experience using statistical programs such as SAS, SPSS, and Stata to check data, working in both UNIX and Windows environments
  • Attend courses in the ICPSR Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of Social Research
  • Participate in a weekly Lunch and Lecture series that covers topics related to social science research and professional development.

Compensation:
$3,000 – $5000* stipend, room and partial-board in university housing, and a scholarship covering the cost of fees, texts, and materials for coursework in the ICPSR Summer Program.

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New Books in Communication!

  • Posted by: Kristyna Carroll
  • Posted Date: January 11, 2012
  • Filed Under: New Comm Books

Start out the new year with some new books! See the highlights below, or browse the list of new books of particular interest to communication faculty and students.

Film and stereotype: A challenge for cinema and theory
by Jorg Schweinitz; translated by Laura Schleussner
Columbia University Press
2011

Risk: A very short introduction
by Baruch Fischhoff and John Kadvany
Oxford University Press
2011
Check out all the Very Short Introductions available at Falvey!

Mediated girlhoods: New explorations of girls’ media culture
edited by Mary Celeste Kearney
Peter Lang
2011

Page one: Inside the New York Times and the future of journalism
edited by David Folkenflik
PublicAffairs
2011
Keep an eye on our collection for the DVD documentary, which will be arriving soon.

Foundations of community journalism
edited by Bill Reader and John A. Hatcher
SAGE Publications
2012

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Syllabus Tip – Send Students to Library for Required Readings

If you will be requiring your students to read scholarly articles this semester, please consider sending them to the library to find the full text themselves (assuming the article is included in the library’s holdings). Rather than sending the students a PDF via email or Blackboard, or simply distributing a printout in class, allowing the students to search out the article on their own has several advantages.

Good for students

Allowing students to search the library’s resources to find the full text of an article from the citation builds familiarity with the library and its website. This exercise also demonstrates that the library is a valuable place to find scholarly resources. As an added bonus, your students will learn to interpret a citation. Finding the full text is good practice for scholarly research!

To help with this task, we provide detailed instructions for finding the full text using an article citation on our Finding Full Text Guide. Feel free to include this link on your syllabus. Librarians are also available to help by phone, email, chat, or in person.

Good for the Library

Sending students to the library’s website for full text articles being used in your class helps the library keep better statistics. We regularly evaluate our collection to ensure that it is meeting the needs of faculty and students. If you distribute a printout of an article to the students of your class, our records will only indicate one download from that journal, although it is being used by many more patrons. Allowing students to download their own articles is one way of indicating that a particular journal is important to the curriculum.

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Last Modified: January 3, 2012