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8th IMPRS Uncertainty Summer School

  • Posted by: Georg Theiner
  • Posted Date: March 1, 2014
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized

The International Max Planck Research School on Adapting Behavior in a Fundamentally Uncertain World (Uncertainty School) combines approaches from Economics, Law and Psychology to explain human decisions under uncertainty more effectively and to better design institutional responses. The IMPRS Uncertainty Summer School aims at stimulating the scientific discourse on decision making under uncertainty between economists, psychologists and legal scholars. The 8th Summer School of the IMPRS Uncertainty will be held from July 13th till August 8th. Keynote: Jennifer Arlen (New York University School of Law).
Find here the preliminary schedule for this years’ summer school. Please note that all courses, names, slots, etc are still subject to change!

The general organization is described here.

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JOB: Stony Brook (2 positions)

Descriptive Title:  Assistant/Associate Professor (2 Positions)

REF#:  F-8271-13-10

Budget Title:  same as above

Department:  Philosophy

Campus:  Stony Brook West Campus/HSC

Faculty Position

Salary:  Commensurate with Experience

Stony Brook University, home to many highly ranked graduate research programs, is located 60 miles from New York City on Long Island’s scenic North Shore.  Our 1,100-acre campus is home to 24,000 undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral students and more than 13,500 faculty and staff.  The University is a member of the prestigious Association of American Universities and co-manager of nearby Brookhaven National Laboratory, a multidisciplinary research laboratory supporting world class scientific programs utilizing state-of-the-art facilities.  Stony Brook Medicine is Suffolk County’s only academic medical center and tertiary care provider.  Many opportunities exist for collaborative research, and in some cases, joint appointments with BNL or with Medical School departments.

Required Qualifications:  PhD in Philosophy.  Area of specialization:  either Classical Phenomenology or Continental Philosophy.  Languages relevant to specialization.  Research/publication potential.  Evidence of teaching experience.

Area Of Specialization: Classical Phenomenology; Area Of Competency: competence especially in one or more of these areas: embodied cognition; phenomenology and psychology/psychiatry; feminism; environmental philosophy; and other interdisciplinary directions.

Area Of Specialization: Continental Philosophy; Area Of Competency: French feminism; Nietzsche; political and social thought of a continental cast.

Preferred Qualifications:  Evidence of teaching ability in areas other than AOS.

Responsibilities & Requirements:  The Assistant/Associate Professor will be responsible for:

  • Undergraduate and Graduate teaching, 4 courses per year (2 per semester).
  • Dissertation and Thesis supervision.
  • Standard non-teaching duties.
  • Research leading up to publication.

Special Notes:  These are tenure track positions.  FLSA Exempt position, not eligible for the overtime provisions of the FLSA.  Internal and external search to occur simultaneously.  Anticipated start date:  Fall 2014, 2015

The selected candidate must successfully clear a background investigation.

Application Procedure:  Those interested in this position should submit complete dossier (application letter, CV, a sample of academic writing, an outline of current and future research interests, graduate transcripts, three letters of reference, and evidence of teaching effectiveness) to:

Philosophy Search Committee

Philosophy Department

Stony Brook University

Stony Brook, NY

11794

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JOB: Assistant Professor, Philosophy Department, Grinnell College

Assistant Professor

Philosophy Department, Grinnell College

Job category Junior faculty / Tenure-track or similar
AOS AOS: 19th and 20th Century Continental Philosophy
AOS categories 19th/20th Century Philosophy
Continental Philosophy
AOC Open
Workload Full time
Vacancies 1
Location Grinnell, Iowa, United States
Start date Fall 2014
Job description

GRINNELL COLLEGE – DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY (19TH & 20TH CENTURY CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY) – TENURE-TRACK POSITION (START FALL 2014)

GRINNELL COLLEGE. Tenure-track position in the Department of Philosophy (AOS: 19th and 20th Century Continental Philosophy; AOC: Open), starting Fall 2014. Assistant Professor (Ph.D.) preferred; Instructor (ABD) or Associate Professor possible. Grinnell College is a highly selective undergraduate liberal arts college; the Philosophy Department values the history of philosophy and is committed to representing both the Anglo-American and the Continental traditions of philosophy. The College’s curriculum is founded on a strong advising system and close student-faculty interaction, with few college-wide requirements beyond the completion of a major. The teaching schedule of five courses over two semesters will include an intermediate-level survey of 19th-century Continental philosophy, intermediate-level courses in 20th-century Continental philosophy, advanced seminars in the candidate’s area of specialization, and ahistorically oriented introduction to philosophy course; every few years one course will be Tutorial (a writing/critical thinking course for first-year students, oriented toward a special topic of the instructor’s choice).

In letters of application, candidates should discuss their interest in developing as a teacher and scholar in an undergraduate, liberal arts college that emphasizes close student-faculty interaction. They should also discuss how they might contribute to a college community that has diversity—of people, personal and educational experiences, and disciplinary perspectives—as one of its core values.  To be assured of full consideration, all application materials should be received by November 15, 2013.

Please submit applications online by visiting our application website at https://jobs.grinnell.edu. Candidates will need to upload a letter of application, curriculum vitae, transcripts (copies are acceptable), and provide email addresses for three references. Questions about this search should be directed to the search chair, Professor Johanna Meehan at [PhilosophySearch@grinnell.edu] or 641-269-3157.

Grinnell College is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer committed to attracting and retaining highly qualified individuals who collectively reflect the diversity of the nation. No applicant shall be discriminated against on the basis of race, national or ethnic origin, age, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, marital status, religion, creed, disability or veteran status. For further information about Grinnell College, see our website athttp://www.grinnell.edu.

How to apply
Application type Online
Instructions
Please submit applications online by visiting our application website at https://jobs.grinnell.edu. Candidates will need to upload a letter of application, curriculum vitae, transcripts (copies are acceptable), and provide email addresses for three references. Questions about this search should be directed to the search chair, Professor Johanna Meehan, at [PhilosophySearch@grinnell.edu] or 641-269-3157.
Web address to apply https://jobs.grinnell.edu
Email to apply PhilosophySearch[here goes you know what sign]grinnell.edu
Application deadline Friday, November 15 2013 CST
Contact
Contact name Professor Johanna Meehan
Contact email PhilosophySearch[here goes you know what sign]grinnell.edu
Contact phone 641-269-3157
Bookkeeping
Time created Wednesday, September 4 2013, 3:26pm EST
Expires on Saturday, November 16 2013, 11:59pm CST
Submitted by Schrift, Alan (Grinnell College)
schrift[here goes you know what sign]grinnell.edu
Last updated Friday, September 6 2013, 11:39am EST
Last update notification
Please note revised text regarding letter of application.
Friday, September 6 2013, 11:39am EST
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Class on Radical Democracy at UPenn

  • Posted by: Gabriel Rockhill
  • Posted Date: September 3, 2013
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized
PSCI 598-304 Tuesdays
Radical Democracy 9:00 – 12:00 p.m.
Professor Anne Norton
We often take democracy as an undisputed good, yet it is hard indeed to find any praise of democracy in the Western canon. Contemporary political theory and Western political systems both treat democracy as a danger and the people as a problem to be managed. This seminar is intended to question those assumptions. We will read both canonical and less known works from a variety of traditions: Thomas Paine, the Antifederalists, Schmitt, Wolin, Rancière, Swabian peasant rebels, Caribbean pirates, al Farabi, Rousseau. We will also look at diverse sites of democratic practice, from the ancient Near East and the Norse althing to New England Townships. The course will also question the relation of democracy to rights, liberalism, equality and property. Aspects of the course will be drawn from and sympathetic to theorists understood as radicals and from others regarded as politically conservative, especially libertarians and others suspicious of the state
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Fellowships for France

  • Posted by: Gabriel Rockhill
  • Posted Date: August 22, 2013
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized
Application
Institut Français d’Amérique
CB# 3170
The University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3170
PHONE: 919-962-2032
FAX: 919-962-5457
    * President: Dr. Catherine A. Maley The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    * Vice President: Dr. Homer B. Sutton, Davidson College
    * Secretary: Dr. Lloyd S. Kramer, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    * Treasurer: Mrs. Jean Wilson, Durham, North Carolina
GILBERT CHINARD  RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS
HARMON CHADBOURN RORISON FELLOWSHIP
EDOUARD MOROT-SIR FELLOWSHIP IN LITERATURE
Four $1500 awards for maintenance (not travel) during research in France for a period of at least one month.
CANDIDACY:
Final stage Ph.D. dissertation, or Ph.D. held no longer than three years before application deadline of January 15.
FIELDS:
French studies in the areas of: art, economics, history, history of science, linguistics, literature and social sciences.
APPLICATION:
No application form. Applicants write two pages maximum describing research project and planned trip (location, length of stay, etc.), and include curriculum vitae. A letter of recommendation from dissertation director is  required for Ph.D. candidates and a letter from a specialist in the field for assistant professors.
REPORT:
Upon return, the awardee will send a brief report to the Institut Français d’Amérique about their research and what they have completed in France.
Applications will be sent before January 15 to:
Dr. Catherine A. Maley,
President, Institut Français d’Amérique,
Department of Romance Languages & Literatures,
CB# 3170
Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 27599-3170
Please visit our website at: http://www.unc.edu/depts/institut
An Institute for French-American Studies
Founded in Washington D.C in 1926 Based in Chapel Hill since 1972
Formerly Institut Français de Washington
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Schelling Symposium at Temple University

  • Posted by: Nikolaus Fogle
  • Posted Date: July 19, 2013
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized

‘Freedom – The Beginning and End of All Philosophy’
A Symposium on the Philosophy of FWJ Schelling

Co-organized by the Department of Philosophy at Temple University
and the International Center for Philosophy at Bonn University

October 4-5, 2013
Temple University
Philadelphia, PA

Speakers:
Jennifer Dobe (Grinnell College, USA)
Michael Forster (University of Bonn, Germany)
Markus Gabriel (University of Bonn, Germany)
Marcela Garcia (Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico City, Mexico)
Sebastian Gardner (University College London, UK)
Yitzhak Melamed (Johns Hopkins, USA)
Dalia Nassar (Villanova University, Philadelphia, USA; University of Sidney, Sidney Australia)
Lara Ostaric (Temple University, USA)
Richard Velkley (Tulane University, USA)
Eric Watkins (University of California, San Diego, USA)
Jason Wirth (Seattle University, USA)
The sponsors for this event include: The Greater Philadelphia Philosophy Consortium, The University of Bonn International Center for Philosophy, the Department of Philosophy at Temple University, the Office of International Affairs at Temple University, and the Center for the Humanities at Temple (CHAT)-Temple University.

For more information: http://schelling2013.weebly.com/index.html

Contacts:
Dr. Lara Ostaric: lostaric@temple.edu
Dr. Owen Ware: owenjware@temple.edu

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Enrique Dussel at Drexel

  • Posted by: Gabriel Rockhill
  • Posted Date: May 1, 2013
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized
Drexel University Comparative Political Theory Colloquium
presents
Enrique Dussel
 
Professor of Philosophy at the UAM-Iztapalapa and the UNAM
Interim Rector of the UACM in Mexico City
“Ethics, Political Economy, and Liberation”
Dussel will be speaking on his new book 16 Theses on Political Economy 
and his recently translated Ethics (Duke, 2013).
 
Monday, May 6th at 3pm
Marks Intercultural Center, Multipurpose Room (Lower Level)
33rd and Chestnut, Northwest corner
 
For details, please contact George Ciccariello-Maher, gjcm@drexel.edu
Funded by a Career Development Award

 

 

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New Philosophy Books

  • Posted by: Nikolaus Fogle
  • Posted Date: April 10, 2013
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized

A few more of the latest:

EckhartA Companion to Meister Eckhart
edited by Jeremiah M. Hackett (Brill)

From the publisher: This book meets an obvious need in English language studies on Meister Eckhart. It is the first handbook on Eckhart for graduate and undergraduate students. It is divided into three parts. Part one deals with the life, works, career, and trial; Greek, Jewish, and Arabic philosophical sources, and some central philosophical ideas. Part two examines Eckhart as a Latin exegete, vernacular preacher, Eckhart’s understanding of God, Eckhart as a reader of Maimonides and in relation to women’s spirituality. Part three deals with the reception of Eckhart and his works from the fourteenth century to the twenty-first century. It covers fourteenth-century German readers of Eckhart, the fifteenth-century reader Nicholas of Cusa, the sixteenth-seventeenth-century reader Valentine Weigel, the reception of Eckhart in German idealism and romanticism and Eckhart and philosophy in the twentieth century. There is an epilogue on mysticism and philosophy in Eckhart and an appendix on Dominican education in the Middle Ages. Contributors include Walter Senner OP, Allesandra Beccarisi, Dagmar Gottschall, Loris Sturlese, Tamar Tsopurashvili, Jennifer Hart Weed, Jeremiah Hackett, Udo Kern, Alessandro Palazzo, Eliza Rubino, Donald F. Duclow, Bruce Millem, Markus Enders, Yossef Schwartz, Lydia Wegener, Jack C. Marler, Nadia Bray, Elizabeth Brient, Fiorella Rettucci, Andrew Weeks, Cyril O’Regan, Dermot Moran, Karl Albert and Paul Dietrich.

Levi-Strauss anthropologyAnthropology Confronts the Problems of the Modern World
by Claude Lévi-Strauss, translated by Jane Marie Todd (Harvard University Press)

From the publisher: Anthropology Confronts the Problems of the Modern World is the first English translation of a series of lectures Claude Lévi-Strauss delivered in Tokyo in 1986. Written with an eye toward the future as his own distinguished career was drawing to a close, this volume presents a synthesis of the author’s major ideas about structural anthropology, a field he helped establish. Critiquing insights of his earlier writings on the relationship between race, history, and civilization, Lévi-Strauss revisits the social issues that never ceased to fascinate him. He begins with the observation that the cultural supremacy enjoyed by the West for over two centuries is at an end. Global wars and genocides in the twentieth century have fatally undermined Western faith in humanity’s improvement through scientific progress. Anthropology, however, can be the vehicle of a new “democratic humanism,” broadening traditional frameworks that have restricted cross-cultural understandings of the human condition, and providing a basis for inquiries into what other civilizations, such as those of Asia, can teach. Surveying a world on the brink of the twenty-first century, Lévi-Strauss assesses some of the dilemmas of cultural and moral relativism a globalized society faces—ethical dimensions of economic inequality, the rise of different forms of religious fundamentalism, the promise and peril of genetic and reproductive engineering. A laboratory of thought opening onto the future, Anthropology Confronts the Problems of the Modern World is an important addition to the canon of one of the twentieth-century’s most influential theorists.

Sloterdijk You must change your lifeYou Must Change Your Life: On Anthropotechnics
by Peter Sloterdijk (Polity Press)

From the publisher: In his major investigation into the nature of humans, Peter Sloterdijk presents a critique of myth – the myth of the return of religion. For it is not religion that is returning; rather, there is something else quite profound that is taking on increasing significance in the present: the human as a practising, training being, one that creates itself through exercises and thereby transcends itself. Rainer Maria Rilke formulated the drive towards such self-training in the early twentieth century in the imperative ‘You must change your life’. In making his case for the expansion of the practice zone for individuals and for society as a whole, Sloterdijk develops a fundamental and fundamentally new anthropology. The core of his science of the human being is an insight into the self-formation of all things human. The activity of both individuals and collectives constantly comes back to affect them: work affects the worker, communication the communicator, feelings the feeler. It is those humans who engage expressly in practice that embody this mode of existence most clearly: farmers, workers, warriors, writers, yogis, rhetoricians, musicians or models. By examining their training plans and peak performances, this book offers a panorama of exercises that are necessary to be, and remain, a human being.

Gill PhilosophosPhilosophos: Plato’s Missing Dialogue
by Mary Louise Gill (Oxford University Press)

From the publisher: Plato famously promised to complement the Sophist and the Statesman with another work on a third sort of expert, the philosopher–but we do not have this final dialogue. Mary Louise Gill argues that Plato promised the Philosopher, but did not write it, in order to stimulate his audience and encourage his readers to work out, for themselves, the portrait it would have contained. The Sophist and Statesman are themselves members of a larger series starting with the Theaetetus, Plato’s investigation of knowledge, and the whole series relies on the Parmenides, the second part of which presents a philosophical exercise, introduced as the first step in a larger philosophical program. Gill contends that the dialogues leading up to the missing Philosopher, though they reach some substantive conclusions, are philosophical exercises of various sorts designed to train students in dialectic, the philosopher’s method; and that a second version of the Parmenides exercise, closely patterned on it, spans parts of the Theaetetus and Sophist and brings the philosopher into view. This is the exercise about being, the subject-matter studied by Plato’s philosopher. Plato hides the pieces of the puzzle and its solution in plain sight, forcing his students (and modern readers) to dig out the pieces and reconstruct the project. Gill reveals how, in finding the philosopher through the exercise, the student becomes a philosopher by mastering his methods. She shows that the target of Plato’s exercise is internally related to its pedagogical purpose.

Burgess KripkeSaul Kripke : Puzzles and Mysteries
by John Burgess (Polity Press)

From the publisher: Saul Kripke has been a major influence on analytic philosophy and allied fields for a half-century and more. His early masterpiece, Naming and Necessity, reversed the pattern of two centuries of philosophizing about the necessary and the contingent. Although much of his work remains unpublished, several major essays have now appeared in print, most recently in his long-awaited collection Philosophical Troubles. In this book Kripke’s long-time colleague, the logician and philosopher John P. Burgess, offers a thorough and self-contained guide to all of Kripke’s published books and his most important philosophical papers, old and new. It also provides an authoritative but non-technical account of Kripke’s influential contributions to the study of modal logic and logical paradoxes. Although Kripke has been anything but a system-builder, Burgess expertly uncovers the connections between different parts of his oeuvre. Kripke is shown grappling, often in opposition to existing traditions, with mysteries surrounding the nature of necessity, rule-following, and the conscious mind, as well as with intricate and intriguing puzzles about identity, belief and self-reference. Clearly contextualizing the full range of Kripke’s work, Burgess outlines, summarizes and surveys the issues raised by each of the philosopher’s major publications. Kripke will be essential reading for anyone interested in the work of one of analytic philosophy’s greatest living thinkers.

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Pittsburgh Summer Symposium in Contemporary Philosophy: Schelling and Naturphilosophie

  • Posted by: Nikolaus Fogle
  • Posted Date: March 22, 2013
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized

Pittsburgh Summer Symposium in Contemporary Philosophy

Duquesne University

Dept. of Philosophy

Pittsburgh, PA

 

Call for Applications

 

We are pleased to announce the Pittsburgh Summer Symposium in Contemporary Philosophy, held at Duquesne University.  Details for the program are as follows:

 

Schelling and Naturphilosophie

August 5 – 9, 2013

(Optional Participants’ Conference, August 3-4)

 

“What then is that secret bond which couples our mind to Nature, or that hidden organ through which Nature speaks to our mind or our mind to Nature?” (Ideas for a Philosophy of Nature)

“The concept of nature does not entail that there should also be an intelligence that is aware of it. Nature, it seems, would exist, even if there were nothing that was aware of it. Hence the problem can also be formulated thus: how does intelligence come to be added to nature, or how does nature come to be presented?” (System of Transcendental Idealism)

 

Seminar Leaders:

Prof. Iain Hamilton Grant (University of the West of England, Bristol)

Prof. Jason Wirth (Seattle University)

 

Course Description:

In recent years there has been a surge of research on the work of the German philosopher F.W.J. Schelling, aided in the English-speaking world by a number of recent translations. This movement has included reexaminations of Schelling as a figure in the history of philosophy, as a source of influence on a number of twentieth century thinkers, and as a rich resource for addressing contemporary philosophical debates.

 

Schelling’s distinctive influence in the history of philosophy has been, in part, a product of his objective approach to transcendental idealism. In opposition to Fichte’s Wissenschaftslehre, which argued that the subject must be the fundamental ground for transcendental idealism, Schelling argued that an objective approach, taking the form of Naturphilosophie, is equally necessary for explaining the subject-object form of knowledge. Additionally, in his later works, Schelling’s concepts of freedom, existence, and the non-ground, would give some of the earliest critiques of Hegel’s absolute idealism, and would later influence thinkers like Kierkegaard, Marx, and Nietzsche. In the twentieth century, the impact of his work would continue. His Freiheitsschrift, for instance, forms an important part of the conceptual context within which Martin Heidegger developed his notions of event, ground, and the plight of the human being, operative in the 1930s and early 40s. Likewise, Schelling’s influence profoundly marked Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s later ontology of the flesh, his understanding of art, the unconscious, and the provocative task of doing a “psychoanalysis of Nature.”

 

More recently, Iain Hamilton Grant has mobilized Schellingian Naturphilosophie as a basis for recasting epistemological and metaphysical or ontological issues regarding the relation of physics and metaphysics, the nature of time, the nature of ground, and more broadly calling for a radical reevaluation of the post-Kantian philosophical framework dominant over much of the last two centuries. This project has established one of the major arms of the recent movement to rethink the realist/anti-realist debate. Likewise, Jason Wirth has revitalized Schellingian accounts of the Good, intellectual intuition, aesthetics, nature, and life in contemporary debates. He has also worked to put Schelling into conversation with a number of other recent thinkers, both Western and, notably, of the Japanese Kyoto School.

 

Other contemporary philosophers have also taken up Schelling in related manners. Markus Gabriel, for instance, has integrated Schelling’s notion of non-ground into his “domain ontology” and its treatment of the nature of the world (or more properly the non-existence of the world), mythology, evil, contingency, and necessity. Further, in the Lacanian meta-psychology of Slavoj Žižek and Adrian Johnston, Schelling’s philosophy has been used to give an account for the genesis of the transcendental subject out of natural and material substance conceived with reference to Trieb, or drive.

 

This summer symposium will bring together interested graduate students, postdoctoral students, and junior faculty  for a week of discussion, lecture, and close textual study concerning this important philosopher. The topic for the seminar is Schelling’s Naturphilosophie. We will examine questions about nature, objectivity, matter, life, knowledge, and whether or not transcendental philosophy can be reconciled with the findings of the empirical sciences. All texts and discussion will be in English.

 

Application:

We invite current graduate students, postdoctoral students, and junior faculty in philosophy or related disciplines to submit an application composed of a C.V. and a short letter of intent (500 words maximum) to pghsummersymposium2013@gmail.com. The deadline for applications is April 5, 2013. The seminar will be limited to 20-30 participants. For more information as it becomes available, we have created a website for the symposium:

http://pghsummersymposium.wix.com/pghsummersymp2013

 

Participants’ Conference (August 3-4):

In order to facilitate a further exchange of ideas and research, a participants’ conference will be held the weekend before the seminar begins. Applicants who receive notice of acceptance as participants will be asked – if interested – to submit an abstract of up to 500 words on any theme related to the topic of the seminar. The participants’ conference will take place on Saturday and Sunday, August 3-4, 2013.

 

Financial Information:

There will be a $125 registration fee for each participant of the seminar. This money will be used for a conference dinner, celebration, and daily expenses such as coffee, etc. Please note that participants will be responsible for arranging their own housing as well as financing most of their own meals for the duration of the symposium. However, with respect to lodging, we expect a number of arrangements with graduate students will be available on a first come, first serve basis.

 

Organizers:

James Bahoh
Dept. of Philosophy
Duquesne University
bahohj@duq.edu
Dave Mesing
Dept. of Philosophy
Villanova University
dmesing@villanova.edu
Martin Krahn
Dept. of Philosophy
Duquesne University
krahnm@duq.edu
Jacob Greenstine
Dept. of Philosophy
Duquesne University
greenstinea@duq.edu
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Past Masters: Full-Text Primary Sources Online

  • Posted by: Nikolaus Fogle
  • Posted Date: March 21, 2013
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized

Past mastersPast Masters is an abundantly useful online collection of primary source texts, mainly in philosophy, which has proven to be highly popular among those who have discovered it.

It consists of scholarly editions of great writers and thinkers, usually the complete or collected works in the original language or in English translation. At present, our Past Masters holdings include the works of Anselm, Aquinas, Aristotle, Augustine, Descartes, Dewey, Feuerbach, Fichte, Foucault, Hegel, Hobbes, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Leibniz, Locke, Marx and Engels, Merleau-Ponty, Nietzsche, Pascal, Peirce, Plato, Santayana, Schopenhauer, Spinoza, Wittgenstein, and Wollstonecraft.

We also have several period collections that contain many further important works: The Latin Background: 1100-1550, The Continental Rationalists, British Philosophy: 1600-1900, The Romantic Age, and Political Philosophy: Machiavelli to Mill.

Apart from the convenience of being able to read these works online, on a mobile device, or select sections to print, it’s also very handy to be able to search the full text. You can do this not only for individual works, but for whole collections as well. For example, if you know that Merleau-Ponty discusses marxisme in parts of his corpus, but you don’t know exactly where, Past Masters will create a neatly formatted list of the places in each work where the term occurs.

We are continuing to expand our access to Past Masters collections, so look out for new works to be added in the future.

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Last Modified: March 21, 2013