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Interviews with Alain Badiou on France Culture

  • Posted by: Gabriel Rockhill
  • Posted Date: January 31, 2013
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized
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Psychoanalysis and Politics

  • Posted by: Gabriel Rockhill
  • Posted Date: January 30, 2013
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized

http://www.psa-pol.org

About Psychoanalysis and Politics

PSYCHOANALYSIS AND POLITICS aims to address how crucial contemporary political issues may be fruitfully analyzed and addressed through psychoanalytic theory. It is an interdisciplinary conference series – we invite theoretical contributions and historical, literary or clinical case studies on these and related themes from philosophers, sociologists, psychoanalysts, group analysts, psychotherapists, literary theorists, historians and others. Perspectives from different psychoanalytic schools are most welcome.

The symposia differ from most conferences in that they are democratic; they make room for presenters at different stages in their careers, and from outside as well as inside academia. They present a space for discussion, with an emphasis on engagement and active participation from everyone who is present. The debates continue during joint meals at the symposia.
E-mail: psychoanalysis.politics@gmail.com

Psychoanalysis and Politics is funded by, and forms a part of, NSU, an initiative of The Nordic Ministerial Council, which aims to promote original and interdisciplinary research collaboration between Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Iceland, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, and between these countries and the rest of the world. See the page ‘about NSU’ and:  www.nsuweb.net

Coordinators:
LENE AUESTAD, Research Fellow, Philosophy, University of Oslo/ Centre for Studies of the Holocaust and Religious Minorities/ currently London
JONATHAN DAVIDOFF, Psychologist, Postgraduate Student in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, Tavistock Centre, London

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CFP: Monetization of User-Generated Content — Marx revisited

  • Posted by: Annika Thiem
  • Posted Date: January 25, 2013
  • Filed Under: Call for Papers

CFP: Monetization of User-Generated Content — Marx revisited

Forum Editors:
Jennifer Proffitt, School of Communication, Florida State University
Hamid Ekbia, School of Library and Information Science, Indiana
University, Bloomington
Stephen McDowell, School of Communication, Florida State University

Two TIS articles, Fuchs (2010) and Arvidsson & Colleoni (2012), which
develops a critique of the former, have generated considerable debate,
including a response from Fuchs (2012), regarding fundamental questions
about the core processes of value creation and social and economic
organization in contemporary societies. To further this conversation, we
invite 4000- 5000 word Perspective essays, which are published at the
discretion of the guest editors / editor, and should address one or more
of the following questions the Fuchs and Arvidsson & Colleoni debate
problematizes:
* Is the production of user-generated content a form of labor? Or,
should it be re-thought as an affective investment? Or something else?
* Do the theory and concepts that are part of a labor theory of value
limit our understanding of user-generated content? Should we choose a
different point of departure for our theoretical endeavors?
* Is the Marxist notion of commodity an appropriate analytic for
understanding appropriation of value in the case of user-generated
content? Or, should it be de-centered from such an analysis?
* Is the notion of “labor time” relevant to the production of
user-generated content?
* How can Marxist and historical-critical perspectives engage with the
new organization of information economies and information societies?
* Is it appropriate to extend Dallas Smythe’s notion of “audience work,”
which he developed in 1970s when broadcasting was the dominant mode, to
the Internet world? What are the problematics of extending “old”
theories to “new” technologies?
The Perspective essays should have layers of thought that take the
thinking beyond Fuchs and Arvidsson & Colleoni. Approximately half of
the essay should be devoted to a reflection on / critique of these
writings and the ensuing debate, and the remaining half should extend /
add to the theoretical foundations of the debate.

Interested authors are invited to email an abstract (no longer than 500
words) to Jennifer Proffitt (email: jproffitt@fsu.edu) by March 1, 2013.
Authors of selected abstracts will be invited to submit their
Perspective essays by July 1, 2013.

For pdf copies of Fuchs (2010) and Arvidsson & Colleoni (2012), please
send an email to hsawhney@indiana.edu

Sources
Arvidsson, A., and E. Colleoni. 2012. Value in informational capitalism
and on the Internet. The Information Society 28(3): 135-150.
Fuchs, C. 2010. Labor in informational capitalism and on the Internet.
The Information Society 26(3): 179 -196.
Fuchs, C. 2012. With or without Marx? With or without capitalism? A
rejoinder to Adam Arvidsson and Eleanor Colleoni. tripleC 10(2): 633-645.

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London Critical Theory Summer School 2013

  • Posted by: Gabriel Rockhill
  • Posted Date: January 18, 2013
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized

The 2013 London Critical Theory Summer School will take place at Birkbeck from 1st July – 12th July 2013. This unique opportunity is for graduate students and academics to follow a course of study and to foster exchange and debate. It will consist of at least 6 modules over the two weeks, each convened by one of the participating academics.

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/bih/lcts

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New Philosophy Books

  • Posted by: Nikolaus Fogle
  • Posted Date: January 7, 2013
  • Filed Under: Uncategorized

Falvey Library receives new philosophy books every day, and you never know when something exciting, important or serendipitous will appear. Here are a few of the latest.

The New Wounded: From Neurosis to Brain Damage by Catherine Malabou (Fordham University Press)

From the publisher: “This book employs a philosophical approach to the “new wounded” (brain lesion patients) to stage a confrontation between psychoanalysis and contemporary neurobiology, focused on the issue of trauma and psychic wounds. It thereby reevaluates the brain as an organ that is not separated from psychic life but rather at its center.The “new wounded” suffer from psychic wounds that traditional psychoanalysis, with its emphasis on the psyche’s need to integrate events into its own history, cannot understand or cure. They are victims of various cerebral lesions or attacks, including degenerative brain diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. … Effacing the limits that separate “neurobiology” from “sociopathy,” brain damage tends also to blur the boundaries between history and nature. At the same time, it reveals that political oppression today assumes the guise of a traumatic blow stripped of all justification. We are thus dealing with a strange mixture of nature and politics, in which politics takes on the appearance of nature, and nature disappears in order to assume the mask of politics.”

Our Aesthetic Categories: Zany, Cute, Interesting by Sianne Ngai (Harvard University Press)

From the publisher: “The zany, the cute, and the interesting saturate postmodern culture. They dominate the look of its art and commodities as well as our discourse about the ambivalent feelings these objects often inspire. In this radiant study, Sianne Ngai offers a theory of the aesthetic categories that most people use to process the hypercommodified, mass-mediated, performance-driven world of late capitalism, treating them with the same seriousness philosophers have reserved for analysis of the beautiful and the sublime. Ngai explores how each of these aesthetic categories expresses conflicting feelings that connect to the ways in which postmodern subjects work, exchange, and consume. As a style of performing that takes the form of affective labor, the zany is bound up with production and engages our playfulness and our sense of desperation. The interesting is tied to the circulation of discourse and inspires interest but also boredom. The cute’s involvement with consumption brings out feelings of tenderness and aggression simultaneously. At the deepest level, Ngai argues, these equivocal categories are about our complex relationship to performing, information, and commodities.”

The I in We: Studies in the Theory of Recognition by Axel Honneth (Polity)

From the publisher: “In this volume Axel Honneth deepens and develops his highly influential theory of recognition, showing how it enables us both to rethink the concept of justice and to offer a compelling account of the relationship between social reproduction and individual identity formation. Drawing on his reassessment of Hegel’s practical philosophy, Honneth argues that our conception of social justice should be redirected from a preoccupation with the principles of distributing goods to a focus on the measures for creating symmetical relations of recognition. This theoretical reorientation has far-reaching implications for the theory of justice, as it obliges this theory to engage directly with problems concerning the organization of work and with the ideologies that stabilize relations of domination. In the final part of this volume Honneth shows how the theory of recognition provides a fruitful and illuminating way of exploring the relation between social reproduction and identity formation. Rather than seeing groups as regressive social forms that threaten the autonomy of the individual, Honneth argues that the ‘I’ is dependent on forms of social recognition embodied in groups, since neither self-respect nor self-esteem can be maintained without the supportive experience of practising shared values in the group.”

Heidegger and Cognitive Science edited by Julian Kiverstein and Michael Wheeler (Palgrave MacMillan)

From the publisher: “The cognitive scientists of today are increasingly occupied with investigating the ways in which human cognition depends on the dynamic interaction over multiple time scales of brain, body and world. The old vision of the mind as a logic machine whose workings could be explained in abstraction from the biological body and the cultural environment is looking increasingly untenable and outdated. This collection explores the idea that this development in cognitive science can be productively interpreted through an encounter with Heidegger’s existential phenomenology. Not only can Heidegger help us to understand the history of cognitive science but his philosophy also provides a conceptual framework for the cognitive science of today and of the future. Heidegger, however, is standardly interpreted as being resolutely anti-naturalist, as insisting that a scientific understanding of human beings is necessarily limited and partial in what it can tell us about human existence. Can there be a cognitive science of human existence or is such a project doomed to fail for reasons already articulated in Heidegger’s philosophy?”

Against the Physicists by Sextus Empiricus – a new translation by Richard Bett (Cambridge University Press)

From the publisher: “Sextus Empiricus’ Against the Physicists examines numerous topics central to ancient Greek inquiries into the nature of the physical world, covering subjects such as god, cause and effect, whole and part, bodies, place, motion, time, number, coming into being and perishing and is the most extensive surviving treatment of these topics by an ancient Greek sceptic. Sextus scrutinizes the theories of non-sceptical thinkers, and generates suspension of judgement through the assembly of equally powerful opposing arguments. Richard Bett’s edition provides crucial background information about the text and elucidation of difficult passages. His accurate and readable translation is supported by substantial interpretative aids, including a glossary and a list of parallel passages relating Against the Physicists to other works by Sextus. This is an indispensable edition for advanced students and scholars studying this important work by an influential philosopher.”

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MONTREAL POLITICAL THEORY MANUSCRIPT WORKSHOP AWARD

  • Posted by: Annika Thiem
  • Posted Date: January 3, 2013
  • Filed Under: Prize, Publishing

THE ANNUAL MONTREAL POLITICAL THEORY MANUSCRIPT WORKSHOP AWARD

Call for applications: The Groupe de recherche interuniversitaire en philosophie politique de Montréal (GRIPP), spanning the departments of political science and philosophy at McGill University, l’Université de Montréal, Concordia University, and l’Université du Québec à Montréal, invites applications for its 2013 manuscript workshop award. The recipient of the award will be invited to Montreal  for a day-long workshop in April/May 2013 dedicated to his or her book manuscript. This “author meets critics” workshop will comprise four to five sessions dedicated to critical discussion of the manuscript; each session will begin with a critical commentary on a section of the manuscript by a political theorist or philosopher who is part of Montreal’s GRIPP community. The format is designed to maximize feedback for a book-in-progress. The award covers the costs of travel, accommodation, and meals.

Eligibility:

A. Topic: The manuscript topic is open within political theory and political philosophy, but we are especially interested in manuscripts related to at least one of these GRIPP research themes: 1) the history of liberal and democratic thought, especially early modern thought; 2) moral psychology and political agency, or politics and affect or emotions or rhetoric; 3) democracy, diversity, and pluralism. 4) democracy, justice, and transnational institutions.

B. Manuscript: Book manuscripts in English or French, not yet in a version accepted for publication, by applicants with PhD in hand by 1 August 2012, are eligible. Applicants must have a complete or nearly complete draft (at least 4/5 of final draft) ready to present at the workshop. In the case of co-authored manuscripts, only one of the co-authors is eligible to apply. (Only works in progress by the workshop date are eligible; authors with a preliminary book contract are eligible only if no version has been already accepted for publication).

C. Application: Please submit the following materials electronically, compiled as a single PDF file: 1) a curriculum vitae; 2) a table of contents; 3) a short abstract of the book project, up to 200 words; 4) a longer book abstract up to 2500 words; and, in the case of applicants with previous book publication(s), (5) three reviews, from established journals in the field, of the applicant’s most recently published monograph. Candidates are not required to, but may if they wish, submit two letters of recommendation speaking to the merits of the book project. Please do not send writing samples. Send materials by email, with the subject heading “2013 GRIPP Manuscript Workshop Award” to Arash Abizadeh <arash.abizadeh at mcgill.ca>. Review of applications begins 10 January 2013. Contact Arash Abizadeh <arash.abizadeh at mcgill.ca> with questions.

Evaluation Process: The final decision for choosing the winner of the GRIPP manuscript award lies with the GRIPP Jury. The Jury will seek to meet within the first two weeks of the rolling deadline for submissions.  All bilingual regular faculty members of GRIPP have the right to participate as members of the Jury. Each regular faculty member of GRIPP has the right to suggest a short-list of up to five proposals for consideration by the Jury, but the final decision rests with the Jury itself. All elements of the Jury’s deliberations are confidential; unfortunately it is not possible for the Jury or its members to provide any feedback to applicants concerning the merits of their proposal. A full list of the regular GRIPP faculty membership is available at <http://www.mcgill.ca/rgcs/gripp/faculty>

Previous GRIPP Manuscript Workshops:
May 2012: Daniel Viehoff (Sheffield), The Authority of Democracy
May 2011: James Ingram (McMaster), Radical Cosmopolitics: The Ethics and Politics of Democratic Universalism
April 2010: Hélène Landemore (Yale), Democratic Reason: Politics, Collective Intelligence, and the Rule of the Many
April 2009: Alan Patten (Princeton), Equal Recognition: The Moral Foundations of Minority Cultural Rights
March 2009: Kinch Hoekstra (UC Berkeley), Thomas Hobbes and the Creation of Order

<http://www.mcgill.ca/rgcs/gripp/fellowships>

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Last Modified: January 3, 2013